Love & Other Carnivorous Plants
Freshman year at Harvard was the most anticlimactic year of Danny's life. She's failing pre-med and drifting apart from her best friend. One by one, Danny is losing all the underpinnings of her identity. When she finds herself attracted to an older, edgy girl who she met in rehab for an eating disorder, she finally feels like she might be finding a new sense of self. But when tragedy strikes, her self-destructive tendencies come back to haunt her as she struggles to discover who that self really is.

Love & Other Carnivorous Plants Details

TitleLove & Other Carnivorous Plants
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 15th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreLgbt, Young Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

Love & Other Carnivorous Plants Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 25%. I see no point in reading this book. I already know that it’s not going to teach me something meaningful and I feel as though there is a part missing—the part before and where she is recovering. All we get is the *after* part, making it seem as though the story begun a long time ago and what we get is what the heroine cares to share. Speaking of the heroine, she is the non-stop sarcastic type. At first it was okay, and I even enjoyed her crazy thoughts or somewhat clever remarks, but DNF at 25%. I see no point in reading this book. I already know that it’s not going to teach me something meaningful and I feel as though there is a part missing—the part before and where she is recovering. All we get is the *after* part, making it seem as though the story begun a long time ago and what we get is what the heroine cares to share. Speaking of the heroine, she is the non-stop sarcastic type. At first it was okay, and I even enjoyed her crazy thoughts or somewhat clever remarks, but at some point I just realized that most of what the characters say makes no sense or is really plain weird—not the sort of things real teenagers would think or say to each other.Examples include:I can’t breathe—not because there’s not enough air in the room, but because I’m suddenly allergic to it.I’m sorry, what? Allergic?One. Two. Three. I exhale slowly. By the time I’m twenty-five they’ll have found a way to sell my own breath back to me.Who’s ‘‘they’’?? Also, didn’t you just say that you were allergic to it, so why do you want it back? You are not consistent, girl. ‘‘Come over tonight. I’ll make you dinner.’’I hesitate. But I can tell I’ve already begun to fall.‘‘Okay.’’ I hope my voice sounds more confident than I feel. ‘‘But I’m a vegan today.’’She gets up and pats my shoulder. ‘‘I was a vegan once too, until a piece of bacon saved my life.’’Right… Because vegans necessarily have health problems since they don’t eat meat. Ok thanks for explaining. Sike. I know many vegans, and I have to say that I, myself, eat meat maybe once a month and I’m feeling fine thank you very much. I don’t like characters that are trying to convert others to what they think is best.I was excited about the LGBT theme in the beginning but spoiler alert: it’s not romantic. She meets a girl, loses the girl, then sees her again—and once more we realize that we’ve missed a huge chunk of the story. I like to get the *before*, not simply the *after*. Is that so unreasonable?Anyway, moving on. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • ellie
    January 1, 1970
    This book features a character so self-destructive that she might as well come with a Danger! Object may combust under extreme stress sticker. Or in other words, it was everything about myself I try to not dwell on. Danny? She dwells. She makes stupid decisions, thinks the worst things, and is an all-around mess. But I think that’s what made her so real.Mental illness makes you think - no, dwell - on the worst parts of yourself. And Danny reflects that. This is a book about a girl who tries to e This book features a character so self-destructive that she might as well come with a Danger! Object may combust under extreme stress sticker. Or in other words, it was everything about myself I try to not dwell on. Danny? She dwells. She makes stupid decisions, thinks the worst things, and is an all-around mess. But I think that’s what made her so real.Mental illness makes you think - no, dwell - on the worst parts of yourself. And Danny reflects that. This is a book about a girl who tries to escape her thoughts but ultimately realizes that she can’t. She’s stuck with who she is, and it’s not exactly what she wants, but it’s all she’s got. And the thing is: she still has the opportunity to choose to be the best version of herself.The last line, paraphrased, is something like “they don’t know where they’re going, but they end up where they needed to be anyway.” And I think that’s a perfect summary of the book."Danny? Look at me.”“Yes?”She pauses and I try to hold her gaze. The problem is that looking at her is like looking into a megawatt light-bulb; I’m just so human and she’s just so bright.I don’t really know what else to say about it, because it’s definitely an experience to read this book. But the love subplot was SO GOOD. I swear, it was the first time I read a sex scene and didn’t feel the urge to cringe on some level. It was exactly what it needed it to be. Both girls were clinging to each other at one point in the book, and they realize later that they had to let go. And then they found their ways back to each other, because like all things managing to stay afloat in the Great Ocean of Life, you can’t stray very far from the ones who you need to survive.It’s only after, when your sweat is drying and you’re regaining the feeling in your toes that you realize you’re some sort of miracle. What else do you call going to pieces without falling apart?I’ve seen reviews calling the love interest a “manic pixie dream girl” and I see where they’re coming from, but I don’t think it’s true at all. I think she was someone struggling, and she found solace in Danny. She found someone who understands, on some level, the need to escape from her struggles. They talk about running away to Paris because that’s what teenagers do.When I have a fight with my parents, I tell my bestfriend that I’d give anything to be in Paris with her, having the freedom to choose what I wanted in life. I don’t think it makes someone a manic dream girl if all they want is the freedom to get away from the things that are suffocating them for a while. Because, god, we all deserve that feeling, you know?”I think, besides my gravestone reading ‘tried and failed to lose the same twenty-five pounds,’ my greatest fear is that when we die there’s nothing, not even a hole to suggest we might have once conducted a mediocre life here. Isn’t that why people try to write epic novels and compose famous symphonies and build monuments and put human debris on the moon? To avoid oblivion?”Wow, so I thought I didn’t have a lot to say about this book but I apparently do. So here, have these words. I’m going to type up the quotes that I loved a lot - and treasure the poem this book gave me forever. I don’t know how I went this long without knowing about “Wild Geese,” because it is everything.So thank you, Florence Gonsalves, for that.'"Look, I’m sorry that I’m not as strong-stomached as the rest of you. I’m sorry the second that bad shit happens I lock myself in my inner closet and don’t come out. I need to do this my way, and I’m sorry if that offends you, and even though I could probably try a little harder to do things your way, I like who I am and I like doing things my way.”It’s probably a stretch to say I like who I am, but maybe if I say it enough times, it’ll be true.’
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  • alice (arctic books)
    January 1, 1970
    is.CaptureI’m so surprised with this novel! I picked LOVE & OTHER CARNIVOROUS PLANTS up on a whim, and I just finished reading this in one sitting. I’m definitely adding Florence Gonsalves to my auto-buy authors.This novel follows Danny, who is a college student at Harvard but is struggling with an eating disorder, body image, her sexuality, and the recent death of a close friend. The plot was very fast-paced and I whipped through the pages faster than I thought was possible. Danny was so au is.CaptureI’m so surprised with this novel! I picked LOVE & OTHER CARNIVOROUS PLANTS up on a whim, and I just finished reading this in one sitting. I’m definitely adding Florence Gonsalves to my auto-buy authors.This novel follows Danny, who is a college student at Harvard but is struggling with an eating disorder, body image, her sexuality, and the recent death of a close friend. The plot was very fast-paced and I whipped through the pages faster than I thought was possible. Danny was so authentic and genuine, and I loved reading through her perspective.While this novel covers several different themes and topics, such as bisexuality, grief, alcohol abuse, LBGTQ+, grief, and mental health, Gonsalves does a wonderful job depicting the ways that one can find help and support. I feel like the author was fantastic in being honest and authentic with these various issues in modern society.Overall, I really enjoyed this one. I highly, highly recommend this book for all readers. Danny will resonate with readers everywhere in the way she depicts common issues that many people go through. Be sure to pick this one as soon as you can!Thank you to the Novl for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Corey
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 STARSOh gosh, I have such mixed feelings about this one. On the one hand, there's a lot to like. The prose is beautiful, which is especially refreshing in a YA novel, as I often find that the writing in the genre ditches quality sentences in favor of what a lot of authors must see as "voice." Gonsalves sees no need to compromise though; the prose is crystalline and occasionally lyrical, and yet LOVE's protagonist, Danny, sounds exactly like a nineteen-year old. Her voice is pitch-perfect, an 3.5 STARSOh gosh, I have such mixed feelings about this one. On the one hand, there's a lot to like. The prose is beautiful, which is especially refreshing in a YA novel, as I often find that the writing in the genre ditches quality sentences in favor of what a lot of authors must see as "voice." Gonsalves sees no need to compromise though; the prose is crystalline and occasionally lyrical, and yet LOVE's protagonist, Danny, sounds exactly like a nineteen-year old. Her voice is pitch-perfect, and she wonderfully demonstrates that weird combination of self-confidence, utter insecurity, idealism, cynicism, and irony native to late-adolescence. I also found the ending to be enormously satisfying. Without giving too much away, Gonsalves has so much to say, and makes sure that the urgency behind the book doesn't get lost in the romance that drives the plot. Suffice it to say that this is a coming-of-age novel in the truest sense of the phrase.But also, there's plenty that didn't work here. Whereas Danny's internal voice was dead-on accurate, the dialogue of just about all the characters here fell flat for me, which is frustrating because Gonsalves clearly has such a keen ear. The people in the book, when they speak to each other, just don't sound very much like people. And then there's Danny's love interest, Bugg, who felt a little under-developed to me and too much like the notorious "manic pixie dream girl." And while the book is carefully written--there's seemingly no throwaway image, no scene without some kind of attempt at urgency and poignancy--a few of the metaphors feel super heavy-handed. About halfway through the book, there's a literal bird trapped in a glass box.So it's a promising debut, but by no means flawless. I'll be intrigued to see what Gonsalves does next.
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Think American Panda meets Paperweight , which sounds really great except it felt like I'd already read this, because I wouldn't say it does a ton on top of those things. (Especially because although she's in college, she's never in that setting for any portion of the book, so it differentiates itself even less from Paperweight .) From a queer perspective, I really liked this; I know readers will dislike Danny's refusal to self-label, and the author knows it, too, because there's an author's Think American Panda meets Paperweight , which sounds really great except it felt like I'd already read this, because I wouldn't say it does a ton on top of those things. (Especially because although she's in college, she's never in that setting for any portion of the book, so it differentiates itself even less from Paperweight .) From a queer perspective, I really liked this; I know readers will dislike Danny's refusal to self-label, and the author knows it, too, because there's an author's note that pre-emptively addresses what a lot of criticism of this book and its main character is gonna be. (More on that below.) But over and over again it's made clear that Danny's still questioning things, that maybe she's somewhere on the ace spectrum (no such words are used, but she says things repeatedly about not being sexual, and it's never clear to the reader or to her whether it's Bugg or girls that are the exception), and I thought it was nicely done and very believable for Danny. On the subject of that author's note...I did not love its inclusion. She's not wrong that people are going to hate the lack of labeling, or the main character eschewing medication for mental illness (content warning there - this is another of those "I hate the way it makes me feel" books that just leaves it at that), but those are the choices you make as an author and leave to the reader to react to. This feels like a "Can't criticize me because I explained!" move, vs. an author's note like in If I Was Your GirlIf I Was Your Girl, where the author's note genuinely felt in service of readers. And that's an easy way out, which, honestly, I felt like the book's ending was too. Not an easy way out for Danny, per se, but an easy way out for the author. It's hard to discuss without spoiling it, but it felt to me as if it was telling me Danny had had some sort of character arc that I just wasn't seeing. None of this is to say I think it's a bad book, and I'm sure there are readers who will find themselves in it; I just don't know that they'll feel good about that by the time they finish.Cw: Heavy eating disorder themes and depictions, mentions of suicide, above note re: mental illness meds
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  • Kaylie
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved Danny’s voice in this book. She made me laugh and feel her acute contradictions and the itchy realness of her suffering. She was a wonderful narrator of the show-don’t-tell variety, who fucks up and fucks up and lies to herself and lies to you and makes hyperbolic jokes all along the way.The story itself I didn’t love. Halfway through it takes a sudden sharp turn, and from there wavers along, no longer certain of its destination or goals. It doesn’t stick the landing because it ca I really loved Danny’s voice in this book. She made me laugh and feel her acute contradictions and the itchy realness of her suffering. She was a wonderful narrator of the show-don’t-tell variety, who fucks up and fucks up and lies to herself and lies to you and makes hyperbolic jokes all along the way.The story itself I didn’t love. Halfway through it takes a sudden sharp turn, and from there wavers along, no longer certain of its destination or goals. It doesn’t stick the landing because it can’t decide which way it’s even jumping. Eating disorders, recovery, queer discovery, girls helping girls, challenging your own expectations to live a genuine life, creative writing: all topics I love. I would recommend this book for stellar YA writing and voices, but not so much the actual plot.
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  • Paige Green
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this book through KidLitExchange and Little, Brown Books! Thanks! All opinions are my own.Rating: 3/5Genre: YA ContemporaryRecommended Age: 16+ (sex, lgbt+, eating disorders, fixation, self-destructive tendencies. Please be aware there are some possible triggers for those who have eating disorders).Pages: 352Author WebsiteAmazon LinkSynopsis: Freshman year at Harvard was the most anticlimactic year of Danny's life. She's failing pre-med and drifting apart from her best fri Disclaimer: I received this book through KidLitExchange and Little, Brown Books! Thanks! All opinions are my own.Rating: 3/5Genre: YA ContemporaryRecommended Age: 16+ (sex, lgbt+, eating disorders, fixation, self-destructive tendencies. Please be aware there are some possible triggers for those who have eating disorders).Pages: 352Author WebsiteAmazon LinkSynopsis: Freshman year at Harvard was the most anticlimactic year of Danny's life. She's failing pre-med and drifting apart from her best friend. One by one, Danny is losing all the underpinnings of her identity. When she finds herself attracted to an older, edgy girl who she met in rehab for an eating disorder, she finally feels like she might be finding a new sense of self. But when tragedy strikes, her self-destructive tendencies come back to haunt her as she struggles to discover who that self really is.I have to say that this book, while sad and destructive, is so beautiful at the same time. The book revolves around a girl who’s fighting an eating disorder on top of all these other stresses in life. And when she meets someone she cares for? She has a whole new set of issues to conquer. The book did marvelous in pacing and the book’s writing was also well done. I personally liked the sarcastic humor in the main character. However, I feel like we were missing the story. The main character really proved herself to be an unreliable narrator and it felt like she was cherry picking what she would tell us. It doesn’t feel like a complete story to me and that’s just weird in a book.Verdict: Beautiful, but not quite whole. Is this a larger meaning about life in general?
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  • Sue (BeautyBookCorner)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars. Okay, it's been a few days since I finished the book. I still stand by my 3.5 rating. The book starts off funny. I loved the sarcasm and dark humor of the main character. Danny is a highly-focused overachiever. She was valedictorian at her high school and is going to Harvard as a premed major. She and her best friend have always had a plan. They would go to college together, get married, become widows, and live the rest of their lives out together. Unfortunately, that plan becomes mes 3.5 Stars. Okay, it's been a few days since I finished the book. I still stand by my 3.5 rating. The book starts off funny. I loved the sarcasm and dark humor of the main character. Danny is a highly-focused overachiever. She was valedictorian at her high school and is going to Harvard as a premed major. She and her best friend have always had a plan. They would go to college together, get married, become widows, and live the rest of their lives out together. Unfortunately, that plan becomes messy as Danny ends up at Harvard. I think we’ve all had friendships that we thought would last forever (especially after high school or a big life event). Unfortunately, friendships often change or end altogether. Danny is going through that stage in her life with her best friend Sarah.What we know right from the beginning is that Danny has developed an eating disorder as a way to cope with her OCD and anxiety. She feels constantly pressured by her environment. She ends up at a treatment center. The story begins as she is leaving the center. It's summer vacation and she is now back in her hometown. Her friendship with Sarah is a little rocky, and she is well aware of her mental issues. I felt Danny was likable and relatable. I loved her matter-of-fact way of thinking. That being said she is a very flawed character. She is flippant in the way she thinks of her compulsion and mental health. She sees those around her dealing with substance abuse and while she is concerned, she does not do anything to help them. Somehow though, this didn't bother me as a reader. I felt for her because she was battling her own demons while trying to keep her mental breakdown from the previous semester a secret. Something tragic happens midway and the book turns a dark corner. Things get darker and angrier as she begins to relapse hard. Her dark humor is still there to bring some lightness to the overall angsty mood, but it's definitely angrier and more desperate. You can feel her grasping for any semblance of control while giving into her compulsions.While I liked the mental health and friendship aspects, I wish this book had more diversity. There is almost no people of color. Everyone seemed to be rich, young, white girls who lived in mansions. It gave the book an early 2000s The O.C. soap opera-ish vibe.Overall, I enjoyed the book and it got me out of a big reading slump. I think for those looking to read an book about mental health issues that isn't too intense, this is a great option. I ended the book rooting for Danny and sincerely hoping she gets better. One thing I'd like to mention is that Danny begins to form a romance with a girl she meets at treatment. However, this is not a coming-out story. I believe the girl was the first person she was really attracted to and with everything that she’s going through, trying to label herself as any specific sexual orientation is not a priority. The focus is much more her journey to a healthy mental state. Trigger warnings for eating disorders, alcohol abuse, depression, attempted suicide, grief, compulsion disorders, and anxiety.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, so basically I got this book for free. When one gets a book for free that is nothing to sniff at. I almost drop kicked a few children to get my hands on it. Am I happy about that decision? I dunno. Would I do it again? Probably. Anyway, without further adieu, let's get to what I kind of liked about this book and what I absolutely hated.Pros because I like to start positive: has a very real portrayal of eating disorders and mental illness, also the main character is in a same-sex relationsh Okay, so basically I got this book for free. When one gets a book for free that is nothing to sniff at. I almost drop kicked a few children to get my hands on it. Am I happy about that decision? I dunno. Would I do it again? Probably. Anyway, without further adieu, let's get to what I kind of liked about this book and what I absolutely hated.Pros because I like to start positive: has a very real portrayal of eating disorders and mental illness, also the main character is in a same-sex relationship so yay for diversity.Cons: Okay, let's be real, the main character's love interest is a manic pixie dream girl for pretty much the entire book. Also, just as a personal distaste, I did not like how much this book encouraged smoking. Call me a wet blanket or whatever but what teenager in this day and age thinks that breathing in toxic chemicals is cool? Actually, don't answer that. Guess I'm not cool enough to understand wanting lung cancer. Even with the teens doing such 'rad' things the writing was still kind of bland. Sorry.Overall, I like what the author was going for in terms of showing eating disorders such as bulimia, but this was just not the book for me maybe because I have not struggled with such issues and do not fully understand. If you or someone you know has dealt with eating disorders then maybe you will like this book more than I did and get a little more out of it. Which is great! We all have different opinions and world views. In conclusion, read this if you want and don't come for me if you liked it.
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  • Sierra
    January 1, 1970
    Ahhh, this book. It has my entire heart. The eating disorder rep is unparalleled.
  • Gabrielle
    January 1, 1970
    we're going to move on from this nightmare :)
  • Emmi Rose (emmirosereads)
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5* If you know me then you know contemporary novels aren't my most favorite thing. I've read many that I've enjoyed and want to read a few but there aren't something I actively reach for or that capture me as much as a good fantasy does. I know though that I would have loved this so much more if I was really into the contemporary genre and might have even given it five stars. With all that being said I still enjoyed this book for the most part. It's a book that deals with a lot of hard but im *3.5* If you know me then you know contemporary novels aren't my most favorite thing. I've read many that I've enjoyed and want to read a few but there aren't something I actively reach for or that capture me as much as a good fantasy does. I know though that I would have loved this so much more if I was really into the contemporary genre and might have even given it five stars. With all that being said I still enjoyed this book for the most part. It's a book that deals with a lot of hard but important topics so there were many parts that just made me feel, and broke my heart. But equally there were many parts that made me laugh and smile. I think what I enjoyed most about this were the characters. I really enjoyed Danny, and her love interest. I especially loved her love interest. I thought she was a really cool character and I love her and Danny together. Sarah was really annoying to me, but I think that was a little bit of the point. I also felt like I could relate to Danny in the way she dealt with a lot of things. Humor is kind of a huge coping mechanism for her and I find that's really true for myself. I did feel like there was a bit of insta love between the two characters, which we all know I don't like insta love but it wasn't overly annoying while I was reading.I also really enjoyed the writing and narrative of this book and thought it was really well done! I usually don't like first person POV but this really fit the story and was well done so I did like it. I will say that the ending of this book honestly felt a little random and abrupt, and I'm not sure everything felt wrapped up nicely, but overall this was still a good book.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    When I got this book from the library, I was prepared to fall head-over-heels in love with it. I had seen someone in the booktube community give it high praise, and I was sure this meant I was going to adore the book. Sadly, this was not the case. Although there was plenty about this book that I enjoyed, it wasn't the five star read I was anticipating. Summary: Danny's life is not going according to plan. She got accepted at Harvard as a pre-med student, but lost her second semester as she was f When I got this book from the library, I was prepared to fall head-over-heels in love with it. I had seen someone in the booktube community give it high praise, and I was sure this meant I was going to adore the book. Sadly, this was not the case. Although there was plenty about this book that I enjoyed, it wasn't the five star read I was anticipating. Summary: Danny's life is not going according to plan. She got accepted at Harvard as a pre-med student, but lost her second semester as she was forced to go to rehab for her newly-developed eating disorder. Fresh out of rehab, she returns home with plans to conceal where she's been and the feelings she's developing for a girl she met there. Hands down, my favorite thing about this book was the main character. Dandelion, or Danny for short, was such a relatable and approachable character. Her personality felt very realistic and hit close to home. A lot of times, I found her over-exaggerations and her expressions to be exactly the kind of thing I would think to myself or say. Her voice really came across through the writing, and I adored that. I always love having strong main characters because they make it easier to stick with the story even if the plot is not that interesting. Danny was far from a perfect character, but that's what made her so engaging. She said a lot of things that were horrible and hurtful, but they never came across as being right. It was clear she was being nasty and not exactly behaving as anyone ought to. She also exhibited a lot of self-sabotaging behavior that felt very accurate for someone suffering from an eating disorder (but that of course can be highly triggering). She was a pretty unreliable narrator, and I enjoyed sifting through the lies she told herself and her skewed way of portraying the people around her. All in all, she was a really well developed character. Unfortunately, now I have to talk about what I didn't enjoy about this novel. For starters, the first 40% of this book felt like a big pile of nothing had been dumped on me. Don't get me wrong, I'm good at sticking with books with no plot, but this was a little rough for me. During that first half of the book, Danny's struggles just came across as annoyances. The novel focused a lot on her fractured relationship with her best friend, Sara, and their problems were just so ridiculous to me. It felt like the stereotypical nerd and jock friends drifting apart after college because they have completely different views on life. This was not interesting to read about. The whole thing made me want to roll my eyes. Then we add in the fact that Sara came across as vapid and ignorant half of the time, and I couldn't see how they had been friends in the first place. To this we also have to factor in all that these two "best friends" were hiding from each other, and I just could not stand their drama. *SPOILER ALERT*As bad as it sounds, it was a relief when Sara died. This novel actual picked up speed and got more interesting when she was out of the picture. We got to watch as Danny and Bugg (the girl from rehab) got close and began to develop feelings for each other, and we got to see how Danny started spiraling out of control. This made the second half of the novel more engaging. I found it easier to keep turning the pages and keep reading about Danny's life falling apart.*SPOILERS OVER*Still. There were little things that bothered me about this book. For one, Danny makes some comments about how gross she finds blushing boys and their nervous tics when they're trying to flirt and I just ? ? ? I don't understand why she has to be so mean. I totally understand not being sexually attracted to guys (as someone who is asexual and biromantic I totally do get it), but I don't understand finding a certain gender repulsive simply because they're whatever gender they are. A lack of sexual attraction doesn't mean you have to find the other person gross. Then there's also the fact that Danny has a compulsive need to hide everything. She didn't want people to know she was in rehab, she didn't want people to know she was failing pre-med, she didn't want people to know she was into Bugg, she didn't want people to know she was falling into her unhealthy eating habits again. . . It was just too much. I'm not a fan of pathological liars. They just rub me the wrong way. The book had other little things that rubbed me the wrong way, but I don't want to dwell on them anymore. At the end of the day, I'm not a hundred percent sure about how I feel about this novel. It wasn't what I was expecting it to be, but it was not a terrible read. I guess I'm just happy I got this from the library and didn't purchase it myself (even though the hardback is gorgeous).
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  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    If you're looking for a sophisticated "adult" read, be prepared. This isn't for adults. The writing and the voice is way more amateur, but as a young adult novel this voice isn't meant for adults. This book in general isn't made for adults because while hitting on some serious adult themes, it's still made for teenagers.The only thing that really irked me about the book was the writing and the voice. However, I also took it with a grain of sand because Florence Gonsalves had a point in writing t If you're looking for a sophisticated "adult" read, be prepared. This isn't for adults. The writing and the voice is way more amateur, but as a young adult novel this voice isn't meant for adults. This book in general isn't made for adults because while hitting on some serious adult themes, it's still made for teenagers.The only thing that really irked me about the book was the writing and the voice. However, I also took it with a grain of sand because Florence Gonsalves had a point in writing this book with that particular voice.Aside from that, this was one randomly deep book. I picked this up because I wanted to read something light and simple. With the word "love" and a cute picture of a Venus Fly Trap, I thought that this would be one of those books. However, what I got was quite the opposite.The main character, Danny (short for Dandelion, which is kind of cringe-y for a name), is a young driven woman who during her first year at Harvard suffered from so much stress and disorder in her life that she was placed in a special hospital for her eating disorder. The story begins with her release from the hospital and trying to reconnect with her friends during summer break. She has until the end of the summer to decide if she wants to go back to Harvard after she's feeling better.During that time, she's faced with her best friend, Sarah, who has changed drastically within the ten months they were separated for school. She also meets a friend she met at the hospital, Bugg, who later becomes her love interest.I think that if you're a person who has ever had a best friend throughout your childhood and suddenly feel the strain of leaving each other for school, then this book will resonate with you. You may not be suffering from an eating disorder or even questioning your sexuality, but if you thought your friends would be friends forever and now it's not then this will ring in your ears like the bells of Notre Dame.I really liked this book because I resonated with that. Also, I resonated with some of the mental health issues Florence Gonsalves brings up. While I don't have an eating disorder, it's been considered that Bulimia and Anorexia both have underlying symptoms of OCD. The inability to control everything around them materializes in control over your own body and your food intake. It becomes an obsession with obsessive thoughts. For example, being able to look at a piece of food and not spiral out of control on what would happen if you ate that food. It was really difficult to read Danny's relationship with food. She's always wearing mu-mus because she's ashamed of the way her body looks. You find her vegan-ness to be more of a way to control her calorie intake than really anything to do with the harm of innocent creatures. You can see the symptoms in everything she says (lots of denial), her binge eating habits, her inability to tell the truth, etc.I think the only thing I felt was a little unbelievable was the levels of Hell she found herself in. Most people don't experience as much pain and loss as Danny does and somehow Danny gets through ALL of it before the end of the book. In the realism of the book, I had to ding it because it just doesn't seem feasible that she can have that much woe at one time. Perhaps it is and there are some people who experience everything at once. When it rains it pours.But in the end, I really liked this book and it kept my attention the entire time. Now I really need something a little bit more simple and fun.
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  • Rimpy Toor
    January 1, 1970
    First I'd like to mention that this novel contains mentions of suicide, eating disorders, and depression. Please understand this before deciding to pick this novel up. I wanted to love this novel so badly. I read the synopsis and automatically was intrigued with the plot and the characters we got to follow. Unfortunately, this novel fell a bit flat for me and I really couldn't get into it after the first 100 or so pages. After starting this novel I honestly thought it was going to be a new favou First I'd like to mention that this novel contains mentions of suicide, eating disorders, and depression. Please understand this before deciding to pick this novel up. I wanted to love this novel so badly. I read the synopsis and automatically was intrigued with the plot and the characters we got to follow. Unfortunately, this novel fell a bit flat for me and I really couldn't get into it after the first 100 or so pages. After starting this novel I honestly thought it was going to be a new favourite for me. The first 100 pages were so interesting and strong that I couldn't put the book down when I first picked it up, but despite that, I found myself becoming more and more disinterested as the book went on. CharactersThe characters in this novel all went through a lot. They had lives that were everything but easy, and they worked through these difficulties with a lot of strength, which was admirable. Unfortunately other than that strength, I didn't find much more about the characters to be entirely interesting. I found myself easily becoming annoyed with the characters and their choices and I found that I really didn't care what happened with them. I don't want to mention too much about the characters because I feel like that might be a bit spoiler-y but I do want to mention that these characters all definitely showed a lot of growth throughout the novel, but I found the growth to be expected and uninteresting. I feel horrible for saying that, but I honestly couldn't connect with these characters, so when anything of matter happened to them in this novel, I just didn't care. Writing + PlotThe writing in this novel was entirely ordinary. It wasn't horrible, but it also didn't amaze me. I found myself skimming a lot of the pages when I got near the end of the book, and I don't want to blame that on the writing as much as I want to blame it on the plot. I think the biggest issue I had with this novel was with how slow everything moved. Not only was the content of this novel something that had a slow burn, but on top of that, all the interesting plot points I actually liked, tended to just slow to a turtle like crawl and I found myself becoming disinteresting in them because I just didn't want to follow them that slowly. I don't know if it's because I'm someone who likes a novel that has a certain swiftness to it's plot, but I felt like this novel just dragged on for the second half of it.All in all, this novel is one that I know a lot of people are going to love. It has a great discussion in regards to mental health issues and also includes a F/F relationship that I personally loved. This novel was not for me at all, but I do think that if you're someone who likes a slow burn, this novel will probably be perfect for you!For all my Fantasy and Sci-Fi readers, maybe pass on this one, it's just not something that could compare to the swiftness of a high fantasy novel, so I don't know if it'd hit you like you'd want it to. 
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  • Teenreadsdotcom
    January 1, 1970
    Danny and Sara have been best friends forever. Along with being best friends forever comes The Plan. The Plan is to go to college together, fall in love with brothers and raise their kids together. But when Danny is accepted to Harvard, The Plan goes haywire. As she goes to her first year of college, her life catches up to her. After studying pre-med for part of a year, Danny winds up in treatment for an eating disorder where she meets an older girl who understands what it feels like to be compl Danny and Sara have been best friends forever. Along with being best friends forever comes The Plan. The Plan is to go to college together, fall in love with brothers and raise their kids together. But when Danny is accepted to Harvard, The Plan goes haywire. As she goes to her first year of college, her life catches up to her. After studying pre-med for part of a year, Danny winds up in treatment for an eating disorder where she meets an older girl who understands what it feels like to be completely messed up.After leaving treatment, Danny has the whole summer ahead of her. She’s back with Sara, but they can’t talk about anything real. When she finds the girl again it seems like things might be turning back to okay, but then tragedy strikes, and Danny starts to destroy herself all over again.Gonslaves uses a darkly hilarious voice to tell a story of life, loss and learning how to be okay with yourself. Even though she is living in a terrible time for herself, Danny narrates in a way that is funnier than anything I have read before --- and yet, her unfailing ability to make a joke, no matter how morbid, seemed to amplfy the severity of the situation she’s in. When the book started, her humor made me laugh out loud, but as it progressed, I began to realize what the humor meant for Danny. It got darker and darker as she fell further and further from herself.LOVE & OTHER CARNIVOROUS PLANTS tells a love story in a way unlike many I read. Instead of the typical vision of two people falling in love and fixing each other’s problems, solving everything with their emotions, Gonslaves tells something real. Danny and Bugg are very real people. They have problems, they break down, they need help. But with each other, they get a reprieve. They find someone who understands, without ruining the reality of their characters. Not only their relationship, but everything is real. From her parents, to college, to her treatment, to her friends, Danny’s life can be mirrored in our own. Even without an eating disorder, all of us understands what it feels like to not be good enough.The way that Danny deals with hardships and struggle is vividly real. Gonslaves manages to make something so horrible seem like it barely exists, and simultaneously that it is the end of the world. Coping with tragedy is something no one excels at, but she shows that the inability to manage it is okay. She shows that sometimes feeling nothing and everything all at once is the only way to handle it.As a hilarious, thoughtful novel of trying to figure out loving other people when it hurts, and loving yourself when it’s impossible, LOVE & OTHER CARNIVOROUS PLANTS flies by. It reminds us that even after all the ups and downs of life, we can always somehow find a way to keep on going.Reviewed by Caitlyn K., Teen Board Member
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  • Tonya Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    (This is my first in-depth book review. Bear with me.)There are a many reasons I didn’t like this book, a few being a) the instalove trope that way too many YA novels have, b) the underdeveloped characters, and c) the random, unnecessary lists in almost every chapter. Love & Other Carnivorous Plants sounds good until you actually dive into it. There’s little to no backstory about how Danny developed her eating disorder. It even goes as far as to say you developed it because her dad had an ea (This is my first in-depth book review. Bear with me.)There are a many reasons I didn’t like this book, a few being a) the instalove trope that way too many YA novels have, b) the underdeveloped characters, and c) the random, unnecessary lists in almost every chapter. Love & Other Carnivorous Plants sounds good until you actually dive into it. There’s little to no backstory about how Danny developed her eating disorder. It even goes as far as to say you developed it because her dad had an eating disorder 20+ years ago and it’s hereditary or something. Personally, I can’t speak to how well her character was portrayed. However, I don’t think you can just turn an eating disorder on and off depending on if you’re fighting with your girlfriend or not. Speaking of girlfriend (named Bugg btw). Her character isn’t introduced until 30 pages in at a random party even though she and Danny knew each other prior. It’s instalove the moment they’re alone and just really unrealistic. On to the Danny’s “best friend”, Sara. Her main characteristic is how heavily she drinks and how often yet she DIES FROM A HEREDITARY HEART CONDITION?? Wtf. If she had to die, something like alcohol poisoning or a drunk driving accident would have made so much more sense. Not some random newly discovered heart condition that was mentioned in as little as a paragraph. Not that Sara is gone, Danny is grieving and blah blah blah but you can’t really feel anything since their friendship wasn’t developed at all. Oh, they’ve been friends for 14 years? That’s nice, they act like strangers forced to get along. There’s more I could bitch about but I’ll skip to the end. Where Sara’s mom just hands the keys to her Range Rover over to Danny like it’s no big deal. Is that a rich people thing? “Here honey, I know you miss your best friend, here’s her 2 year old $86,000+ car to make you feel better.” Then to top that off, Danny turns around and sells it. She buys two tickets to Paris and convinces Bugg that neither of them need treatment for their issues (when they really do) and then decides on the way to the airport that she was wrong and they should go home and take a break from each other. I feel like at this point I’m so frustrated with this book that I’m not articulating myself the way I want to but I’ll stop here. This book was a waste of time. Maybe I would have liked it in middle school, but at 25, nope, no way.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    “She makes me feel like I’m not myself and more myself at the same time. She devours me in the best way and kills me in the worst way, but I’m happy to be killed by her because she’s heaven too.” I have mixed feelings about this book and writing this review is so difficult. It’s not that I didn’t like the book, because I did like it. I would even recommend reading it, because it talks about a lot of important things; such as eating disorders, mental illness, alcohol abuse, questioning your sexu “She makes me feel like I’m not myself and more myself at the same time. She devours me in the best way and kills me in the worst way, but I’m happy to be killed by her because she’s heaven too.” I have mixed feelings about this book and writing this review is so difficult. It’s not that I didn’t like the book, because I did like it. I would even recommend reading it, because it talks about a lot of important things; such as eating disorders, mental illness, alcohol abuse, questioning your sexuality, and a few other things as well. It’s jam packed with important things.As far as the characters go, I liked the characters. They were all going through something different. They were all struggling with something in their lives. Danny was really sarcastic a lot of the time and she tried to use humor to cope with some of the things happening in her life. I really liked her relationship with Bugg (the girl she meets in rehab). Bugg was a really cool character. Danny’s best friend, Sarah, I wasn’t the biggest fan of hers. But again, she was also going through a lot as well. I can see how it could change her.This tragic event that happens, I honestly wasn’t expecting it at all. I think that’s also where the book took a turn for me and where my mixed feelings about the story came into play. The pace of the book started to slow down. I was waiting for things to happen and they just weren’t happening or at a decent pace anymore. It was taking awhile to get there. I was also hoping for a little bit more with the ending and for certain things to go differently. Like the tragedy that happened, I personally felt like that didn’t need to happen. It’s hard to really talk about it without giving spoilers though.Overall, I liked Love and Other Carnivorous Plants. I thought it was a good story. It dealt with a lot of pretty important and tough things. For the most part they were handled pretty well. I liked Florence’s writing style and it was easy to read. I wish the pace didn’t change in the second half of the book, but it was still a good read. I would still recommend reading it.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I randomly picked this up at the library during LGBTQ Pride Month. I enjoyed it, but it just wasn't "my book." There were SO many adult issues going on in this book (thought it was published under Young Adult), and I just didn't relate to any of them. What I did enjoy was the authentic voice and experience that the characters had. They felt like real people, but dealing with things with which I couldn't empathize. In the author's note at the end, Gonsalves mentions that she wanted her protagonis I randomly picked this up at the library during LGBTQ Pride Month. I enjoyed it, but it just wasn't "my book." There were SO many adult issues going on in this book (thought it was published under Young Adult), and I just didn't relate to any of them. What I did enjoy was the authentic voice and experience that the characters had. They felt like real people, but dealing with things with which I couldn't empathize. In the author's note at the end, Gonsalves mentions that she wanted her protagonist, Danny, to be real and relatable, but not exemplary. I think that's the perfect way to describe this book. Danny (Dandelion) is 19 and a hot mess. She missed second semester of her freshman year at Harvard while receiving treatment for bulimia, and kept this a secret from everyone other than her parents, even her best friend Sara. When Danny returns home from treatment, she finds her friendship with Sara fraught with the tension of kept secrets (on both sides). She is riddled with indecision about whether or not she WANTS to return to Harvard or pursue pre-med. To top it off, Danny finds herself feeling romantic feelings for a girl she first met in treatment and is now encountering in "the real world." Danny was never interested in boys, which she largely put down to not finding the right one, but now she finds herself dealing with her sexual orientation and identity. So - eating disorders, expectations for education and life, parental relationships, friendships, grief, sexual identity, sexual orientation.... What a big, heavy list for one 19-year-old girl to deal with, and she doesn't always handle it well. This book will give you all the feels on all the emotions, but it might be too much for some readers. Definitely not appropriate for young readers, and exercise caution for high school age; lots of potential triggers for a variety of issues. However, I do think it is important to note that I KNOW teens deal with this issues, and it is important for readers to find themselves in literature, so just be aware that this book contains mature language, teen drinking and tobacco use, and sexual content in both hetero and homosexual situations.
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  • Melissa (YA Book Shelf)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a hard book for me to read. I mean I was blowing through it quite quickly in comparison to other books I’d read recently, but I had to put it down at one point because after tragedy strikes, some things that Danny had seemingly under control, get thrown out the window. It might go without saying that this book could be triggering to some with regard to eating disorder behaviours, binge drinking, and other risky behaviours. Sometimes though when you pick a book up again, the triggering n This was a hard book for me to read. I mean I was blowing through it quite quickly in comparison to other books I’d read recently, but I had to put it down at one point because after tragedy strikes, some things that Danny had seemingly under control, get thrown out the window. It might go without saying that this book could be triggering to some with regard to eating disorder behaviours, binge drinking, and other risky behaviours. Sometimes though when you pick a book up again, the triggering nature seems to be less of an issue, and that was definitely the case with me and this book. Once I picked it up again, I couldn’t put it down until I’d gotten to the very end. I really liked Danny’s relationship with Bugg at first. They had some things in common since they both met at St. John’s, which probably made their relationship challenging. But at the same time, I was so there for their budding love story. While I generally prefer to see a character label themselves and their sexuality when it comes to a bisexual character, it really felt like Danny was just coming to understand who she might be and how it might be different from the status quo, so the fact that she doesn’t come out, so much as shares that she likes Bugg with some of her other friends and eventually family members was really good, especially because it was explained as such. And because it seemed like this sexuality was respected by the people that mattered really and only treated like a science experiment by characters who were obviously shallow and ridiculous. That said, because I liked the idea of Danny and Bugg, I was torn by the ending. On the one hand, I appreciated that Florence Gonsalves didn’t wrap up their story in an unrealistic way given their circumstances. On the other, the romantic in me wanted to see them have a chance at something different.
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  • Ferris Knight
    January 1, 1970
    "We separate it, homogenize it, fix it to our liking, right? And the same goes for bulimia, anorexia, depression, anxiety, and what is it now? Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified? Fucking stop it. It's compulsion wearing different coloured riding hoods. It's dis-ease, disease, destruction. I wish you'd leave me alone in mine."Trigger warnings for eating disorders, drugs and griefIn some ways I felt like this book was exactly what I needed. A girl at a crossroads, and acknowledging that cros "We separate it, homogenize it, fix it to our liking, right? And the same goes for bulimia, anorexia, depression, anxiety, and what is it now? Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified? Fucking stop it. It's compulsion wearing different coloured riding hoods. It's dis-ease, disease, destruction. I wish you'd leave me alone in mine."Trigger warnings for eating disorders, drugs and griefIn some ways I felt like this book was exactly what I needed. A girl at a crossroads, and acknowledging that crossroads suck. She's recovering but not from her eating disorder. She is unsure of her sexuality. She doesn't do everything 'right', because none of us do, and holds views that not all would agree with (such as her resistance to medication, which the author does address and is also something that others hold as well, but isn't the 'right' thing to do these days). She lives between labels and between lives, segmenting herself and scared when different intersections of her lives come together. She is young and lost and ill and feeling alone in those feelings, the way you do with those feelings. But at the same time there was nothing that stood out. Nothing that made me fall in love with any of the characters or prose. Bugg was and wasn't a manic pixie dream girl, but is that how a first love feels in a sense? More in love with being in love than who you're in love with? Did we have a chance of seeing Bugg another way through Danny's eyes? I will say that Gonsalves took some turns I didn't see coming and did them well, and also talked about eating disorders well, but I still keep flicking between 3 and 4 stars.
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  • Kadie Hayward Mullins
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerTrigger Warning: This book explores a number of potentially triggering topics including addiction, suicide, eating disorders, and death. When you’re used to being the best, how do you cope with being perfectly mediocre? Danny finds she doesn’t cope particularly well during her freshman year at Harvard. The story picks up as she is leaving a rehabilitation facility for an eating disorder and explores the complicated dynamic of self-discovery, youthful promises, self-destru @kidlitexchange #partnerTrigger Warning: This book explores a number of potentially triggering topics including addiction, suicide, eating disorders, and death. When you’re used to being the best, how do you cope with being perfectly mediocre? Danny finds she doesn’t cope particularly well during her freshman year at Harvard. The story picks up as she is leaving a rehabilitation facility for an eating disorder and explores the complicated dynamic of self-discovery, youthful promises, self-destruction, and ‘forever’ friendships – however long forever may last. This book deals with some incredibly heavy topics that are exceptionally real and relatable but the plot itself is drastically less realistic. You know what? I don’t even care. The writing is a little contrived in some places, particularly Danny’s voice; the characters are oddly under-developed though feeling intensely personal but they’re still somehow enjoyable (except when they really, really aren’t but even then I still found myself oddly invested in them). Love & Other Carnivorous Plants is quippy and raw(ish).These topics should be heavy but I breezed through it. I don’t know if this speaks to the quality of the writing or a lack of depth in the exploration. I’m a sucker for coming-of-age stories, for exploring the crossroads of post-high school life. If I wasn’t, I’m not sure I would have enjoyed this book as much as I did. But the reality is I did enjoy it .Thank you for the @kidlitexchange network for providing a copy of this book for review. All opinions are my own. #kidlitexchange
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  • Emily Reed
    January 1, 1970
    Love and Other Carnivorous Plants is the story of a girl named Danny. Danny had a bright future ahead of her as she finished her first year at Harvard. She had it all, the dream school, a supportive family, and her best friend of fourteen years, Sara, waiting for her at home. At least that’s what she told people. Danny had a secret that threw off everything, or should I say threw up everything? Danny’s life soon became anything but bright. Danny was a very relatable person. If you’ve ever had an Love and Other Carnivorous Plants is the story of a girl named Danny. Danny had a bright future ahead of her as she finished her first year at Harvard. She had it all, the dream school, a supportive family, and her best friend of fourteen years, Sara, waiting for her at home. At least that’s what she told people. Danny had a secret that threw off everything, or should I say threw up everything? Danny’s life soon became anything but bright. Danny was a very relatable person. If you’ve ever had anything go wrong in your life it happened to Danny at some point throughout this story. It was easy to connect with the characters to a point. This book was able to highlight many of today’s struggles, but not in a helpful or productive manner. It wasn’t hard to relate to things Danny struggled with but it seemed to glorify addiction, which I found to be counterproductive. Love and Other Carnivorous Plants was based off an amazing idea however, I feel it wasn’t written to its fullest potential. The book itself wasn’t written as well as it could’ve been considering all the plot twists and depth of content. What it lacked in grammatical pizzazz it should have been able to make up for in plot however, it could not redeem itself due to its weak and inconclusive ending. I would not recommend this book especially not to anyone struggling with an eating disorder, depression, or addiction.
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  • Melissa Orth
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book as an ARC at the Public Libraries Conference after asking the publisher for titles featuring gay characters with sex positive messages. This delivers on that part. I’d give this teen drama 3.5 Stars. On one hand, Gonsalves perfectly captured the inner turmoil that the main character would feel after leaving a prestigious college and having spent a stint in a rehabilitation center for eating disorders. Danny’s anxiety over whether to return to a pre-med program she doesn’t enjoy a I got this book as an ARC at the Public Libraries Conference after asking the publisher for titles featuring gay characters with sex positive messages. This delivers on that part. I’d give this teen drama 3.5 Stars. On one hand, Gonsalves perfectly captured the inner turmoil that the main character would feel after leaving a prestigious college and having spent a stint in a rehabilitation center for eating disorders. Danny’s anxiety over whether to return to a pre-med program she doesn’t enjoy and the fear of disappointing her parents was so real it was palpable. But her relationship with this girl named Bugg seemed too flighty: this girl waltzes into her life, teaches her to embrace her body and supplies her with booze and kisses. This relationship needed more grounding and exploration but, like Danny herself, she didn’t want to examine it more closely when there was so much else to deal with: parental pressure, identity crisis, eating and drinking disorders, anxiety, death of a friend, and more. There’s a lot to deal with, and , like Danny, I felt overwhelmed by it all. But I look forward to reading more by this author.
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  • Vanessa Jimenez
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t even know how I feel about this novel. I thought it was going to be completely different but it turned out to be something else. Danny is someone I somewhat know, because I was Danny. In some ways, I am still her. I struggle with food and body image and depression. and any little thing in my life that I can’t control, triggers it all. I like the fact that there is a WLW romance in this novel, but it wasn’t enough to make me love the relationship. I don’t like that Danny came to depend I don’t even know how I feel about this novel. I thought it was going to be completely different but it turned out to be something else. Danny is someone I somewhat know, because I was Danny. In some ways, I am still her. I struggle with food and body image and depression. and any little thing in my life that I can’t control, triggers it all. I like the fact that there is a WLW romance in this novel, but it wasn’t enough to make me love the relationship. I don’t like that Danny came to depend on Bugg to “be better”, because relationships don’t save you. I feel like everything was just “too easy” in Danny’s life in a sense. like it was just too convenient whenever she did something. I don’t know. I was just craving so much more from this story and it didn’t fill me up. I wasn’t expecting to learn anything with this novel because not all stories need to teach me things. but I was just wanting so much more than what I received. ⭐️3 STARS⭐️
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  • Tiah
    January 1, 1970
    So I have been pushing off this review because didn't know how to fully and accurately put all my thoughts and feelings into a full review. I'm going to make this review short because that's all this book needs. THIS BOOK. This book was not only amazing, but a new favourite, it was so real and raw.I felt this book. I felt all the emotions. I felt all the feelings. These characters felt when people around them were struggling. This book gave me a character to relate to and another character, her So I have been pushing off this review because didn't know how to fully and accurately put all my thoughts and feelings into a full review. I'm going to make this review short because that's all this book needs. THIS BOOK. This book was not only amazing, but a new favourite, it was so real and raw.I felt this book. I felt all the emotions. I felt all the feelings. These characters felt when people around them were struggling. This book gave me a character to relate to and another character, her girlfriend, that I see everyday in the real world. I got hard truths and a scary eating disorder and addictions.This book was not an easy read. But this book was so important and gave me a character to relate to unlike any other book I've read.Trigger Warnings: drug and alcohol abuse/addiction and eating disorder not otherwise specified and bulimia.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars Love and Other Carnivorous Plants is a humorous and witty yet deep reaching novel that focuses on mental illness, addiction, and sexual identity. Danny is an extremely flawed and often delusional character, but as someone who has personal experience with both addiction and mental illness, I really connected with her perspective on both. Having a mental illness or loving someone with an addiction can be very confusing to navigate and can leave you in up and down States of mind. It can a 4.5 stars Love and Other Carnivorous Plants is a humorous and witty yet deep reaching novel that focuses on mental illness, addiction, and sexual identity. Danny is an extremely flawed and often delusional character, but as someone who has personal experience with both addiction and mental illness, I really connected with her perspective on both. Having a mental illness or loving someone with an addiction can be very confusing to navigate and can leave you in up and down States of mind. It can also be so easy to fall back into the same routine, even when you think you aren’t. I think Danny’s flippancy about her addictions and illness and the author’s more light tone will throw some people off; but I couldn’t put this book down. It’s refreshing to see a not too funereal take on these topics while still showing their complex emotional and life altering affects.
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  • Adam Howell
    January 1, 1970
    Love & Other Carnivorous Plants is a story about a girl named Danny who has come home from Havard after dropping out of the semester due to a eating disorder that she was sent to by her parent. She doesn't want to tell her best friend Sara so she keeps it a secret. While in the treatment facility she meets this girl a few years older than her named Bugg who she begins dating and realizes she likes girls but wants to keep it on the Down Low. Theres a lot more to the story but i wont ruin it. Love & Other Carnivorous Plants is a story about a girl named Danny who has come home from Havard after dropping out of the semester due to a eating disorder that she was sent to by her parent. She doesn't want to tell her best friend Sara so she keeps it a secret. While in the treatment facility she meets this girl a few years older than her named Bugg who she begins dating and realizes she likes girls but wants to keep it on the Down Low. Theres a lot more to the story but i wont ruin it. Mainly this book deals with topics of mental disorders and the aftermath. It has a humorous element from Danny as she always seems to be sarcastic but i think she does this as a way to cope with her emotions.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book that's going to stick with me for a while. Danny is a 19-year-old pre-med student who may or may not return to Harvard after a disastrous first year that ended at St. Johns, a rehab treatment facility where she attempted to recover from her eating disorder--and where she met free-spirited Bugg, who introduces her to poetry and creative writing. The plot is not tight, but the voice is strong, and I liked that it was a little messy and inconclusive. I also liked that Danny gets her This is a book that's going to stick with me for a while. Danny is a 19-year-old pre-med student who may or may not return to Harvard after a disastrous first year that ended at St. Johns, a rehab treatment facility where she attempted to recover from her eating disorder--and where she met free-spirited Bugg, who introduces her to poetry and creative writing. The plot is not tight, but the voice is strong, and I liked that it was a little messy and inconclusive. I also liked that Danny gets her in own way, and the book ends without her resolving all of her problems. This isn't a book for everyone, but I think a lot of readers will relate to these feelings and experiences.
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  • Andrijana
    January 1, 1970
    I am so thrilled to see a novel representing eating disorders not credited enough in YA fiction (EDNOS, orthorexia, BED, bulimia). Although many may not appreciate the way Danny's character dealt with her problems and her poor coping mechanisms, I thought this made her evermore a relatable, real character and rung true with the reality of life. She's not perfect, she may not share the most admirable personal views, and that's what makes her so raw, honest, and a continuous work-in-progress like I am so thrilled to see a novel representing eating disorders not credited enough in YA fiction (EDNOS, orthorexia, BED, bulimia). Although many may not appreciate the way Danny's character dealt with her problems and her poor coping mechanisms, I thought this made her evermore a relatable, real character and rung true with the reality of life. She's not perfect, she may not share the most admirable personal views, and that's what makes her so raw, honest, and a continuous work-in-progress like the rest of us. So happy I got my hands on this book as early as I did!
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