Tomorrow's Kin (Yesterday's Kin Trilogy, #1)
Tomorrow's Kin is the first volume in and all new hard SF trilogy by Nancy Kress based on the Nebula Award-winning Yesterday's Kin.The aliens have arrived... they've landed their Embassy ship on a platform in New York Harbor, and will only speak with the United Nations. They say that their world is so different from Earth, in terms of gravity and atmosphere, that they cannot leave their ship. The population of Earth has erupted in fear and speculation.One day Dr. Marianne Jenner, an obscure scientist working with the human genome, receives an invitation that she cannot refuse. The Secret Service arrives at her college to escort her to New York, for she has been invited, along with the Secretary General of the UN and a few other ambassadors, to visit the alien Embassy.The truth is about to be revealed. Earth s most elite scientists have ten months to prevent a disaster and not everyone is willing to wait."

Tomorrow's Kin (Yesterday's Kin Trilogy, #1) Details

TitleTomorrow's Kin (Yesterday's Kin Trilogy, #1)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherTor Books
ISBN0765390299
ISBN-139780765390295
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Aliens, Fiction

Tomorrow's Kin (Yesterday's Kin Trilogy, #1) Review

  • Brad
    July 8, 2017
    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!I've read a lot of Nancy Kress, going way back to the Eighties and Nineties when she was a regular in Asimov. I'll be honest and say that I was amazed by her debut novels. Some of the later ones, though? Not so much. I know that this novel isn't going to get a super-glowing review, but I can tell you that it's solid novel. Very solid.As with a lot of Kress, we get a lot of single or at most dual high-science concepts taken all the way as the grand arc for a novel, Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!I've read a lot of Nancy Kress, going way back to the Eighties and Nineties when she was a regular in Asimov. I'll be honest and say that I was amazed by her debut novels. Some of the later ones, though? Not so much. I know that this novel isn't going to get a super-glowing review, but I can tell you that it's solid novel. Very solid.As with a lot of Kress, we get a lot of single or at most dual high-science concepts taken all the way as the grand arc for a novel, and this one is no different. In this case, were talking about the global effects of an invasive species in an ecological System, only we see it from the actions of an alien first-contact scenario and focus more on the subtle effects rather than an in-your-face action sequence that dominates most stories.I appreciate that a lot.It's thoughtful, personal, and because of the nature of the theme, usually only obvious long after the initial contact is done and done. That's not to say the effects aren't long lasting... because they are. And in a very real way, it's very dangerous and even possibly catastrophic.This is just assuming that all parties involved, I.E., both humans and aliens, enter into some sort of dialog or transaction with the highest possible motives! I think that's Kress's main strength. People are generally rational and even when everyone is doing their best on either side of a huge (or small) genetic gap, unintended consequences always can ruin your day. :)For everyone else just wanting to know what they can expect, science-wise? Genetics, a bit of cool physics, Systems Theory, and a lot more than a hint of species-change. :) And there are a few cool surprises and scary points, too, with action and explosions, but this is NOT the coolest part of the novel. The coolest part is how down-to-earth it is and how much good science is explored in a really fascinating way. :)I'm looking forward to any sequels to this. It's so nice to see rational people struggle and eventually succeed in good stories. We all know how often the other sort tends to dominate the hero business.
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  • Carrie
    June 24, 2017
    Aliens have landed on Earth and stationed their ship at the New York Harbor. They've communicated that their own world is very different from Earth and they cannot leave their ship but are willing to talk with the United Nations about their arrival. This is of course causing a bit of fear and panic among citizens wanting to know more and why the aliens are here. Dr. Marianne Jenner had made a discovery that got her name on the map but while attending a faculty event someone arrives stating that Aliens have landed on Earth and stationed their ship at the New York Harbor. They've communicated that their own world is very different from Earth and they cannot leave their ship but are willing to talk with the United Nations about their arrival. This is of course causing a bit of fear and panic among citizens wanting to know more and why the aliens are here. Dr. Marianne Jenner had made a discovery that got her name on the map but while attending a faculty event someone arrives stating that she has been requested to accompany them to New York. After arriving Marianne finds herself among other elite scientists with the dilemma of solving a scientific discovery with a countdown of ten months until all of Earth will be in danger. Tomorrow's Kin is the first book of the Yesterday's Kin Trilogy by Nancy Kress. First I will admit sci-fi is not a top genre for me so I always find reading them that it's a bit iffy as to whether I'll enjoy a book or not. With this particular book I found the story involved to be an interesting one and wanted to give it a try. For me though this story was entertaining enough plot wise that I wanted to know what would happen but I wasn't a huge fan of the way it's executed overall. I knew there was a countdown which made a big part of the story but what we have is some really quick time jumps which leaves me a bit disconnected to the characters. All in all by the end years have gone by and while it's interesting what is going on I can't say I wouldn't have liked more depth to get more hooked into the book. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....
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  • Bookwraiths
    July 29, 2017
    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.Tomorrow’s Kin by Nancy Press is a first encounter science fiction story which expands on the author’s Nebula Award winning novella Yesterday’s Kin. While it has some explosive events and normal alien conspiracy elements to it, this story is more focused on its main character, Dr. Marianne Jenner, and the cutting-edge science at its heart.Four months ago, an object heading toward Earth was discovered to be an alien spacecraft. Thankfully, the extraterrestrials Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.Tomorrow’s Kin by Nancy Press is a first encounter science fiction story which expands on the author’s Nebula Award winning novella Yesterday’s Kin. While it has some explosive events and normal alien conspiracy elements to it, this story is more focused on its main character, Dr. Marianne Jenner, and the cutting-edge science at its heart.Four months ago, an object heading toward Earth was discovered to be an alien spacecraft. Thankfully, the extraterrestrials were peaceful, placed their ship in orbit around the moon, and made contact with the United Nations to assure them of their peaceful mission. Eventually, the aliens received permission to launch a floating embassy in New York Harbor in exchange for sharing scientific data.Since their landing on Earth, the aliens have remained apart from the world, communicating via electronic technology. But now they have requested a face-to-face meeting with a group of U.N. ambassadors and Dr. Julian Jenner, a little known geneticists.From this setup, Nancy Kress tells a story focused on the global effects of the introduction of an invasive species on a planet. The scientific fields of both biology and genetics playing huge roles in the narrative; the author doing an outstanding job educating her readers about the important science at the heart of the story, yet never turning the tale into a dry scientific info dump.The strength of the narrative is its main character Marianne Jenner: this fifty year old mother and soon-to-be grandmother an ordinary person. Certainly, she is a geneticists, who has made some important discoveries, but she still works at a second tier university, isn’t one of the rock stars of the scientific world, and lives a fairly normal life. No one would ever pick this lady out and label her a budding heroine. In fact, her relationship with her family and friends highlights how normal she really is, seemingly unsuited for aliens to ask to consult with her. And this “normalcy” is what grounds Tomorrow’s Kin, helps it maintain its focus as a story about humanity as opposed to a tale about science.The main weakness here is the secondary characters; the most notable of which was Marianne’s assistant Sissy. None of these people really developed very much throughout their time in the narrative, remaining fairly static in their roles, and seemingly there only as a nod toward sci fi diversity. Personally, I felt a few strong supporting characters would have helped the story grow to be about more than just Marianne and her family.With a plausible plot, understandable science, and a true-to-life main character, Tomorrow’s Kin is a very readable tale. Certainly, this will appeal more to readers who prefer there science fiction to be about real science, but with its simple prose and quick pacing, it is a tale I can see many sci fi fans enjoying.I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank them for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.
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  • Everdeen Mason
    July 7, 2017
    So, this is more of a 2.5. From my column:Tomorrow’s Kin, by Nancy Kress, starts off with a strong, intriguing angle. Theoretical geneticist Dr. Marianne Jenner makes a seemingly minor discovery that catches the interest of aliens camping out in New York. They inform her that she and a team of human scientists will be crucial in preventing a disaster in 10 months that could end humanity. The first half of the book swells with promise and interesting ideas, but by the middle, it grows soggy with So, this is more of a 2.5. From my column:Tomorrow’s Kin, by Nancy Kress, starts off with a strong, intriguing angle. Theoretical geneticist Dr. Marianne Jenner makes a seemingly minor discovery that catches the interest of aliens camping out in New York. They inform her that she and a team of human scientists will be crucial in preventing a disaster in 10 months that could end humanity. The first half of the book swells with promise and interesting ideas, but by the middle, it grows soggy with sappy characterizations. It also features a cringe-inducing stereotype of a loud black woman: Sissy, Marianne’s assistant, with “frizzy curls.” (NOTE: This is not how one would describe natural, kinky hair unless you have never known a black person). Sissy didn’t understand how bad her college was until she went to fancy colleges with Marianne; she may not have book smarts, but she’s got sense! Kress’s novel, the first of a projected trilogy, is based on her Nebula Award-winning novella of the same name. It reads as breezily, and fans of aliens and first-contact stories may be compelled to pick up the second volume, forthcoming next spring.SPOILER ALERT**********So after reading her embarrassing characterization of Sissy (what kind of name is that?), I turned to my boyfriend and started reading passages so he could see how ridiculous it was. We were like she has never met a black person who isn't like, the cashier at her neighborhood store. Then I said, well she's probably going to die soon anyways so Marianne can feel sad for one minute.She died like, 2 chapters later. And then Marianne got to sleep with Sissy's hot white boyfriend. It was really, really weird and uncomfortable. And to be fair, Sissy isn't the only person that dies. The only gay character, who also only served to make Marianne seem like a nice human, also dies violently. Basically, anytime Marianne thinks "wow, I care about this person as much as my children, they're my family now" they die. It's really sloppy, and weird because they were also her throw away diversity characters.
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  • Clair
    July 10, 2017
    A first encounter sci-fi story. Dr Marianne Jenner discovers something unusual in the human genome and receives an invite to visit an alien Embassy ship which is floating over New York Harbour. Here she discovers how her work relates to the aliens and an imminent disaster that is threatening the planet.There was plenty of science in this book to keep me entertained, from genetics, physics, ecology etc. and aliens with possibly shady motives to give me the conspiracy theory thrill. I loved that t A first encounter sci-fi story. Dr Marianne Jenner discovers something unusual in the human genome and receives an invite to visit an alien Embassy ship which is floating over New York Harbour. Here she discovers how her work relates to the aliens and an imminent disaster that is threatening the planet.There was plenty of science in this book to keep me entertained, from genetics, physics, ecology etc. and aliens with possibly shady motives to give me the conspiracy theory thrill. I loved that this book didn’t just focus on the action of the first encounter, it explores the after-effects and unexpected changes to the eco-system and the planet afterwards and humans reactions to this. Its a bit of a slow-burn but very well thought out. There are some large time leaps which can be a bit dis-orientating but they are needed to cover the timescale and show the impact within the book. An enjoyable read with some interesting ideas about the effects of aliens coming to earth and reactions towards it.I enjoyed that the star of this book is not a “hero”. Dr Marianne Jenner is a scientist, a mother, an “average” person with no spectacular super-hero traits to set her apart. She makes mistakes, loves, works hard and is a believable character. Not all the characters are as well thought out and some of the lesser characters feel a little stereo-typical. The main story is told through Marianne’s perspective but there are sections seen through other people such as her children and others involved in the story. This adds some variety and a depth of views to the story.Even though there was plenty of science I still found it an easy read and read it over two days. I’m intrigued to see what the next book in the trilogy brings.Recommended to: fans of stories based on science, hard sci-fi, ecological, aliens and alternative futures.
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  • Kate
    July 17, 2017
    I thoroughly enjoyed this, gobbling it up, and cannot wait for book 2! 4.5 stars.A review: https://forwinternights.wordpress.com...
  • Kristen
    July 25, 2017
    Tomorrow's Kin is the first novel in a new trilogy expanding upon Nancy Kress' excellent Nebula Award-winning novella Yesterday's Kin. The first third is the previously published story, and the rest of the novel follows what happens after the end of the original novella. Though I did think the novella was the strongest part, I found the novel as a whole to be smart and engaging. I also enjoyed following the main protagonist, Dr. Marianne Jenner, a mother, grandmother, and geneticist who makes an Tomorrow's Kin is the first novel in a new trilogy expanding upon Nancy Kress' excellent Nebula Award-winning novella Yesterday's Kin. The first third is the previously published story, and the rest of the novel follows what happens after the end of the original novella. Though I did think the novella was the strongest part, I found the novel as a whole to be smart and engaging. I also enjoyed following the main protagonist, Dr. Marianne Jenner, a mother, grandmother, and geneticist who makes an interesting--but fairly unremarkable--scientific discovery that leads to her being among the first to meet alien visitors to Earth. Kress seamlessly blends science and fiction in this novel, and I'm looking forward to finding out what happens next.Full Review on My Website
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  • Xavi
    July 16, 2017
    7'5/10https://dreamsofelvex.blogspot.com/20...
  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)
    July 9, 2017
    2.5 StarsI was originally very excited for the premise of this story, but unfortunately I was quite disappointed by the execution. The synopsis sounded very similar to the basic setup of Arrival/Story of Your Life. However, this book was completely different and it would be unfair to compare it to that masterpiece work.For me, the downfall of this novel started with the marketing, which setup the wrong expectations for the reader. This book is advertised as hard science fiction, which was not at 2.5 StarsI was originally very excited for the premise of this story, but unfortunately I was quite disappointed by the execution. The synopsis sounded very similar to the basic setup of Arrival/Story of Your Life. However, this book was completely different and it would be unfair to compare it to that masterpiece work.For me, the downfall of this novel started with the marketing, which setup the wrong expectations for the reader. This book is advertised as hard science fiction, which was not at all accurate. Instead, this read more like a family drama, that just happened to have elements of science fiction. Certainly, this book involved aliens and research, but those aspects almost felt like background noise. For a science fiction story, I hoped there would be more focus on the technology and alien culture. Also, given the synopsis, I was surprised that this was not really a story of first contact. Instead, the novel begins four months after the aliens arrived on earth. I wanted to read firsthand how the characters reacted to the ship appearing on earth, but instead these events were simply described to the reader retroactively in a handful of paragraphs. I feel the author really missed an opportunity to tell one of the most interesting aspects of the story in a more active manner. Instead, the story is more of a character study, focusing on the central character and her children. This story is very emotionally driven demonstrating the fallout of how this world-changing event affected this particular family. The story is more about the humans, than the aliens, addressing how average people would react in such a life-changing situation.The book, itself, was fairly short and was easy to read. Told over multiple perspectives, I was able to finish this story relatively quickly, despite not really enjoying the reading experience. The writing was very simple to follow, with a straightforward style. There is not a lot of action in the story, yet the plot-driven narrative kept the story moving along through time. The book was readable, yet it ultimately lacked substance. The plot felt hollow, despite the grand scale potential of the larger story. I requested this book from the publisher via Netgalley.
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  • Mark
    July 23, 2017
    This is really three novels in one: An "Earth's first encounter with aliens" story, an "ecological apocalypse" story, and a "intrigue with space battle" story. It's dark, particularly the middle part, but it's pretty entertaining if you can surf the shift in stories. Nancy Kress is talented enough to make such surfing pretty easy and I admire the scope of the effort. I particularly appreciate the closure at the end with enough open window for a sequel - no mean feat.
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  • Amelia
    July 16, 2017
    I enjoyed the book a lot, and a big part of that was because I could relate to the main character. She is an academic, so am I. She does basically obscure research that no one outside her field cares about, which occasionally (and apparently randomly) gets a lot of public attention. That's my job in a nutshell. She also has to deal with a lot of bullshit from people who should really know better, or who should at least be more considerate. Welcome to my life.I found the story very engaging, and I enjoyed the book a lot, and a big part of that was because I could relate to the main character. She is an academic, so am I. She does basically obscure research that no one outside her field cares about, which occasionally (and apparently randomly) gets a lot of public attention. That's my job in a nutshell. She also has to deal with a lot of bullshit from people who should really know better, or who should at least be more considerate. Welcome to my life.I found the story very engaging, and read the book quickly. Another reviewer pointed out that the author makes some pretty bad stereotypes of minority characters, which in retrospect I agree with completely but didn't notice at the time. Besides that, I found the characters mostly believable.It would have been nice to have more info about the aliens, and about what happens to some of the side characters. There were a few loose ends, but this is just the first in the series so who knows? Maybe I would have been less forgiving to the author if the main character had been less relatable to me personally. In any case, I recommend it.
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  • Chris
    June 28, 2017
    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Tomorrow’s Kin is the first in a new sci-fi series by Nancy Kress. It opens with a mystery, of sorts – an alien spaceship sat at anchor near the United Nations. But there’s more than first contact at stake.The world as we know it has changed. Well, a little, anyway. At the start of Tomorrow’s Kin, the social geography feels familiar. New York is still New York – a thriving city of millions, going about its business in a way that the reader is broadly *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Tomorrow’s Kin is the first in a new sci-fi series by Nancy Kress. It opens with a mystery, of sorts – an alien spaceship sat at anchor near the United Nations. But there’s more than first contact at stake.The world as we know it has changed. Well, a little, anyway. At the start of Tomorrow’s Kin, the social geography feels familiar. New York is still New York – a thriving city of millions, going about its business in a way that the reader is broadly acquainted with. Kress does show us snippets of urban life – there are quiet moments in city parks, and brash, gritty diners. These are contrasted neatly with the quieter, more remote rural areas. Again, this feels like the calm before the storm – the world is one we recognise instantly, and the concerns are similar, if sometimes a little esoteric – damage to the environment, debates over immigration and sovereignty, economic downturns, and who’s going to win the Superbowl. It’s all mostly in the background, but this is our world, the lives we live, and in that context, it’s very convincing.Of course, in this case, there’s also aliens. Quite what they’re up to, why they’ll only talk to the United Nations, and even what they look like – it’s all something of a mystery. I was reminded of Clarke’s Childhood’s End; the aura of mystery and creeping concern is similar. But these aliens – whatever they may be – are a catalyst for exploring larger ideas. The text follows one family, that of Dr. Marianne Jenner. Jenner is brought to speak with the aliens after making an unusual genetic discovery – and everything unravels thereafter. Marianne herself is an interesting protagonist – a sharp, smart professional, who is self-aware enough to be confident in her competence but not feel egotistically brilliant. Her two drivers appear to be professional progress, and, perhaps more importantly, her family. She’s convincing as the logical, perhaps slightly frosty scientist; but her internal monologue gives her a vulnerability in thoughts of her family which is equally substantial.That family is multi-generational – children and grand children – and more than a little troubled. A daughter is a forceful immigration agent, given room to discuss immigration, the economy, and other bête noir. This usually leads to a clash with one of Marianne’s sons – an ecologist, concerned with invasive plant species, rather than with the movement of people. They’re both given the room to be opinionated, their arguments crashing together between the pages. This isn’t a political tract, mind you – but the discussions are engaging, and help indicate both the personalities of the characters, and the state of the world around them (or at least, those parts of it which they’re concerned with). Marianne does have another son, Noah – a wanderer, a wastrel, a man who feels the need to take drugs in an effort to define an identity for himself, lost in the shadow of his siblings.This is a book which tries to meld the drama of one family – their smaller squabbles and relationships and concerns – into the larger narrative themes it’s wielding. It actually works rather well, letting the broader themes be illustrated in the effects on individual lives. As the story hots up, the focus draws tighter around Marianne, tracking her through decades of discovery, and charting her family and world at the same time.It’s surprisingly difficult to talk about Tomorrow’s Kin without spoilers, as you can probably tell from the above. But it pulls together some excellent science-fiction threads: it has a big idea, and it follows that idea to a logical conclusion. The story approaches its concepts logically and plausibly – and the trials and tribulations of the characters work, both because they make sense in context, and because we’re drawn into caring about the characters. Alongside the big idea (or two), there’s a multigenerational family story, one with arcs of personal discovery to match the science happening elsewhere on the page, and with the ability to relate facets of larger debates into a smaller scale, convincingly and in such a way as to make for an interesting read.It’s not perfect – it feels in some cases that the conceptual stuff, the clever ideas, the “sci-fi” bit, if you like, takes up the page at the expense of further depth of character, especially for some of Marianne’s family. This isn’t an entirely bad thing – the concepts on display are cool, and a lot of fun to read. I guess what I really wanted was a little more; we can care for Marianne, and sympathise with her tribulations, but it feels like there’s room here to tell more stories about her family, and give them a little more room to breathe.That said, this is an undertaking of impressive scope – a mixture of multigenerational saga and hard science fiction, across geography and time periods, able to talk around some of the big issues of the day, and throw its own ideas into the mix. On those terms, it’s also a successful one – I kept turning pages to see where the story would take me next, and the ambitious and compelling narrative held up to the end. If you’re looking for a solid piece of hard SF, this looks like the start of an exciting new series.
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  • Amy Softa
    July 11, 2017
    I’ve read a couple of books by this author and thoroughly enjoyed both of them, in fact, the first book that I read was Yesterday’s Kin. The book that this series is based upon or is a continuation of. I thought the cover looked familiar when requesting it so I dug a little deeper and discovered the connection and became concerned for a moment that I was about to read the same book twice. The page count was different so I decided to continue and see what was different.I have to confess I did ski I’ve read a couple of books by this author and thoroughly enjoyed both of them, in fact, the first book that I read was Yesterday’s Kin. The book that this series is based upon or is a continuation of. I thought the cover looked familiar when requesting it so I dug a little deeper and discovered the connection and became concerned for a moment that I was about to read the same book twice. The page count was different so I decided to continue and see what was different.I have to confess I did skip the first third of the book which felt like it was either the same as Yesterday’s Kin or close enough that I would probably be fine if I jumped to the new material. The book was divided into three parts and starting in part two the story picks up where the first novella left off. If you want to read what I thought of that first third of the story you can do so here, Yesterday’s Kin Review.So what did I think of this revamped or continued story? I think it was bloody brilliant! In my review of the previous story, I held back one star, mentioning closure for two of the characters but perhaps it was more of I needed closure. I wanted to know more, what happened next. In this book, the author delivers, big time. The second part of the book picks up a few years after the first part ends and we get to see the aftermath of what happened on Earth when the aliens left and the disaster struck. It wasn’t pretty, but I think it was pretty accurate in what the author envisioned. Like The Martian, Ms. Kress uses real science to weave a captivating and thoughtful story about human nature and human’s place in the world. There was so much I hadn’t thought of if a disaster like this struck. What the ramifications would be not only to our environment but our way of life and even our evolution. It was truly fascinating.The book does feel fairly science accurate but it was never stuffy or boring. The author never lectures but simply illuminates and uses science to give her story teeth. Ms. Kress is truly a gifted story-teller and I loved this book. I am excited that there are two more tales to come as I can not wait to see where she takes these characters next.If you want a smart yet thrilling science fiction story that echoes current environmental, political, and cultural struggles we face today while throwing an interesting twist then this is a book you are going to want to pick up for yourself. This story has it all!I received a copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.
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  • Natalie
    July 15, 2017
    A mature female scientist protagonist who is a grandmother who works. She isn't/ hasn't been a perfect mom, or maybe she has ? She hasn't been the perfect wife or girlfriend, or maybe she has ? She isn't/ hasn't been the perfect friend or co-worker, or maybe she has ? Why is it so hard to know? Because life's not perfect and neither are the people we love, depend on, armoire or even envy. Why? Because good days follow bad days, but sometimes not in that order. She's a unique heroine and i'm glad A mature female scientist protagonist who is a grandmother who works. She isn't/ hasn't been a perfect mom, or maybe she has ? She hasn't been the perfect wife or girlfriend, or maybe she has ? She isn't/ hasn't been the perfect friend or co-worker, or maybe she has ? Why is it so hard to know? Because life's not perfect and neither are the people we love, depend on, armoire or even envy. Why? Because good days follow bad days, but sometimes not in that order. She's a unique heroine and i'm glad Kress wrote her onto the page.
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  • Andy Pond
    July 15, 2017
    I quit this book less than halfway through. I was constantly irritated by the poorly constructed plot, and dated, stereotyped characterizations--the first being the "discreet"gay friend who is never given anything but "plummy accent" and "manicured fingers" to flesh out his character. They are good friends for years, we hear but she actually asks him if he's gay--because she's apparently never asked before. The dialogue isn't plausible. The science seems off. At one point we are told that the al I quit this book less than halfway through. I was constantly irritated by the poorly constructed plot, and dated, stereotyped characterizations--the first being the "discreet"gay friend who is never given anything but "plummy accent" and "manicured fingers" to flesh out his character. They are good friends for years, we hear but she actually asks him if he's gay--because she's apparently never asked before. The dialogue isn't plausible. The science seems off. At one point we are told that the aliens genetic profile indicates that there wasn't a bottleneck in human population 70,000 years ago. Then we learn that the opposite is true. Seems like two irreconcilable ideas for the plot competed, and both were left in without explanation. Worse was to come:In part 2 of the book that we meet a "frizzy haired" black woman (her hair is mentioned multiple times) who doesn't speak "proper English" when excited (she says "ain't"...heavens!). It's not intentional, I'm sure, but I don't have patience for stereotyped, borderline racist nonsense. Had the book been written in 1962, that might be forgivable, but I don't expect contemporary authors to be so lazy. The author has written some good books, which why I gave it two stars: I was expecting more. I got a poorly edited mess that read like a first-time author who needed an editor to turn it into a readable novel. Bummer.
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  • Leslie Rusch
    June 24, 2017
    A very light read. Felt like a novella. Not very satisfying.
  • Jennifer
    July 28, 2017
    Part One of this novel is obviously the well-polished short story that inspired this full-length novel. It ends on a note that could be final or could blend into the beginning of a longer story. I was a little disappointed that the Denebs looked humanoid but Ms. Kress did a good job of explaining why and left herself fodder for future installments in the trilogy. There were lots of almost-too-convenient coincidences (there kind of have to be in a short story), but I still feel the story was well Part One of this novel is obviously the well-polished short story that inspired this full-length novel. It ends on a note that could be final or could blend into the beginning of a longer story. I was a little disappointed that the Denebs looked humanoid but Ms. Kress did a good job of explaining why and left herself fodder for future installments in the trilogy. There were lots of almost-too-convenient coincidences (there kind of have to be in a short story), but I still feel the story was well-crafted. I would give this 5 stars.The middle part of the book (Part Two-ish) starts to drag a little bit. The aftermath of the collision with the spore cloud has some predictable results in destroying the economy and causing terrorism and unrest. The whole interconnectedness theme reeks of so many other sci-fi authors (foremost in my mind is Orson Scott Card and that planet that Ender ended up on). I felt the middle was quite derivative and not very original (I was reminded most of Beggars in Spain here) . I was thinking this deserved 3 stars as I read it.I did like Colin's superhearing and how they tested it at the bridge building site and the relationship between Colin and Jason. However, I almost get attached to the characters and need to find out what happens to them. So, of course, I finished the book. While I despise the Jonah Stubbins character (as I was at least partly supposed to do), his twists and turns did lend some originality. I found the whole mouse-infection thing intriguing and added more complexity.The end was a little weird and maybe a little hard to swallow. Again, there was a lot of convenience in Colin trying to save the mice and Judy being on the Venture. The ship accidentally taking off and preparing to destroy the Mest' was a little over the top, but it did make a dramatic end to the first novel. It's a little hard to believe that Marianne shot Stone in the neck with the tranq gun on her first try. Score one for middle-aged female protagonists! (Marianne and Judy rocked it (however unbelievably) in bringing Venture safely back to Earth.)I also find it unbelievable that Marianne and Harrison found their way back together again....My guess for the second novel of the trilogy...maybe Noah's trip back to World and his life there was the spore cloud collides, interspersed with Earth's actual launching of Venture and maybe a twist of Ryan re-exerting parental control over his children?I could see the final installment being a joint quest between Worlders and Terrans to find the master race that scooped up the original Worlders from Earth and deposited them on World. I'm sort expecting to be disappointed by however Ms. Kress resolves this.There were some overall echoes from Beggars in Spain, especially the protected enclaves of the privileged. I think Ms. Kress' perspective has changed now that she is her own middle-aged protagonist.
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  • Kathryn at Book Ink Reivews
    July 9, 2017
    A copy of the review can be found here: http://bookinkreviews.blogspot.com/20...Hard Science Fiction is a thing! And Nancy Kress blew this one completely out of the park.First, I want to point out that I am an incredibly hard sell with Sci-Fi. I don't read it often, because I normally can't stay interested. Second, I have a degree in Psychology--my husband is the Chemist. So in no way do I tend to enjoy stories that surround the hard sciences. Third, when I read blurbs that include "aliens" I ru A copy of the review can be found here: http://bookinkreviews.blogspot.com/20...Hard Science Fiction is a thing! And Nancy Kress blew this one completely out of the park.First, I want to point out that I am an incredibly hard sell with Sci-Fi. I don't read it often, because I normally can't stay interested. Second, I have a degree in Psychology--my husband is the Chemist. So in no way do I tend to enjoy stories that surround the hard sciences. Third, when I read blurbs that include "aliens" I run the other way, I don't even finish the blurbs. BUT, I can get behind Tomorrow's Kin with zero issue, finished the blurb, and was ready to dive into the story.The following review may contain minor spoilers, so if you don't want that to happen, stop reading the review now and just go read the book!It is well fleshed out in how the aliens arrive, who they are, what they want, and what happens to Earth after they visit. It also never looses it's more important piece: humanity. We get to follow a very broken family and how the Denebs arriving made the fractures even more apparent and it is so dang good, y'all. Plus, the book actually spans past the countdown to a terrible spore field that will kill and cripple everything (and the Denebs leaving Earth) and I think that was a brilliant move. Just like the Bubonic plague, nothing kills out all of humanity at once, and it is incredibly important to investigate the fall out.  At it's core, Tomorrow's Kin is about humanity and it's will to bounce back, survive, and adapt.The aliens are believable and not hokey, and I actually ended up really liking them--and slightly preferring them to their Earth counterparts. It wasn't actually they're fault, but considering so many of the conspiracy theorists in the story decided it was, the GIF is incredibly accurate for this book.Pick this book up when it comes out on July 11. You will not be disappointed.Thank you to NetGalley, Nancy Kress, and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.  
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  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    July 16, 2017
    Having previously read and loved Yesterday's Kin, I was eagerly looking forward to this extended version (though the page count doesn't expand by much). It starts of the same, with Dr Marianne Jenner being collected by the FBI in the middle of an evening celebration dedicated to her and her work, as she's needed for the alien issue. Because aliens have landed, and it's her work specifically that the entire world is now relying on.Four months ago aliens arrived on earth. They set up shop, didn't Having previously read and loved Yesterday's Kin, I was eagerly looking forward to this extended version (though the page count doesn't expand by much). It starts of the same, with Dr Marianne Jenner being collected by the FBI in the middle of an evening celebration dedicated to her and her work, as she's needed for the alien issue. Because aliens have landed, and it's her work specifically that the entire world is now relying on.Four months ago aliens arrived on earth. They set up shop, didn't allow anyone on board or (to anyone's knowledge) leave their own ship, but they started communicating immediately with the UN in English that rapidly improved the more study they took. Two months ago they requested permission to land their structure in New York Harbour and in return they'll share some of their knowledge of physics (though not technology).Now, though, Marianne along with very few others have been specifically invited on board the vessel. And you'll just have to read on to find out what happens next.The point of view changes between Marianne, her son Noah (who's a bit of a failure at pretty much everything), and though the book starts of with rather a narrow focus, it expands as the plot expands and the deadline of the whole point of the book is revealed. Though the whole ten month thing is almost negligible - what this is really all about is family - it's what holds Marianne together, and it's what drives the aliens onwards.What I don't really remember from reading Yesterday's Kin was the slightly awkward choice of deaths - first to one of the few (only?) black characters (Sissy), and then to the only gay character. Marianne also then sleeps with Sissy's husband, for some reason. Yes, it shows the failings of our 'hero', but the actual choices were disappointing. Overall this is more of a three-and-a-half star rating, but I bumped it up to four in case it's just my preconceived ideas from remembering loving Yesterday's Kin way more than I ended up liking this one.  
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  • Lia Cooper
    July 19, 2017
    ARC received in exchange for a review vis Netgalley.I was initially excited to read this book because I've been on a real scifi kick this summer and I was approved for an ARC shortly after watching Arrival. I expected an alien first contact story in a similar vein. I got a very small amount of that in the first part of the book, but as the narrative continued to jump further and further into the future, the less attached i became to it. All together, the story spans roughly 10 years, which isn't ARC received in exchange for a review vis Netgalley.I was initially excited to read this book because I've been on a real scifi kick this summer and I was approved for an ARC shortly after watching Arrival. I expected an alien first contact story in a similar vein. I got a very small amount of that in the first part of the book, but as the narrative continued to jump further and further into the future, the less attached i became to it. All together, the story spans roughly 10 years, which isn't bad on it's own, but the time jumps were so regular they didn't allow the reader much time to dwell on what was going on, and a huge problem for me was the fact that much of the really important and/or interesting action through the first 3/4 of the book took place off screen. One of the best examples of this are the choices and transformation undertaken by the protagonist's youngest son, Noah, during Part 1 of the story. He makes a huge life change that effects his place in the story and yet that entire transformation happens completely off screen. Most, if not all, of the actual science also appears off screen.There's an unfortunate amount of 'telling' rather than 'showing' as the author continually tries to catch the reader up on everything that happened during a time jump instead of just....showing up the exciting/interesting stuff happening.(view spoiler)[I wasn't a huge fan of the way Kress stuck in two diverse stereotypes and then used them for cheap "emotional" shock value. When you kill your gay and fridge your "frizzy haired" black woman, it tells me that you only included them to check off diversity boxes. =/ (hide spoiler)]The entire third part was predictable (it's nothing you havent seen done before).Overall, not the worst thing i've ready, but uninspiring especially compared to Arrival (perhaps an unfair comparison, but considering how closely together i engaged with both and their similar subject matters I don't think it's entirely inappropriate to talk about them together).If you're looking for a very low-science, mild first contact story you can give it a try.
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  • Jeff Raymond
    July 20, 2017
    Tomorrow's Kin is a solid, interesting first contact novel. As someone who generally really responds well to any first contact novel, to enjoy one a little more than the rest is not a bad thing in the least, and I would say that's where I place Tomorrow's Kin.The premise is pretty straightforward, where some aliens land on Earth and, once communication is established, we learn about where they are from and why they are here. The results of all this information inform a story that becomes less ab Tomorrow's Kin is a solid, interesting first contact novel. As someone who generally really responds well to any first contact novel, to enjoy one a little more than the rest is not a bad thing in the least, and I would say that's where I place Tomorrow's Kin.The premise is pretty straightforward, where some aliens land on Earth and, once communication is established, we learn about where they are from and why they are here. The results of all this information inform a story that becomes less about "what is it like knowing there's other life" and more about coping with the aftermath, both of meeting an alien race (and all that implies in this book's conceit) and of what the aliens came to accomplish. It's a unique and different take on the genre, and one I appreciated greatly.The big downfall of this book? Approximately the first third is basically (if not entirely) a reprint of the novella that preceded it, Yesterday's Kin. I somewhat wish someone had warned me of this ahead of time, as I worked to complete the novella before diving into this only to find that I was basically rereading the novella immediately afterwards. If there were additions, they did not make a measurable impact on the overall story for me, so use this as a takeaway if you're already familiar with the novella. For new readers, though, you can dive right in without issue. Absolutely a great read and solid take on the subgenre.
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  • Cy
    July 31, 2017
    not really what I thought it would be, but pretty interesting. very science-heavy. mostly about genetics, but also focuses on the idea of aliens being an invasive species, and how first contact would affect the economy, ecology, etc. I wasn't a huge fan of most of the characters, but the plotline was interesting, with some big unexpected twists to keep you reading.there were some uh, problematic characterizations. evan, a gay character, is a snarky, British stereotype. marianne mentions that he' not really what I thought it would be, but pretty interesting. very science-heavy. mostly about genetics, but also focuses on the idea of aliens being an invasive species, and how first contact would affect the economy, ecology, etc. I wasn't a huge fan of most of the characters, but the plotline was interesting, with some big unexpected twists to keep you reading.there were some uh, problematic characterizations. evan, a gay character, is a snarky, British stereotype. marianne mentions that he's gay (in her narration, not dialogue) almost every time they interact, which is weird. another character, sissy, is a black woman, and has some elements of the mammy archetype. (view spoiler)[to make things worse, both evan and sissy end up dying. uh. hmm. ok. (hide spoiler)]anyway. I read 2/3 of this book in one day, so there must have been something good about it that I kept reading for. but I don't think I'll read the next one.
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  • Glennis
    July 16, 2017
    This novella is set in three parts. First dealing with the aliens and finding out who they are. Marianne is the scientist that has found DNA evidence of a newly discovered mitochondrial DNA sequence that the aliens are very interested in. The second part deals with a few years after the aliens left with a few people with this DNA sequence and in exchange they have given us technology that we can build our own ships and come to them. The Earth is also dealing with worldwide disaster from passing This novella is set in three parts. First dealing with the aliens and finding out who they are. Marianne is the scientist that has found DNA evidence of a newly discovered mitochondrial DNA sequence that the aliens are very interested in. The second part deals with a few years after the aliens left with a few people with this DNA sequence and in exchange they have given us technology that we can build our own ships and come to them. The Earth is also dealing with worldwide disaster from passing through a giant spoor cloud that the aliens warned us but didn’t have the technology to stop it. The third section deals with the spaceships almost being completed. As much as you would think this is a tech story this is more of a people story and how persons and people as a whole react to all of these changes. A good solid read and I’ll be interested to see where it goes next.Digital review copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    July 19, 2017
    If you read the novella Yesterday's Kin you can skip the first part of this book and start on part two. Part one is the same and the addition starts with part two. I have to say I was very disappointed. I loved the novella but it just went downhill after the aliens left. I kept reading and hoping that I would like the addition but I just found it boring. Spaceships were being built and there was danger but the plot just did not make that much sense. I will continue with book two and hope it is b If you read the novella Yesterday's Kin you can skip the first part of this book and start on part two. Part one is the same and the addition starts with part two. I have to say I was very disappointed. I loved the novella but it just went downhill after the aliens left. I kept reading and hoping that I would like the addition but I just found it boring. Spaceships were being built and there was danger but the plot just did not make that much sense. I will continue with book two and hope it is better.
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  • Michele L. Bolton
    July 25, 2017
    Pretty good and fairly hard SF, but a bit heavy-handed on the global warming/climate change, "we're destroying the environment" shtick.
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