Kings of Broken Things
With characters depicted in precise detail and wide panorama—a kept-woman’s parlor, a contentious interracial baseball game on the Fourth of July, and the tragic true events of the Omaha Race Riot of 1919—Kings of Broken Things reveals the folly of human nature in an era of astonishing ambition.During the waning days of World War I, three lost souls find themselves adrift in Omaha, Nebraska, at a time of unprecedented nationalism, xenophobia, and political corruption. Adolescent European refugee Karel Miihlstein’s life is transformed after neighborhood boys discover his prodigious natural talent for baseball. Jake Strauss, a young man with a violent past and desperate for a second chance, is drawn into a criminal underworld. Evie Chambers, a kept woman, is trying to make ends meet and looking every which way to escape her cheerless existence.As wounded soldiers return from the front and black migrant workers move north in search of economic opportunity, the immigrant wards of Omaha become a tinderbox of racial resentment stoked by unscrupulous politicians. Punctuated by an unspeakable act of mob violence, the fates of Karel, Jake, and Evie will become inexorably entangled with the schemes of a ruthless political boss whose will to power knows no bounds.Written in the tradition of Don DeLillo and Colum McCann, with a great debt to Ralph Ellison, Theodore Wheeler’s debut novel Kings of Broken Things is a panoramic view of a city on the brink of implosion during the course of this summer of strife.

Kings of Broken Things Details

TitleKings of Broken Things
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Sports and Games, Sports, Literature, 20th Century, Mystery, Novels, Adult Fiction, Social Issues, Literary Fiction

Kings of Broken Things Review

  • Devin Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    I love when a story grabs me right away and drops me into a world I had no idea I would be fascinated by. This book pulled me into Omaha, Nebraska at the end of WWI, and showed the immense racial, national, and economic strife bubbling up to the surface. The cast of characters are rich, diverse, and compelling. I’ve happened across some of Wheeler’s short stories in literary journals in the past and made a note to watch out for whatever big book he surly had in him, and this does not disappoint. I love when a story grabs me right away and drops me into a world I had no idea I would be fascinated by. This book pulled me into Omaha, Nebraska at the end of WWI, and showed the immense racial, national, and economic strife bubbling up to the surface. The cast of characters are rich, diverse, and compelling. I’ve happened across some of Wheeler’s short stories in literary journals in the past and made a note to watch out for whatever big book he surly had in him, and this does not disappoint. The amazing amount of research that went into the writing of this book was seamlessly incorporated and created a lively, sort of dangerous world on the cusp of great cultural change. The lead up to and execution of the Omaha race riot he portrays feels like one of those prophesized historical moments that if forgotten, repeats itself, and reading this novel against the backdrop of our current news cycles was a profound experience. I loved the writing, the story, and the great reminder that historical fiction is very much a mirror to our daily lives. A great read!
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  • Sam Slaughter
    January 1, 1970
    A thoroughly engaging work of historical fiction that manages to blend race relations, baseball, and the corruption that made early 1900s Omaha run. Wheeler's prose is fluid and carries you along from beginning to end.
  • Becky Ford
    January 1, 1970
    This books reminds me of Rilla Askew's 'Fire in Beulah.' The historical events in both books are eerily similar and the fictional stories surrounding these events are heartbreaking. This is an excellent novel, and I look forward to reading more from Wheeler!
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    Towards the end of World War I, three people with different backgrounds find themselves in Omaha, Nebraska. Karel Miihlstein is a young boy who came to the United States from Austria with his father and three sisters. He soon discovers a love for the game of baseball and some talent to go along with it. Jake Strauss flees to Omaha after a violent incident and starts working for some shady people. Evie Chambers loves to sew and make clothes but that's not exactly how she makes a living. This is a Towards the end of World War I, three people with different backgrounds find themselves in Omaha, Nebraska. Karel Miihlstein is a young boy who came to the United States from Austria with his father and three sisters. He soon discovers a love for the game of baseball and some talent to go along with it. Jake Strauss flees to Omaha after a violent incident and starts working for some shady people. Evie Chambers loves to sew and make clothes but that's not exactly how she makes a living. This is a fictional account of what led up to the tragic real-life events of the Omaha Race Riot of 1919.There's a lot going on in this book which is its strength and weakness. There's racial tension, corruption, prostitution, the refugee experience, etc.. All of these are important subjects that give you an idea of what was going on in Omaha during this time period. Learning about what was happening prior to the race riot really adds to the book's dramatic and horrifying conclusion. As I mentioned before there is almost too much going on in the book. I think if the book would have been slightly condensed it would have flowed better. I wouldn't eliminate any of the main topics of the book but I think the plot with Karel's ill sister didn't add that much to the story. While the book might seem to drag in parts, I do recommend reading it because it provides a good history lesson. The ending is so tension filled and dramatic that it's horrifying that this was based on a true life event.
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  • Karna Converse
    January 1, 1970
    Insightful look into life in immigrant neighborhoods of Omaha, Nebraska in the years building up to the Omaha Race Riot of 1919.Wheeler introduces readers to three main characters who are searching to build new lives during a time of political corruption, growing nationalism, and contentious race relations. Their lives intersect in Omaha's River Ward during a time that soldiers are returning home from war and America is welcoming refugees to her land. The result is both heartwarming and frighten Insightful look into life in immigrant neighborhoods of Omaha, Nebraska in the years building up to the Omaha Race Riot of 1919.Wheeler introduces readers to three main characters who are searching to build new lives during a time of political corruption, growing nationalism, and contentious race relations. Their lives intersect in Omaha's River Ward during a time that soldiers are returning home from war and America is welcoming refugees to her land. The result is both heartwarming and frightening.My grandparents grew up in Nebraska and were teenagers during this time period. I didn't have the chance to talk to them about the Omaha Race Riots but can see bits and pieces of their attitudes toward Europe, war, immigrants, and race in Wheeler's characters. Lyrical descriptions, historic detail, and believable characters make this a book I'll continue to recommend to family and friends.
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  • Zara
    January 1, 1970
    American history is not my strong point ...But I must say I thought this book was about race relations with respect to a baseball game. And maybe I missed it but, there were some characters made more important than necessary, so I often found myself trying to remember who that person was. All in all a decent story ... perhaps trying to squeeze too many elements into it - a perception born of ignorance of the real history I suppose.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I chose this as my Amazon prime book of the month because it sounded so interesting. The premise is great, however the book left a lot to be desired for me. So many of the characters fell flat for me. I feel as though the author created some amazing characters, but just was not able to turn them into dynamic and unique characters. The author's halting sentences disrupted the flow of the book for me, it was difficult to read at times due to odd sentence structure. I feel as though this book was t I chose this as my Amazon prime book of the month because it sounded so interesting. The premise is great, however the book left a lot to be desired for me. So many of the characters fell flat for me. I feel as though the author created some amazing characters, but just was not able to turn them into dynamic and unique characters. The author's halting sentences disrupted the flow of the book for me, it was difficult to read at times due to odd sentence structure. I feel as though this book was trying to be a classic like A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, highlighting a specific time and place in history with engaging characters and historical significance. Sadly, it was a struggle to read at times.
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  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    Most native Omahans with anything like an inkling of interest in history are aware of the race riots and subsequent lynching of Willie Brown and almost the mayor too. Maybe they've had a teach talk about in class, perused the scant wikipedia article or simply saw that plaque somewhere in South Omaha. Theodore Wheeler takes this horrific scar on the famously, milquetoast cow-town's path and builds up to it like a long slow simmer, examine the social attitudes, political jockeying and ethnic shoul Most native Omahans with anything like an inkling of interest in history are aware of the race riots and subsequent lynching of Willie Brown and almost the mayor too. Maybe they've had a teach talk about in class, perused the scant wikipedia article or simply saw that plaque somewhere in South Omaha. Theodore Wheeler takes this horrific scar on the famously, milquetoast cow-town's path and builds up to it like a long slow simmer, examine the social attitudes, political jockeying and ethnic shoulder rubbing that lead to the horrific riot that came at the end of World War I.Following three main characters, a young boy immigrant, a black woman and a farm boy new in town, Wheeler is able to unwrap all the parts of early 20th century life in the sticky city tied to the riverbank. Saloons, baseball fields and worksites come alive in his vivid descriptions, giving you a sense of the sweltering and sweaty life of urban early 20th Century America.As with any book that has multiple main characters, you'll find yourself tiring of some and wanting to get back to others. I personally found the story of the young Austrian immigrant Karl and his struggle to define himself against his family of sisters and the rugged ideas of masculinity hoisted on him by his new home, to be the most engaging but there was never any point in the book where I wasn't engaged.And all the different arching stories tie together in the climactic historic event which is portrayed with all the chaotic grandeur it deserves. The finale is a feat in and of itself but the rest of the book leading up to it is still a fiercely well-written piece of Americana that is perfect for fans of E.L. Doctorow and other authors who have used the past to tell us truths about ourselves.
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  • Elizabeth C
    January 1, 1970
    Gripping Historical ReadThis book is extremely well written, blending historical facts with storytelling that brings history alive and makes the reader feel as though they are witnessing the events firsthand.
  • Jim Sitrick
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding on Omaha Superb book that captures the underlying themes and tensions in Omaha in the early 20th century with a mix of fictional and real historical characters.
  • David Haws
    January 1, 1970
    Retributive Justice (an eye for an eye) is an illusion because the two things considered in exchange are never equal and seldom equivalent; what we have is anger and the desire for revenge. This should be the take-away from the Omaha Race Riot, but this isn’t what we get in the novel. The prose is spotty (sometimes good, occasionally difficult to parse, but mostly adequate) as might be expected from someone who makes their living by writing quickly. Some of the characters don’t work (particularl Retributive Justice (an eye for an eye) is an illusion because the two things considered in exchange are never equal and seldom equivalent; what we have is anger and the desire for revenge. This should be the take-away from the Omaha Race Riot, but this isn’t what we get in the novel. The prose is spotty (sometimes good, occasionally difficult to parse, but mostly adequate) as might be expected from someone who makes their living by writing quickly. Some of the characters don’t work (particularly Evie) because they’re being forced to support a pre-determined storyline. The burnt-cork-serial-rapes don’t work as a viable explanation, but the worst thing for me are small historical flubs.The actual riot was obviously well-researched, but a historical novel needs to be meticulously accurate—anachronism and other lapses can make the whole work questionable. For example, it’s fairly well-known that the CSA didn’t award metals to its soldiers (the closest equivalent, being mentioned I a dispatch) but we see characters examining Confederate medals. There are also several mentions of a “Model A” or a “Model A Ford” nearly a decade before they were introduced. In fairness, Ford did produce something they called a “Model A” between 1903 and 1904 (not nearly so ubiquitous at the later Model A) but most people in a modern audience are going to be unaware of the ambiguation. In a historical novel, where the reader is being required to swallow actual inventions, it’s important not to strain credibility by bringing factual accounts into question.I’d also like to comment on an author giving a reader’s evaluation of his own work, only slightly more obnoxious than the collusion of getting friends to inflate your composite numbers. To give a rating unsupported by a written statement (like a review) seems equivalent to speaking into a hurricane. Reviewing your own work (especially if you give yourself a “5”) is farting in the wind.
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  • Wanda DeHaven Pyle
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes being King is more important than fixing what’s broken.Theodore Wheeler paints a vivid picture of political corruption and social injustice in Omaha during and after World War I. It is a timely reflection of much of the current political and social division in today's society, proving that mankind doesn't really learn much from past indiscretions. The language is poetic and yet down-to-earth which suits the characters and the scenes he describes. Although the point of view switches thr Sometimes being King is more important than fixing what’s broken.Theodore Wheeler paints a vivid picture of political corruption and social injustice in Omaha during and after World War I. It is a timely reflection of much of the current political and social division in today's society, proving that mankind doesn't really learn much from past indiscretions. The language is poetic and yet down-to-earth which suits the characters and the scenes he describes. Although the point of view switches throughout the novel, there is enough introspection for the reader to become vested in each of the major characters and to care about what happens to them. The only disappointment was the character of Will Brown. The story builds up to his demise, but we never really get to know the character. Therefore, it is difficult to fully sympathize with his situation. I cared more about what happened to Josh, the negro ballplayer, than Will Brown.This is a novel based on indepth character development rather than plot. It is written with the eye of a reporter rather than a story teller. For that reason, the ending may be disappointing to some readers. It brings the characters full circle, but does not provide a resolution. This gives the work an existential quality. Life goes on. Nothing much changes.I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys good literary fiction. It is thought-provoking and complex. It requires the reader to engage and reflect on the events depicted. Not a quick read, but certainly worth the effort.
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  • Christine Lowe
    January 1, 1970
    Great Book!What an unexpectedly interesting book. This isn't what I usually choose to read but I wanted to try something different this month. This was a great choice for my Kindle First Pick for July. Although the book is a work of fiction, in the Author's Note Wheeler writes ".... the scenes depicted are a fictional approximation of what life was like in Omaha during the last years of World War 1 and how the Omaha Race Root of 1919 was experienced." I must confess I didn't even know that Omaha Great Book!What an unexpectedly interesting book. This isn't what I usually choose to read but I wanted to try something different this month. This was a great choice for my Kindle First Pick for July. Although the book is a work of fiction, in the Author's Note Wheeler writes ".... the scenes depicted are a fictional approximation of what life was like in Omaha during the last years of World War 1 and how the Omaha Race Root of 1919 was experienced." I must confess I didn't even know that Omaha had race riots.This is an amazing accomplishment for the first time novelist, Theodore Wheeler. I was transported to a time and place that was unknown to me. The characters are extremely well written. There wasn't a false word that made me think this isn't real. This is a time of immigration, political corruption, open prostitution and the doughboys coming home from the war to find their jobs are no longer available. Many of them are amputees and many more suffering from PTSD, better known then as "shell shock" and are unable to work. The Spanish Influenza was spreading eventually killing fifty million people. One comment regarding the sickness: "A plague like this never would have spread around the globe if it weren't for the war."This was not a quick easy read. I took my time with it because it gave me a lot to think about. This is a sweeping epic of a book, well written with lots of background regarding the time and place. If you're willing to take the time to read it, this is a great book. This is my idea of a serious book that deserves five stars.
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  • sjnash
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading and I love history so I should love historical novels. Unfortunately, many are not well written. Characters not fully developed, historical flavor adding little to what I am already aware of. This book does a great job of painting a complete picture of the main characters. Where they came from, their fears and desires, all of which helped in understanding the decisions they made both good and bad.All had a common struggle - trying to find their place in a brutal, hostile world. Ou I love reading and I love history so I should love historical novels. Unfortunately, many are not well written. Characters not fully developed, historical flavor adding little to what I am already aware of. This book does a great job of painting a complete picture of the main characters. Where they came from, their fears and desires, all of which helped in understanding the decisions they made both good and bad.All had a common struggle - trying to find their place in a brutal, hostile world. Outsiders trying to be accepted in the face of a fear of those who were different – immigrants, negroes and women who wanted to something more than just a housewife.The author paints a detailed, picture of Omaha during this troubled, turbulent times all leading up to an explosion of the underlying racial and nationalistic tensions that culminated in the tragic riot and hanging of an innocent black man. The people’s fears stoked and manipulated by a desperate, power hungry head of the political machine.Nobody is all good or all bad. But, instead, a complicated mix of both. Victims, survivors and casualties the times they lived in.My only real complaint (a minor one at that) is that based on the description of the book, I was under the impression that the story would be centered around baseball. While one of the main characters, Karel, an immigrant child fell in love with baseball and his talent for the game became his way out of Omaha, it was a minor part of the overall story.
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  • Joan Buell
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating historical novelThe author brings to life the city of Omaha in 1918, through the skillful portrayal of its three main characters: a young boy recently immigrated from Germany, a light-skinned African-American woman stuck in prostitution and passing as white, and a young Nebraskan man over his head in the corrupt political machine. Woven through the story are glimpses of socialism, anarchists, baseball players, a child in poor health,and Prohibition. There is romance, and troubled fam Fascinating historical novelThe author brings to life the city of Omaha in 1918, through the skillful portrayal of its three main characters: a young boy recently immigrated from Germany, a light-skinned African-American woman stuck in prostitution and passing as white, and a young Nebraskan man over his head in the corrupt political machine. Woven through the story are glimpses of socialism, anarchists, baseball players, a child in poor health,and Prohibition. There is romance, and troubled family dynamics, gentleness, and violence. I had never heard that there was a race riot in Omaha in 1919, and even though very familiar with our country's troubled racial past, I was blown away by the intensity of the hatred and evil that existed at this time and in this place. It was a good reminder of how easy it is to be influenced by rumor, false reports, and the actions of the majority, and to be propelled into a situation we would never enter as an individual.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This book takes a look at Omaha, Nebraska, as it existed a century ago. World War I is raging in Europe, the Spanish Flu decimates the population, and a few average folks are just trying to get by. There's baseball, racial tensions, and crooked machine politics. It's a very interesting world to inhabit, one which is both unpleasant and fascinating. The book also covers a critical event, the Omaha Race Riot of 1919, that I wasn't very familiar with. Obviously, this isn't a historical textbook, bu This book takes a look at Omaha, Nebraska, as it existed a century ago. World War I is raging in Europe, the Spanish Flu decimates the population, and a few average folks are just trying to get by. There's baseball, racial tensions, and crooked machine politics. It's a very interesting world to inhabit, one which is both unpleasant and fascinating. The book also covers a critical event, the Omaha Race Riot of 1919, that I wasn't very familiar with. Obviously, this isn't a historical textbook, but Wheeler did try to hew to the actual events in general.The book ends a bit suddenly, though there is an epilogue which wraps up a few lose ends. Ultimately, though, life just goes on as it always does. There may not be one simple message to this work, but having a look at the characters and the world of the early 1900s is worth it. The book is engrossing, and provides a window into a tumultuous era of American history, one that hasn't been heavily analyzed.
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  • Orvil Hazelton
    January 1, 1970
    America's Growing Pains This superb historical novel portrays the human condition as Americans come of age during the industrial revolution. This occurs in Omaha, portraying the people and their lives in the years leading up to the terrible rioting there in in 1919. These are real people and those that could have been real as they meet the pressing issues of immigration, poverty, WWII and racial in-justice. We see how people responded yesteryear to issues that are just as pressing in today's so America's Growing Pains This superb historical novel portrays the human condition as Americans come of age during the industrial revolution. This occurs in Omaha, portraying the people and their lives in the years leading up to the terrible rioting there in in 1919. These are real people and those that could have been real as they meet the pressing issues of immigration, poverty, WWII and racial in-justice. We see how people responded yesteryear to issues that are just as pressing in today's society. This novel portraying history makes me think of how I may better the human condition as an American right now. This is the author's first novel and I expect great things from him in the future.
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  • James C. Graves
    January 1, 1970
    Wheeler is a terrific writer. His character development, his understanding of human frailty instills compassion for people who do bad things. He understands how people are manipulated by evil forces that exist in every society and culture. His attention to historical detail, the research that went into the writing is brilliant! I purchased this book on a whim, as I do with many of the ebooks I buy, and continually read many books simultaneously. I read this book straight through .com the beginni Wheeler is a terrific writer. His character development, his understanding of human frailty instills compassion for people who do bad things. He understands how people are manipulated by evil forces that exist in every society and culture. His attention to historical detail, the research that went into the writing is brilliant! I purchased this book on a whim, as I do with many of the ebooks I buy, and continually read many books simultaneously. I read this book straight through .com the beginning. Read it! You'll be surprised how good it is. I have found the history of this era, early 1900's, during WW1 and the world after the war, to have many similarities to the early 21st century.
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  • William E. Hammond
    January 1, 1970
    Great period piece on age of big city bosses.I grew up in 40s and 1950s in Missouri hearing of Pendergast in KC. Family spoke in whispers of a cousin who married one of his men. This books evokes the period. After receiving a PhD, taught French history for 40 years. Retired to Omaha. This book offered a chance to think of family history and also a chance to view an adored home. The description of places like the old waterfront and tailgates was good. Character description particularly if Jake an Great period piece on age of big city bosses.I grew up in 40s and 1950s in Missouri hearing of Pendergast in KC. Family spoke in whispers of a cousin who married one of his men. This books evokes the period. After receiving a PhD, taught French history for 40 years. Retired to Omaha. This book offered a chance to think of family history and also a chance to view an adored home. The description of places like the old waterfront and tailgates was good. Character description particularly if Jake and Evie were excellent. The interplay with baseball also caught my fancy. Karels love for baseball rang so true as I have followed my grandsons enthusiasm. Have me a picture of a !omg home era in Omaha. Baseball !view on with the big game now the College World Series.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    This could have been a very good book, given the characters, difficult times, troublesome interactions, etc. However, I found it to be primarily an account of actions, of who did what when, and maybe some explanation of motive that was more superficial than specific to the person who was acting. The lack of insight into the thoughts and reasoning of most of the characters made the book more superficial than it might have been. The opportunity for te author to explore his characters mre deeply wa This could have been a very good book, given the characters, difficult times, troublesome interactions, etc. However, I found it to be primarily an account of actions, of who did what when, and maybe some explanation of motive that was more superficial than specific to the person who was acting. The lack of insight into the thoughts and reasoning of most of the characters made the book more superficial than it might have been. The opportunity for te author to explore his characters mre deeply was there. (Compare Dennis Lehane's The Given Day). Even with the few main characters, it was still more an account of action without much additional insight.
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  • Jan Lehman
    January 1, 1970
    Such an interesting storyI gave this book 4 stars because of the ending ,which wasn't quite enough to satisfy the reader. Very interesting story and compelling. I really enjoyed reading it,even though it certainly did not paint the best picture of our ancestors. However it did show the resilience and fortitude that built this country . One hundred years later we american New and old still struggle with same issues. Really good first book, looking forward to reading more from this author.
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  • Betty Richard
    January 1, 1970
    Kings of Broken ThingsI liked the book, first I have read of WWI era . It is hard to decipher why people tract in such an awful way. You mostly read of such plight in the South. I can are why Omaha would want to forget this ever happened. The story was very sad seems family did not patent the way we to today. Lots of qurstions that you only wrote about the plight of poor People.
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  • Laura Wagner de Romero
    January 1, 1970
    Quite remarkableI found the King of Broken Things to be a very satisfying and interesting book. Very authentic in the way it captured the voices of many different protagonists. Full of historic details yet never pedantic. Very thought provoking about perennial issues like race relations, discrimination by new and less recent immigrants against others and what is political integrity. I was thrilled by this first novel and look forward to new works by Theodore Wheeler.
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  • Joe
    January 1, 1970
    This is historical fiction which follows several interesting characters through the 1919 riots in Omaha and the events leading up to it. I happened to select it from a few different books offered to me for free from Amazon Prime. I generally have low expectations for things I get for free. But this was historical fiction, set in Omaha, and I liked the title. What a pleasant surprise for me to accidentally fall into such a well written and fascinating book.
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  • Molly Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    Surprisingly interestingAs a free book, I didn't expect much. But the story held my attention. I thought it was well written, despite the ugliness of the circumstances. It is historical fiction, and it explores an incident not familiar to me, never having lived in Omaha. I think it describes attitudes that were present in the whole country at the time. Fast paced and easy to read.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    Great historical novel set right after WWI in Omaha, NE. What is significant in this time period is the hanging of a black man in front of the court house. Events leading up to this terrible act tell us about the ethnic make-up of the city, their jobs, homes and politics. Party boss, Tom Dennison was in power and most of the problems were attributed to him. It is not a boring read. Very interesting!
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  • Mike Collins
    January 1, 1970
    The Author's Got Some Imagination!This book, at times gripping, often led my concentration astray with overly detailed descriptions of settings and actions. I mean, that's usually good with a novel and why we read books in the first place, but I thought there were too many times where it went too far. That said, I did appreciate the depiction of Omaha in 1919 and at book's end, I did have renewed interest in further research on Omaha's race riots of this period.
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  • Vicky K.
    January 1, 1970
    Who said it was better then?A very eye opening view of an era some declare a "simpler, better time". Take off the rose colored glasses and see a truer version of those times: a difficult, hard life that for many was a life and death struggle every day, where " civilized" living was for those who could afford to lay for it at any cost. Not so much has changed!
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    What is a kingWe are all serving someone. We all are out to please someone or just survive for a little while. To what levels we climb, or what level will we stoop to get our own piece or what is ours?This historical novel brings to light of what wrongs were so easy to spot when looked at from the outside looking in. Is it close to what us taking place in our lives today?
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  • Curtis & CeCe Barlow
    January 1, 1970
    Not so greatI have great respect for anyone who is a writer, especially those who write in a historical context. This book gave us a Cliff Notes version of a look at the Omaha riot. The characters were shallowly developed and the story line was not very deep, either. It was more like a short story than a novel.
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