They All Fall Down
She knows there’s a killer on the loose.But no-one believes her.Will she be next?Hannah had a normal life – a loving husband, a good job. Until she did something shocking. Now she’s in a psychiatric clinic. It should be a safe place. But patients keep dying.The doctors say it’s suicide. Hannah knows they’re lying. Can she make anyone believe her before the killer strikes again?

They All Fall Down Details

TitleThey All Fall Down
Author
ReleaseJul 13th, 2017
PublisherDoubleday
ISBN-139780857524621
Rating

They All Fall Down Review

  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    They All Fall Down by Tammy Cohen is a psychological thriller about Hannah who is a patient in a psychiatric clinic. After two other patients die Hannah is convinced that they have been murdered but no one believes her. There are quite a few twist and turns in this story and it's hard to know who to believe.I would like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed all of Tammy Cohen’s psychological thrillers: “Dying for Christmas,” “First One Missing,” and “When She Was Bad,” so I was looking forward to reading her latest. Hannah has been in The Meadows for eight weeks when we first meet her. This is a private clinic for patients with a high suicide risk and, as the story unravels, we discover why Hannah is there and learn about her fellow patients. At first though, all we are aware of is that there is that there is a baby involved and that I have enjoyed all of Tammy Cohen’s psychological thrillers: “Dying for Christmas,” “First One Missing,” and “When She Was Bad,” so I was looking forward to reading her latest. Hannah has been in The Meadows for eight weeks when we first meet her. This is a private clinic for patients with a high suicide risk and, as the story unravels, we discover why Hannah is there and learn about her fellow patients. At first though, all we are aware of is that there is that there is a baby involved and that Hannah’s marriage has been in trouble for a while.Although the patients at The Meadows are seen as suicide risks, we are also informed that one of Hannah’s closest friends at the clinic, Charlie, has recently died. Indeed, she is the second patient to die within a fairly short time and Hannah does not believe that Charlie killed herself. Is she merely being paranoid, or does she have a reason to suspect something is not quite right? At first, Hannah’s mother, Corinne, feels that Hannah is simply disturbed, but, gradually, she too begins to fear for her daughter’s safety and to investigate both the clinic and the events which brought Hannah there.This is, undoubtedly, another interesting read from Tammy Cohen. A good cast of characters, from the assorted clinic patients, with their issues and back stories, to creepy clinic director, Dr Roberts, the other staff, Hannah’s work colleagues and the film crew, who are constantly recording everything at The Meadows for a future documentary. This is not my favourite of Cohen’s books (“When She Was Bad,” is still the winner for me), but a very enjoyable read nonetheless. Cohen is very skilled at taking closed communities, such as clinics, a support group, or an office, and creating a fairly oppressive atmosphere, which is realistic and works well, as well as characters you care about
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  • Tracy Fenton
    January 1, 1970
    As the self-confessed No 1 fan of Tammy Cohen when I saw she had a new psychological thriller out in July I was very excited and when the publishers sent me a proof copy I did squeal a lot.This psychological thriller is set in a mental institution and once again the author introduces a twisty, twisted set of characters, that get under your skin and keep you on the edge of your toes.Alternating narrators bring this dark and clever thriller to life and the author has a wonderful knack of leading y As the self-confessed No 1 fan of Tammy Cohen when I saw she had a new psychological thriller out in July I was very excited and when the publishers sent me a proof copy I did squeal a lot.This psychological thriller is set in a mental institution and once again the author introduces a twisty, twisted set of characters, that get under your skin and keep you on the edge of your toes.Alternating narrators bring this dark and clever thriller to life and the author has a wonderful knack of leading you in one direction, slamming on the brakes, causing severe whiplash and doing a three-point turn. It’s a fast-paced and fabulous thriller and Tammy Cohen proves why she is one of the best authors of psychological thrillers around. Highly recommended.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah led a normal life until one day, everything started to fall to pieces. Now she’s in a psychiatric clinic. But when two of her friends die and it is said they committed suicide, Hannah knows she’s being lied to. Nobody believes her though and time is running out.Tammy Cohen’s writing is so incredibly beautiful and strong that I soon found myself completely engrossed in this brilliantly woven and intricate plot. So much so that it wasn’t until I closed the book that I realised I hadn’t been Hannah led a normal life until one day, everything started to fall to pieces. Now she’s in a psychiatric clinic. But when two of her friends die and it is said they committed suicide, Hannah knows she’s being lied to. Nobody believes her though and time is running out.Tammy Cohen’s writing is so incredibly beautiful and strong that I soon found myself completely engrossed in this brilliantly woven and intricate plot. So much so that it wasn’t until I closed the book that I realised I hadn’t been taking any notes to help me in writing my review.The author doesn’t rely on all the tricks of the trade, dazzling the reader with a multitude of twists and turns, and she doesn’t need to. That’s not to say there aren’t any twists. Of course there are! But they’re done masterfully and as you get to know the various characters, they actually make sense as opposed to the ones that come out of nowhere like a bolt of lightning.Delving into the human psyche in an environment like a psychiatric clinic, where every single person is dealing with mental health issues, was already compelling enough on its own. But adding a mystery and a long list of potential suspects brought the story to a whole other level. Is it a member of staff? Is it a client? Is it someone else entirely? Or is Hannah just paranoid? I have unholy love for an author who can keep me guessing like this. While I had an inkling halfway through the book that I knew what was going on, I never felt quite secure in my belief. As it turns out, I was only half right and there was a part near the end that made my jaw drop so hard I think my chin hit the floor.My list of go-to authors continues to grow at a terrifying pace as I now also add Tammy Cohen and I’m confident that no matter which genre she writes in, I’ll be first in line.
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  • Roman Clodia
    January 1, 1970
    What a disappointment from Cohen! To her credit, she doesn't simply re-write the same book constantly as some commercial authors do, but this one lacked the life of her usual stories. The setting is intriguing but then it turns into a same-old 'female' thriller built around multiple narrators, unfaithful husband, baby obsession, and an everyday woman turning murder investigator. Add in some in-your-face dodgy characters and this is soon teetering on the edge of black comedy.(view spoiler)[This i What a disappointment from Cohen! To her credit, she doesn't simply re-write the same book constantly as some commercial authors do, but this one lacked the life of her usual stories. The setting is intriguing but then it turns into a same-old 'female' thriller built around multiple narrators, unfaithful husband, baby obsession, and an everyday woman turning murder investigator. Add in some in-your-face dodgy characters and this is soon teetering on the edge of black comedy.(view spoiler)[This is about the third book I've read recently which takes maternity to its extremes by having a woman faking a pregnancy though, to be fair, Cohen treats the trope slightly more realistically than some. All the same, it feels overblown, and given that it's kept hidden from us till 40% through, the great revelation felt anticlimactic to me - after all, we know that whatever Hannah's done, it can't be that bad given that she's in a private clinic, not a psychiatric ward or prison. (hide spoiler)]A particular bugbear of mine is when a book relies on faux suspense by withholding something major from the reader that everyone in the book knows: (view spoiler)[here the fact of the fake pregnancy (hide spoiler)] - it's like sitting with a group of friends and they're all talking about something which happened last night but won't tell you what it was - mighty irritating! And a cheap way for an author to create artificial tension. I lost interest at 40%, skim read to the end and was unsurprised and glad to be done with this. Hopefully this is just a blip and Cohen will be back to her best in the next book.Thanks to the publisher for an ARC via NetGalley
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  • Joanne Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    I do love a new Tammy Cohen book and I have to admit that They All Fall Down did “somehow” manage to sneak its way up my topping TBR pile as I was just DYING to read it! And it definitely didn’t disappoint as I have to say I think it’s her best psychological thriller since Dying for Christmas!The setting here is a psychiatric clinic, where Hannah has been detained since an horrific incident that we have to wait impatiently to find out more about.  The unanswered questions about Hannah’s mental h I do love a new Tammy Cohen book and I have to admit that They All Fall Down did “somehow” manage to sneak its way up my topping TBR pile as I was just DYING to read it! And it definitely didn’t disappoint as I have to say I think it’s her best psychological thriller since Dying for Christmas!The setting here is a psychiatric clinic, where Hannah has been detained since an horrific incident that we have to wait impatiently to find out more about.  The unanswered questions about Hannah’s mental health got this book off to a claustrophobic and intriguing start. What had happened to instigate her being admitted to such a facility and why does she think the girls who have committed suicide have been murdered? As we get to know the other patients and staff at the institution, we come to realise that maybe Hannah isn’t an incredibly reliable narrator and it’s left to Hannah’s mum Corrine and other narrators to fill in the blanks for us.Well, Tammy Cohen has absolutely knocked my socks off AGAIN-I loved this book! Every character was well drawn and developed gradually, inspiring so many different emotions in me as more details start to seep out about Hannah’s life before. Corrine was the archetypal protective mother, desperate to help her child no matter what the cost either financially or at the expense of her own happiness. Her determination and commitment to finding the right balance between just being there for Hannah no matter what but also trusting her mother’s instinct that something didn’t quite add up. I felt a lot of admiration for her and I think I enjoyed her narrative more than any other. As for Danny, the husband, I just wanted to scratch his eyes out, rather like Hannah and THAT photo!The plot here zig zagged along at a jaunty pace, throwing out red herrings galore along its path and doubling back on itself just when you thought you knew in which direction it was heading. With every twist and turn, I was drawn deeper into Hannah’s nightmare until I was nearly in need of some relaxation therapy myself! And although there are some very upsetting issues brought to the forefront here, they were integral to the intensity and development of the plot. I was so totally gripped me by the storyline and the conspiracy theories running through my head that I was forced to cram in every single page in one gluttonous sitting. And what a feast it was!Very highly recommended by me.
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  • Laura Rash
    January 1, 1970
    A little disappointed by this one. It had me for quite a bit at the beginning then slowed down so much I was getting bored. It seemed like too many characters & extra storylines that it was just distracting.
  • Clair
    January 1, 1970
    A psychological thriller set inside a psychiatric clinic. Hannah is admitted into a clinic and is convinced that someone is killing off the other patients. She believes her life is in danger and is trying to convince others that everything is not right. Throughout the novel she discovers why she is here and about the clinic she resides in. The book has 2 other main narrators, Hannah’s mother and a woman who works in the clinic, who add their own views and twists to the story.This book has all th A psychological thriller set inside a psychiatric clinic. Hannah is admitted into a clinic and is convinced that someone is killing off the other patients. She believes her life is in danger and is trying to convince others that everything is not right. Throughout the novel she discovers why she is here and about the clinic she resides in. The book has 2 other main narrators, Hannah’s mother and a woman who works in the clinic, who add their own views and twists to the story.This book has all the ticks for a good thriller, a few different suspects, an unreliable narrator and plenty of plot twists to keep things interesting. The main story is told through a number of different narrators who all have their own voices and put a different spin on what is happening throughout the story. It was gripping with some brilliant twists and very cleverly written. I loved hearing about Hannah’s story, how she ended up where she is and seeing that despite this she still had the strength within her to go on challenging what was around her and walking her path to recovery.Tammy Cohan handles mental health really well. She portrays various mental health disorders in a largely realistic but also sympathetic manner. Its a difficult subject handled well in the context of a thriller. I suffer from depression myself and could relate to some elements. The grey areas between being unwell and in recovery. How the illness impacts on your life and can cloud the way you see things.Overall its a very good book, well written with interesting characters and plenty of clever plot twists to keep you reading.I’d recommend to people who enjoy: psychological thrillers, mental health, well-written female characters.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    It is no secret that I am a huge huge fan of Tammy Cohen. I've been reading her books for years, ever since she published The Mistress's Revenge under the name of Tamar Cohen. She's also written under the name Rachel Rhys for the historical fiction story A Dangerous Crossing.Tammy Cohen never fails me, her writing is as tight as a drum; her writing is fresh and exhilarating and her plots are always solid. She has a very special knack of leading her readers up quite a few paths before blocking th It is no secret that I am a huge huge fan of Tammy Cohen. I've been reading her books for years, ever since she published The Mistress's Revenge under the name of Tamar Cohen. She's also written under the name Rachel Rhys for the historical fiction story A Dangerous Crossing.Tammy Cohen never fails me, her writing is as tight as a drum; her writing is fresh and exhilarating and her plots are always solid. She has a very special knack of leading her readers up quite a few paths before blocking their way with an in-your-face, shocking twist, she never fails to amaze me.They All Fall Down is set in a private psychiatric clinic and is Hannah's story. Hannah was a successful woman with a great job in publishing, married and flourishing. All she wanted was a baby and the reader is immediately aware that there's a baby at the centre of this mystery, but this author very cleverly avoids the reveal, instead she slowly and shrewdly drip feeds little snippets until she feels that the time is right to expose the facts.Two of Hannah's co-patients have died. Reported as tragic suicides, Hannah is convinced that neither of them would have taken their own lives. She is determined to prove this, yet she's a patient in a psychiatric hospital, her senses are dimmed by anti-psychotic drugs, she has a history of erratic behaviour - why would anyone believe her?One of the main strengths of They All Fall Down is the realistic setting. This author has clearly researched how a clinic such as this is run, with the stringent security measures, the attitudes of staff and the therapies offered. As a reader, I appreciate this, it shows a respect to the reader that I have found to be lacking in recent novels that are set in similar institutions. For me, this aspect added so much to the story.I devoured They All Fall Down, it kept me guessing right up until the end. The writing is intelligent and Tammy Cohen's use of description for her settings and her characters is quite masterful.I was both absorbed and at times disturbed, but always always completely consumed. This is another amazing story from one of my favourite authors.https://randomthingsthroughmyletterbo...
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Another excellent page turner of a psychological thriller from Tammy Cohen here - brilliant. Always always a good reading time.Full review spotlight to follow publication week.
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Another outstanding thriller from an author who's become one of my very favourites. A review: https://forwinternights.wordpress.com...
  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Gosh. I don't know where to begin. This book is incredible.Tammy Cohen has a significant back catalogue and has also written a fantastic cozy crime novel under the name of Rachel Rhys but I have to say, this novel felt so accomplished, so polished, so confident and so fluent that I was absolutely blown away by it. The writing was faultless and I was utterly swept up in the narrative and carried along right until the very last word. This has to be her best novel yet. And she had set the bar prett Gosh. I don't know where to begin. This book is incredible.Tammy Cohen has a significant back catalogue and has also written a fantastic cozy crime novel under the name of Rachel Rhys but I have to say, this novel felt so accomplished, so polished, so confident and so fluent that I was absolutely blown away by it. The writing was faultless and I was utterly swept up in the narrative and carried along right until the very last word. This has to be her best novel yet. And she had set the bar pretty high already.The premise - a killer in a psychiatric clinic - is in itself such an enormous hook and immediately throws the reader into an atmosphere of tension, suspense and intrigue but what really captivated me was the prose. Cohen is so eloquent and her writing is so striking that the reader cannot help but be consumed by the storyline and it's hard not to become fuelled with compassion for the characters. Her writing can not but provoke an emotive response from the reader.This is a very different kind of setting from the previous novels I have read by this author and I was fascinated by her decision to set the story in a psychiatric ward. What is so delicious and compelling about this setting is that the protagonist and the characters on which you are relying to tell you the 'facts' are all "mad". Who can you trust? Who could possibly be reliable? Who is not going to be confusing reality with their delusions? As Hannah says,"You don't have to be mad to live here but...oh, hang on, yes, you do."But aside from testing the reader with unreliable narrators, if there is a killer on the loose, who is going to believe these girls? Who is going to protect them? Again, in Hannah's words: "people die all the time here....That's what makes it so easy for a killer to hide her, in plain sight."Deeply gripping. Deeply troubling. Deeply unnerving. Cohen has really nailed it.I think it was a very brave and bold decision to set the novel in this kind of location and to focus on characters who are suffering from complicated mental illness and seriously chronic conditions. But my admiration is not just because it is brave and bold but because it is brilliantly handled."Suffering from mental illness is like suddenly becoming a foreigner in your own country. Close friends and relatives start talking very loudly and very slowly in the belief that you might understand them better. They don't realise it's not the understanding that's the problem, it's the application. When everything that made you you has disintegrated, it's possible to make abstract sense of things without having the first clue how they might be relevant to you." Cohen has not used this location for shock, for sensationalism or to steal the next number one slot as a shocking thriller, she has set her book here because it is completely relevant and necessary for the story she wants to tell and the themes she wants to write about. It is appropriate for the characters and as a place in which she can explore their issues, backstories and secrets.It is a dark and intense read - of course it is, it is about psychiatric patients, but Cohen is an intelligent and thoughtful writer and she has struck a balance of weaving a great tale that explores families, relationships, heartbreak and guilt alongside more deeper psychiatric issues. She pushes the story to a higher level by exploring issues of boundaries, delusion, desire and self deception.There is a good range of characters created in the novel too - not just in personality, role and purpose but also in terms of their illness and state of mind. Yet some of the most 'damaged' appear to be so observant and perceptive they often point out the obvious more ably that the doctors - and in a tone or style that is so caustic and so brutal it is quite exquisite to watch. There are some great suggestions about who or what madness and rationality look like should you wish to delve deeper or analyse further! In Hannah she has created a character who is sharp, intelligent, witty, sarcastic, someone we root for and yet someone riddled with complications. She fiercely delusional and even though I wondered if I shouldn't like her - and at times you don't - I really did like her a lot.In the last third of the book, Tammy Cohen excels herself. The depth, the layers, the knitting up of all the unravelling madness into a cohesive conclusion is flawless. Or in real words, it simply blew my mind. This is an impressive book. It has all the elements of a perfect suspense novel and yet Cohen has taken this psychological thriller to the next level. She has achieved much more than just scaring us, teasing us with twists and turns and chilling us to the bone. This is a psychological thriller with huge integrity.Yes reader, I did like it. A lot. I think this novel is perceptive; it shows a sound and respectful awareness and understanding of mental health, its traps, its destructive and malignant power and Cohen choses not to trivialise anything for a shocking twist or unreliable narrator. But it is also a right good read full of chilling characters, threatening twists, interwoven plot lines and intense moments of suspense and tension. As I said before, incredible.
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  • Lavender
    January 1, 1970
    “They All Fall Down” promises to be a psychological thriller. But soon it turns into a domestic drama.Hannah finds herself in a psychiatric clinic. The reason why she is there remains a secret to us for a while. Hannah was pregnant and something happened to the baby. It couldn’t be so bad because otherwise she would be in prison. Unfortunately the last book I read had exactly the same topic. So I figured out almost immediately what happened. But all this talking around Hannah’s problem and leavi “They All Fall Down” promises to be a psychological thriller. But soon it turns into a domestic drama.Hannah finds herself in a psychiatric clinic. The reason why she is there remains a secret to us for a while. Hannah was pregnant and something happened to the baby. It couldn’t be so bad because otherwise she would be in prison. Unfortunately the last book I read had exactly the same topic. So I figured out almost immediately what happened. But all this talking around Hannah’s problem and leaving out what she did felt quite forced. Two other patients of the clinic killed themselves. Hannah somehow suspects that they were murdered. But the story is not turning into a thriller. Hannah and her problems with her marriage and her desperate wish for a baby are the main thing here. Her mother is also a main character. She turns into a kind of detective and investigates some of Hannah’s suspicions and a few things of her own. For my taste the whole story was told too slow. There was almost too much in it. Mental problems, a failing marriage, the drama with the baby, murder,. I would have wished for a thriller but it was more of a domestic drama. The setting in the clinic is a great idea and there is a lot going on. But there is too much crammed into the story so that many things just fell flat. I could not feel for Hannah. I think it was a bit extreme to put her in the clinic for what she did. She is free to go but she is talked into staying by her husband and her mother. She wants to leave one minute but the next she stays because of the women who killed themselves. But this all did not work out for me. It was back and forth all the time. And I failed to see how they helped her in the clinic. This was my third book from Tammy Cohen. I liked “When She Was Bad” very much. “First One Missing” was an OK-read. Unfortunately “They All Fall Down” was also only an OK-read for me. It was not a fast paced thriller and definitely no pageturner for me. There was too much so that most of the topics just got scratched on the surface. The twist at the end was a surprise. I have to give that to the author. That I just read another book about a woman desperately wishing for a baby is not Tammy Cohen’s fault. There are so many books about babies and missing children at the moment. It was just too much domestic drama for me.I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Michelle Ryles
    January 1, 1970
    I could not contain my excitement when I received a copy of Tammy Cohen's new book, They All Fall Down. I have been a fan of Tammy Cohen's writing since reading The War of the Wives many years ago so this book literally dropped onto the doormat and into my hands without even making a brief visit to the TBR pile.I knew I was going to love it from the start as the first page reminded me of Alice in Wonderland's 'we're all mad here' and as it's set in a psychiatric institution I did find this rathe I could not contain my excitement when I received a copy of Tammy Cohen's new book, They All Fall Down. I have been a fan of Tammy Cohen's writing since reading The War of the Wives many years ago so this book literally dropped onto the doormat and into my hands without even making a brief visit to the TBR pile.I knew I was going to love it from the start as the first page reminded me of Alice in Wonderland's 'we're all mad here' and as it's set in a psychiatric institution I did find this rather amusing. Amusing as Hannah is a lot more sane than she realises and I was desperate to learn why she had been incarcerated. As my mind kept asking the same question: 'What happened to her baby, Emily?' Such a fine hook from Ms Cohen as I greedily took the bait and raced through the story, uncovering more than I ever expected.Not only do we have Hannah's story to unravel, but suddenly patients appear to commit suicide. Hannah is sure that something untoward is happening, but who will believe her - she's mad, isn't she? Part of me wondered if it was all in Hannah's head but the storyline is SO much better than that. It went in directions I never even saw coming and then suddenly Hannah is next on the kill list. Will her family get there in time to save her? Eeeeeek!What a great storyline - it's like a study of the human mind that plays with your mind. I could have quite easily questioned my sanity at times, as Tammy Cohen continued to surprise me. You're always guaranteed a good read with one of Tammy Cohen's books and They All Fall Down is no exception. This is surely set to rocket up the charts - you'd be mad not to read it.I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Rachel Gilbey
    January 1, 1970
    A very interesting psychological suspense story, with one unreliable narrator, one relatively biased narrator and a third narrator who pops up from time to time, but who I felt I got to know more in the others sections. The three narrators are all women, and all quite different. One works in a psychiatric clinic, one who has been admitted to the clinic and her mother. At first you aren't completely sure why Hannah has been admitted to this facility, but slowly her story starts to emerge. And its A very interesting psychological suspense story, with one unreliable narrator, one relatively biased narrator and a third narrator who pops up from time to time, but who I felt I got to know more in the others sections. The three narrators are all women, and all quite different. One works in a psychiatric clinic, one who has been admitted to the clinic and her mother. At first you aren't completely sure why Hannah has been admitted to this facility, but slowly her story starts to emerge. And its as the story starts to emerge you are lead to wonder if the conclusions she is drawing about the deaths of other people in the clinic, are true or just further delusions. I found the setting to be rather fascinating, especially with the range of mental illnesses being displayed, in largely realistic and sympathetic tones. We get to know some of the other patients and their quirks, as well as some of the therapists. The main question is whether Hannah's life is potentially in danger, and will anyone believer her before its potentially too late. However its Corrinne I perhaps liked the most, she was determined to investigate certain things both of her own findings and also some of Hannah's suspicions. As each new piece of information was revealed, it compelled me to continue reading to see how it would play out. They All Fall Down is a very good book, that is compelling in places, and just interesting in others. It's very well written, and I'm glad I gave it a go despite the difficult subject matter. Thank you to Netgalley and Transworld for this copy which I have reviewed honestly and voluntarily.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh. This book dragged. It was rather unrealistic. AND there was quite a few spelling mistakes or just sentences that made NO sense. I wish I liked this book, I really do. I enjoyed the characters, I could feel the suspense throughout and it was and easy-ish read but it was boring, not a lot happened it was just a whole lot of, who's the baddy?
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  • Ingstje
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah is staying in a private pschychatric clinic and it seems it wasn’t entirely out of her own volition. The reason for her stay is carefully dodged but I’m great at making lists of possibilities in my head and cross-referencing them with details I find so I thought I had her backstory figured out quite soon. I was pleasantly surprised my nose was pointed in the right direction and that I didn’t have to wait for the reveal of her reasons to stay until the end of the novel, which was what I ki Hannah is staying in a private pschychatric clinic and it seems it wasn’t entirely out of her own volition. The reason for her stay is carefully dodged but I’m great at making lists of possibilities in my head and cross-referencing them with details I find so I thought I had her backstory figured out quite soon. I was pleasantly surprised my nose was pointed in the right direction and that I didn’t have to wait for the reveal of her reasons to stay until the end of the novel, which was what I kind of expected. It was a pretty little bomb dropped at the exact moment that you’ve got that feeling that you really just have to know now ‘what exactly is going on’ and I can only say that it’s very much in line with what I was expecting from Ms. Cohen. If you’ve read other books by this author, you know that there’s no limit to what she can write and in my books she’s known for her great plot twists and plotlines that are running very deep and are intricately crafted. A great start of this novel because Hannah suddenly becomes a very unreliable narrator, there’s no denying that you’ll have her backstory in your mind all the way through now. I’m still impressed with how cleverly she made Hannah to be doubted now at all times. A woman who did ‘that’ is surely not to be trusted?Hannah’s convinced two of the patients there – one of them happened to be one of her best friends – didn’t kill themself.“I’m frightened. I’m frightened that I’m right and I’ll be next. I’m even more frightened that I’m wrong, in which case I’m as crazy as they all think I am.”Then her mother finds a picture of a woman on her daughter’s nightstand with the eyes pierced out. Who is she and why so much hatred? She starts investigating on her own and soon enough you can’t stop but wonder if the threat is actually coming from in- or outside the clinic.People are lying and not everybody is who he or she claims they are and it’s up to Hannah and her mother to dig around and make people talk. Lots of deceit and lies to go round but are any of these people responsible for killing someone? I knew the who early on and the author didn’t really disguise it all that much, it’s not like it all really came out of the blue, so what really intrigued me the most was finding out why? What was the motive? And is Hannah in real danger?As I was racing towards the end, I got really on edge how this was going to go down… I felt fearful but also relished that sense of danger lurking in the shadows. Ms. Cohen held out a long time and made me wait for it, keeping me on tenterhooks for the grand finale!Maybe this isn’t my favorite novel by her, I still think When She Was Bad or Dying for Christmas proved to be just that little more exciting and sinister but it was still a good read with a couple of nice twists!
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  • Cleo Bannister
    January 1, 1970
    The setting of this latest novel is in a private psychiatric clinic and right from the off there is a feeling that Hannah isn’t there of her own volition, but quite why and what happened before is left in the shadows. This isn’t the only mystery though, two women have died at the small clinic and Hannah is worried that they weren’t the suicides that everyone presumes. The problem is Hannah clearly has problems and she’s not being taken seriously by anyone, least of all her husband Danny who is b The setting of this latest novel is in a private psychiatric clinic and right from the off there is a feeling that Hannah isn’t there of her own volition, but quite why and what happened before is left in the shadows. This isn’t the only mystery though, two women have died at the small clinic and Hannah is worried that they weren’t the suicides that everyone presumes. The problem is Hannah clearly has problems and she’s not being taken seriously by anyone, least of all her husband Danny who is becoming increasingly frustrated with what he thinks is her continued paranoia.Once again Tammy Cohen has the pace absolutely nailed down. Now I’m somewhat a connoisseur of psychological thrillers, I know the wily tricks authors play to keep the facts hidden in order to ensure their twists give the maximum punch to the guts, and I confess this knowledge has tarnished the more amateur examples, but in this instance, there were enough clues given so that any twist felt far less artificial. Our main narrator, Hannah, by the very fact of her setting can be considered to be unreliable but we have other narrators including her fabulous mother Corrine. Corrine is so desperate to help her daughter no matter what she has done but she is also a realist who isn’t going to blindly go charging in without testing some of her daughter’s theories, so she turns detective. As always with this author all of the characters are carefully drawn, one where each time we meet them we learn a little bit more, sometimes coming to a different conclusion. This is particularly difficult with some of the issues Hannah’s fellow patients suffer from and I have to confess while racing through the book, I was also just like Hannah trying to leave the confines of the claustrophobic clinic.If twists and turns enhanced by the fabulous pace aren’t enough to tempt you to read this, I must also mention the dialogue which is absolutely pitch perfect. With so many of the interactions between the characters betraying something which is key to the storyline, particularly those between the doctors and patients – those group meetings rang so true and at times the words on the page cut deep and I winced as the subjects battled both internal and external demons.One of my issues with some books in this genre is the reliance on twists which is now the selling point rather than the original notion which was to explore the psyche, to my delight They All Fall Down manages both, we have the time to reflect on actions of the characters, and how their emotions can lead to them acting in the way that they do, but we also have some brilliant twists which in this case weren’t the ones I was expecting at all.
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  • Sara Eames
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent psychological thriller from the pen of Tammy Cohen. This is the 2nd book I have read by her and both have been excellent. They All Fall Down is set in a psychiatric hospital, where 2 women have committed suicide. Hannah - who at the start of the book, we know has done something "terrible" - is convinced that the women have been murdered. However, because of where she is - and what she has done (which is eventually revealed) - no-one believes her. The claustrophobic surroundings add An excellent psychological thriller from the pen of Tammy Cohen. This is the 2nd book I have read by her and both have been excellent. They All Fall Down is set in a psychiatric hospital, where 2 women have committed suicide. Hannah - who at the start of the book, we know has done something "terrible" - is convinced that the women have been murdered. However, because of where she is - and what she has done (which is eventually revealed) - no-one believes her. The claustrophobic surroundings add to the increasing tension. My only minor complaint was that, towards the end, it became more difficult to remember who was who in terms of character names. However, the characters were very well-written, the story dynamics believable and the plot moves at a brisk pace. I look forward to reading more from this author.
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  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    Set in a mental hospital this is one place most of us luckily will never see or encounter in any way so to go inside is fascinating.It's a gothic and dark gloomy place at once Jane Austen style and something that time forgot. Who do you believe, who is the narrator exactly and why is she there? What does she know? Why is no one listening, what do they know? This book has you asking so many questions you start to question what you are reading and what you are thinking. Tammy! What are you doing t Set in a mental hospital this is one place most of us luckily will never see or encounter in any way so to go inside is fascinating.It's a gothic and dark gloomy place at once Jane Austen style and something that time forgot. Who do you believe, who is the narrator exactly and why is she there? What does she know? Why is no one listening, what do they know? This book has you asking so many questions you start to question what you are reading and what you are thinking. Tammy! What are you doing to me? Twisting me in a mangle that's what. The therapy sessions, the issues raised and the spotlight on mental health issues and their complexity really shines here. A Cohen classic I think!
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  • Emma Curtis
    January 1, 1970
    I think this may be my favourite of Tammy Cohen's books. It was intriguing, fast-paced and surprisingly moving. Based in a psychiatric hospital, two patients commit suicide. Or did they? Hannah, another patient, doesn't believe it for one moment. Her own story is told, as she attempts to unravel the mystery and bring justice to her friends.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsThis story had so much promise but it didn't deliver for me I'm afraid! To be brutally honest the end was almost comical! Apart from the ending being completely far fetched I also found it extremely rushed. I will not be recommending this book in a hurry !
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  • Mo
    January 1, 1970
    Another of Tammy books that didn't fail to disappoint. A fast paced , well written thriller mainly set in a psychiatric institution and written from alternating characters. Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for my copy . Looking forward to her next one already
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  • Heather Eames
    January 1, 1970
    Love love love this book. Couldn't put it down and thought it was well written.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    The summary of this book intrigued me, what is the "something shocking" that Hannah has done? Why is she is on a psychiatric ward? Are women really being murdered, or is it a delusion of a mentally ill mind? Well, the shocking event that Hannah committed was a bit of a let down. In hindsight I suppose that it couldn't have been a criminal act (although this was heavily suggested), or Hannah would have been in a more secure unit. There was also an awful lot going on in this book. There is a cheat The summary of this book intrigued me, what is the "something shocking" that Hannah has done? Why is she is on a psychiatric ward? Are women really being murdered, or is it a delusion of a mentally ill mind? Well, the shocking event that Hannah committed was a bit of a let down. In hindsight I suppose that it couldn't have been a criminal act (although this was heavily suggested), or Hannah would have been in a more secure unit. There was also an awful lot going on in this book. There is a cheating spouse, an estranged sister, a suspicious clinician with a murky past, an art therapist with a severely disabled mother and an undefined relationship with someone called Annabel. Add to this a camera crew filming at the psychiatric ward (one of whom is very intense and creepy), a dysfunctional family set up with Drew's ex-lover and that's before dealing with the two women who have died on the ward. Strangely enough this meant that the book became less suspenseful and even slow going. It was hard to keep up with all the events and names involved, and even harder to care. The numerous twists at the end of the book failed to fill me with anything other than relief that I had finished the book. Unfortunately this was a bit of a disappointment and not one that I would recommend.
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  • Aleasha
    January 1, 1970
    THIS WAS SO GOOD!Okay now that's out of the way, 'They All Fall Down' is seriously addictive and un-put-down-able! I am definitely keeping this review very brief and just going to tell you to READ IT as I don't want to say one thing to give the game away. Serious twists keep you guessing and on your toes, Tammy Cohen hits it out of the park.This is the 2nd novel by Tammy I have read and it won't be the last!
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  • Shawna P.
    January 1, 1970
    Oh man did I ever need this. I have been in such a reading funk lately, and not because I haven't found great books, but because I dived into reading non-fiction recently. I have mostly been reading self help books and books about fertility so the irony of this books plot didn't escape me. I needed a break from data, tomes about how easy it is to be happy, make friends, make a million dollars...teach your cat to pee on the toilet. I had my first Tammy/Tamar rodeo with The Broken which turned out Oh man did I ever need this. I have been in such a reading funk lately, and not because I haven't found great books, but because I dived into reading non-fiction recently. I have mostly been reading self help books and books about fertility so the irony of this books plot didn't escape me. I needed a break from data, tomes about how easy it is to be happy, make friends, make a million dollars...teach your cat to pee on the toilet. I had my first Tammy/Tamar rodeo with The Broken which turned out to be one of my favorites ever. Like Mark Edwards, Ms. Cohen takes seemingly ever day scenarios, adds some messed up characters and creepy atmosphere...always making for a great read. If she and Mark ever wrote something together, I would die of happiness. They All Fall Down is about a young woman named Hannah, who after a tragedy, is in a psychiatric unit. We meet a lot of the other girls there ala' Girl Interrupted, as well as the staff. While she is staying there, two girls commit suicide and it is a huge shock to those who knew them. Hannah refuses to believe they killed themselves. Could the enigmatic doctor be behind this? Or even her husband? Hannah and her mother start to wonder if Hannah if she is safer within the confines of her mind...or at the unit. Really good page turner that had me connecting the dots until the last page. If I did learn anything from this book it's (view spoiler)[ self medicate and don't go to therapy ha! (hide spoiler)]
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah is a new patient in a women’s low-security psychiatric facility called The Meadows outside London, the result of an incident Cohen takes some time to reveal. In the several weeks before this psychological thriller opens, two of the facility’s dozen or so patients have committed suicide. In fact, the first line is, “Charlie cut her wrists last week with a shard of caramelized sugar.” Hannah doesn’t believe Charlie killed herself. She believes both of the so-called suicides were murder. But Hannah is a new patient in a women’s low-security psychiatric facility called The Meadows outside London, the result of an incident Cohen takes some time to reveal. In the several weeks before this psychological thriller opens, two of the facility’s dozen or so patients have committed suicide. In fact, the first line is, “Charlie cut her wrists last week with a shard of caramelized sugar.” Hannah doesn’t believe Charlie killed herself. She believes both of the so-called suicides were murder. But who will believe her?Most of the short chapters are told in either Hannah’s first-person point of view or that of her mother Corinne, in third-person. Corinne isn’t sure what to make of Hannah’s accusations. She wants to believe her daughter, but Hannah’s done some strange things lately that weaken her credibility. At the same time, Corinne is desperate to believe her daughter is safe at The Meadows. And the director, Dr. Oliver Roberts, and the art therapist, the supportive Laura, as well as most of the other staff seem capable and conscientious, don’t they? Are these people who they say they are? Their contention that their patients are high-risk, with histories of suicide attempts, never quite reassures her.Author Cohen has assembled an interesting group of patients: Odelle, thin as a stick with serious eating disorders; Stella, whose otherworldly appearance results from too many cosmetic surgeries, including removal of a rib to achieve a smaller waistline; and Judith, who says she’s just being “honest” when she makes her intentionally cruel remarks. As events unfold and confidences are shared, these patients form a kind of lamenting Greek chorus. The characters are mostly well developed; however, it was jarring when the patients’ ages would be mentioned. They were in their mid-thirties or so (Hannah is 32), but they came across like teenagers. Perhaps this is because they are highly dependent, vulnerable personalities.Throw into the mix a lurking filmmaker and his cameraman working on a “fly-on-the-wall” documentary. The filmmakers were a nice touch (with the director Justin “doused in self-absorption like cheap cologne”), since an underlying theme of the book is perception. What does the “neutral” eye of the camera perceive? What do each of the characters perceive about each other, and do they trust each others’ perceptions—they certainly share doubts about Hannah’s—and does she even trust her own?In general, the writing style is effective and the pace is good and varied. Cohen uses cliffhangers to keep you reading “one more chapter”—mysterious items and messages turn up in the hospital, a red baby hat on Corinne’s doorstep. Eventually these are all explained, but the repeated technique begins to feel artificial. On the whole, an intriguing psychological thriller.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah’s world comes crashing down around her feet when she slips on a fast food flyer left outside her flat for recycling, after hurriedly escaping from a row with her husband. In the rush to get away she takes a very nasty tumble. Her shocked husband Danny insists on taking her to hospital to have her nasty wrist injury checked out and also to check out if their six-month pregnancy has been threatened by the heavy fall. They are both equally devastated when they find out Hannah is suffering fr Hannah’s world comes crashing down around her feet when she slips on a fast food flyer left outside her flat for recycling, after hurriedly escaping from a row with her husband. In the rush to get away she takes a very nasty tumble. Her shocked husband Danny insists on taking her to hospital to have her nasty wrist injury checked out and also to check out if their six-month pregnancy has been threatened by the heavy fall. They are both equally devastated when they find out Hannah is suffering from pseudocyesis and the shocking result of the examination caused Hannah to suffer a complete breakdown.Installed in a very stylish and modern psychiatric facility Hannah slowly comes to terms with what she has lost; her baby Emily. The rest, relaxation and therapy sessions are soon working well and Hannah feels well enough to go home. Then two patient suicides rock the steady boat and Hannah‘s condition quickly deteriorates. She knows that she is in danger because she knows for certain that the dead girls did not take their own lives. But nobody believes her; not the patients or the staff. She starts to conduct investigations of her own to gather evidence to prove that she is right, but as the viper’s den is unsettled, so Hannah puts herself in mortal danger.'They All Fall Down' is a thrilling psychological suspense story. Secrets, lies, deception and manipulation all play a part in this novel. It’s is not only the patients that are at risk either as new information is imparted to one of the relatives. Somewhere, somehow a secret adversary with an axe to grind is playing the role of a puppet-master, leading everyone down the path they certainly do not want to tread. The storytelling is incisively planned, the setting and background meticulously researched, and the characters ‘worked’ with skill. This is a chilling tale of revenge mercilessly metered out, the characters singing to the tune of the cunning conductor. The inmates tell their sad, twisted stories of narcissism, betrayal, abuse and more whilst the carers have devastating stories of their own. It’s a veritable murder fest, the body count rising at regular intervals. I was particularly impressed with the ending which perfectly fitted the dark, twisted story.I would like to thank NetGalley and publisher Transworld Digital for my copy of 'They All Fall Down', by Tammy Cohen. I enjoyed this novel and loved the way the pace accelerated as the storytelling moved forward. I recommend this a good read within the genre.
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  • Megan Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah had a normal life consisting of a good job and a loving husband. Until she did something wrong and her life crumbled around her. Now Hannah is in a psychiatric clinic, a place where she and all the other residents should be safe but are they? For in this clinic, patients keep dying. They are written off as suicides but Hannah has her doubts. Can Hannah make anyone believe her before the killer strikes again?Like a lot of psychological thrillers this is a slow burn as Cohen fleshes out bac Hannah had a normal life consisting of a good job and a loving husband. Until she did something wrong and her life crumbled around her. Now Hannah is in a psychiatric clinic, a place where she and all the other residents should be safe but are they? For in this clinic, patients keep dying. They are written off as suicides but Hannah has her doubts. Can Hannah make anyone believe her before the killer strikes again?Like a lot of psychological thrillers this is a slow burn as Cohen fleshes out backstories and hints at the plot direction. I read this in one sitting and slowly but surely found myself absorbed in Cohen's story.That is not to say I did not enjoy this read as I did. The plot is complex and I loved all the backstory, there is a lot of background needed for this plot to be exciting and Cohen drip feeds everything we need to know about Hannah and the people around her, always revealing something exciting and always leaving the reader wanting more. Hannah's story and the stories of the other patients are tragic and will definitely pull at your heart strings but they are so important to the plot.Setting this in a psychiatric clinic is a great idea, we have the feeling of being safe and secure whilst knowing there is something bubbling under the surface. The reader is never quite sure who to trust and by the end of the book it seems that everyone had a secret. The reveal is obvious but fits the plot and left me feeling satisfied with the book. Hannah as a character is someone who is terrific to follow, we see her at her lowest and follow her as she tries to put herself back together. We learn about the events that meant she was in a psychiatric hospital which only means the reader feels for her and what she has been through even more. Hannah is not the only great character, they are all worthy additions to the book and ensure for enjoyable reading. 'They All Fall Down' is an unsettling, dark thriller that I thoroughly enjoyed reading and absorbing myself in. Whilst I did really like this novel, there is nothing that sets this apart from anything else for me. 
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