Avatar (North and South, #3)
North versus South--the final showdown!Fire Lord Zuko and Earth King Kuei arrive in the lands of the Southern Water Tribe amid protests against Gilak's imprisonment. While the leaders hold council to solidify Malina and Hakoda's unification plans, Gilak breaks free and leads a powerful rebellion, crashing the council and kidnapping the Earth King! In the face of these two opposing forces, Katara will have to make peace with her nostalgia and distrust to save the home and family she loves from being permanently torn apart.

Avatar (North and South, #3) Details

TitleAvatar (North and South, #3)
Author
ReleaseMay 9th, 2017
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506701301
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Fiction, Young Adult, Childrens

Avatar (North and South, #3) Review

  • Alexandra Elend Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    "Look, I'm pretty sure that to us, nobody but mom will ever seem right for dad. But maybe that's okay, because dad gets to choose who's right for dad." That was such a bitter-sweet ending. I really love how realistic and human Yang manages to always make the characters. With real struggles and conflicts that they need to see other sides in order to overcome or come to terms with. The action, of course, is always on point. I wish I could bend, but, alas! I can't. Still, at least seeing them d "Look, I'm pretty sure that to us, nobody but mom will ever seem right for dad. But maybe that's okay, because dad gets to choose who's right for dad." That was such a bitter-sweet ending. I really love how realistic and human Yang manages to always make the characters. With real struggles and conflicts that they need to see other sides in order to overcome or come to terms with. The action, of course, is always on point. I wish I could bend, but, alas! I can't. Still, at least seeing them do it is a good comfort.I can't wait to see more struggles from the flourishing Southern Water Tribe and how they managed to transform it into what we encounter in The Legend of Korra and how they'll make the people accept it. "A northerner, a southerner, and an air nomad, all working together to recover a tradition that was almost lost. That's the kind of collaboration we need." __________________Is it too silly if I leave an RTC in here?.........Oh well, I guess it doesn't really matter. RTC.
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  • Lilibeth
    January 1, 1970
    I'm finally done with the school year and these comics were a nice way to start my summer reading mojo again. Is it too much to hope for one final team avatar comic where they're all in they're late teens/early 20s and building republic city? I need that in my life.
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  • Tilly
    January 1, 1970
    Does anyone know if this is supposed to be the last Avatar comic? Because if that's the case, I don't know what I should do with my life now :O I have to re-watch the entire series!
  • Aleksandra
    January 1, 1970
    This was amazing!!!Great conclusion to the ATLA comics, but I hope we get to see the Gaang again!Perfect balance of plot, humor, serious discussions and all encompassing love these people have for each other and for their nations.
  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I love these Avatar stories. They are so stepped in Buddhist and Daoist teachings. This story dealing with politics in the South was pretty good and then ending was satisfying. I will be reading the other runs of the series. All the elements had a bender in the South Pole and they worked together, Fire, Earth, Water, Air, together which can achieve balance.Simply a fun story that holds friendship and family in high regard. It's also nice to see the Chinese characters show up in the book and I ev I love these Avatar stories. They are so stepped in Buddhist and Daoist teachings. This story dealing with politics in the South was pretty good and then ending was satisfying. I will be reading the other runs of the series. All the elements had a bender in the South Pole and they worked together, Fire, Earth, Water, Air, together which can achieve balance.Simply a fun story that holds friendship and family in high regard. It's also nice to see the Chinese characters show up in the book and I even know a few of them.
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  • Ken Yuen
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know if they're going to do any more of these stories, but it felt like a real good bow tie for the series. All our beloved characters are back and there's a nice theme of change and moving on with one's life.
  • Bara
    January 1, 1970
    Metalbenders are back.
  • Gail Bullard
    January 1, 1970
    I really hope they make an actual end to this series, even if they have to time jump.
  • Doc.
    January 1, 1970
    General review of #1-3 sans spoilers:The major theme in this arc is Katara’s yearning for a simpler time, with which I can sympathise considering nostalgia for the TV show is what keeps me reading these comics. Luckily for me, although the Last Airbender comics aren’t going to change anyone’s life, they’re written by the accomplished hand of Gene Luen Yang. Yang does an excellent job of recreating my beloved characters as I remember them, and in this run, he puts them in a believable moral quan General review of #1-3 sans spoilers:The major theme in this arc is Katara’s yearning for a simpler time, with which I can sympathise considering nostalgia for the TV show is what keeps me reading these comics. Luckily for me, although the Last Airbender comics aren’t going to change anyone’s life, they’re written by the accomplished hand of Gene Luen Yang. Yang does an excellent job of recreating my beloved characters as I remember them, and in this run, he puts them in a believable moral quandary of real-world relevance. Humankind has always clashed, often violently, at the prospect of change. We’ve never taken it lying down—whether it was the Luddites’ resistance to mechanisation, predicting in automation a death-knell for the labour force, or the Southern Water Tribe’s protests against international trade and the massive environmental disruption underway to exploit their natural resources.There are important points to be made on both sides of the argument but Yang does not explore them, instead dealing with the issue superficially. However, he does cram a few other interesting ideas into the arc, like, to state just one, the lasting effects of war. He also depicts the visceral emotional reactions triggered by outsider influence in a post-colonial landscape, if not the intellectual ones. He ought to have elaborated the reasons for the distrust that links xenophobia to economic protectionism, though I suppose this is about as much as one can expect in an eighty-page comic book for kids! We finally have an arc that I felt was worth reviewing, one that vocalises the sociopolitical undertones of the show rather than overplaying its fantastical notes. Gurihiru’s competent artwork helps elevate this final Avatar comic above average.
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  • Jessica Mae
    January 1, 1970
    I really wish they'd made comics for every year between The Last Airbender and Korra, because I'd shamelessly read every last one. Even if it was domestic life with Aang and Katara. Call me crazy, but I just really want closure! I HAVE SO MANY QUESTIONS. There are still several loose ends. And no amount of rewatching the series will tie them up. Don't get me wrong, the plot was good. It just wasn't as satisfying or epic as I feel it could've been, considering it's the last one they made.But here I really wish they'd made comics for every year between The Last Airbender and Korra, because I'd shamelessly read every last one. Even if it was domestic life with Aang and Katara. Call me crazy, but I just really want closure! I HAVE SO MANY QUESTIONS. There are still several loose ends. And no amount of rewatching the series will tie them up. Don't get me wrong, the plot was good. It just wasn't as satisfying or epic as I feel it could've been, considering it's the last one they made.But here are the things I still loved about this book:- Aang literally sweeping Katara off her feet. What a stud. Also carrying 3 or 4 people WHILE airbending on his glider. So proud of my boy.- Potluck with the Four Nations. (Filing this under fun, nerdy party ideas. Who's with me?)- Amazing, dynamic artwork! I adore Gurihiru's style and I want to study it. 😍 The way he's subtly aged the main characters was perfect, too.
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  • L. C. Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Avataaar <3
  • Aina
    January 1, 1970
    Aang and Katara calling each other sweetie warms my heart I'm so akdksldhlagsla
  • Sophia Hanson
    January 1, 1970
    *sigh* Honestly, they could keep making ATLA comics forever and I would read every single one of them. I really enjoyed the finale of this particular trilogy. Again, dealt with some really important like destruction of native lands, fetishization of POC, racial/cultural tensions, and racial slurs. I love watching Team Avatar grow up. I love Katara and Aang as a couple, and Toph was on point. Anyway. If you guys haven't started reading the ATLA comics and you loved the series, they're totally wor *sigh* Honestly, they could keep making ATLA comics forever and I would read every single one of them. I really enjoyed the finale of this particular trilogy. Again, dealt with some really important like destruction of native lands, fetishization of POC, racial/cultural tensions, and racial slurs. I love watching Team Avatar grow up. I love Katara and Aang as a couple, and Toph was on point. Anyway. If you guys haven't started reading the ATLA comics and you loved the series, they're totally worth it!
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  • Rottgrl88
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! What a conclusion. As you would expect from this series, you get a whirlwind of an ending that provides action/adventure and happy, fluffy feelings. Of course, Aang and the crew save the day and find out who the real bad guys are and all gets resolved happily. Loved every minute of this series and even though I am sad to see it end I am so happy that the creators continued this story in graphic novel form to allow the fans the time to get a little more answers and good times from the gang. Wow! What a conclusion. As you would expect from this series, you get a whirlwind of an ending that provides action/adventure and happy, fluffy feelings. Of course, Aang and the crew save the day and find out who the real bad guys are and all gets resolved happily. Loved every minute of this series and even though I am sad to see it end I am so happy that the creators continued this story in graphic novel form to allow the fans the time to get a little more answers and good times from the gang. I recommend highly!!!
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this was an intense conclusion to this particular trilogy of comics. It certainly helps to show how some of the issues in Korra came to be as they were in that series. My only complaint about this comic series (as it has been the whole time) is how much Aang and Katara overuse calling each other "sweetie." It is pretty much all the time. I mean, I understand that the characters are only like 14-16 years old, but wow, it is annoying. Other than that, I still absolutely love reading these, an Wow, this was an intense conclusion to this particular trilogy of comics. It certainly helps to show how some of the issues in Korra came to be as they were in that series. My only complaint about this comic series (as it has been the whole time) is how much Aang and Katara overuse calling each other "sweetie." It is pretty much all the time. I mean, I understand that the characters are only like 14-16 years old, but wow, it is annoying. Other than that, I still absolutely love reading these, and I can tell that both the show and these comics are ones that I will definitely re-watch and re-read again and again in the future.
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  • Dania F
    January 1, 1970
    While the Avatar North South comic book series captures the spirit of the original series, one has to wonder if the oil industry didn't finance this. Getting oil out of the north pole is a means of achieving equality? The guys who are trying to prevent the oil extraction by foreign companies end up being the bad guys? Pumping oil out of the ground is a sign of progress? Absolutely terrible storyline and morale
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Krásné počteníčko.
  • Martina Urbanová
    January 1, 1970
    Po dobre odvedenej práci vždy príde dobrá večera.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    There better be more of these coming soon!!
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this one certainly had an interesting conclusion. I think I'm going to be pondering this one for a while. It legitimately ended with Katara saying, "well, this is going to happen, but not for a while, and I'm not sure how I feel about it." That's some of the beauty of A:tLA, honestly. Sometimes, there's no right answer. Sometimes, both sides have a point and there's never going to be a clear-cut solution forward.This series especially made some of the Native American inspirations very clea Well, this one certainly had an interesting conclusion. I think I'm going to be pondering this one for a while. It legitimately ended with Katara saying, "well, this is going to happen, but not for a while, and I'm not sure how I feel about it." That's some of the beauty of A:tLA, honestly. Sometimes, there's no right answer. Sometimes, both sides have a point and there's never going to be a clear-cut solution forward.This series especially made some of the Native American inspirations very clear. I guess I can only speak for myself, but it was impossible for me not to think about NA and the struggle they feel to respect the past and respect their culture here in present times. That is such a conundrum; how does a society that is almost subsumed by larger conquering societies, but not destroyed, establish itself in a time period without that natural progression? The Southern water tribe is rich in culture, but very different from even the Northern water tribe, which desperately covers the oil locked in the southern ice; oil that could bring the South on par with the North, the Earth kingdom, and the Fire nation. Is it true to yourself to want to be bring your society up to the same level of playing field as others? When do you get to feel comfortable with the forward direction of your culture? All very open-ended questions here, with no answers. On one hand, I really liked that, because as I mentioned above, there doesn't seem to be answer. However, I don't think it was really addressed within this book what southern water tribe culture really is, though aspects of it were brought up, like Asaka's (sp?) tough seal jerky, or igloos instead of ice cities. The opposition of Gilak and followers had a bit to say about it, but not so much the rest of the southerners. I think there could have been a little bit more focus there, though I admit it would be difficult due to the length restrictions imposed by the format of these series.Overall, yet another stellar post-addition to the Avatar lore that works as a bridge between A:tLA and the Legend of Korra. Some serious nods to the world of LoK: Sokka and Maliq the northerner discussing how oil and technology is going to bridge the gap and make equals of benders and non-benders, the blending of cultures with North and South working together in addition to the earthbenders from Toph's metalbending academy, etc. I like that these are addressed in the first few years post-Avatar, because hey, Rome wasn't built in a day.
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  • Tung
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of this series that aired on Nickelodeon for three seasons. The series takes place in a universe inhabited by four primary cultures tied to the four basic elements (fire, water, air, and earth). In this universe, certain people are gifted with the ability to “bend” their culture’s element; that is, they can manipulate the element in order to attack, defend, move, heal, etc. (e.g. earthbending might be used to cause the dirt at your feet to form a giant shield in front of you). E I am a huge fan of this series that aired on Nickelodeon for three seasons. The series takes place in a universe inhabited by four primary cultures tied to the four basic elements (fire, water, air, and earth). In this universe, certain people are gifted with the ability to “bend” their culture’s element; that is, they can manipulate the element in order to attack, defend, move, heal, etc. (e.g. earthbending might be used to cause the dirt at your feet to form a giant shield in front of you). Every few generations through reincarnation, one special individual (the avatar) is uniquely gifted with the ability to master all four elements in order to maintain peace and balance. The cartoon followed the life of one avatar named Aang as he grew into his role as avatar, and as he sought to bring the world back into balance after the fire nation attempted to conquer the other elemental tribes. This three-part graphic novel picks up several months/years after the series finale. Two of the series’ protagonists (Katara and her brother Sokka) return home to the southern water tribe village (the “South” of the title). They find that during their time away, their little village has been built up and is going through the process of modernization. The modernization efforts are being led by their sister tribe in the north, as well as the earth kingdom – all under the leadership of Katara’s and Sokka’s father. This graphic novel raises real questions about culture, politics, and the process of moving into the future while retaining and cherishing the past. Overall, I could easily imagine the animators making this a great episode. The main characters’ personalities showed through the illustrations, and the dialogue kept the show’s trademark earnestness and humor. Fans of the show will absolutely love the story being told here.
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  • Xiomy's Book Tales
    January 1, 1970
    Well then, part three was such a joyous ride to have it conveyed in me laughter, sadness, a new found sense of family, and it was compelling! Even though I had a bit of a negative start to this final installment with the author it ended with a bang!Also previously established characters were once again seen such as Momo (love him always), Toph's students from the Metal Bending Academy (the Dark One was too hilarious), King Kuei (even though he felt a bit off I enjoyed his appearance), and of cou Well then, part three was such a joyous ride to have it conveyed in me laughter, sadness, a new found sense of family, and it was compelling! Even though I had a bit of a negative start to this final installment with the author it ended with a bang!Also previously established characters were once again seen such as Momo (love him always), Toph's students from the Metal Bending Academy (the Dark One was too hilarious), King Kuei (even though he felt a bit off I enjoyed his appearance), and of course our Fire Lord Zuko (oh I'm always giddy with happiness when I see him).This was such an emotional conclusion filled with intrigue, growth from Katara for accepting that things aren't as they always appear, and the bending/art work was too gorgeous!Also we have to love Sokka for his brilliance and goofiness, he's growing up so fast!
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    Super duper cute. Love the picture on the last page.
  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I just want them to keep making avatar comics for the rest of my life - is that too much to ask?
  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    Some of the fight choreography was a bit off, especially in how easily Team Avatar was flummoxed by a small group of enemies / Southern Water Tribe warriors, when we’ve seen them in the past fight large groups with ease. Toph’s use of her space rock was a nice nod to Korra. I agree with other reviewers, in that I’d happily keep reading more, especially with time skips!
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  • Britt
    January 1, 1970
    I am a bit sad because I believe this is the last Avatar the Last Airbender comic so the Gaang's story is really over. It makes me want to rewatch and reread everything again. I feel like this story could go on and on but that would make it, for me, somehow lesser because who wants to listen to a never-ending story?As for this conclusion of this trilogy, I felt like it was less strong than some of the others. The final showdown was not that impressive to me. However, I am glad that Avatar never I am a bit sad because I believe this is the last Avatar the Last Airbender comic so the Gaang's story is really over. It makes me want to rewatch and reread everything again. I feel like this story could go on and on but that would make it, for me, somehow lesser because who wants to listen to a never-ending story?As for this conclusion of this trilogy, I felt like it was less strong than some of the others. The final showdown was not that impressive to me. However, I am glad that Avatar never backs down to tell stories which are difficult and still very relevant in real life. I think I really noticed that in this trilogy.The Southern Water Tribe, after the Air Nomads, was hit the hardest during the Hundred Year War. Now after the war, they are debating how to rebuild. The Northern Water Tribe wants to help but some of them have nasty plans in store to exploit the South Pole's oil (see how relevant?). After a century of war, the South Pole looks at her culture and what she wants to preserve and which new technologies she wants to use.Of course, not everyone agrees. After the nasty Northerner's plans are revealed xenophobia because to raise among some of the civilians (see the relevance) and start to protest other foreigners too, thus, the Fire Nation (thus more understandable, Zuko agrees, since the Fire Nation's crimes) and the Earth Kingdom. "Foreigners Out"There wasn't full closure on those problems which I understand since everyone in the real world here hasn't figured it out either. So I don't think it would have been that convincing if Yang would give a magical solution for these problems.I think Guri Hiru always did a good job with their art and since this is the last comic, I just wanted to point that out. Gene Luen Yang did a good job with the characters' essence. So even though he did not create them, he portraited them well.
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  • Allan
    January 1, 1970
    I found the dynamics this storyline set up in parts 2 and 3 very engaging. But part 3 while visually stunning fell apart at the end in terms of plot and character. The most compelling element of the antagonist in this story, particular the first volume, is that he's not a villain. He's a dissident who fought a war to preserve his culture and a new post-war momentum is preventing the very preservation he sought to defend. His foe is rendered incorporeal, no longer embodied in any single soldier h I found the dynamics this storyline set up in parts 2 and 3 very engaging. But part 3 while visually stunning fell apart at the end in terms of plot and character. The most compelling element of the antagonist in this story, particular the first volume, is that he's not a villain. He's a dissident who fought a war to preserve his culture and a new post-war momentum is preventing the very preservation he sought to defend. His foe is rendered incorporeal, no longer embodied in any single soldier he can fight but in the hearts of his own community. So he is introduced in a very jovial way and he has a great point, if misguided. The second volume indicates the violent ends his philosophy and commitment have. But they're still realistic. Here, the antagonist has devolved into a two dimensional villain--which would be fine if it were consistent like Ozai, but it's not. And the resolution for the character is fairly tidy for a series that often concludes with ambiguity. It also appears to exhibit some disregard for life that The Last Airbender fought so hard to preserve in its series finale.Also Zuko's presence is underutilized. While there is logic for him and the Earth King to be in this story, they feel like convenient plot devices more than integrated elements.Conclusions are hard. And while the art is impressive, I found this one a clunker for such a strong entry into the series.
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  • Earl
    January 1, 1970
    It's good to reconnect with Team Avatar in this new trilogy continuing the storylines from the TV series.I had the read and enjoyed the other four trilogies before watching and loving the series- and even watched the spin-off series The Legend of Korra- so I've become more of a fanatic with official new stories.Katara and Sokka return home only to find everything's changed. It's a battle between maintaining and preserving the past while trying to move forward. The stakes are high when both sides It's good to reconnect with Team Avatar in this new trilogy continuing the storylines from the TV series.I had the read and enjoyed the other four trilogies before watching and loving the series- and even watched the spin-off series The Legend of Korra- so I've become more of a fanatic with official new stories.Katara and Sokka return home only to find everything's changed. It's a battle between maintaining and preserving the past while trying to move forward. The stakes are high when both sides have valid points and loyalties shift and lives threatened.I highly recommend reading the each series as a whole when each part comes out or waiting for the omnibus editions and maybe space them out because the plot lines may seem formulaic as each member of Team Avatar practically have to tackle a new world after a devastating war and coming to terms with the old and new ways of life.
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  • Joseph R.
    January 1, 1970
    Team Avatar works to protect a meeting between Southern Water Tribe leader Hakoda and the newly arrived Fire Lord Zuko and Earth King Kuei. They have come at Hakoda's invitation to discuss plans and support for economic development in the Southern Water Tribe's kingdom. Oil has been discovered and a refinery is under construction but some locals oppose development that might turn the Southern Water Tribe into a pale imitation of the other nations. Resistance leader Gilak (who was imprisoned in t Team Avatar works to protect a meeting between Southern Water Tribe leader Hakoda and the newly arrived Fire Lord Zuko and Earth King Kuei. They have come at Hakoda's invitation to discuss plans and support for economic development in the Southern Water Tribe's kingdom. Oil has been discovered and a refinery is under construction but some locals oppose development that might turn the Southern Water Tribe into a pale imitation of the other nations. Resistance leader Gilak (who was imprisoned in the last issue) breaks out of jail and makes trouble for everyone.As always, Yang does a great job balancing the action and jokes with a more substantive storyline. Waterbender Katara has both nostalgia for the tribe's past and fear of a future assimilation into the other cultures. The story presents many sides of the issue and gives a nice, hopeful resolution.Highly recommended!
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    This one's okay as a conclusion. I like the emotional arc that Katara's gone through across the story, helping put the new post-Ozai world into perspective for her. Most of the other characters are window dressing as they take on Gilak and his anti-foreigner manifesto.I do like that everything's not totally tied up in a bow by the end; change isn't that easy to deal with, even if you can come to a compromise, so Avatar remains very accurate in its portrayal of a realistic world.And of course, Gu This one's okay as a conclusion. I like the emotional arc that Katara's gone through across the story, helping put the new post-Ozai world into perspective for her. Most of the other characters are window dressing as they take on Gilak and his anti-foreigner manifesto.I do like that everything's not totally tied up in a bow by the end; change isn't that easy to deal with, even if you can come to a compromise, so Avatar remains very accurate in its portrayal of a realistic world.And of course, Guruhiru's artwork is still right in line with the cartoon. I'm surprised they're managing to pencil most of Gwenpool as well as this, especially since this one's longer than the usual 64 pages. I know they're a studio and not just like two people or something but it still surprises me.
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