A Purely Private Matter (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #2)
The Rosalind Thorne mystery series—inspired by the novels of Jane Austen—continues as the audacious Rosalind strives to aid those in need while navigating the halls of high society...Rosalind Thorne has slowly but assuredly gained a reputation as “a useful woman”—by helping respectable women out of some less-than-respectable predicaments.Her latest endeavor is a tragedy waiting to happen. Desperate Margaretta Seymore is with child—and her husband is receiving poisoned pen letters that imply that her condition is the result of an affair with the notorious actor Fletcher Cavendish. Margaretta asks Rosalind to find out who is behind the scurrilous letters. But before she can make any progress, Cavendish is found dead, stabbed through the heart.Suddenly, Rosalind is plunged into the middle of one of the most sensational murder trials London has ever seen, and her client’s husband is the prime suspect. With the help of the charming Bow Street runner Adam Harkness, she must drop the curtain on this fatal drama before any more lives are ruined.

A Purely Private Matter (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #2) Details

TitleA Purely Private Matter (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #2)
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2017
PublisherBerkley
ISBN0425282384
ISBN-139780425282380
Number of pages368 pages
Rating
GenreMystery, Cozy Mystery, Historical, Historical Mystery

A Purely Private Matter (Rosalind Thorne Mysteries #2) Review

  • Alicia
    March 19, 2017
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/03...The second book in Wilde's Rosalind Thorne series is just as entertaining as its predecessor--I love historical mysteries where ladies get things done! In this one, Rosalind is asked by a friend of a friend to help prove she is innocent of adultery--so the child she is carrying won't be labeled a bastard. Wilde does such a good job highlighting the issues of women in this era, while also filling her books with super awesome ladies. The mystery here is a bi http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/03...The second book in Wilde's Rosalind Thorne series is just as entertaining as its predecessor--I love historical mysteries where ladies get things done! In this one, Rosalind is asked by a friend of a friend to help prove she is innocent of adultery--so the child she is carrying won't be labeled a bastard. Wilde does such a good job highlighting the issues of women in this era, while also filling her books with super awesome ladies. The mystery here is a bit convoluted but the storytelling is riveting--though I do hope the love triangle is resolved sooner rather than later, because that has the potential to become really repetitive. Anyway, I look forward to reading more in this series for sure. B+.__A review copy was provided by the publisher. This book will be released on May 2nd.
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  • Gail
    March 31, 2017
    This Jane Austen-inspired historical mystery series has become a must read for me. Rosalind Thorne has learned to survive in London society, where the wrong word, indeed a wrong glance or gesture, can lead to loss of social standing and even ostracism. For single lady Rosalind, this could also mean loss of career as a "useful woman," one who helps society women out of delicate predicaments, such as blackmail and accusations of adultery and murder.Rosalind is an intelligent and sympathetic heroin This Jane Austen-inspired historical mystery series has become a must read for me. Rosalind Thorne has learned to survive in London society, where the wrong word, indeed a wrong glance or gesture, can lead to loss of social standing and even ostracism. For single lady Rosalind, this could also mean loss of career as a "useful woman," one who helps society women out of delicate predicaments, such as blackmail and accusations of adultery and murder.Rosalind is an intelligent and sympathetic heroine who pursues the truth, at her own peril, to save an innocent, but boorish Captain accused of murder. Suspects abound, chief among them, the Captain's own wife. There is also a possible sighting of Rosalind's missing sister and further developments in the love triangle from the first book, (Devon, to whom Rosalind had hoped to become engaged, and Adam, a Bow Street detective, who carries a torch for her). While the triangle has evolved naturally up to this point, I hope that it is resolved soon. Drawn out triangles have spoiled many series, frustrating readers and cheapening the quality of the stories.Full Disclosure--Net Gallery and the publisher provided me with a digital ARC of this book. This is my honest review.
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  • Regan
    April 22, 2017
    Darcie Wilde starts Rosalind Thorne’s latest story, A PURELY PRIVATE MATTER, in a fairly innocuous manner—she is tasked with retrieving a piece of jewellery. For the reader who enjoys a straight forward read, a mystery to be solved, Wilde delivers. For the reader who enjoys multiple layers to a story as well as the intricacies of a character that bring them to live, she delivers in an even more engrossing manner. As I said in the beginning, Rosalind lives in two worlds, one foot in each. There a Darcie Wilde starts Rosalind Thorne’s latest story, A PURELY PRIVATE MATTER, in a fairly innocuous manner—she is tasked with retrieving a piece of jewellery. For the reader who enjoys a straight forward read, a mystery to be solved, Wilde delivers. For the reader who enjoys multiple layers to a story as well as the intricacies of a character that bring them to live, she delivers in an even more engrossing manner. As I said in the beginning, Rosalind lives in two worlds, one foot in each. There are aspects of both, as seen through her relationships with Devon and Adam. Devon the boy of her youth, now a man—but given his place in society, can he truly support Rosalind’s desire—need in some instances—to help women with their discrete problems? Adam, on the other hand would gladly work hand in hand with her, yet he will not cross the class lines to put him there. Even their coloring adds to the layers of their differences and roles—Adam, fair haired yet, as a Bow Street Runner, takes to the shadows. Devon, dark haired, gray-eyed, walks boldly in the light. And Rosalind, in the middle. The reader does not need to take in these nuances to enjoy the story.
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  • Debbie
    April 23, 2017
    "A Purely Private Matter" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the second book in the series. You don't need to read the previous book to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mystery.This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind and Harkness carefully asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. I was pretty certain of whodunit shortly after we met the character and only bec "A Purely Private Matter" is a mystery set in 1817 in London, England. This is the second book in the series. You don't need to read the previous book to understand this one, and this one didn't spoil the previous mystery.This was a clue-based puzzle mystery. Rosalind and Harkness carefully asked questions and collected information in their different ways. Rosalind was clever, but the mystery was complex and twisty. I was pretty certain of whodunit shortly after we met the character and only became more convinced as the case progressed. It turns out I wasn't quite correct, though whodunit is technically guessable and actually had a better motive than my guess.The characters were interesting and complex. Though the romantic triangle was still there (the duke or the Bow Street runner?), the focus was on the mystery and on finding Rosalind's sister. I started rooting for the Duke, though, partly because people wouldn't be able to threaten to ruin Rosalind's reputation (and thus manipulate her) so easily. The historical details were woven into the story as part of the case, and the author clearly put research time into getting those details correct. There was no sex. There was a minor amount of bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting mystery.I received this book as a review copy from the publisher.
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