G-Man (Bob Lee Swagger, #10)
From bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Stephen Hunter, the latest episode in his Swagger familiy saga replete with Hunter's wicked suspense, vivid gun fights, and historical truths. 1934 was a pivotal year in the ongoing battle between the FBI and America's most famous outlaws--it was a year of giant personalities and huge shoot-outs, and it marked the deaths of John Dillinger, Bonnie and Clyde, and Pretty Boy Floyd, among others. But that year, FBI agent Sam Cowley's priority was to nab the most dangerous gangster this country has ever produced, a man so violent he scared Al Capone and was booted from the Chicago mob--Baby Face Nelson. To stop him, Cowley recruited the most talented gunman of the time--Charles Swagger.When Bob Lee Swagger, now in Idaho, finally sells the land he owned in Arkansas, the developers begin to tear down the old homestead and uncover a steel case hidden in the foundation. The case contains a batch of 1934 memorabilia--a much-corroded FBI badge, a .45 automatic preserved in cosmoline, a gun clip, and a cryptic diagram, all belonging to Charles Swagger. Bob never knew his grandfather Charles, who died before he was he born, and his father Earl refuses to mention him. Fascinated by this new information, Bob is driven to find out what happened to his grandfather, and why his own father, whom he worshipped, never spoke of Charles. But as he investigates further, Bob learns that someone is following him, someone with his own obsession of finding out what Charles Swagger left behind."

G-Man (Bob Lee Swagger, #10) Details

TitleG-Man (Bob Lee Swagger, #10)
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherBlue Rider Press
ISBN0399574603
ISBN-139780399574603
Number of pages368 pages
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction, Suspense, Action

G-Man (Bob Lee Swagger, #10) Review

  • Karen
    February 21, 2017
    G-MAN by Stephen HunterI loved this story and Bobby Swagger's enthusiasm for learning all about his Grandfather's past. This was a very interesting part of history. My own father lived through the Great Depression. We have all heard of Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd. The investigative arm of the law was The United States Division of Investigation. The new name of this law enforcement is the FBI. The FBI considered Pretty Boy Floyd to be dangerous and they thought Charle G-MAN by Stephen HunterI loved this story and Bobby Swagger's enthusiasm for learning all about his Grandfather's past. This was a very interesting part of history. My own father lived through the Great Depression. We have all heard of Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd. The investigative arm of the law was The United States Division of Investigation. The new name of this law enforcement is the FBI. The FBI considered Pretty Boy Floyd to be dangerous and they thought Charles Swagger to be a top notch gunman.Baby Face Nelson was thought to be extremely dangerous. Considering that Charles Swagger was thought to be very talented using a gun he was recruited. When Charles Swagger's family home was sold a treasure trove of memorabilia was discovered. Found were items such as a badge, a preserved pistol. Bobby Swagger begins his search for everything he can learn about his Grandfather's past.This was engaging reading and I absolutely loved it. Highly Recommended for everybody that enjoys history and is nostalgic about learning about their own family roots. Thank you to Net Galley, Stephen Hunter and the Publisher for providing me with my digital copy in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Debbie Krenzer
    April 12, 2017
    A very interesting story whereby the author has invented a character that was secretly used by the Justice Department (FBI) who actually was the one that killed all the infamous bank robbers of the day. Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger, etc. The old homestead of this man is being demolished and during that process a tin box is found. Inside the box is a government issue weapon, an FBI badge and another item no one is exactly sure what it is. The grandson of this man has never heard of his grandf A very interesting story whereby the author has invented a character that was secretly used by the Justice Department (FBI) who actually was the one that killed all the infamous bank robbers of the day. Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger, etc. The old homestead of this man is being demolished and during that process a tin box is found. Inside the box is a government issue weapon, an FBI badge and another item no one is exactly sure what it is. The grandson of this man has never heard of his grandfather being in the FBI and he wonders what these items are all about. This is the premise of the book.I thought it was a very interesting take and enjoyed reading the book very much. I would like to thank Penguin Group, Blue Rider Press and Net Galley for allowing me the privilege to read and review this interesting and entertaining story.
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  • Jacqui
    March 10, 2017
    Stephen Hunter's latest in the Bob Lee Swagger series, G-Man (Penguin Random House 2017) unexpectedly starts in the 1930's with the death of Bonnie and Clyde at the hands of Bob Lee's grandfather, Charlie Swagger. Charlie is a small-town sheriff with a big reputation for heroism, bravery, and doing the impossible. Quickly, Hunter moves readers to the present day as the Bob Lee we know is settling into retirement and all the boredom and aches that includes:"Nothing [to do] meant a three-hour ride Stephen Hunter's latest in the Bob Lee Swagger series, G-Man (Penguin Random House 2017) unexpectedly starts in the 1930's with the death of Bonnie and Clyde at the hands of Bob Lee's grandfather, Charlie Swagger. Charlie is a small-town sheriff with a big reputation for heroism, bravery, and doing the impossible. Quickly, Hunter moves readers to the present day as the Bob Lee we know is settling into retirement and all the boredom and aches that includes:"Nothing [to do] meant a three-hour ride on land that was all his, another hour of horse care, then three or four hours in his shop working on this or that rifle project (this year: .375 Chey Tac at over thirty-five hundred yards, and, damn, if he didn’t own over thirty-five hundred yards’ worth of Idaho on which to find out what it could do). Then on to the email thing, for conversations with old friends the world over, including reporters and retired sergeants, Russian gangsters, Japanese Self-Defense Force NCOs, FBI..."When a Colt 45 and a thousand dollar bill are found under the foundation of the old family house (which is being bulldozed), Bob Lee in his boredom decides to try to unravel the mystery of why they were hidden there. The search takes him back to the '30s when Dillinger and Baby Face and that entire crew were robbing banks with impunity. In an effort to stop them, the FBI hired gunslingers--like Charlie Swagger--to engage the bandits in gunfights at their skill level.As with all Bob Lee Swagger novels, this one is imbued with a deep love of firearms:"His fingers knew it immediately. As a design, the thing was one of many masterpieces that had tumbled from the brain of John M. Browning before World War I, so perfect in conception and execution, such a chord of power and grace and genius of operation that even now, more than a century after its year of adaptation in 1911, it was standard sidearm of many of the world’s elite units."One thing I always like about Bob Swagger novels is Bob's sage wisdom. He's able to break life and lessons down to their essentials so anyone can get it. Here's his take on handsome men:"As an analyst of human strength and weakness, he knew that the handsome ones could be tricky. It’s something an infantry officer and a cop pick up on fast. They get used to being the center of attention. They expect things to go their way. They don’t like to take orders, especially from the many less attractive than they are. They move at their own pace. Sometimes they seem not to hear what is said to them. They are very stubborn, not out of commitment to a certain line of logic but to the idea that their beauty confers on them certain divine rights. The moving pictures and the fancy magazines have only exacerbated these problems, for on-screen the handsomest man is always the best, the champion of the show, the lure of all the gals, the hero of all the guys, and your real-life pretty fellow too often comes to assume the same of himself, except he has yet to do a thing to earn that reputation. So problems—little, knotty difficulties, little spats, grudges, pissing contests, garbled communications, slights too slight to mention but annoying to suffer, a sense of self-importance—all make every transaction with the handsome man more bother than it should be."Then there are some of the words he uses. Not a lot but I'm pretty well read and it stopped me when people were 'palavering' (chatting).Overall a good read though a bit more wandering than his usual--which explains the 4/5 stars. I was expecting his traditional action-packed story and got one that is more contemplative, personal, and less intense than what I expected.
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  • Cheryl
    April 14, 2017
    "Hillbilly justice"I can remember picking up Stephen Hunter's first book in the Bob Lee Swagger at the library by chance not long after it was first published in 1993. I don't know why I picked it up that day. It wasn't any of the genres of books I normally read. And I didn't read it right away. I kept putting it off. So one afternoon I opened to the first page of POINT OF IMPACT and started reading and I was enthralled. I couldn't tear myself away from the story that Hunter so masterfully told. "Hillbilly justice"I can remember picking up Stephen Hunter's first book in the Bob Lee Swagger at the library by chance not long after it was first published in 1993. I don't know why I picked it up that day. It wasn't any of the genres of books I normally read. And I didn't read it right away. I kept putting it off. So one afternoon I opened to the first page of POINT OF IMPACT and started reading and I was enthralled. I couldn't tear myself away from the story that Hunter so masterfully told. And that book still holds a place in the top 10 Books I've ever read.After that I really enjoyed the next few books in the Bob Lee and Earl Swagger series. But then the books started to lose focus and lose my interest. I did enjoy SNIPER'S HONOR and I enjoyed this offering, I think because Bob Lee had a bigger part in this story.Bob Lee is 71 years young in this story. He's sold off some family property in Arkansas and as the house on the property is being torn down, a metal box is discovered and the contents send Bob Lee and his friend, Nick Memphis, on a fact finding mission trying to learn more about Bob Lee's grandfather, Charles Swagger.The story alternates between 1934, Charles, and a number of well-known gangsters of that time, and current day with Bob Lee and Nick.I enjoyed the story especially the gangster history. I probably liked his last story more - SNIPER'S HONOR - but this one was still well worth reading.I received this book from Blue Rider Press through Net Galley in exchange for my unbiased review.
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  • Ronald Koltnow
    April 19, 2017
    We have read of Stephen Hunter's military sniper hero Bob Lee Swagger. Then in HOT SPRINGS we met Bob's father Earl. Now, in G-MAN, the patriarch, Charles Swagger, Bob's grandfather, appears, and his story is a corker. More taciturn and conflicted than the other Swagger men, Charles is just as deadly with a gun. It is hard to tell when Hunter is telling us a story or discussing historical events; it's seamless that way, as is the case with James Ellroy. Apparently, the FBI did hire ex-lawmen and We have read of Stephen Hunter's military sniper hero Bob Lee Swagger. Then in HOT SPRINGS we met Bob's father Earl. Now, in G-MAN, the patriarch, Charles Swagger, Bob's grandfather, appears, and his story is a corker. More taciturn and conflicted than the other Swagger men, Charles is just as deadly with a gun. It is hard to tell when Hunter is telling us a story or discussing historical events; it's seamless that way, as is the case with James Ellroy. Apparently, the FBI did hire ex-lawmen and gunmen to assist the early Bureau, then called The Division, in hunting down gangsters. Charles, it seems, was there to gun down Bonnie and Clyde, he shot Dillinger, and eventually met up with Pretty Boy Floyd. He was a one-man vengeance squad. As is generally the case with Hunter, there is a lot of talk about the hardware, the guns used in the crime. Here, most of us will be introduced to the Colt Monitor, complete with resonator. It is almost a character in the novel. Hunter's novels are always a bit like mythology, slightly unbelievable but thoroughly enchanting. He grounds his stories in realistic depictions and historical verities but it is still a tall tale. Hunter does not give himself much room for a sequel, at least not as exciting a sequel, but there is much more to Charles Swagger than we are given here.
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  • Kori Morris
    February 11, 2017
    While this won't be my favorite book of the year, I enjoyed it and would easily recommend to anyone who enjoys the occassional historical fiction, gunslinger fiction. I have lived in Texas for the past 8 years, and in San Antonio 4 of those 8, and the scenes in San Antonio make me fondly recall a city that I otherwise find not to be for me."Gang slang" or mob talk is a often hack way to set the stage, and written like a middle aged author imagines a police serial come to life - in this book the While this won't be my favorite book of the year, I enjoyed it and would easily recommend to anyone who enjoys the occassional historical fiction, gunslinger fiction. I have lived in Texas for the past 8 years, and in San Antonio 4 of those 8, and the scenes in San Antonio make me fondly recall a city that I otherwise find not to be for me."Gang slang" or mob talk is a often hack way to set the stage, and written like a middle aged author imagines a police serial come to life - in this book the mob dialect flowed realistically. Would I recommend: yes, to almost anyone. This book doesn't get 5 stars purely because I think it's more fun than personally impactful, but for fun it's a 5/5.
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  • Kevin
    February 14, 2017
    First Book by Stephen Hunter. I won this as a Goodreads ARC. I was very entertained by the story and how it all came together. A fun read
  • Susan Csoke
    February 2, 2017
    G-Man is an action packed thriller. The year was 1934. The time of the depression. Tommy gun wielding, bank robbing notorious outlaws such as Pretty boy Floyd, Bonnie and Clyde and John dillinger were on the loose. >>>Charles Swagger, the most talented gunman of the time was hired by the new FBI to track and capture these outlaws. >>>Eight years later, Bob Lee Swagger- the grandson of Charles decided to sell the family homestead. His grandfather died before he was born. >&gt G-Man is an action packed thriller. The year was 1934. The time of the depression. Tommy gun wielding, bank robbing notorious outlaws such as Pretty boy Floyd, Bonnie and Clyde and John dillinger were on the loose. >>>Charles Swagger, the most talented gunman of the time was hired by the new FBI to track and capture these outlaws. >>>Eight years later, Bob Lee Swagger- the grandson of Charles decided to sell the family homestead. His grandfather died before he was born. >>>Upon tearing down the house, developers found a steel case hidden in the foundation. Inside was an array of documents dating back to 1934. >>Fascinated and puzzled by this find, Bob sets out to uncover the truth about his grandfather.>>>THANK YOU GOODREADS FIRSTREADS FOR THIS FREE BOOK!!!!!
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  • Brian
    January 18, 2017
    *****
  • Schuyler Wallace
    March 31, 2017
    Bob Lee Swagger is Pulitzer Prize winner Stephen Hunter’s creation and the protagonist of “Shooter,” a popular TV series. In this book, “G-Man,” Bob Lee is determined to uncover the legacy of his grandfather, Charles Swagger, a notorious gunman, sheriff, and early FBI agent, who vanished in the 1930s after a brilliant career but is never spoken of by relatives. The story switches between 1934 and the present as the author tells Charles Swagger’s story both from his view and what his grandson fin Bob Lee Swagger is Pulitzer Prize winner Stephen Hunter’s creation and the protagonist of “Shooter,” a popular TV series. In this book, “G-Man,” Bob Lee is determined to uncover the legacy of his grandfather, Charles Swagger, a notorious gunman, sheriff, and early FBI agent, who vanished in the 1930s after a brilliant career but is never spoken of by relatives. The story switches between 1934 and the present as the author tells Charles Swagger’s story both from his view and what his grandson finds later. The author has done some heavy research into his fictional account of the manhunts leading to the deaths of some of the notorious gangsters of the time; John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, Homer Van Meter, and Pretty Boy Floyd. Charles Swagger had a hand in the tracking down and killing of each of them. The Swaggers have all been men with guns. Charles, his son Earl, and his grandson, Bob, knew guns and how to use them. Each, in his own way, subscribed to the theory that there are always men who need killing and others who would do the killing. Hunter explores that way of life with his storyline and, along the way, teaches the reader about guns and their usage in dramatic detail. If you like guns, this is a primer.The switching around of timelines creates some confusion, but the reader will have less difficulty as the book progresses. The author uses the vernacular of the 1930s when he writes in that time frame and abandons it when in the present. He does so with a skill that makes the dialogue ring true throughout the book.This is a fast moving and enjoyable book thanks to the author’s skill and authentic storyline.
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  • Marci
    April 15, 2017
    This was a really long book. In my opinion the book would have been somewhat better and a quicker read if it did not go into such minute detail about every gun and car in it. But, I'm not that into guns and cars. However, i did find all of the minute details in regard to the Illinois and Wisconsin locations really interesting because that's where I am from and I could picture the exact location where things were happening. So whether there is too much detail is all about perspective. I thought t This was a really long book. In my opinion the book would have been somewhat better and a quicker read if it did not go into such minute detail about every gun and car in it. But, I'm not that into guns and cars. However, i did find all of the minute details in regard to the Illinois and Wisconsin locations really interesting because that's where I am from and I could picture the exact location where things were happening. So whether there is too much detail is all about perspective. I thought the book was well written and unique. It puts a mystery into legendary events. So you kind of think you know what is going to happen, but you don't always, I enjoyed the book and the ending. I would definitely recommend it to anyone. Even though there has to be a lot of bloodshed in a book like this, the details were not overly gruesome. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the First to Read program by Penguin in exchange for an honest opinion. I now have to try to find Shooter on cable.
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  • Pat Byrnes
    April 21, 2017
    G-Man is a thrilling ride that takes one back to the days of Dillinger & Baby Face. Stephen wrote this novel in a way that made you feel that you were right there in the action. The back and forth from present day to the 1930's was a great blend. I couldn't put the novel down, I wanted to see what happened next. The detail of mindset and the weapons made for an enjoyable read. I would recommend this novel if you like the 1930 time era, before all the electronics of today.One part of the nove G-Man is a thrilling ride that takes one back to the days of Dillinger & Baby Face. Stephen wrote this novel in a way that made you feel that you were right there in the action. The back and forth from present day to the 1930's was a great blend. I couldn't put the novel down, I wanted to see what happened next. The detail of mindset and the weapons made for an enjoyable read. I would recommend this novel if you like the 1930 time era, before all the electronics of today.One part of the novel, that I didn't get, was Charles Swagger's secret. It was mentioned and then dropped. There were inferences throughout the remainder of the novel, but was just weird placement in a 1930's era novel. Maybe Stephen is just throwing a social issue into the novel. If you want to know what the secret is, you'll have to read the novel.
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  • Kim Prestley
    March 30, 2017
    One of the better in the series. Good story line. Loved reading about Dillinger and those boys. Hope his next one is just as good.
  • Jen Hanson
    March 22, 2017
    First off, thank you Blue Rider Press and Netgalley for this arc in exchange for an honest review. I'll start off with a brief overview, my dislikes, my likes, and my personal thoughts. This is about a story of Bob Lee Swagger's father, Charles. There are many twists and turns to find out Charles was a gracious and giving grandfather to Bob Lee Swagger. This recounts the 1934 history of Babyface Nelson, John Dillinger, and various other mob-related accounts. You have Babyface Nelson's account, G First off, thank you Blue Rider Press and Netgalley for this arc in exchange for an honest review. I'll start off with a brief overview, my dislikes, my likes, and my personal thoughts. This is about a story of Bob Lee Swagger's father, Charles. There are many twists and turns to find out Charles was a gracious and giving grandfather to Bob Lee Swagger. This recounts the 1934 history of Babyface Nelson, John Dillinger, and various other mob-related accounts. You have Babyface Nelson's account, Grandpa Charles's account, and Bob Lee's account of events. What are my dislikes?1. It needs another good edit. There were some wonky sentences and prepositions. 2. Some labels of races do come off as offensive.3. The beginning was a little rough for me.4. I couldn't figure out if it's supposed to be second POV or third POV. The author seemed to go back and forth. It has the potential to jar the reader. With a good edit, that could be fixed before publication. 5. Nothing else worth mentioning. What are my likes?1. I love how the author gave descriptions on guns. If you're a gun enthusiast, this novel is for you.2. I like violence, so this novel was up my alley. It has action that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Well done. 3. I love the plot twist about Grandpa Charles's deep dark secret, he kept hidden from people. 4. I love the middle and the ending. The author tied it off beautifully. 5. The author gave us a fictional account that could be true.6. I love how the author explained the sole purpose of G-Man.7. I enjoyed the history of guns and the bank-robbing gangs of the 1930's. As for my personal thoughts?If you're a member of SJW or the PC crowd, I would skip it. This is a gritty novel that takes place both in 1934 and present-day. You will find things that may get your goat. If you're gun enthusiast and love history without worrying about the SJW and PC crowd, this novel is for you. I found it to be a high-octane novel and I could see this becoming a movie. Yes, there were some problems with wrong word choices, but overall the plot drove it home for me. I enjoyed this read and I can't wait for it to come out soon.
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  • Philip Bailey
    May 3, 2017
    Homer Van Meter, Lester Joseph Gillis, Charles Arthur Floyd, John Herbert Dillinger. Not exactly household chit-chat material, but larger than life mobsters. Gillis used the alias George Nelson and was thus dubbed “Baby Face” Nelson. Mr. Floyd was dubbed “Pretty Boy” Floyd. Part of American history, criminals, mobsters, (notice no Italian names, not yet anyway). Although by no means the first organized crime gangs, (think Jesse James gang), nor an all-inclusive list, (think Bonnie and Clyde, Ma Homer Van Meter, Lester Joseph Gillis, Charles Arthur Floyd, John Herbert Dillinger. Not exactly household chit-chat material, but larger than life mobsters. Gillis used the alias George Nelson and was thus dubbed “Baby Face” Nelson. Mr. Floyd was dubbed “Pretty Boy” Floyd. Part of American history, criminals, mobsters, (notice no Italian names, not yet anyway). Although by no means the first organized crime gangs, (think Jesse James gang), nor an all-inclusive list, (think Bonnie and Clyde, Ma Barker, Machine Gun Kelly, and many more). This story focuses mostly on the first four names mentioned above, and some of the early law enforcement personnel of the beginning of the FBI. While the story introduces an entirely fictional character, it is an accounting of an earlier time in American history. Reading this recalled an old TV series called “The Untouchables”, which was a Hollywood glorified version featuring Elliot Ness, who never even wore a badge and was not a G-Man. It is excellent reading. Be the perspective history, criminal, or just entertaining fiction based on fact it makes for a great story and though mine was an advanced copy in need of some editing it kept me reading into the wee hours, way past my bedtime. A winner for sure.
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  • Rusty
    April 3, 2017
    Got this as an eARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.I really like the Swagger clan and their stories, been reading them for years. This one was not up to par with the best of them. This is a back and forth between Bob Lee's search for info on his grandaddy Charles and the story of Charles in 1934. It had some interesting bits and some twists, but it was about 100 pages too long. I did have an uncorrected (and poorly formatted) version of the book so hopefully this will change Got this as an eARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.I really like the Swagger clan and their stories, been reading them for years. This one was not up to par with the best of them. This is a back and forth between Bob Lee's search for info on his grandaddy Charles and the story of Charles in 1934. It had some interesting bits and some twists, but it was about 100 pages too long. I did have an uncorrected (and poorly formatted) version of the book so hopefully this will change before the final version prints. Not really recommended unless you are an absolute fan of the series.
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