My So-Called Freelance Life
Tired of clocking in and losing out? Want to pursue creative, fulfilling work on your own time and also make a living in the process? My So-Called Freelance Life is a how-to guidebook for women who want to avoid the daily grind and turn their freelance dreams into reality. Michelle Goodman, author of The Anti 9-to-5 Guide and self-proclaimed former “wage slave,” offers tips, advice, how-to’s, and everything else a woman needs to pursue a freelance career.Confused as to whether you should tell your clients that the odd gurgling sound during a conference call is emanating from the infant sleeping on your shoulder? Goodman answers all of the unusual questions that may arise for women exploring the freelance world. Far more than your normal business guidebook, My So-Called Freelance Life blends candid, humorous anecdotes from a wide variety of freelancers with Goodman’s own personal experiences as a creative worker for hire.Whether you’re a freelance first-timer or a seasoned creative professional, copyediting queen or web guru, My So-Called Freelance Life is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in freelancing.

My So-Called Freelance Life Details

TitleMy So-Called Freelance Life
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 30th, 2008
PublisherSeal Press
ISBN-139781580052597
Rating
GenreBusiness, Nonfiction, Language, Writing, Self Help, Entrepreneurship

My So-Called Freelance Life Review

  • Elevate Difference
    January 1, 1970
    Goodman has been freelancing for sixteen years at the time of publication. From the jump, her writing is accessible and fun. The follow-up to the somewhat well known The Anti-9-5 Guide: Practical Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube, Goodman is once again onto something. What other how-to guides (repeatedly) use phrases like “get this freelance party started”? When you read a book like My So-Called Freelance Life, it isn’t hard to wonder how anyone can break from a traditional mindset abo Goodman has been freelancing for sixteen years at the time of publication. From the jump, her writing is accessible and fun. The follow-up to the somewhat well known The Anti-9-5 Guide: Practical Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube, Goodman is once again onto something. What other how-to guides (repeatedly) use phrases like “get this freelance party started”? When you read a book like My So-Called Freelance Life, it isn’t hard to wonder how anyone can break from a traditional mindset about how to make money and allow themselves the freedom to quit nasty situations. My guess is that radical personal politics and at least a small cushion of safety are two important components. They were for me.Goodman is particularly skilled at debunking the myth that freelancers are kept women who have quaint hobbies and fleeting interests. She also doesn’t assume anything is off limits because of gender. Want to be a freelance welder? According to Goodman, you just need a solid business plan – and not the ugly 200-page kind. Other practical tips include choosing your client instead of being so desperate; they choose you (and you’re forced to accept every nasty job that falls in your lap). Always be moving toward goals: better clients, bigger paychecks, more freedom. Isn’t that why you went solo in the first place? In other words, don’t be afraid to give yourself a promotion just because you’re self-employed.You also should be clear: freelancing will not always mean working for others. Goodman loosely defines freelancers as women who have gone on to start their own businesses with multiple additional employees. Freelancers are also women (much like myself) who do creative work for pay and supplement their income with assorted odd jobs, often in the service industry or as social servants.My So-Called Freelance Life is also a somewhat refreshing anti-establishment approach to making your own way, particularly during the recession that Americans currently face. Sometimes, freelancing can shrink some costs (less commute equals lower car insurance and repairs, for example). Fewer dry cleaning bills aren’t the only reason to work at home. And were you thinking about leaving your 9-5 while still in massive debt? Goodman doesn’t politely say, “Think it over.” She tells you to stick it out or your life, even if being lived in daily cube hell, will only get exponentially worse.The only real criticism I’d have is that despite inclusive, pro-woman language that fills this pseudo self-help book, I cringe whenever I see a female write the phrase, “I’m their bitch.” Reclamation of the word aside, maybe this is a liberal feminism I don’t personally employ, but I do think a better word could easily be used in this type of context.Freelancers abroad be warned – a lot of this information is for stateside folk. Certainly you should write what you know, so Goodman did just that, but if you’re a struggling freelancer in say, London or Cairo, this will give you great generalized advice, but the money sections (and some of the tech specs) won’t do you a bit of good. The author acknowledges her own limited scope, but she doesn’t spend time going into it further than that.You don’t have to reach the final chapters before this book makes you believe you can make it as a freelancer. That, in our culture of fear and negativity, might be the most valuable aspect of all.Review by Brittany Shoot
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Before I bought this book, I handed it to a friend and said, "Do I need to read this or am I buying it because it's pink?" I had my doubts--not only about the fluff-potential of a freelance book marketed so shamelessly to young women but also because I've had more experience as a freelancer than people who might pick up a Freelancing 101 kind of book. So I should say that some of this info applied to me, and some of it didn't, but overall I'm glad I took a refresher course. Freelancing in a void Before I bought this book, I handed it to a friend and said, "Do I need to read this or am I buying it because it's pink?" I had my doubts--not only about the fluff-potential of a freelance book marketed so shamelessly to young women but also because I've had more experience as a freelancer than people who might pick up a Freelancing 101 kind of book. So I should say that some of this info applied to me, and some of it didn't, but overall I'm glad I took a refresher course. Freelancing in a void can be lonely sometimes, sure, but you also run the risk of getting wrapped up swinging project to project, without an overall business plan, little mentoring from other professionals, or a basic idea of how other people handle the challenges in their careers (scheduling, bookkeeping, time management, marketing, and affordable healthcare, to name a few). Michelle Goodman draws on her own experience as a writer and editor, but the book is also filled with snippets of advice from freelance professionals in other fields. She makes a valiant effort to incorporate all freelancers under the book's umbrella, but some sections made me wish the book was tailored more specifically to women in my field. The section on writing a business plan, especially, was way too broad, and I found myself scanning through a lot of the book's chattiness to get to the meaty stuff. Aiming business books specifically at women--especially early-to-mid career women--is an excellent idea, but sometimes they feel too breezy and hip to make me feel like I'm being leveled with. I'm not looking for one of those "The 1 Hour CEO," "The Fifty-Minute Manager," or "45 Seconds to Success!" kind of business books. (Please, people.) But I do need some straight-up facts and advice about how to run a business. And there was a lot of that in this book--I just kind of had to dig around for it. I do think this is a worthwhile book for freelancers who are just starting out or feel like it's time for a healthy reality check about their not-so-healthy freelancing habits (did you know there's this thing called a weekend?). It got my creative & practical wheels turning about how I conduct business, better ways to put myself out there, and building great relationships with clients. It also brought to my attention resources I didn't know were available to me, and reminded me why I joined the freelance world to begin with. Aside from the lifestyle, the people are great--resourceful, gutsy, and generous with information and advice.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Not 5 stars for me, but I've been freelancing for years so most of this was old hat. Anyone who's been freelancing on their own for a while will (or should) already know most of this material. Give this to your favorite cubicle worker who has dreams of setting out on the freelance path, and encourage them to take the leap...
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  • Katrina Sark
    January 1, 1970
    “To fulfil a dream, to be allowed to sweat over lonely labour, to be given a chance to create, is the meat and potatoes of life. The money is the gravy.” (Bette Davis)Introductionp.1 – “I used to be like you, thinking one day I’d pursue my own writing or take up painting again,” they’d say. “But eventually, you learn to let go of those silly dreams. You gotta grow up sometime and get a real job like everyone else.” Why? I remember thinking. What’s so juvenile about actually liking what you do fo “To fulfil a dream, to be allowed to sweat over lonely labour, to be given a chance to create, is the meat and potatoes of life. The money is the gravy.” (Bette Davis)Introductionp.1 – “I used to be like you, thinking one day I’d pursue my own writing or take up painting again,” they’d say. “But eventually, you learn to let go of those silly dreams. You gotta grow up sometime and get a real job like everyone else.” Why? I remember thinking. What’s so juvenile about actually liking what you do for a living? What’s wrong with designing your own career if you can’t stomach the one you’ve got or can’t figure out what kind of a job you want in the first place? Chapter 1 – Business Plan To Gop.14 – Ready to roll up your sleeves? It’s time to write your own Business Plan To Go. It can be all of a paragraph or to. All you need to do is list at least three of your freelance goals for the next year. Bonus points if you also outline your game plan – your to do’s – for reaching each one. p.15 – Give each item in your plan a start date and deadline. Break down the steps into bite-size pieces you can tackle each month, week, or day, and give them deadlines too. Set up whatever reward system you need to prod yourself along. If you can’t wrap your brain around anything beyond the next ninety days, write a three-month plan and rinse and repeat at the end of the quarter. Make a spreadsheet to track you progress. Chapter 2 – Forget the Fuzzy Math“Making money is art and working is art and good business is the nest art.” (Andy Warhol) p.18 – Nobility to me is using your creative talents to invent a job for yourself and getting paid a decent wage to do it. p.20 – Track each bagel and beer for a month to see where all your dough goes, then multiply by twelve to get a tally of your annual spending. Don’t forget any one-time expenses you’ll have for the year, like vacations, car registration, and holiday gifts. Because until you get real with how much you need t live on, you can’t accurately determine what to charge for your freelance projects and how much you’ll need to work each week in order to make enough green to survive. “Just as you’ve trained yourself (or have been trained) to be a mouse, you can teach yourself to be a tiger (non-killing variety).” (Jean Baer, How To Be an Assertive (Not Aggressive) Woman in Life, in Love, and On the Job: A Total Guide to Self-assertiveness, 1976)
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  • Ashly Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 StarsThis is a nonfiction reference book written to aid freelancers trying to startup their own business. Even though the writer works in writing and editing, she includes all types of freelance work in her book and tackles how you should go about things such as office space, rates, finding work, and even a bit on taxes. She shares resources and her own knowledge after having been in the business for 10+ years and gives her readers plenty of tips and tricks to help them get on their feet in 5/5 StarsThis is a nonfiction reference book written to aid freelancers trying to startup their own business. Even though the writer works in writing and editing, she includes all types of freelance work in her book and tackles how you should go about things such as office space, rates, finding work, and even a bit on taxes. She shares resources and her own knowledge after having been in the business for 10+ years and gives her readers plenty of tips and tricks to help them get on their feet in the scary work-for-hire uncertainty of the freelance world.I actually came across this book completely by accident. It was lying on the shelf at Goodwill and screamed at me as I walked by. Me finding this book was meant to be as I’m currently trying to pursue a career in freelance and this book has honestly helped me immensely. There are so many good tips in here that helped me feel less afraid of the scary notion of working for myself. On top of that, Goodman doesn’t talk down to her readers at all. She writes in an inspirational voice that will empower you and have you saying “Hell yea I can do this!”. I love that she doesn’t use her experience in the business to praise herself, but rather to help her readers who want to pursue the same goals.Goodman gives her readers so much useful information that I was actually excited to pick up this book each day. Even though this book was published back in 2006 and some of the information (especially of the technological sort) is out of date, all of the methods she talks about are not. There is so much knowledge in this book that can still be applied to today’s freelance market. These seem to be tried and true methods that will help any freelance start to understand the ropes of the business.This was honestly a really compelling read and was exciting. I’ve read a good amount of nonfiction, and can honestly say that this book was really well done.Of course, I understand this book isn’t going to be for everyone, but those who are looking for this type of thing or to get into this type of business (ad)venture, this is an absolute must read!Review originally published on my Wordpress blog Dreaming Through Literature.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    My So-Called Freelance Life: How to Survive and Thrive as a Creative Professional for Hire is written by full-time freelancer Michelle Goodman. With over fifteen years of experience under her belt at the time this book was published, Goodman provides tips, tricks and advice on how to set yourself up for success in the world of freelance.My So-Called Freelance Life is divided up into three main sections: Section One explains how to adjust to a work-from-home lifestyle after being caught up in the My So-Called Freelance Life: How to Survive and Thrive as a Creative Professional for Hire is written by full-time freelancer Michelle Goodman. With over fifteen years of experience under her belt at the time this book was published, Goodman provides tips, tricks and advice on how to set yourself up for success in the world of freelance.My So-Called Freelance Life is divided up into three main sections: Section One explains how to adjust to a work-from-home lifestyle after being caught up in the 9-to-5 rat-race for your entire working life. Section Two explains how to market yourself effectively using social networking skills both online and in person, while Section Three teaches how to manage your career once you're up and running and your freelance business is thriving.Within each main section are sub-sections that detail various subjects; including setting up an efficient home office, establishing your rates, building clientele, and even managing your taxes.As with most how-to business books, My So-Called Freelance Life will be useful to those readers just starting out on their own; whereas most of the book's content is common-sense knowledge. The book adequately dissects the procedures of setting up any sole-proprietor business, freelance or not. The upsides to reading My So-Called Freelance Life include Goodman's large sub-section and reminder on taking your taxes seriously, as well as her tips on weeding out legit and not-so-legit freelance gigs. The downsides to the book, however, include the time-sensitive material regarding social networking best practices and website links which are now three years outdated. After all, since it's now 2011, much has changed in the freelancing world since the book was written in 2008.Michelle Goodman has also written The Anti 9 to 5 Guide: Practical Career Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube (2007).For more book reviews visit http://dreamworldbooks.com.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I really appreciated the honesty and real-world tips Goodman offers in this book. I think anyone who is currently a freelancer or seriously thinking about becoming one should read this book. It's funny, a quick read, and full of tips that I haven't read anywhere else.
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  • Ami
    January 1, 1970
    This book is chock full of practical advice about building and growing a freelance business. The author has a fun, light tone but is very down to earth and manages to be inspiring & grounding at the same time.
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Even if you don't know Michelle, this book is like having a good friend teach you the ropes.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    another great book for learning about starting a business!
  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    I'll be honest--many of the topics covered in this book don't really apply to me--for example, health insurance, but they are definitely useful for those who need them. I have found, however, that reading books about writing, or freelancing, etc., basically provide the kick in the pants I need to be excited about my work again, and to actually GET MOVING. I did learn something incredibly important, however--one which may be career-changing: to get where you want to be, you need to stop clutterin I'll be honest--many of the topics covered in this book don't really apply to me--for example, health insurance, but they are definitely useful for those who need them. I have found, however, that reading books about writing, or freelancing, etc., basically provide the kick in the pants I need to be excited about my work again, and to actually GET MOVING. I did learn something incredibly important, however--one which may be career-changing: to get where you want to be, you need to stop cluttering your work life with projects that do not move you towards that goal. This year will be the year that I cut out the clutter when it comes to writing.
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  • Root_rambler
    January 1, 1970
    A little dated (it came out 10 years ago) but still mostly useful. A very encouraging and chatty book aimed at women- it was nice that it was encouraging, and other books can fill the gap with additional practicalities. She seemed to give good advice, and I definitely felt like I needed to finish it before starting to freelance in case I made some grievous error.
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  • Fee
    January 1, 1970
    Good read for anyone dreaming about a freelance career. There is plenty of advice for the beginner but you can find that in other books too. The tips or stories aren't that unique or different. This book will just give you the basics. I was hoping for a bit more inspiration and new ways.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    As a freelancer, I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it for new freelancers as an eye opening introduction to what you can expect. The writing style is friendly and honest but also helpful and practical.
  • Jinal Shah (If I Were Marketing)
    January 1, 1970
    there were so many places in the book that I said 'true that'!!!!! it was very relatable and hence, helpful. Nicely written- with a good dose of humor..
  • M.E. Kinkade
    January 1, 1970
    If you are considering a freelance gig--full-time or part-time, and especially if it's in a creative field--pick up this book. Goodman leverages her extensive background as a freelance writer and editor to explain the tricky points of starting your own business, and does it all in a friendly girl-next-door tone that is reassuring despite a sometimes-stressful topic. The book is divided into three parts: Initial set-up ("You Fled the Cube, Now What?"), Getting Ahead ("Sell, Baby, Sell"), and gene If you are considering a freelance gig--full-time or part-time, and especially if it's in a creative field--pick up this book. Goodman leverages her extensive background as a freelance writer and editor to explain the tricky points of starting your own business, and does it all in a friendly girl-next-door tone that is reassuring despite a sometimes-stressful topic. The book is divided into three parts: Initial set-up ("You Fled the Cube, Now What?"), Getting Ahead ("Sell, Baby, Sell"), and general topics ("Your So-Called Freelance Life"), and each part is divided into chapters on particular topics, like setting your price or figuring out insurance. And she covers a lot--despite the fluffy fun title, starting your own business is serious work, and Goodman reflects that. She offers practical advice, a trove of books and online resources, real anecdotes from freelancers of all stripes, and some wit along the way.It's not just for creative professionals, and Goodman does a great job of creating examples for people of all industries--for example, in a section about why you might want to go freelance and still be able to pay the bills, she says "More often than not, your breadwinning work will help you fuel your enthusiasm for the screenplay, crocheted handbags, or life-size ceramic replica of Margaret Cho you're chipping away at on the side."Interestingly, this book IS targeted to women freelancers, something I guess I was supposed to assume from the cover's pink writing but honestly surprised me when I realized it 20 pages in. Nothing about the front or back cover (except the pink) says this is a no-boys-allowed book, and I don't think it really needs to be. Despite the occasional mention of things that are slightly gendered, like childcare, I think a man starting out on his own would benefit from Goodman's sound advice as much as any woman. (I'm pretty sure the IRS doesn't come after female freelancers only, if you know what I mean).While it does claim to help freelancers from the beginning up, I'm not sure it quite does. I would have liked to see a whole chapter related to "getting your business started," beyond the nuts-and-bolts "what do I charge?"-type questions. Though she mentions that all freelancers she knows have taken some kind of temp job to support their freelancing, she doesn't really explain, and you don't get a sense of the reality of the beginning of a business except through cobbled-together snippets scattered throughout. While the chapter on time management (at the end of the book--I had to skip ahead and read it sooner because it felt pretty urgent to me) might help a phone-always-ringing professional like Goodman, it doesn't offer much for a newbie, so you're more or less on your own there. Similarly, I plan on picking this reference up again as topics become more relevant to me: protection against lawsuits isn't at the top of my list when I'm still figuring out if getting a business card is worth it.Overall, this was a very helpful and inspiring book and I'm glad I found it before I got my editing business off the ground.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe it's because I recently started on my own full-time freelancer journey, but learning about making money by working from home in my jammies has been on my mind a lot lately. Graduation from my undergraduate college was in May and I start my new grad program in the fall, so I'm taking a big leap of job faith: instead of finding another part-time summer gig folding clothes at a retail joint I hate, I'm trying to support myself through my writing (yay book reviews!) and graphic design. Natural Maybe it's because I recently started on my own full-time freelancer journey, but learning about making money by working from home in my jammies has been on my mind a lot lately. Graduation from my undergraduate college was in May and I start my new grad program in the fall, so I'm taking a big leap of job faith: instead of finding another part-time summer gig folding clothes at a retail joint I hate, I'm trying to support myself through my writing (yay book reviews!) and graphic design. Naturally, I'm calming myself through the "what the hell was I thinking" panic moments by reading about how to be a successful freelancer.A lifesaving little number I came across is called My So-Called Freelance Life by Michelle Goodman. Complete with business plan advice, tips for creating a web portfolio, an index of helpful resources, and other hints from "an old salt," as Goodman calls herself, this book has successfully stopped my regular nightly panic attacks. Goodman covers all of the basics of starting a freelance business, whether you're writing and designing like moi, or coding, building, and gardening, her advice applies to any and all self-started businesses. She is, however, a freelance writer herself, so it seems to me that there is an extra-awesome amount of tips that are specific for writers.I can't seem to get enough of Goodman's super-helpful, and also super-funny advice and anecdotes. Luckily she has another book, The Anti-9-to-5-Guide, and a blog which she updates regularly (the link is also found in my blogroll). Hopefully with Goodman's help, I'll be cranking out freelance jobs in no time!
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    Should I have known that this book was for ladies only? Maybe. There are flip flops and pink letters right there on the cover (and I later found out the byline of publisher is "By women. For women."), which normally wouldn't raise any flags. Lots of women like flip flops and pink. My wife likes flip flops and pink and she offers me advice all the time.As a man, reading this book was like being the only Jack at a Jack & Jill event. Or tumbling into somebody's girls' night. Or reading a blog c Should I have known that this book was for ladies only? Maybe. There are flip flops and pink letters right there on the cover (and I later found out the byline of publisher is "By women. For women."), which normally wouldn't raise any flags. Lots of women like flip flops and pink. My wife likes flip flops and pink and she offers me advice all the time.As a man, reading this book was like being the only Jack at a Jack & Jill event. Or tumbling into somebody's girls' night. Or reading a blog called Parenting 101 that should be called Sassy & Stylish Mommas. It was very...I don't know...girly. The author seemed to be talking to a woman. Every freelancer example was a woman. Even the examples are girly slanted (Bread and Butter list: Sassy & Sassy Advertising, Living the Dream List: Working Mama magazine). And that's fine. Great, in fact. Have a ladies' night and talk. Have a women-only seminar and get more than you have. Lift each other up. I'm good with it. Just warn me. Let me know what I'm walking into so I don't feel like the only hog in the slop. Outside the thoroughly women-centric style, this had good general tips. Don't avoid taxes. Work when you're supposed to. Treat freelancing like a job. Sell like mad. Weed out bad clients and shoot for good ones. This is a good general place to start, but I think you'll hit the end of the book and say "Great. Now what?" Unless you're a man. Then you'll probably go saw something just to recoup enough lost testosterone to keep from weeping gently in the basement over your fledgling freelance career.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I have really garnered a lot of useful information from this book. As I delve further into freelance writing/editing, its been very practical to learn all aspects of working for oneself. There were so many things I didn't really know I needed to do or even how to do. She really stresses the points of creative versus "bread buying" projects, which not every freelancer wants to hear . . . but when you first start out in business foir yourself, you've got to do some nitty gritty along with some fun I have really garnered a lot of useful information from this book. As I delve further into freelance writing/editing, its been very practical to learn all aspects of working for oneself. There were so many things I didn't really know I needed to do or even how to do. She really stresses the points of creative versus "bread buying" projects, which not every freelancer wants to hear . . . but when you first start out in business foir yourself, you've got to do some nitty gritty along with some fun. The same applies to life. It's a balance and it's well worth examining. She stresses that with ANY job there will be some dull, teeth gritting work, but the payoff comes after you've established yourself, gained credentials, and can free yourself slowly to work more and more on your creative endeavors. She doesn't suggest back-burnering them, but simply understanding that you have to be able to pay your rent and eat to properly function in the creative "other world" of careers. I got this as a Christmas gift from my husband since we both desire to someday completely work for ourselves and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in doing the same. She is sharp; tongued and witty, luckily this book doesn't delve into a lot of repetitive examples of her own successes but rather how to make the lifestyle and career of freelancing successful by avoiding some of her own mistakes. I plan on passing this one on to a few other friends who are going into business for themselves in the next few years.
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  • Lisa Brunette
    January 1, 1970
    I reviewed this book on Amazon back in 2008 but find myself continuing to recommend the book to freelancers, so I thought I'd add it to Goodreads now as well. Here's my 2008 review, which still stands: As a freelancer for 16 years, I was skeptical at first that this book would teach me anything I didn't already know. I started out around the same time Goodman did, in my twentysomethings, and was just as green at the time (she and I both spent too much money on neat new business stationery). But I reviewed this book on Amazon back in 2008 but find myself continuing to recommend the book to freelancers, so I thought I'd add it to Goodreads now as well. Here's my 2008 review, which still stands: As a freelancer for 16 years, I was skeptical at first that this book would teach me anything I didn't already know. I started out around the same time Goodman did, in my twentysomethings, and was just as green at the time (she and I both spent too much money on neat new business stationery). But I'd been waylaid along the route by a grad-school stint, and then got sucked into teaching, so her real-world advice has helped me refocus on the freelance goal, identify (and correct) a few re-entry missteps, and build on my niche expertise (even if you don't think you have one, you most likely do).Plus, this book is a terrifically fun read. It's like sitting down with one of your gal-pals to talk shop instead of gossip. Although filled with practical, usable suggestions, Goodman writes with humor and pathos, sharing some of her own horror stories (such as a gig that dragged on so long, she ended up making a few cents per hour on it) and hewing to a no-nonsense, colloquial tone, with subheadings such as "Problem: Your Client Is a Bloodsucker" and "Ebbs Are for Amateurs."I often receive e-mails from budding young freelancer-wannabes seeking advice. Now all I have to do is give them this book.
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  • Iris
    January 1, 1970
    This book changed my life. Seriously! I didn't realize how much I DIDN'T have my act together when it came to my finances and doing freelance work. Believe it or not I didn't think twice about taxes and a year into my official freelance life, I realized that I was supposed to be saving taxes myself and sending them in 4 times a year. Needless to say I'm kind of in trouble at the moment, but in many other ways this book has set me straight.Michelle Goodman, who fortunately for me seems to be work This book changed my life. Seriously! I didn't realize how much I DIDN'T have my act together when it came to my finances and doing freelance work. Believe it or not I didn't think twice about taxes and a year into my official freelance life, I realized that I was supposed to be saving taxes myself and sending them in 4 times a year. Needless to say I'm kind of in trouble at the moment, but in many other ways this book has set me straight.Michelle Goodman, who fortunately for me seems to be working in Seattle where I currently live, goes through every important aspect of freelancing (and while the book is supposedly for women, besides the almost complete use of "she", the book should be totally useful for any gender and actually has little female-only content in it). Learn how to get involved in the freelance community, get your legal act together and everything you need to deal with your finances and your clients. She also gives loads of tips for dealing with clients in different situations throughout the book which I imagine will be very helpful for me if I can just remember them. Definitely a must-read for any freelancing n00bs out there!
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    When I checked this book out from the library, I at first wasn't exactly sold on it. The premise seemed like something that could be helpful, but the first couple of chapters didn't quite feel like new information to me. However, now that I have finished it, I am quite literally sold on this book - I'm going to buy a copy of my own for future reference. It's just that useful. Tucked in among the witty writing are some true gems of information covering everything from naming your business, to avo When I checked this book out from the library, I at first wasn't exactly sold on it. The premise seemed like something that could be helpful, but the first couple of chapters didn't quite feel like new information to me. However, now that I have finished it, I am quite literally sold on this book - I'm going to buy a copy of my own for future reference. It's just that useful. Tucked in among the witty writing are some true gems of information covering everything from naming your business, to avoiding unintentional tax accidents, to working towards financial solvency and keeping yourself on track with your business goals. This book really helped me to crystallize exactly what goes into running a business, and made me do a lot of thinking about what lies ahead and how to best plan for it. Although the writing of the book seems clearly geared towards women, I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone who hopes to build the stable, independent, and financially worthwhile business of their dreams.
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  • Tristy
    January 1, 1970
    This book offers some great guidance and advice for those just starting out with freelance work. It's written in that whole cutesy/blogger kind of language (with chapters like "You're so Money!") which started to really grate on my nerves after awhile. It's hard to read a whole book in that kind of language. There is plenty of information in here that applies to everyone, but I did find that she was a little too copy-editing/writer-focused in her advice (which is what the author does). There are This book offers some great guidance and advice for those just starting out with freelance work. It's written in that whole cutesy/blogger kind of language (with chapters like "You're so Money!") which started to really grate on my nerves after awhile. It's hard to read a whole book in that kind of language. There is plenty of information in here that applies to everyone, but I did find that she was a little too copy-editing/writer-focused in her advice (which is what the author does). There are so many other ways to be a freelancing human in the world and she would occasionally throw in a few "this applies to dog walkers and crafters!" but not very often. It's a good book for beginning freelance folks to nail down the basics of writing a contract/invoice and how to deal with taxes. The most valuable part of the book was her advice on having clear and strong boundaries with clients - something most freelancers have a difficult time with, no matter how long they have been in business, but if you've been at it for awhile (as I have) you should probably save your hard-earned cash.
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  • earthy
    January 1, 1970
    Goodman's got the freelance experience and the clever, easy accessible narrative voice to back it up. Most of the info here is fairly basic, which I actually found very helpful, though it didn't quite cover the more specific freelance issues I've been having. While the intended audience seems to be primarily women interested in freelancing for large-ish companies, the advice here is good for any gender in any work situation.I've been reading a lot of how-to freelance books lately, and this was o Goodman's got the freelance experience and the clever, easy accessible narrative voice to back it up. Most of the info here is fairly basic, which I actually found very helpful, though it didn't quite cover the more specific freelance issues I've been having. While the intended audience seems to be primarily women interested in freelancing for large-ish companies, the advice here is good for any gender in any work situation.I've been reading a lot of how-to freelance books lately, and this was one of the more fun-to-read ones, though I wonder about the viability of being so broad about the area of freelancing covered in a book like this. Given that Goodman's background is primarily in freelance writing/editing, it might've given her more chance to go into specifics if she'd focused just on that area rather than trying to lump all freelance types into her audience.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Even if you're not a "creative" freelancer (and I count myself among the noncreative types), this is still a very informative and entertaining book. And let's face it, when it comes to discussing nitty gritty business and work-life matters, entertaining helps. A lot. Goodman's style is easy and casual, but she's not just writing this to have fun. She comes across as sincere in her desire to help others learn from her mistakes and successes in the world of being in business for yourself. And she Even if you're not a "creative" freelancer (and I count myself among the noncreative types), this is still a very informative and entertaining book. And let's face it, when it comes to discussing nitty gritty business and work-life matters, entertaining helps. A lot. Goodman's style is easy and casual, but she's not just writing this to have fun. She comes across as sincere in her desire to help others learn from her mistakes and successes in the world of being in business for yourself. And she interviewed a bunch of other non-employee types in order to incorporate advice and stories from quite an array of professions. I recommend this book for any freelancer/contractor who is interested in hearing how other people do it and how he or she might do it better.
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  • Kathleen Dupré
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book that I am destined to reference again and again. I am not normally a big reader of nonfiction, but I was riveted to this book from the beginning. Michelle Goodman has a frank, funny voice that supplements her invaluable information perfectly. It is clear that she is not only a truly seasoned freelancer, she has also done her research. And she's so likeable. Normally I feel condescended to when I get advice from authors in books, but reading Goodman's advice genuinely felt like hav This is a book that I am destined to reference again and again. I am not normally a big reader of nonfiction, but I was riveted to this book from the beginning. Michelle Goodman has a frank, funny voice that supplements her invaluable information perfectly. It is clear that she is not only a truly seasoned freelancer, she has also done her research. And she's so likeable. Normally I feel condescended to when I get advice from authors in books, but reading Goodman's advice genuinely felt like having a conversation with an older, wiser friend. (Not that Michelle Goldman is old. I just view her as a role model now.) If you have any aspirations to a freelance career of any type, please pick up this book immediately. For real. Do it.
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  • Sonnet Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very well-written book, but aimed mostly at those who are just considering going freelance and making plans. As someone who has been a freelancer for years, I found very little new information. Many of the suggestions also assume the freelancer will be working for corporations, instead of for individuals as is more common in today's gig economy.That said, while I personally didn't find it overly useful, it's a great book. The writer's voice is friendly and fun, and there are solid tips This is a very well-written book, but aimed mostly at those who are just considering going freelance and making plans. As someone who has been a freelancer for years, I found very little new information. Many of the suggestions also assume the freelancer will be working for corporations, instead of for individuals as is more common in today's gig economy.That said, while I personally didn't find it overly useful, it's a great book. The writer's voice is friendly and fun, and there are solid tips and plans included. I would recommend this book to anyone I know making the switch from employee to freelancer.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I purchased this book almost two years ago after hearing a friend rave about it. I didn't get past the first chapter and let it sit until about two weeks ago. Two weeks ago, I picked this book up and made notes. And what my friend raved about? I get it now. As someone who will be transitioning from the 9-to-5 in a few months to a full-time freelancer, I feel like I have a gameplan for my little business and a direction to aim for now, before I leave the corporate grind forever. And I cannot wait I purchased this book almost two years ago after hearing a friend rave about it. I didn't get past the first chapter and let it sit until about two weeks ago. Two weeks ago, I picked this book up and made notes. And what my friend raved about? I get it now. As someone who will be transitioning from the 9-to-5 in a few months to a full-time freelancer, I feel like I have a gameplan for my little business and a direction to aim for now, before I leave the corporate grind forever. And I cannot wait because this book is brilliant. A must-read for anyone who wants to be a full-time creative at some point in their life!
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  • Milka
    January 1, 1970
    If you're thinking about starting a freelance career and have never read a book on freelancing, you'll find a lot of useful information in this book. If you've read other books about the subject like me, you probably won't learn anything new. I had picked this book thinking it'd be interesting to read a book written by a woman on this topic. Unfortunately I quickly found out Michelle Goodman is not married and has no kids, so she's got a lot of working time on her hands, something I don't have. If you're thinking about starting a freelance career and have never read a book on freelancing, you'll find a lot of useful information in this book. If you've read other books about the subject like me, you probably won't learn anything new. I had picked this book thinking it'd be interesting to read a book written by a woman on this topic. Unfortunately I quickly found out Michelle Goodman is not married and has no kids, so she's got a lot of working time on her hands, something I don't have. I'll have to read a book on freelancing and being a mom to find what I'm looking for.
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  • Rica
    January 1, 1970
    A book I wish I'd had when I was starting out as a freelancer. A book I could have written by now--though not with half the flair and fun that Goodman brings to the endeavour.Time--and colleagues who generously shared their advice--eventually taught me most of these lessons. But even this seasoned freelancer learned a tip or two from Goodman.I enjoyed it so much that I've subscribed to her blog at www.anti9to5guide.com (for people who "think outside the cube").Highly recommended.
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