The Saturday Evening Girls Club
For four young immigrant women living in Boston’s North End in the early 1900s, escaping tradition doesn’t come easy. But at least they have one another and the Saturday Evening Girls Club, a social pottery-making group offering respite from their hectic home lives—and hope for a better future.Ambitious Caprice dreams of opening her own hat shop, which clashes with the expectations of her Sicilian-born parents. Brilliant Ada secretly takes college classes despite the disapproval of her Russian Jewish father. Stunning Maria could marry anyone yet guards her heart to avoid the fate of her Italian Catholic mother, broken down by an alcoholic husband. And shy Thea is torn between asserting herself and embracing an antiquated Jewish tradition.The friends face family clashes and romantic entanglements, career struggles and cultural prejudice. But through their unfailing bond, forged through their weekly gathering, they’ll draw strength—and the courage to transform their immigrant stories into the American lives of their dreams.

The Saturday Evening Girls Club Details

TitleThe Saturday Evening Girls Club
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 25th, 2017
PublisherLake Union Publishing
ISBN-139781503943278
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

The Saturday Evening Girls Club Review

  • Cindy Roesel
    January 1, 1970
    Four women forged a friendship that changed their lives one week at a time.****Let me start by writing while reading THE SATURDAY EVENING GIRLS CLUB, I kept hearing in my head, "nevertheless, she persisted." It's the battle cry for Women standing together today as part  the Women's March. We will not be silenced.Escaping tradition and trying to become their own women in the 1900s doesn't come easy for four young immigrants living in Boston’s North End. In Jane Healey's debut novel, THE SATURDAY Four women forged a friendship that changed their lives one week at a time.****Let me start by writing while reading THE SATURDAY EVENING GIRLS CLUB, I kept hearing in my head, "nevertheless, she persisted." It's the battle cry for Women standing together today as part  the Women's March. We will not be silenced.Escaping tradition and trying to become their own women in the 1900s doesn't come easy for four young immigrants living in Boston’s North End. In Jane Healey's debut novel, THE SATURDAY EVENING GIRLS CLUB (LakeUnionPublishing), it's the turn of the century when women don't have the right to vote, nor is much expected from them by a society determined to keep them "in their place." But at least Caprice, Ada, Maria and Thea have one another and their Saturday Evening Girls Club. The once a week meeting gives the group a break from their home lives and a chance to share their hopes and dreams.Caprice works at Madame DuPont's Millinery in the North End and dreams of opening her own hat shop. Her parents want her married to a nice Italian young man, and often arrange dinners with prospective suitors, much to her horror. Brilliant Ada secretly takes college classes despite the disapproval of her Russian Jewish father and hopes to be a doctor one day. Stunning Maria is a dressmaker and could marry anyone yet guards her heart to avoid the fate of her Italian Catholic mother, broken down by an alcoholic husband. And shy Thea is torn between asserting herself and embracing the antiquated Jewish tradition of being married off in an arranged marriage.The four young women face family disappointments, romantic love and heartbreak, work and career struggles, as well as deep cultural prejudice. But their weekly meeting makes it possible for each to have the courage and strength needed to transform their immigrants stories into individual American lives. Each had the odds stacked against her, but persist, believing in their dreams.I loved learning about this part of history, but what made the novel so wonderful for me are the characters. Jane Healey creates unique personalities in all four of the young women; all of whom I'd love to befriend. There are times I've read a novel with several friends/characters and they tend to blend. Caprice, Ada, Maria and Thea are each their own woman and delightful.*****It's interesting to note that although THE SATURDAY EVENING GIRLS CLUB is a work of fiction, there was a real Saturday Evening Girls Club which started as a book club in Boston in 1899. By the 1910s, it had evolved into something much bigger. There were over 250 members of clubs named after each day of the week.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Oh this was the ultimate book of friendship! Set in 1908 in Boston, just over the course of a few months of that year, it traces the changing life course and deep bonds of four young women. Caprice, Ada, Thea, and Maria. Two are Italian, two are Russian Jewish. Each of the four is expected to fulfill the expectations of women at that time, combined with the dictates of their culture. All four are supposed to marry, and marry from their tradition, country, and religion. In fact, all four are cont Oh this was the ultimate book of friendship! Set in 1908 in Boston, just over the course of a few months of that year, it traces the changing life course and deep bonds of four young women. Caprice, Ada, Thea, and Maria. Two are Italian, two are Russian Jewish. Each of the four is expected to fulfill the expectations of women at that time, combined with the dictates of their culture. All four are supposed to marry, and marry from their tradition, country, and religion. In fact, all four are contending with the culture and expectation of arranged marriages, and families who carry old world traditions. The book is narrated from the voice of Caprice, our young Italian Sicilian heroine - who dreams of owning her own hat shop. Who wants to run her own business and make a success out of herself.At the forefront of the novel, is the Saturday Evening Girls Club, two women who have been a haven for the young girls of the community of all backgrounds, they have hosted every Saturday night, a place for young women to be together, to support each other, in friendship, solidarity, and in their dreams of fulfillment. It is there that the relationship between the four young women is born and sustained, and it is going strong when the book opens. I found this little gem, because it was in the "staff recommends" section of our library and it caught my attention. For those of you who are librarians or booksellers, you wouldn't believe how powerful a draw that is. Or you would, given that we are all frequenting a website that relies on others recommendations to find hidden gems, or to steer us well. I had planned to read it, but when the genre of the month was tagged as friendship, I knew this one would be a perfect fit and it was. Enjoyed the ride. 3.8. It wasn't a not to be missed, but I enjoyed it all the same.
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  • DeAnn
    January 1, 1970
    This was a quick, easy, light-hearted read, perfect for my December book club meeting. I enjoyed that it was set in Boston, 1908. Interesting to read at the end that there are several other real "Evening Girls Clubs" -- not just Saturday. In some ways, so you could see how far women have come where in those days fathers expected them to marry, no life or career outside that. This one has a fun cast of strong female characters, but was pretty fluffy!
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  • Linda Zagon
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank NetGalley, Lake Union Publishing, and Jane Healey for an ARC of "The Saturday Evening Girls Club" by Jane Healey for my honest review. The genres of this book are General Fiction(Adult), and Women' Fiction. I also feel that this is Historical Fiction and Romance. Kudos to Jane Healey who did the historical research about The Saturday Evening Girls Club, and other clubs in Boston North in the early 1900s. The club offered young women, especially immigrants, the wonderful art I would like to thank NetGalley, Lake Union Publishing, and Jane Healey for an ARC of "The Saturday Evening Girls Club" by Jane Healey for my honest review. The genres of this book are General Fiction(Adult), and Women' Fiction. I also feel that this is Historical Fiction and Romance. Kudos to Jane Healey who did the historical research about The Saturday Evening Girls Club, and other clubs in Boston North in the early 1900s. The club offered young women, especially immigrants, the wonderful artistic opportunity for making pottery, and supporting the arts with drama and music. These clubs were sponsored by wealthy women and women who loved the arts. The club offered the opportunity for young women to have friends. The pottery became valuable, and is known as Paul Revere Pottery. The story takes place in Boston North in the early 1900's when four young women become friends through the Saturday Evening Girl's Club. They are young immigrants working mostly in dress design and making hats. I like the way the author describes their homes in small apartments, and many neighbors. Although these girls were not rich, they were bound to their families traditions. Although the girls came from Jewish and Italian homes, they respected each other. Caprice gave her pay check to her family and tried to save for her dream to own her own hat shop. When the store closes where she has worked, she starts to work at the pottery shop. Caprice is extremely talented in decorating and trimming hats, and holds on to her dream of owning her own shop one day. Ada, is a young intelligent Jewish immigrant. She has been taking college courses at night, and keeping it a secret from her father. Ada more than anything wants to be a physician. Maria is a gorgeous Italian dressmaker,who lives at home with an alcoholic father, who causes major stress to her family. Thea is a young Jewish immigrant, who is the first to be engaged to a man , by an arrangement by her family. Saturday nights are so important to these young women as they share there secrets,hopes and dreams. The club is so important to them. Caprice, Ada and Maria want to break with certain traditions and choose what they want to do in their lives. They want to choose someone they love. They want to live their dreams. Jane Healey writes about family, friendship, tradition, choice, support, love and hope. The author also writes about goals, dreams, and working hard for what one believes in. It is amazing how the author describes her characters, settings and situations. I enjoyed this intriguing and heartwarming novel and would highly recommend this.
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  • Gem
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't expect that this book would be the object of my love for the few days that I've read it. I loved Thea, Maria, Ada and especially Caprice! They are what we would call today as #squadgoals. :P I liked the storyflow and the characters. The style of writing didn't bore me, as well. Will be writing a more thorough review soon!Thank you to the publisher for giving me access to an ARC via Netgalley. :)
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  • Piper Huguley
    January 1, 1970
    There's going to be a sequel right? A great story of warmth, love, and friendship. I need to make sure Maria and Ada are OK. Sequel please!
  • Patricia Sands
    January 1, 1970
    Caprice, Maria, Ada, and Thea share a wonderful friendship as they grow up in the Jewish and Italian immigrant neighborhoods of north Boston. The setting is the turn of the 20th century when life is going through tremendous change. Living within families where their parents still adhere to the traditional ways of the “old country”, these four young women struggle with choices they must make for their dreams to become reality. Healy’s extensive research brings this era to life as the reader exper Caprice, Maria, Ada, and Thea share a wonderful friendship as they grow up in the Jewish and Italian immigrant neighborhoods of north Boston. The setting is the turn of the 20th century when life is going through tremendous change. Living within families where their parents still adhere to the traditional ways of the “old country”, these four young women struggle with choices they must make for their dreams to become reality. Healy’s extensive research brings this era to life as the reader experiences the historical and cultural details of the time, including learning the delightful history of The Saturday Evening Girls Club.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    The setting is Boston at the turn of the 20th century. Some historical figures are central to the story- wealthy women who had projects to support immigrant young women.The main character Caprice is from a very traditional Sicilian immigrant family. There were so many details that this book got wrong which is something I loath is a book that purports to be historical fiction. Sicilians of the time spoke Sicilian and though some might call it a dialect, each region of Italy had its own language, The setting is Boston at the turn of the 20th century. Some historical figures are central to the story- wealthy women who had projects to support immigrant young women.The main character Caprice is from a very traditional Sicilian immigrant family. There were so many details that this book got wrong which is something I loath is a book that purports to be historical fiction. Sicilians of the time spoke Sicilian and though some might call it a dialect, each region of Italy had its own language, and they were not necessarily mutually intelligible. So every time Caprice mentions her parents speak Italian, it is more likely they spoke Sicilian. Also she wants to open a hat shop - and says the obstacle is banks won't lend to immigrants. No, the issue was that in most of the US of the time, women couldn't have their own bank accounts. In fact, in some states women didn't get that right until some time in the 1970's. Caprice works and socializes with young women of different backgrounds. She has a Jewish friend and she and other Catholic friends go to her wedding. Before the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) Catholics weren't allowed to attend services in places of worship that were not Catholic. My mother was a rebel in the late 50's when she let me go to an ice cream social in the basement of a Protestant church, saying it was OK because I wasn't "going to church".Do all these details really matter? I'd argue that they do because readers add these misunderstandings and misinterpretations of times, places, cultures and religions to their concepts of the world. They perpetuate and reinforce stereotypes and reduce historical and cultural complexity to creations that make the author's job easier (why do any research other than the names of a few streets, and historical figures).
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  • Linda Lpp
    January 1, 1970
    Well am going to see if I can get past all the first person frequent use of "I". Wish me luck Penni 🙄Finished! Quite enjoyed the experiences of these first generation young immigrant women set in the early 1900's in Boston. Friendships began when they were in their early teens and all attended the Saturday Evening Girls Club. They all faced challenges in regards to strict family expectations, pressures around arranged marriages, and who they could date especially not someone of a different relig Well am going to see if I can get past all the first person frequent use of "I". Wish me luck Penni 🙄Finished! Quite enjoyed the experiences of these first generation young immigrant women set in the early 1900's in Boston. Friendships began when they were in their early teens and all attended the Saturday Evening Girls Club. They all faced challenges in regards to strict family expectations, pressures around arranged marriages, and who they could date especially not someone of a different religion or region in Sicily. Even a female wanting to pursue further education beyond high school was deemed by one father a complete waste. Women were meant to get married, bear children and stay in the family. Wanting a better chance at life than their parents was a struggle when they sought jobs. And you certainly could not work and be married, much less strive to be self employed or seek advanced education (and in one case enter medical school). They struggled with their choices of boyfriends and the effect on their family if they chose themselves and or a different religion.A comment made by another reviewer about the repetition of the word "I" excessively was indeed noted. Initially it seemed its use was to demonstrate the boredom, and endless life routines that made up Caprice's life. But that impression did not hold in my mind in the remainder of the book. With a first person account story it may be unavoidable. Thoughts anyone else? A sequel would be great to carry on in their lives.
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  • Shari
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book from start to finish. Set in the 1900s, the 4 girls connect through the Saturday Evening Girls Club regardless of their nationalities and traditional expectations that are placed on them by their families. Watching each girl navigate the world differently while still remaining close-knit with their friends was heartwarming. The girls are all so close and genuinely care about one another. Caprice is the glue that holds them all together and she often reminds the other girls of w I loved this book from start to finish. Set in the 1900s, the 4 girls connect through the Saturday Evening Girls Club regardless of their nationalities and traditional expectations that are placed on them by their families. Watching each girl navigate the world differently while still remaining close-knit with their friends was heartwarming. The girls are all so close and genuinely care about one another. Caprice is the glue that holds them all together and she often reminds the other girls of what is right and how to remain true to themselves. Watching Caprice grow and realize her goals in life was a wonderful transition into adulthood. By the end of the book, all of the girls had started to evolve into women. It was wonderful to watch them choose their paths and get to see how they were setting themselves up for their futures.I'd recommend this to anyone who enjoys a quick, impactful read. The writing was great and easy to follow. Great book!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Caprice, and her three fellow immigrant friends, Ada, Maria, and Thea, navigate dating and their ambitions with their enduring friendship seeing them through it all. Set in Boston at the turn of the 20th century, I thought the story itself was enjoyable, but unfortunately, there wasn't enough action to keep me interested. It was, however, the perfect listen on audiobook, especially during International Women’s Friendship Month!Location: Boston, MassachusettsAudiobook, Copy owned on Audible
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  • Rachel - Chocolate and Chapters
    January 1, 1970
    Find reviews and other bookish talk at Chocolate and Chapters Caprice is the daughter of Italian immigrants who dreams of opening her own hat shop. She attends the Saturday Evening Girls Club with three of her best friends, all of whom also come from immigrant families. As the four girls try to make their way and discover who they are in an ever-changing America, they find that the tradition of their families is difficult to escape. They navigate love, education, family, and dreams, all while at Find reviews and other bookish talk at Chocolate and Chapters Caprice is the daughter of Italian immigrants who dreams of opening her own hat shop. She attends the Saturday Evening Girls Club with three of her best friends, all of whom also come from immigrant families. As the four girls try to make their way and discover who they are in an ever-changing America, they find that the tradition of their families is difficult to escape. They navigate love, education, family, and dreams, all while attending the Club and supporting each other through it all.  Sigh. This book is essentially the less-good version of what you'd get if you took a huge pot and mixed together the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding and the book The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.And if you're like me, naming those two (My Big Fat Greek Wedding and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants) as "similar" might give you hope. But unfortunately, this book is missing all of the fun and relatability of those two stories. It's actually quite dull. There are literally scenes taken out of each that are transplanted into this book... I could give a plethora of examples, but I'll spare you.  I could also go into further detail about the things that annoyed me: extensive informational dialogue, way too much telling instead of showing, and so on. But again, I'll spare you. And I'll tell you: I'm not a skimmer (almost ever), but I was with this book. Overall, this book is sweet and doesn't require much of its reader. Maybe others will enjoy its tone and the feeling of camaraderie between the girls, but it did nothing for me besides bore me. Boo.
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  • Stephanie Probst
    January 1, 1970
    Quick read. Enjoyable. Would recommend to people. I loved the friendship of the girls. I loved the idea of a Saturday evening girls club.
  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Kindle Scout and I am so glad that I read it and it was published. The only problem I had with this book was the ending left you hanging big time and I hope there is more to this story. Per the author's website though, she loved the ending and she doesn't plan on continuing this story. This is a huge disappointment to me. The Saturday Evening Girl Club is based on some true facts about immigrants in the 1900's and it was nice that the author actually did research on thi I received this book from Kindle Scout and I am so glad that I read it and it was published. The only problem I had with this book was the ending left you hanging big time and I hope there is more to this story. Per the author's website though, she loved the ending and she doesn't plan on continuing this story. This is a huge disappointment to me. The Saturday Evening Girl Club is based on some true facts about immigrants in the 1900's and it was nice that the author actually did research on this. The main character is Caprice and she is a pioneer woman of her time/heritage. She has 3 other friends and you get to know them all through out this story. Very well developed story except for the end.
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  • Ali (the bandar blog)
    January 1, 1970
    I made in 20% through. This book bored the crapola out of me, and I'm sick of reading a book that takes place in 1908 with a modern day dialect. I'm sure it's possible it was going to get better (or maybe not), but only reading 50 pages in a week doesn't bode well. I'm done. Life is too short. DNF at 20%
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  • Neelam Babul
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading stories revolving around women who challenge the norms and fight for their dreams. Compared to other stories where women are damsels in distress rescued by powerful male heroes, this was a moving and powerful story exploring the role of women in the world and their struggle for independence and love. Caprice, Maria, Ada, and Thea share a wonderful friendship as they grow up in the Jewish and Italian immigrant neighborhoods of north Boston. The setting is in the 20th century where I love reading stories revolving around women who challenge the norms and fight for their dreams. Compared to other stories where women are damsels in distress rescued by powerful male heroes, this was a moving and powerful story exploring the role of women in the world and their struggle for independence and love. Caprice, Maria, Ada, and Thea share a wonderful friendship as they grow up in the Jewish and Italian immigrant neighborhoods of north Boston. The setting is in the 20th century where a great change is taking place in society. Living within families where parents adhere to the traditional ways of life and where society expects women to get married and raise kids, these four young women struggle with choices they must make to make their dreams come true. A delightful and inspiring book.
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  • Victoria Zieger
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. It had a little bit of everything. History, romance, tough topics, feminism, and strong bonds. I loved the girls and how different they were, yet they all worked well together in the novel. The writer did a great job of really making the reader understand her characters and time period. Great writing and really interesting story!
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  • Judy Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow.
  • Ellaine
    January 1, 1970
    This was the July book club pick which I purchased through Once Upon A Book Club.Yet another fun and engaging read from Once Upon A Book Club! I do not work for them, but I sure wish I did. Being able to get paid to find book club books and choose little gifts and treasures that go with the story sounds like a dream job. I work at my local library in the Teen Department, so I'm not too heartbroken that I don't work for OUABC.Anyway, on to this book review.To get this over with The Saturday Eveni This was the July book club pick which I purchased through Once Upon A Book Club.Yet another fun and engaging read from Once Upon A Book Club! I do not work for them, but I sure wish I did. Being able to get paid to find book club books and choose little gifts and treasures that go with the story sounds like a dream job. I work at my local library in the Teen Department, so I'm not too heartbroken that I don't work for OUABC.Anyway, on to this book review.To get this over with The Saturday Evenings Girls Club was a light and fluffy read. There is nothing wrong with an easy read, but I wanted to put that out there. We follow four girls (Caprice, Ada, Maria and Thea) on their journey from childhood to adulthood. While this book was chosen for adults in the book club, I would easily recommend this to my older teen patrons. This book glosses over and waxes romantic about immigration in the 1900s where there were a lot more intense and ugly emotions about new immigrants in the United States. Those more intense and ugly themes can be found in other books, but there wasn't much of that here. Having and making choices was the name of the game in this book. And all four women were able to choose what they wanted for themselves (other than Ada, but it was ultimately her choice (view spoiler)[to leave Dominic? I don't remember Caprice's cousin's name and I don't have the book handy (hide spoiler)]) without much repercussion. Even though this story is told in Caprice's POV my favorite character was Thea (I always feel a kinship to the introverts in stories) and her story was just super sweet.All in all I am content with this book club choice and again I recommend this to readers that enjoy a cute easy historical (really reaching on historical because this bordered on complete character journeys with little resistance/antagonists/hardships) read about friendship and girl power in the 1900s.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Four young women in the 1920s whose parents were immigrants are the main characters of this novel. Two are Italian, and two are Jewish. They are good friends and attend the Saturday Evening Girls Club (SEG) every week. Not much is expected of young women except to marry the man of their parents' choosing, help their families, and little else. The parents do not understand wanting more--an education or a job.But they are Americans and want to take advantage of what this country has to offer. With Four young women in the 1920s whose parents were immigrants are the main characters of this novel. Two are Italian, and two are Jewish. They are good friends and attend the Saturday Evening Girls Club (SEG) every week. Not much is expected of young women except to marry the man of their parents' choosing, help their families, and little else. The parents do not understand wanting more--an education or a job.But they are Americans and want to take advantage of what this country has to offer. With the help of the director and a rich Bostonian who is patron of the club, they improve themselves and their lives. One is going to college on a scholarship and wants to be a doctor; another opens her own millinery shop (unheard of for a woman), one has a good job working for a dressmaker, and the fourth improves her job from working in a box making factory to working for an interior decorator. Along the way, there are several budding romances. Their parents do not always understand what their daughters are all about. (I wanted to stand and cheer for them:)This book is similar to The Boston Girl by another author which takes place at the same time, the club is set in a library, and focuses on one young woman who is telling her story at age 84 to her granddaughter.Both novels are wonderful coming of age stories. I also love it when my two favorites come together--literature and art. The young women put on a play for Boston socialites at the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum/home, hosted by Mrs. Gardner herself. When they enter the coutyard of the home, they are in awe of the architecture and splendor. I remember the same reaction when we visited the museum.
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  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    I won this Kindle-eBook through a Goodreads Giveaway and by Amazon. Thanks so much as I found this book very enjoyable and it also increased my knowledge of life in the 1900's in Boston, especially for young women. I didn't know if this was based on anything true till I reached the end of the book and found out that indeed there was The Saturday Evening Girls Club and that the people in the book were real people! I was surprised and delighted. The novel follows four best friends, – Caprice, Ada, I won this Kindle-eBook through a Goodreads Giveaway and by Amazon. Thanks so much as I found this book very enjoyable and it also increased my knowledge of life in the 1900's in Boston, especially for young women. I didn't know if this was based on anything true till I reached the end of the book and found out that indeed there was The Saturday Evening Girls Club and that the people in the book were real people! I was surprised and delighted. The novel follows four best friends, – Caprice, Ada, Thea and Maria – as they navigate family problems, romantic situations, career struggles and cultural prejudice. It was a different time and culture in the early 1900s, but it was an interesting one. Watching these young women figure out their futures was amazing. They each had expectations placed upon them, but they each had a different idea of what they wanted for their lives. A very nice clean book for anyone to read.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome! Amazing! Superb!If you cannot tell I absolutely loved the four main "Girls" and this heartwarming tale of friendship, family, the struggle women faced between the old country ways to embracing many different new ways, and for Healey's bringing historical facts and giving historical women a voice and blending them so richly to a wonderfully crafted work of art. Jane Healey Will soon become one of my favorite historical fiction writers.Thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for my Awesome! Amazing! Superb!If you cannot tell I absolutely loved the four main "Girls" and this heartwarming tale of friendship, family, the struggle women faced between the old country ways to embracing many different new ways, and for Healey's bringing historical facts and giving historical women a voice and blending them so richly to a wonderfully crafted work of art. Jane Healey Will soon become one of my favorite historical fiction writers.Thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for my advanced copy for an honest review, which due to some health complications, on my part, delayed my review from coming out the week the book was released.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I do not understand why this book has so many positive reviews. The writing is very amateurish, the dialogue riddled with anachronisms ("Hey"?), and the plot trite and predictable. Having the plot center around the 4 girls while also focusing on their parents, the women who founded the club, all 4 of their boyfriends/fiancés, and siblings/other family members was just was too much for the 250 page novel. None of the characters emerged as having distinct voices as a result. Caprice was the most d I do not understand why this book has so many positive reviews. The writing is very amateurish, the dialogue riddled with anachronisms ("Hey"?), and the plot trite and predictable. Having the plot center around the 4 girls while also focusing on their parents, the women who founded the club, all 4 of their boyfriends/fiancés, and siblings/other family members was just was too much for the 250 page novel. None of the characters emerged as having distinct voices as a result. Caprice was the most developed and thus the most interesting, but the other girls and their relationships were too underdeveloped for me to care.
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  • Julie Bakey
    January 1, 1970
    The Saturday Evening Girls Club blends real historical figures of early 20th century Boston with an engaging story of young women from immigrant families trying to find their place in the new world. The characters struggle with respecting the “old ways” of their immigrant parents, and pursuing opportunities of work, education and autonomy that were beginning to be available to women. This is the best book I’ve read this year!
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  • Christina Gagliano
    January 1, 1970
    A charming and historically interesting look at life in Boston's North End--with glimpses into the society lives of the Storrows and Gardners--that will entertain and educate.
  • Emer Browne
    January 1, 1970
    This 1 star is not for the book, it's for me for getting through it.
  • Merrie
    January 1, 1970
    Engaging enough that I read it in half a day. In some ways predictable and others surprising, it is an easy read. I particularly enjoyed the setting and the historical background. Engaging enough that I read it in half a day. In some ways predictable and others surprising​, it is an easy read. I particularly enjoyed the setting and the historical background.
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  • Rochelle Weinstein
    January 1, 1970
    Healy is a remarkable writer who expertly captures the history of Boston's North End. Four friends joined together by their own individual struggles. The Saturday Evening Club is a wonderful and important read, especially in today's world.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    L
  • Amy Ingalls
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pleasant book, but I found it a little repetitious. The characters and setting were interesting, and I liked that it included actual historical figures, but overall I just found it OK.
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