The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen
A woman's place is saving the universe. Think comic books can t feature strong female protagonists? Think again! In The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen you ll meet the most fascinating exemplars of the powerful, compelling, entertaining, and heroic female characters who ve populated comic books from the very beginning. This spectacular sisterhood includes costumed crimebusters like Miss Fury, super-spies like Tiffany Sinn, sci-fi pioneers like Gale Allen, and even kid troublemakers like Little Lulu. With vintage art, publication details, a decade-by-decade survey of industry trends and women s roles in comics, and spotlights on iconic favorites like Wonder Woman and Ms. Marvel, The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen proves that not only do strong female protagonists belong in comics, they ve always been there."

The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen Details

TitleThe Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2017
PublisherQuirk Books
ISBN1594749485
ISBN-139781594749483
Number of pages240 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Sequential Art, Comics, History, Graphic Novels

The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen Review

  • Jody McGrath
    November 21, 2016
    This is about female superheroes, mostly unique, obscure ones. It is spread in decade format and has a lot of good information about them. I think I would have liked it more if they would have hit on a few more of the major ones though. It went through a lot a deifferent comic genres, and a lot of them felt demeaning,which didn't surprise me at all. Maybe not my kind of book, but I have a friend who is really into female superheroes and she will probably right a glowing review!* I read an ARC of This is about female superheroes, mostly unique, obscure ones. It is spread in decade format and has a lot of good information about them. I think I would have liked it more if they would have hit on a few more of the major ones though. It went through a lot a deifferent comic genres, and a lot of them felt demeaning,which didn't surprise me at all. Maybe not my kind of book, but I have a friend who is really into female superheroes and she will probably right a glowing review!* I read an ARC of this book and gave an honest review *
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  • Carol
    May 14, 2017
    I received a digital ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review.For comics novices and fanatics alike, you can expect a historical overview and explanation of some of the most famous, infamous, and all-but-forgotten heroines of comics and webcomics. Each section focuses on one decade, giving insight into the historical context of the overall comics market and how this impacted women (or, in some cases, how women impacted the industry). After the decade overview the b I received a digital ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review.For comics novices and fanatics alike, you can expect a historical overview and explanation of some of the most famous, infamous, and all-but-forgotten heroines of comics and webcomics. Each section focuses on one decade, giving insight into the historical context of the overall comics market and how this impacted women (or, in some cases, how women impacted the industry). After the decade overview the book provides individual character bios, context, sample panels, and how to get your hands on the comics runs (spoiler alert: many are, sadly, nearly impossible to find nowadays). The end of each section wraps up with the Hero of the Decade, which is where you'll find the comics heroines that are prevalent in pop culture: your Wonder Womans and your Batgirls, etc. This fantastic reference of female comic book characters and creators is destined for my own personal library shelves!
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  • Pam ☼Because Someone Must Be a Thorn☼ Tee
    March 28, 2017
    ~ review copySISTERHOOD of SUPERWOMEN was an interesting read. The art choices are great and of course, there can never be enough of them.The author takes a look at the progression, and sometimes regression, of female characters in American comic books. She breaks the book up into chapters by decades; a format that works exceedingly well as the American culture changed over time, responding to events such as World War II and the Groovy 60's.One of the features I liked in the book was the inclusi ~ review copySISTERHOOD of SUPERWOMEN was an interesting read. The art choices are great and of course, there can never be enough of them.The author takes a look at the progression, and sometimes regression, of female characters in American comic books. She breaks the book up into chapters by decades; a format that works exceedingly well as the American culture changed over time, responding to events such as World War II and the Groovy 60's.One of the features I liked in the book was the inclusion of real-life women in the Comics industry. It makes sense, for example, that both women artists and managers would pick up the slack during the 1940s while so many men were in the military.SUMMARYTHE SPECTACULAR SISTERHOOD OF SUPERWOMEN is going to appeal a lot people. Fans of comics and anime are going to want to add it to their libraries because it provides a useful history. Those of us who like comics and are interesting in expanding our reading experience are going to find it helpful in finding new series. There are plenty of the ones you'll recognize, like Lu-Lu and Wonderwoman, but there will also likely be ones that are new to you --like Torchy Brown and Seniorita Rio.
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  • Rachel Mans Mckenny
    March 2, 2017
    Long story short: read this.Full review here: https://rachelmans.wordpress.com/2017...
  • Michelle (In Libris Veritas)
    April 29, 2017
    4.5 Stars! #readathonIt’s pretty easy to assume that comic books are a man’s game. When you think about the big name heroes out there a lot of them are men, some of the most vocal fans are men, the majority of the comic book companies are run by men. From the outside looking in it can be pretty sparse looking, but women have been a part of the industry since it’s beginning both in the creative chairs and on the pages. The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen is a book that serves to highlight so 4.5 Stars! #readathonIt’s pretty easy to assume that comic books are a man’s game. When you think about the big name heroes out there a lot of them are men, some of the most vocal fans are men, the majority of the comic book companies are run by men. From the outside looking in it can be pretty sparse looking, but women have been a part of the industry since it’s beginning both in the creative chairs and on the pages. The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen is a book that serves to highlight some notable characters throughout the decades.Superheroes are some of the few instances where I enjoy the ‘extra credit’ research I tend to do on the internet. I like the weird origins stories and the not so popular side characters that time has desperately tried to forget, but I also like finding new favorites from older eras. Sisterhood delivers on both points. There are a lot of characters packed into this book, spanning from the 1930’s to the current decade we get a wide variety of women who have appeared in comic books. Each entry comes complete with a notable quote, their first appearance, creator, and small summary; underneath all of that, we get a longer summary of their adventures and their impact (or lack thereof). This isn’t a book that paints all of the characters in a positive light and Nicholson is quick to point out flaws in the stories and the characters themselves. It’s important to note that not all of the women in this book are in fact superwomen, some are normal women in more contemporary stories like romance or straightforward mysteries. I personally didn’t find this to be a problem though as I’m rather uninformed on those genres of comics and I genuinely enjoyed learning more about them.Nicholson doesn’t shy away from the more risque comics either, and several main characters from sex comics are also featured which I honestly didn’t know had as big of a market as they did in the time periods they show up in.I’m really looking forward to trying to find some of these comics on my own. A lot of these comics are ones that I would have sort of glossed over and moved on, pegging them for something I wouldn’t like, but I actually wouldn’t mind trying out an old romance comic or seeing what the old T&A comics were actually like (versus the way I picture them). If you enjoy reading comics, especially those with prominent female characters, this is definitely a book to check out! There are plenty of genres to choose from and a lot of information given, so I feel that everyone is bound to find one or two that they want to learn more about.
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  • Milky Mixer
    May 25, 2017
    No question, this is beautiful book. From its wraparound cover and transparent dustjacket to its crisp pages and colorful decade-by-decade breakdown, it is clear to see a lot of love went into this book. Less clear is a thread that ties these characters together or explains why they were chosen to be featured. Not that I didn't enjoy myself! I have to admit, an encyclopedia of obscure comic book heroines appeals to me, and I may even track down some of the unknown offerings presented. (The autho No question, this is beautiful book. From its wraparound cover and transparent dustjacket to its crisp pages and colorful decade-by-decade breakdown, it is clear to see a lot of love went into this book. Less clear is a thread that ties these characters together or explains why they were chosen to be featured. Not that I didn't enjoy myself! I have to admit, an encyclopedia of obscure comic book heroines appeals to me, and I may even track down some of the unknown offerings presented. (The author does a great job of pointing curious novices in the right direction.) But if they are meant to be obscure, then why are famous characters like Dazzler and Little Lulu here? If the book is simply meant as a collection of the diversity of female-led comics and stories, then ok, it does that. And it's fun! However, some of these characters star in a maximum of 1 or 2 issues, so other than being notorious or novelty, I'm not sure what impact they made in the history of heroines. If the book is aiming to be a historical album showing change over 80+ years of comics, it might have been peppered with some well-known characters, too. Characters who not only showcase this diverse representation of unique women and girls, but who were also gamechangers in the boys' club of comics over the years, in one way or another. Characters like Little Orphan Annie, Scarlett from GI Joe, Black Canary, Black Orchid, Crazy Jane, Dorothy Spinner, Sue Storm, Storm, She-Hulk, Sheena Queen of the Jungle, Rima the Jungle Girl, Red Sonja, and Sabrina the Teenage Witch might seem more mainstream (and maybe the author was avoiding that), but they defied formula and would have been interesting inclusions in this decade-by-decade approach. They were each rebels in their own way, and they each stood out alongside their male counterparts in ways that made them unique "for their time." So maybe it wasn't everything I wanted it to be, and maybe I didn't understand the odd reflections on some of the characters (even Wonder Woman seems to get snubbed a bit), and maybe I didn't understand how the author could possibly think Jem & the Holograms was a bad show. But it's still a cool book that I'm happy to have in my library. And I smiled seeing Katy Keene!
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  • Artemis
    May 11, 2017
    'A woman's place is saving the universe.'A great history lesson about the leading ladies in comic books, who, along with female creators and artists, have always been around in a supposed boys' club.'The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen' by Hope Nicholson lists long-forgotten and overlooked female characters in chronological order from the 1930s to the 2010s. It is all very interesting. And with so many diverse and totally different females who are products of their time, you will find that 'A woman's place is saving the universe.'A great history lesson about the leading ladies in comic books, who, along with female creators and artists, have always been around in a supposed boys' club.'The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen' by Hope Nicholson lists long-forgotten and overlooked female characters in chronological order from the 1930s to the 2010s. It is all very interesting. And with so many diverse and totally different females who are products of their time, you will find that Ms Nicholson has missed out some of them. For example, there is no mention of 'Rat Queens' - but 'Jem and the Holograms' gets its own section! - nor specific analyses on a lot of DC and Marvel superheroines like Power Girl and Kitty Pryde. Plus, why no history on Betty and Veronica and Sabrina the Teenage Witch? However, Nicholson recognizes stereotypes of women, including the "feminist", "strong female characters", who are, again, products of their time; such as the dark, brooding, scantily-clad, dominatrix anti-heroine that was so popular in the 1990s (i.e. Witchblade, and this could apply to "empowered" heroines like Catwoman). Unsatisfactory fan elements aside, I recommend the fun and educational 'The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen' to any comic book fan - young and old, male and female, and everything else. It can be devoured in a day.Women have always ruled. They have always been cool. We only need to remember and include them in any medium and field.Final Score: 4/5
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  • Billie
    March 6, 2017
    How do you include a character of Raina Telgemeier's but not include anything from the Tamakis or Noelle Stevenson?
  • Kendra
    December 5, 2016
    So here's a great primer if you're somewhat familiar with comics (and female characters in comics) but not so familiar that you're not looking for new material to read and enjoy. Hope Nicholson breaks this book up into decades, and this provides a handy introduction to the limitations and flavor of each. There are brief historical notes, a choice illustration pulled from the panels of each comic, and a summary description of what each "sister" gets up to. As Nicholson herself notes, calling thes So here's a great primer if you're somewhat familiar with comics (and female characters in comics) but not so familiar that you're not looking for new material to read and enjoy. Hope Nicholson breaks this book up into decades, and this provides a handy introduction to the limitations and flavor of each. There are brief historical notes, a choice illustration pulled from the panels of each comic, and a summary description of what each "sister" gets up to. As Nicholson herself notes, calling these women "superwomen" is fraught, since so many of them possess none of the powers which typify our current understanding of "supers"—instead, she points out, the roots of the superheroine doesn't strictly lie in superhero comics of the male type but in detective comics and female sleuths.On the whole, I found this book a fascinating glimpse into a world with which I am only slightly familiar. It was also gratifying to find many familiar faces in the more contemporary decades—from Bitch Planet, Vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine , Rat Queens, Vol. 1: Sass & Sorcery , and of course both Carol Danvers of Captain Marvel (Marvel NOW!) #1 and Kamala Khan of Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal fame. But there are plenty of "sisters" I have not yet had the pleasure of reading, and in that way this book is the perfect discovery tool. With its short, sharply written chapters and its sensitivity to present concerns (past "sisters" get a review on how they measure up when it comes to sexist, racist, or homophobic stereotypes), I could not have been landed with a better book to tide me over lunch breaks at work.
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  • TammyJo Eckhart
    March 21, 2017
    Hope Nicholson has a lot of knowledge about comic books, the role of female characters in comics, and the changes to the literary art form from the 1930s through today. However, while she Nicholson mentions several times in the book that this is a "feminist" book, the criteria for including (or not including) particular characters was a mystery. It was a real adventure to learn about comics and character I may never have heard of but some series and characters were missing or included that made Hope Nicholson has a lot of knowledge about comic books, the role of female characters in comics, and the changes to the literary art form from the 1930s through today. However, while she Nicholson mentions several times in the book that this is a "feminist" book, the criteria for including (or not including) particular characters was a mystery. It was a real adventure to learn about comics and character I may never have heard of but some series and characters were missing or included that made me scratch my head. "Girl Genius" is discussed in the 2010s introduction yet none of the characters is focused on yet back in the 1940s chapter there are several "weak" characters that made me cringe to even read about. Give me a reason for each character to be chosen, make it clear, so that a one-issue heroine seems worthy to be included along with an award-winning, decades long superhero.The book is divided into nine chapters, each focused on a decade of time, and each ending with a "Icon of the Decade." Some of these are "superwomen" and some are "awesome" but many of the characters seem to be included because they were unique or subversive and without a clear definition of why characters (and comics) were chosen the overall group feels uneven. The information about the characters and comics is also a bit uneven. Many entries were so detailed about the character's life and adventures that I felt no need to go and find the "essential reading" that concludes each section. Other entries were more critique of what is stereotypical (or not), sexy (or not), subversive (or not) than who the character was or the comic they appeared in. I was pleased that each entry had at least one image of the character though these ranged from a small square or rectangle to a full-page spread. I'm not sure why some of these images were more expansive than others but the small ones were a bit annoying.This was an entertaining and fun read. The book itself is superior craft, stitched pages, needed dust cover, and colorful hardcover design; it is clear that Quirk values this line of books about comic books that they are putting out. I just wanted a bit more from the inside, too.
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  • Stephanie Cooke
    May 4, 2017
    In an era where the female characters known worldwide to geeks and non-geeks alike can be counted on one hand (ie. Wonder Woman, Batgirl), The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen couldn’t come at a better time. Highlighting countless comic book heroines, Hope Nicholson’s well-researched and enlightening book takes us through the eras that these characters came out of.Nicholson is no stranger to research and has been doing work as a comics historian for quite some time now. Her reprints and rest In an era where the female characters known worldwide to geeks and non-geeks alike can be counted on one hand (ie. Wonder Woman, Batgirl), The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen couldn’t come at a better time. Highlighting countless comic book heroines, Hope Nicholson’s well-researched and enlightening book takes us through the eras that these characters came out of.Nicholson is no stranger to research and has been doing work as a comics historian for quite some time now. Her reprints and restorations of the Canadian heroes Nelvana of the Northern Lights and Brok Windsor got noticed by many and helped launch her career forward as a smart, and meticulous researcher, always on the lookout for interesting projects that the market is in need of.It makes a lot of sense that Nicholson was brought on for this project and I honestly can’t think of a better person to have put this together with precision, accuracy and genuine affection for the characters and the content.While there are other books such as Jon Morris’ The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains and The League of Regrettable Superheroes which poke fun at some of the sillier characters in a delightful way, The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen does a fantastic job of taking characters, silly and all, relatively seriously and giving them a proper history that you may or may not have known about prior to picking the book up.The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen gives you enough information and teaches you about amazing female characters throughout the years and makes you (or maybe just me!) want to read more about them and find their comics or campaign to have some of these characters in new and modern comics.Quirk Books has been putting out a TON of great geek-related content lately. The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen along with Wonder Woman, and Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs and other such books are much sought after and needed. They’re appeasing a demographic within the geek industry that has long been neglected (and is STILL largely neglected) and finding a market with a crowd that is desperate for quality non-fiction (and fiction) that caters to things that that they care about.Verdict:The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen is an absolute MUST BUY. It’s something that I truly believe should not just be on the shelves of every girl but every person, period. It’s a great reminder that strong women and great characters have been around for ages and there are more names that we should know besides Wonder Woman and Batgirl.This book is a great book for a collection or as a coffee table book – as a present for a friend or a present for yourself. It’s just great and I really and truly believe that you need to pick up a copy ASAP.NOTE: I’ve worked with Hope before on The Secret Loves of Geek Girls so my review isn’t completely impartial. That being said upfront, if I felt I couldn’t provide you all with a honest review of this book, I would have passed it on to someone else so please trust that this review comes with integrity.
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  • LH Johnson
    January 9, 2017
    Due out in May, this is one of those books that I want to write about now and talk about now because it's great. Simple as that; I have been looking for books and for writers that historicise their work from a female and a feminist perspective because, so often, that is a perspective that is lacking. And it's a perspective that I've not come across that much in comics and so, because of all of that, and the characters that this text covers, and the sheer welcome presence of it, that I review it Due out in May, this is one of those books that I want to write about now and talk about now because it's great. Simple as that; I have been looking for books and for writers that historicise their work from a female and a feminist perspective because, so often, that is a perspective that is lacking. And it's a perspective that I've not come across that much in comics and so, because of all of that, and the characters that this text covers, and the sheer welcome presence of it, that I review it and tell you to get it on order and get it on request and to find a hole in your budget for it now. Nicholson writes with a lot of love for her subject and isn't afraid to pull and poke at the holes within it. There are always problems in beloved things; nothing is not perfect and there's a skill in being able to love and to address the problematics within your subject. Nicholson doesn't shy away from addressing these and I was struck most powerfully by this with her discussion of Witchblade. Witchblade is a comic I've always struggled with visually and Nicholson both reassured me with this perspective whilst helping me to understand the aesthetic more. And I like this; I like people that make me think twice about something. So yes, this is an early review, but it's a review that I've sat on for about two weeks now and that I don't want to sit on any more. This is an important and relevant book that talks about heroines ranging from Squirrel Girl through to Xavin through to The Wing. Nicholson ranges widely and freely around her topic and I like that a lot. I like this book, can you tell? There's a place for it in the world, and I'd like it to inhabit it quite solidly. As Nicholson herself writes, strong female protagonists "belong in comics [and] they've been there all along."My thanks to the publishers for a review copy.
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  • Emilia P
    May 22, 2017
    Ehhhh. SO this is a decade by decade encyclopedia of ladies in comics, especially superheroes, crime solvers, aliens, teen angels and romantic nurses. It's kinda repetitive and features like one page (if available) of most of their stories. It's dense, it's clearly a labor of love, and I really salute it and know it would be well loved in the right hands. They're not quite mine, but close. Nicholson is a great lover, seeker, and publisher of obscure lady-driven comics, and I deeply salute that p Ehhhh. SO this is a decade by decade encyclopedia of ladies in comics, especially superheroes, crime solvers, aliens, teen angels and romantic nurses. It's kinda repetitive and features like one page (if available) of most of their stories. It's dense, it's clearly a labor of love, and I really salute it and know it would be well loved in the right hands. They're not quite mine, but close. Nicholson is a great lover, seeker, and publisher of obscure lady-driven comics, and I deeply salute that project and am grateful and impressed that someone is doing it. It was definitely cool, but not quite enough for me to seek more of her stuff out. That's on me, not her. Ah well.
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  • Jessi
    May 22, 2017
    I was surprised but grateful to get an ARC of this book after it was already on the shelves. Especially when I saw it was advertised in O magazine. And for a good reason. This book is very well-explored but with short engaging sections that start with a brief description of the comic, a lovely quote, and then information about the creators and when the book first appeared. Not just the popular comics, this book touches on some that only ran for a few issues, ones that are... not quite ready for I was surprised but grateful to get an ARC of this book after it was already on the shelves. Especially when I saw it was advertised in O magazine. And for a good reason. This book is very well-explored but with short engaging sections that start with a brief description of the comic, a lovely quote, and then information about the creators and when the book first appeared. Not just the popular comics, this book touches on some that only ran for a few issues, ones that are... not quite ready for prime time, and some comics that are just plain weird. I was intrigued by a few of the books based on Nicholson's descriptions and added to my TBR. As easy and fun a nonfiction book as you'll ever find.
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  • FloeticFlo
    May 9, 2017
    The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen pleasantly surprised me! I took it on my flight expecting to read only the chapter introductions and then skim the entries. But I found myself pretty much reading it cover to cover. I learned a lot about the comic book industry in the past, and lots of random fun facts. (For example, did you know that Nurse Comics were a big thing? Yep. Who knew?? I mean, maybe you did, but I didn't.) I also enjoyed reading the entries about the superwomen. It was nice to The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen pleasantly surprised me! I took it on my flight expecting to read only the chapter introductions and then skim the entries. But I found myself pretty much reading it cover to cover. I learned a lot about the comic book industry in the past, and lots of random fun facts. (For example, did you know that Nurse Comics were a big thing? Yep. Who knew?? I mean, maybe you did, but I didn't.) I also enjoyed reading the entries about the superwomen. It was nice to see...Read the full review on May 11, 2017 at Book Nerds Across America: http://www.booknerdsacrossamerica.com...
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  • Heather
    June 1, 2017
    Loved this. Great setup with high quality images throughout. Fun, awful, smart, boring, and/or (often) obscure female characters that Nicholson places firmly in their larger cultural context give a rich history of comics themselves. Highly enjoyable and easy read.
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  • Genevieve
    May 19, 2017
    4.5 stars
  • Lynne
    May 22, 2017
    E-galley review to come.
  • Emma Clement
    March 4, 2017
    I loved this! Super great to learn about all kinds of women in comic books. Well written, researched, and with great images from the comics!
  • Michaelene
    January 25, 2017
    I’ll admit that my interest in comics is relatively recent. By that, I mean that I jumped on the wagon around the time The Avengers movie came out, and by Deadpool, I was hooked. What I noticed as I browsed the shelves were the prevalence of males/heroes, and I asked myself: what roles did women play - both as characters and as developers and illustrators - in the comic industry? Were there more archetypes than Wonder Woman and Betty & Veronica?I’m happy to say it’s a resounding yes on that I’ll admit that my interest in comics is relatively recent. By that, I mean that I jumped on the wagon around the time The Avengers movie came out, and by Deadpool, I was hooked. What I noticed as I browsed the shelves were the prevalence of males/heroes, and I asked myself: what roles did women play - both as characters and as developers and illustrators - in the comic industry? Were there more archetypes than Wonder Woman and Betty & Veronica?I’m happy to say it’s a resounding yes on that last one, folks. The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen by Hope Nicholson is a comprehensive reference book that is a must-read! Nicholson dives era by era, and we discover the trends of the decade, who was working behind the scenes, and what women were doing, facing and saving in their story lines.After each section, Nicholson also tells us where to find reprints of comics (digital or print) so we can see these ladies in action. But it’s not all positives for comics - we have a long way to go in having comics target diverse audiences and in doing so, broadening their scope. But there’s a silver lining for Nicholson:“...this decade’s readers - especially the younger generation - are clamoring for the pages to reflect the diversity they see in their lives, in their social media feeds, and in the mirror.”I urge any comic enthusiast - or simply someone with a passing interest in feminine roles in an important part of literature - would gladly immerse themselves between the pages of this book. You’ll find yourself coming back just to learn.And isn’t that what a good book is supposed to do?*I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Glen
    February 6, 2017
    I won an ARC of this book in a goodreads drawing.The title about says it all. Taken decade by decade, it's a bunch of profiles of female comic book characters the author finds exceptional. One can always find exceptions to books like these, but I won't quibble.Infested by PC, the way a book like this probably has to be, but not too obnoxious with it.
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  • Erin
    February 5, 2017
    Super interesting, covering a wide range of comic types and superwomen. I have a bunch of reading to do! Hope Nicholson's writing is easy to read, conversational, she knows her stuff, and she seems really passionate about it--but that doesn't stop her from poking holes in the portrayal of women throughout the ages. Small, tiny critique, some of the comic scans were too small to read, but that might be fixed by the actual printing as I had an ARC.
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  • Jill
    March 29, 2017
    This is truly amazing book. It is beautiful to look at as it is full of images. But even better is the historical analyse of his women have been depicted. Once I enjoy a bit more, I am donating it to the local women's studies department. It is that good.
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  • Christina
    January 27, 2017
    I loved this book. I really enjoyed the breakdown of different time periods and learning more about the obscure superheroes along with a few well known ones. It was a nice read, very engaging and although I wish there was more it was still pretty detailed. It was pretty inclusive as well with a variety of races, backgrounds and orientations. Which I personally enjoyed, it was nice to read more than the cookie cutter type of hero for once. I would definitely and have recommended.This was an unbia I loved this book. I really enjoyed the breakdown of different time periods and learning more about the obscure superheroes along with a few well known ones. It was a nice read, very engaging and although I wish there was more it was still pretty detailed. It was pretty inclusive as well with a variety of races, backgrounds and orientations. Which I personally enjoyed, it was nice to read more than the cookie cutter type of hero for once. I would definitely and have recommended.This was an unbiased and honest review in exchange for a free copy.
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  • Kirsty (overflowing library)
    January 5, 2017
    I'd describe this as a coffee table book which you'd dip in and out of rather than read cover to cover. An interesting overview of female comic heroes. Too DC/Marvel focused for my liking but interesting enough.
  • Variaciones Enrojo
    August 21, 2016
    Futuro tomo de la historia de las mujeres en los comics que seguro pasa el Bechdel Test.
  • Andréa
    October 19, 2016
    Note: I accessed digital review copies of this book through Edelweiss and NetGalley.
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