Girls on the Verge
A powerful, timely coming-of-age story about a young woman from Texas who goes on a road trip with two friends to get an abortion, from award-winning author Sharon Biggs Waller.Camille couldn't be having a better summer. But on the very night she learns she got into a prestigious theater program, she also finds out she’s pregnant. She definitely can’t tell her parents. And her best friend, Bea, doesn’t agree with the decision Camille has made.Camille is forced to try to solve her problem alone . . . and the system is very much working against her. At her most vulnerable, Camille reaches out to Annabelle Ponsonby, a girl she only barely knows from the theater. Happily, Annabelle agrees to drive her wherever she needs to go. And in a last-minute change of heart, Bea decides to come with.Girls on the Verge is an incredibly timely novel about a woman’s right to choose. Sharon Biggs Waller brings to life a narrative that has to continue to fight for its right to be told, and honored.

Girls on the Verge Details

TitleGirls on the Verge
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherSimon & Schuster
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Feminism, Fiction

Girls on the Verge Review

  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely incredible. I hardcore cried while reading this one because it opened my eyes up so much more to the struggles women face every day to have control over their own bodies. It may only be February but I predict that this book will end up in my top 5 of the year because it hit me SO hard. What a devastatingly important book.
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  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    I look like I've been through a battle and lived to talk about it. Out of all of the important sociopolitical topics covered in YA over the last few years, one thing I have constantly wished to see more portrayals of in literature is pro-choice discussions about women doing what needs to be done to retain control of their own bodies. In the last few months, there has been so much going on here in the US regarding reproductive rights that Girls on the Verge is exactly what we needed to see burst I look like I've been through a battle and lived to talk about it. Out of all of the important sociopolitical topics covered in YA over the last few years, one thing I have constantly wished to see more portrayals of in literature is pro-choice discussions about women doing what needs to be done to retain control of their own bodies. In the last few months, there has been so much going on here in the US regarding reproductive rights that Girls on the Verge is exactly what we needed to see burst onto the scene, and it couldn't have come at a better time.Girls on the Verge has so many fantastic points fit into this powerful little story, such as:• The discussion revolving around the fact that birth control isn't flawless and the "just use protection!" argument isn't always enough• The overarching theme of girls supporting girls and learning how to look past their own biases to take care of each other (because supporting a woman's right to choose doesn't have to mean you'd make the same choice yourself)• The delightfully well-crafted references to current political goings-on (I died a little of joy every time Wendy Davis was mentioned!)On top of all of that, though, it's just such a fun story to read. Sure, it tackles very heavy and tough topics, and it definitely made me emotional a few times (mostly just enraged by the ridiculous state of our society right now), but I also laughed so hard at so many of the exchanges between Camille, Bea, and Annabelle. These girls are hilarious and feel so real and genuine; even in little ways, they just feel human, like the way one of them always piped up with "I'll Google it!" when they were curious about the tiniest little thing — that's a very 'me' thing and I loved it. Their friendships are so delightful and lovable and I honestly, truly cherished every single page of Girls on the Verge and hope that it gets the attention it deserves. ♥ P.S. Can I just say this would make an AMAZING teen film adaptation? Get on it, Netflix! All quotes come from an advance copy and may not match the final release. Thank you so much to Henry Holt and Co. for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. WOW; this is such a necessary book.
  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    This book... it was a fucking experience. Here's some gifs that help portray my feelings.
  • Jane (It'sJaneLindsey)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. I’m so glad this book exists.
  • Dylan
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars.So so powerful.I don't know if I can say that I enjoyed reading this? YES it was well written and YES I had a lot of fun with these characters, but this book made me so angry. Angry that society tells teenage girls that they aren't mature enough to make a decision about their own bodies or any woman in general, angry that men believe they can treat women the way that they did in this book and almost caused these girls to be injured, and angry that these young women had to drive hundreds 5 stars.So so powerful.I don't know if I can say that I enjoyed reading this? YES it was well written and YES I had a lot of fun with these characters, but this book made me so angry. Angry that society tells teenage girls that they aren't mature enough to make a decision about their own bodies or any woman in general, angry that men believe they can treat women the way that they did in this book and almost caused these girls to be injured, and angry that these young women had to drive hundreds of miles so that our main character could get an abortion. This book had me incredibly upset but not just because it's sad what they had to go through - but because i'm so frustrated that society refuses to give women the rights to their bodies.This book is sad, but it's also hopeful. Hopeful in the way that it makes me believe that reproductive rights will be full given back in the future, but there's no guarantee.GIRLS ON THE VERGE will definitely end up as a favorite of 2019 and something that I will reread at least once in the near future. This is a novel you aren't going to want to miss.TW: abortion
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  • Luupi
    January 1, 1970
    I need this book like now! *-*
  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .Wow wow wow this is an important book. As more women's rights are taken away across the U.S., Girls on the Verge shines a glaring spotlight on all the hypocrisy and injustice that accompanies each of these decisions.  And you might be thinking "hey, isn't this supposed to be a book review and not a political rant?", but you'd be wrong. Because it's inherently both. Books have a plethora You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .Wow wow wow this is an important book. As more women's rights are taken away across the U.S., Girls on the Verge shines a glaring spotlight on all the hypocrisy and injustice that accompanies each of these decisions.  And you might be thinking "hey, isn't this supposed to be a book review and not a political rant?", but you'd be wrong. Because it's inherently both. Books have a plethora of purposes: To entertain, to shock, to elicit any number of feelings. But one of the purposes can, and should be, to make a social statement. Sharon Biggs Waller does that here, in a way that still makes for an appealing reading experience.The book is chock full of information that women in general but absolutely young women should know about their rights. It discusses such horrors as "crisis centers", which are in the business of trying to prey on scared young women in order to push their conservative Christian agenda. It talks about  the amount of people who will try to shove themselves into a woman's personal reproductive decision making. The vast differences in state laws are a big feature of the book, as are the variations in law when it comes to the time period in which a woman is allowed to seek an abortion, the methods she may use, and whether she needs consent. Which is obviously utter bullshit, because exactly zero of the people making said decisions are a woman and/or her physician.Girls on the Verge tackles this incredibly important topic, but it's also at its core a tremendously heartfelt story about female friendship and growing up. Camille doesn't always see eye to eye with her best friend since forever, Bea. Bea is staunchly religious and is appalled when she learns of Camille's decision. That is when Annabelle steps up to the plate to basically be the most awesome friend in the history of friendship. She's willing to help Camille at, quite literally, any cost. I don't want to go too in depth because this is a story you must read for yourself, and this is spoiler territory. But I promise that Annabelle is complete friend goals. Bea of course starts to come around a bit, and joins them on their journey. But make no mistake, she's going to have to grow a lot as a person if she deserves Camille's friendship. And to be clear, this isn't a bash on religion at all. It's a bash on using conservatism disguised as religion to judge other people. Which is kind of the antithesis of actual religion anyway, right?There's a slight romantic element, but to me it seemed like its purpose was not a focus on romance, but more a focus on how life doesn't end when you're faced with a really difficult hurdle. That you still deserve and can find love in all its forms. Also, if there's anything I love more in a book than roadtrips, it's a road trip to Mexico with three women who are journeying to find themselves. Bottom Line: You need to read this book, appreciate its strong feminist message, then you need to make everyone you know read it. And then, you know, get out there and help change the world.
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  • Unicorn
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a moving, heartbreaking and educational experience. There are just so many things that I do not know about contraception and abortions and just female anatomy despite being a woman which is crazy. This book has helped me learn and taught me how to learn about these things. It is absurd that a woman has to travel to get an abortion but that is the way it is unfortunately. At times I got so angry I wanted to punch every old man making laws about our bodies. This is a must read for 20 This was such a moving, heartbreaking and educational experience. There are just so many things that I do not know about contraception and abortions and just female anatomy despite being a woman which is crazy. This book has helped me learn and taught me how to learn about these things. It is absurd that a woman has to travel to get an abortion but that is the way it is unfortunately. At times I got so angry I wanted to punch every old man making laws about our bodies. This is a must read for 2019 it is so amazing.
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  • Max Baker
    January 1, 1970
    Thank You Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest reviewThis is an important book. I won't deny it, because to do so would be a gross and frankly irresponsible thing to do. Girls on the Verge points out a lot of terrible things the US have done in regards to women's health and abortion. The main character Camille has to go through multiple hoops just to get a straight answer out of someone and it's just awful. Like you seriously want to punch the concept of the st Thank You Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest reviewThis is an important book. I won't deny it, because to do so would be a gross and frankly irresponsible thing to do. Girls on the Verge points out a lot of terrible things the US have done in regards to women's health and abortion. The main character Camille has to go through multiple hoops just to get a straight answer out of someone and it's just awful. Like you seriously want to punch the concept of the state of Texas for what they put this girl and the thousands of others in her position through. This will make you angry, it will make you think, and it will most likely inspire some action in you that you need to take before it gets better.I just think it was a boring book. Girls on the Verge feels very much like a book written in response to a subject that has a lot of controversy surrounding it. And in my experience, they make great responses by humanizing and exploring what someone must go through, but they don't make for a compelling story. Camille is less of a main character and more of an every girl for someone to see through. See the inequality, the judgement, the shame. And make no mistake, it works but it doesn't help with the story or the character.Camille's defining trait is she wants to be an actor. Annabelle's is that she sort of a rebel. And Bea is that she's religious and Camille's best friend. Of all three characters, Bea is the only one who gets the most development, trying to understand Camille's decision to have an abortion and her own religious upbringing. I liked how Bea isn't villainized for her religion and that it plays a strong part in her character rather then a stand-in villain for the religious pro-life people. However, I do think that Bea is the most extraneous character between the three.In my opinion, I think this should have been a road trip with only Camille and Annabelle, because they didn't know each other. Annabelle drives Camille wherever she needs to go, but they're virtually strangers at the start of the book and I don't feel like they grew that close on a personal level. It seemed like Camille cared so much for Annabelle because of what she was doing for her rather then out of genuine friendship. Having the two of them in the car for long periods of time would have allowed for some chemistry to develop between them as well as a friendship. But because Bea was there, Camille was split between her best friend and Annabelle which prevented the two from connecting. However, I do believe that a Camille and Bea story would also work, with Bea going with her best friend despite her religion because she cares so much for Camille and not because she was jealous of Annabelle. As it stands I don't think the main trio was bad in any way, but I would have preferred if they could have had more time to interact and grow with one another.This is an important book, and one I think should be read by nearly everyone in the US, but I'm hard pressed to call it an enjoyable story.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Frank information is the greatest strength of this road trip / coming-of-age story. I kept asking myself, why didn't I know this? How can this be medical care for women in the United States today? The way that I got this ARC months ahead of the release date speaks volumes about potential impact. It was dropped off at the library by a young woman (heading off to college) who wanted to make sure it was included among the titles our teen volunteers are considering in their role as a YALSA Teens' To Frank information is the greatest strength of this road trip / coming-of-age story. I kept asking myself, why didn't I know this? How can this be medical care for women in the United States today? The way that I got this ARC months ahead of the release date speaks volumes about potential impact. It was dropped off at the library by a young woman (heading off to college) who wanted to make sure it was included among the titles our teen volunteers are considering in their role as a YALSA Teens' Top Ten Book group. I know she is a big fan of the author. She could have kept this for herself. Instead, she chose to share it - to spread the word - to sound the alarm. A brave call-to-action about women's reproductive rights that is already being shared reader-to-reader. Highly recommended.
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  • Forever Young Adult
    January 1, 1970
    Graded By: StephanieCover Story: Hubba BubbaBFF Charm: Big SisterSwoonworthy Scale: -1Talky Talk: High-School Required ReadingBonus Factors: Friendship, Acting, Road TripsAnti-Bonus Factors: Pro-Lifers, Crisis CentersRelationship Status: Planned Parenthood VolunteerRead the full book report here.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    shew this was a very hard read. especially while thinking about all the "heartbeat" bills up for a vote in multiple states (with no exceptions for rape or incest) including in the great state i live in - tennessee. it's so unbelievably heartbreaking that this is something women and young girls go through every day.i did feel it was a little heavy handed at times but honestly, i'm ok with that. after all it is targeted towards a younger audience than me, and i think it's important to really impre shew this was a very hard read. especially while thinking about all the "heartbeat" bills up for a vote in multiple states (with no exceptions for rape or incest) including in the great state i live in - tennessee. it's so unbelievably heartbreaking that this is something women and young girls go through every day.i did feel it was a little heavy handed at times but honestly, i'm ok with that. after all it is targeted towards a younger audience than me, and i think it's important to really impress upon the younger generation how important this is. but honestly people of all ages should read this.it's a very heavy read, and i teared up several times but there are also moments of levity and road trip antics which i always appreciate (ya girl loves a road trip book!).**I received an eARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.**
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  • Giulia
    January 1, 1970
    "It isn’t fair that you have to miss out on your future because of one mistake you made in the past. I am so sick of old white dudes telling us what we can and can’t do with our bodies."TW: slut-shaming, abortion Actual rating: 3.5 ⭐What a charming, important and informative read. Do not let the average rating fool you (that is totally my fault as I was expecting something different – I don't even know why, I myself am confused...by myself.)I thoroughly appreciated the message and the educationa "It isn’t fair that you have to miss out on your future because of one mistake you made in the past. I am so sick of old white dudes telling us what we can and can’t do with our bodies."TW: slut-shaming, abortion Actual rating: 3.5 ⭐️What a charming, important and informative read. Do not let the average rating fool you (that is totally my fault as I was expecting something different – I don't even know why, I myself am confused...by myself.)I thoroughly appreciated the message and the educational aspect present in Girls on the Verge. The three girls were lovely and lively. I gotta admit that I felt a particular connection to Annabelle because I, too, am a hoe for coffee and I cannot function without it. Also, I was a fan of Bea’s character arc and her development. The main character - Camille - was charming but also a little bit vanilla, if I have to be honest. The plot itself was captivating and fast-paced. This was an easy and fast read, and I truly appreciated the sex Ed aspect present in this book. And the unflinching honesty about a topic that is more often than not glossed over. It was a frank and informative coming-of-age story with the always deeply cherished touch of road trip-ness. During the drive, they face problems, misogyny, sexism but also kindness of strangers. And, on top of all this, it was also positively feminist read. Camille, Bea and Annabelle had to listen to the never wanted and definitely never needed opinions of white men – who just wanted to control the girls’ bodies and lives – and how they had to fight for their rights. Really likes the feminist undertones and comments. As Rachel would say:Can I get an AMEN!I really liked how at the beginning of the book there were notes on the abortion laws in Texas, as a non US citizen I did not know about all this and thus I think it is vital to have a book that depicts how hard it can be to find a safe, legal abortion in the USA so that everybody (even people outside of America) has the chance to fully understand. I’m glad I’ve read Girls on the Verge. As I’ve mentioned ad nauseam this was a very educational, progressive, honest and unflinching book, but it also had a touching and important friendship. If I have to be honest, I thought that sometimes it was a bit too heavy handed and a bit preachy, but the message was there, and it was important to share and address. I also particularly liked how the prejudices and judgments were not only one way. Whit that I mean that the girls have to face not only judgments and preconceptions from the outside world but also among themselves. Annabelle and Bea had a few arguments about the latter’s faith and beliefs; same thing happened between Bea and Camille. It was refreshing to see them challenging each other and discuss important topics and not just simply pretend that everything was alright. They called each other out and fought and because of that they felt real and human.But now, lemme address the things that did not convince me that much. Because, in the end, this is still a three stars read. For as much as the message was important, I thought the plot as a whole was a bit overly dramatic, underdeveloped and rushed.To be more precise, I thought this book was going to span during a longer period of time. Or at the very least, this is what the synopsis made me believe.I thought Bea and Camille had a serious fall out, I thought they stopped talking to each other and that they had a huge fight some years past. Instead, yes, they had a fight but it happened something like three days prior the road trip. I thought it was more of a piecing together the relationship kind of sub-plot between the two of them, and I couldn’t help but being disappointed. And that is mainly because I LOVE stories about giving second chances to a friend and rebuilding a friendship by clearing things up. But this was not the case because there was nothing to piece together since nothing got really ugly to begin with. They had an argument about abortion (Bea against, Camille pro) but that was it. It was an important argument, don’t get me wrong, but Camille’s reaction was also very much overly dramatic and a bit childish, in my opinion.Another thing that was overly dramatic was the family issues mentioned in this book (if we can call them that, tbh). It is hinted that both Camille and Bea have a pretty tough environment at home. Bea’s is explained: her parents want her to be the perfect daughter and she feels the pressure. But Camille’s was really underdeveloped. It is hinted that, basically, her family does not love her but…I’d say that that’s a lie. When interactions were shown, they were pretty normal and not problematic, in my opinion. So I truly did not understand from where Camille was coming. That useless drama really bothered me and I couldn’t shake it off. It was also suggested that Annabelle did not really have the perfect family life but it was not developed at all, and that let me down a bit. Also because Annabelle’s character remained a mystery and practically nothing about her persona was unveiled. Which was a pity.Since all these aspects weren’t really specified to begin with, the story in general felt rushed (specifically towards the end, where everything was wrapped up way too quickly) and under-developed. I guess I was expecting a bit more instead it truly was “only” a book about a road trip to go and get an abortion. Nothing more but definitely nothing less.And I say that because I truly believe that Camille’s story is an important one to share and scream from the rooftops. It underlined the fight to find a way to give and obtain the right to decide what happens to one’s own body and one’s life. Camille’s story to educate today’s teens on sex Ed and abortion and to encourage empathy for those who do decide to have an abortion is an important one to share and I am truly, deeply glad I’ve read it.I simply think that my expectations were just a tad bit too high. My fault really, not the book's. I’d highly recommend this as Girls on the Verge truly is a good one, guys. Do pick this up!"Your girlfriends are the most important people you’’ll ever have in your life. You keep hold of them."
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  • Joelie
    January 1, 1970
    I have so many feeling over this book. Its only just over 200 pages and I feel like 150 of them made me angry with society in some way. It makes me feel very lucky to live where I live. This story is a heartbreaking account of a girl feeling like she has very few people she can trust and rely on while she goes through something she can't explain but knows is the right choice FOR HER! There where many moments in this book that had me questioning society in general. For example; she is not manure I have so many feeling over this book. Its only just over 200 pages and I feel like 150 of them made me angry with society in some way. It makes me feel very lucky to live where I live. This story is a heartbreaking account of a girl feeling like she has very few people she can trust and rely on while she goes through something she can't explain but knows is the right choice FOR HER! There where many moments in this book that had me questioning society in general. For example; she is not manure enough to make the decision to keep the child or abort it but she is mature enough to go through a pregnancy and either keep the child or put it up for adoption. That sentence massively contradicts itself. I dont understand why men are allowed to make decisions that decide the future of a person from a situation they can't ever be in!And don't get me started on religion and people using God as their argument to stop someone from making a decision!This was brilliant!
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  • Sarah Knope
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't plan to read this in one sitting, but here we are. I've never read a book about abortion before, and this one is so, so important. It's feminist and pro-choice and discusses real issues women have to deal with today, all to make choices about THEIR OWN BODIES. This book is remarkable. And it's not just a book that spits facts at you - at it's core, it's a book about friendship. It's about acceptance and support. It's about a road trip and learning different views. It's about choice. It I didn't plan to read this in one sitting, but here we are. I've never read a book about abortion before, and this one is so, so important. It's feminist and pro-choice and discusses real issues women have to deal with today, all to make choices about THEIR OWN BODIES. This book is remarkable. And it's not just a book that spits facts at you - at it's core, it's a book about friendship. It's about acceptance and support. It's about a road trip and learning different views. It's about choice. It was hard to read. I cried. I loved it. Please read it.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    An incredibly timely book about the difficulties women and girls face in the continuing battle for the right to choose what is best for our selves and our bodies. Sharon Biggs Waller places the reader right in the trenches of abortion warfare when Camille becomes pregnant after having sex for the first time but chooses not to have the baby. The letter that Camille writes toward the end of the book is beautiful and perfect and for me, the best lines of the book.
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  • Chadreadsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Wow what an emotional and powerful book about this one girl who is wanting to have an abortion but the struggles she has to face along the way of trying to get an abortion and the many people who try and change her decision along the way and what she wants to do in her own body.It’s such a sad feeling that even now people judge women for the little things they do and in this book it showed just that how all the blame is put onto women and not both genders and how women have to suffer more throug Wow what an emotional and powerful book about this one girl who is wanting to have an abortion but the struggles she has to face along the way of trying to get an abortion and the many people who try and change her decision along the way and what she wants to do in her own body.It’s such a sad feeling that even now people judge women for the little things they do and in this book it showed just that how all the blame is put onto women and not both genders and how women have to suffer more throughout this difficult time of trying to figure out everything going on and people trying to change her mind.Really loved how the friendship of the three main girls in this and how they bonded because it wasn’t a typical YA friendship in the sense that they all have there own opinion and from different backgrounds such as Bea who is a Christian and when she found out about Camille wanting an abortion she changed the way she felt about her friend because of her beliefs of what she had been taught of what is good or bad at church but as the story goes on we see how she evolves and tries to understand what Camille is going through and definitely the struggle the two friends Annabelle and Bea also have to face along the way.Amazing book and one I couldn’t put down would recommend to anyone and it’s such a important book that needs to be read
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  • Christina (Ensconced in Lit)
    January 1, 1970
    Girls on the Verge is not typically a book I'd read-- it is both a YA contemp and a road trip book, both which are low on my interest list. However, this had such an important topic-- the woman's right to choose-- that I knew I needed to read it. I know quite a bit about the topic but not specifically the difficulties in Texas. I was educated a lot through the book, and the characters were also compelling. They felt real to me and even though what they were doing seemed ridiculous, it became cle Girls on the Verge is not typically a book I'd read-- it is both a YA contemp and a road trip book, both which are low on my interest list. However, this had such an important topic-- the woman's right to choose-- that I knew I needed to read it. I know quite a bit about the topic but not specifically the difficulties in Texas. I was educated a lot through the book, and the characters were also compelling. They felt real to me and even though what they were doing seemed ridiculous, it became clear that the reality IS ridiculous and that is why she was pushed to do what she did. I think this is an important book that needs to be read not only by young adults, but adults too. I thank Waller for being brave enough to bring this controversial topic to light in a way that is easy to digest and understand.
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  • Kate (Beyond Bookish)
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warnings for abortion.I have to say that if you work or have teenagers you need to read this book! Abortion (whether your pro-life or pro-choice) is a very personal topic but one that needs to happen with parents, guardians, authority figures and young people. Texas has some crazy restrictive laws in regards to abortions and family planning and I found my heart breaking for Camille and her friends! Again, no matter where you stand on this issue I feel it is very important that you read a Trigger warnings for abortion.I have to say that if you work or have teenagers you need to read this book! Abortion (whether your pro-life or pro-choice) is a very personal topic but one that needs to happen with parents, guardians, authority figures and young people. Texas has some crazy restrictive laws in regards to abortions and family planning and I found my heart breaking for Camille and her friends! Again, no matter where you stand on this issue I feel it is very important that you read and share this story with your friends, family and others to create a more open dialogue in general.
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  • Gina Adams
    January 1, 1970
    The fact that this book had to be written is so painful. This is fiction but literally the only thing that is manufactured is the characters themselves. The way Camille is treated is so real and happens daily. I’m so grateful that this book was written, published, and sold by Target (online, but still). It’s accessible. It’s accessible for girls who want to feel validated. There’s not much we can do for each other other than validate one another right now but we need as much of that as we can ge The fact that this book had to be written is so painful. This is fiction but literally the only thing that is manufactured is the characters themselves. The way Camille is treated is so real and happens daily. I’m so grateful that this book was written, published, and sold by Target (online, but still). It’s accessible. It’s accessible for girls who want to feel validated. There’s not much we can do for each other other than validate one another right now but we need as much of that as we can get.
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  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    OH MY! This book should be read by every teenage boy, every male in voting age, and well lots of other people. The story is topic, certainly, about the access to female healthcare and the stigmas of abortion, but its also so emotionally well-done. I almost can't write this review, bc remembering the story and the characters makes me want to cry. I wished we were in a world where this book didn't need to exist. Maybe if many people read it, we won't need stories like this in the future.
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  • Ahtiya L.
    January 1, 1970
    🌟4.5🌟 An incredibly moving and powerful book. It's informative, captivating, and features three dynamic young women whose friendship we get to see shift, blossom, and solidify throughout the journey of the book. This book does not shy away from the reality that is living in certain parts of America where strict abortion/anti-women laws are present. I'll probably re-read this book at some point in the future, especially since it's a fairly quick book that packs and a meaningful punch.
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  • Neda
    January 1, 1970
    Really really powerful. An incredibly detailed look into all the horrifying ways this country tries to ban women's access to abortions. There were some cheesy moments, but they were more than made up for by the driving goal of the story; to show just how oppressive the restrictive abortion laws are in this country. I was always fired up about this topic, but I am now more so than ever.
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  • Sandra Benne
    January 1, 1970
    I am grateful everyday for having the luxury of living in Canada. I had no clue what is like to be a teenage girl, in Texas and go through an unwanted pregnancy. I loved so many things about this book. The friendships, the families, the travels, the impact of acts. The education I got on a tiny little bit of US laws on abortion. I am looking forward to watching Roe v Wade movie. Thank you Sharon Biggs Waller for this read. Top 5 of my 2019 fav.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    I knew based on my response to the very beginning of this book that I was in for a read. Impacting, necessary and down-right eye-opening at times. I received an ecopy of this through netgalley; however, all opinions are my own.
  • Emily Knosher
    January 1, 1970
    This book is relevant and educational. I fell instantly in love with Camille, Annabelle, and Bea. This is an amazing story and, no matter what side of the issue you stand on, it provides insight and an understanding of what it's like to be a girl seeking out an abortion.
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  • Madi
    January 1, 1970
    **4.5/5**So so so SO good. I think some things could have been a bit more fleshed, but it was such a stellar and amazing read. Highly, highly HIGHLY recommend.
  • Carin
    January 1, 1970
    Camille is pregnant. It's not a rape or a long-term serious boyfriend. It's a mistake. And she's only 16 and this would really destroy her life in a lot of ways. And she wants to get an abortion.Her best friend, Bea, who is religious, is the opposite of supportive. She cuts Camille off without even hearing her out, leaving her alone. She has no boyfriend to go through this with her, she can't tell her parents (they don't have a bad relationship but a tempestuous one, and this wouldn't improve th Camille is pregnant. It's not a rape or a long-term serious boyfriend. It's a mistake. And she's only 16 and this would really destroy her life in a lot of ways. And she wants to get an abortion.Her best friend, Bea, who is religious, is the opposite of supportive. She cuts Camille off without even hearing her out, leaving her alone. She has no boyfriend to go through this with her, she can't tell her parents (they don't have a bad relationship but a tempestuous one, and this wouldn't improve things), and now her best friend has abandoned her. Luckily, she runs into Annabelle while buying a pregnancy test. Annabelle is older but Camille knows her through Drama. And Annabelle lets Camille know that she will do whatever it takes to help her. Annabelle has her own reason of course, but they embark on an unforgettable roadtrip. Oh, and with Bea along, as she begs Annabelle to let her come, says that while she doesn't agree with Camille, she does want to be supportive. Camille isn't inclined to trust Bea again, but she lets her come. The three set off across Texas on a series of quests, running into every possible legal speed bump along the way.This book was very much written as a way to demonstrate the consequences of the draconian abortion-restriction laws that have been passed across the country in the last decade or so, and often books with such an agenda really sideline novel basics such as plot and character. And while the plot is straightforwardly in service of this goal, it's well done, and the characters are really well drawn. I loved this book. Lots of teenagers (and older women) have to go through this gauntlet of restrictions, and poor Camille gets thwarted at every turn. She even hires a lawyer at one point to try to get permission for a legal abortion in Texas without parental notification. She does everything right. And yet, as a privileged white girl heading to college in a couple of years, the obstacles are nearly insurmountable. One quickly realizes how daunting these same obstacles would be someone with fewer resources.This is a very important book. I love that the character of Bea helps round out the story and address her concerns and be a questioner of Camille's decisions. As much as I would have done the same thing as Camille in her shoes, my high school girl friends were all very religious, and I would have met with much the same resistance. This book can help any teen going through this decision, who might be in the future, or who might have a friend in trouble. And it's also a great road trip, girl-power story. I loved it.
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  • Shel
    January 1, 1970
    This novel feels especially important these days--these days of Draconian laws concerning women and their bodies --and I'm so glad that I took the morning to read it; I'll definitely be giving this one to my daughters and will be putting it on my classroom library shelves as soon as I can. The story of Camille is the story of many young women and it's one that needs to be told in the light of day--not under the cover of darkness or with shame. This story of an unplanned pregnancy and the fear, h This novel feels especially important these days--these days of Draconian laws concerning women and their bodies --and I'm so glad that I took the morning to read it; I'll definitely be giving this one to my daughters and will be putting it on my classroom library shelves as soon as I can. The story of Camille is the story of many young women and it's one that needs to be told in the light of day--not under the cover of darkness or with shame. This story of an unplanned pregnancy and the fear, hopelessness, and confusion it can cause resonated with me. Every aspect of this--from the horror of the realization, the feeling of helplessness and hopelessness when you feel like you have no choice or that your choices are limited, the anger at people taking away safe options, and the loneliness you feel when it feels like you have absolutely no one to turn to-- captured so many of the emotions and thought processes that you undergo from the moment you discover that your pregnant...and you're not ready for it and you're certain this isn't what you wanted. While this novel's main focus is Camille and her journey, it wouldn't be the novel it is without including her best friend Bea (and how conflicted she is about all of this), and an acquaintace-friend Annabelle--the person who really saves the day...saves many days. How I wish every woman had an Annabelle and a Bea in their lives. Bea's struggle with Camille's choices is one I know many of my own friends would have and yet I hope, like Bea, they'd ultimately choose to support a friend in need (I can say, for me, that I did have friends who are supportive like Annabelle and Bea). And with the way society seems to be frothing at the mouth to take women's right to choose away, I feel like the Annabelles of the world are needed more than ever. The journey that these friendships take in a few short days feels like a journey that will solidify them in each other's life forever. The journey of this novel spans days but feels like it spans a lifetime--a before and after. It offers a look at something we don't see very often. It asks you to consider Camille's experience and to remember, if you're no longer (or weren't ever) a young woman, how being young, inexperienced, without a steady income can limit your choices. The subject matter may feel grim or sad, and I suppose it is, but I couldn't help but leave the novel feeling hopeful. The last scene in the novel offered me so much hope for Camille and the bright future she could have. Please pick up this novel and put yourselves in the shoes of these characters. Try to do so without judgement. Try to see what it feels like to be Girls on the Verge.
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