What the Dead Leave Behind (Mac McKenzie, #14)
Once a police detective in St. Paul, Minnesota, Rushmore McKenzie has become not only an unlikely millionaire, but an occasional unlicensed private investigator, doing favors for friends and people in need. When his stepdaughter Erica asks him for just such a favor, McKenzie doesn t have it in him to refuse. Even though it sounds like a very bad idea right from the start.The father of Malcolm Harris, a college friend of Erica s, was found murdered a year ago in a park in New Brighton, a town just outside the Twin Cities. With no real clues and all the obvious suspects with concrete alibis, the case has long since gone cold. As McKenzie begins poking around, he soon discovers another unsolved murder that s tangentially related to this one. And all connections seem to lead back to a group of friends the victim was close with. But all McKenzie has is a series of odd, even suspicious, coincidences until someone decides to make it all that more serious and personal.

What the Dead Leave Behind (Mac McKenzie, #14) Details

TitleWhat the Dead Leave Behind (Mac McKenzie, #14)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN1250094518
ISBN-139781250094513
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller

What the Dead Leave Behind (Mac McKenzie, #14) Review

  • LJ
    June 8, 2017
    First Sentence: The way he paced recklessly in front of me, bouncing off the furniture, tripping on the throw rug/ the way he looked at me with unblinking eyes—I decided the kid was messed up.Former police detective, now unlicensed investigator, Rushmore McKenzie is asked for a special favour; find out her killed the father of a friend. But nothing is simple and one case leads to another unsolved murder and a particular group of friends.Housewright is very good at the concise; from the very begi First Sentence: The way he paced recklessly in front of me, bouncing off the furniture, tripping on the throw rug/ the way he looked at me with unblinking eyes—I decided the kid was messed up.Former police detective, now unlicensed investigator, Rushmore McKenzie is asked for a special favour; find out her killed the father of a friend. But nothing is simple and one case leads to another unsolved murder and a particular group of friends.Housewright is very good at the concise; from the very beginning, we know who are the primary characters. We also have background on McKenzie and, through his internal voice, how he thinks and who matters to him. In addition to his many talents; he cooks—“braised boneless pork ribs simmering in gravy laced with chili powder; mashed potatoes seasoned with onion salt, black pepper, butter, cream cheese, sour cream, and chives; plus green beans and pecans sautéed in chicken broth and maple syrup.”—cautions one to not read when hungry and reminds one a bit of Robert Parker’s Spencer. However, knowing these things is of particular advantage to those jumping into this series for the first time.Housewright’s dialogue is easy, natural, and, at times, quite delightful—“Do you think that the killer might be at the party?” she asked. “That is so Agatha Christie.”“What the Dead Leave Behind” has an excellent protagonist and a very well done plot that goes unexpected places. Learning where everyone ends up is very refreshing.WHAT THE DEAD LEAVE BEHIND (Unl. PI-Rushmore McKenzie-St. Paul, MN–Contemp) - VG Housewright, David – 14th in series Minotaur Books – June 2017
    more
  • Roger
    June 11, 2017
    Minnesota is currently fertile ground for mystery authors, especially those veteran writers who produce series that are consistently excellent. David Housewright is one of these authors. His Rushmore McKenzie series is now 14 books long, and yet his lead character still intrigues. McKenzie is an ex-cop who stumbled on fortune and now seeks justice when the opportunity arises, which it seems to do with some frequency and with great violence.Housewright is able to produce a McKenzie book every sum Minnesota is currently fertile ground for mystery authors, especially those veteran writers who produce series that are consistently excellent. David Housewright is one of these authors. His Rushmore McKenzie series is now 14 books long, and yet his lead character still intrigues. McKenzie is an ex-cop who stumbled on fortune and now seeks justice when the opportunity arises, which it seems to do with some frequency and with great violence.Housewright is able to produce a McKenzie book every summer, and I always look forward to reading the new story. In fact, summer and Housewright seem to go together in my thinking. That is said in the best light. Like his other books, WHAT THE DEAD LEAVE BEHIND is fun, a quick read because it is so engaging, and fulfilling. Yes, the conclusion here does seem a bit rushed, but that is a negligible complaint in the grand scheme. This isn't the best Rushmore McKenzie novel, but it is pretty darn good.In MinnesotaWinters are cold, beer is tooWriters write, thank you!
    more
  • Geoffrey Kozen
    June 9, 2017
    Very well done. Dialogue is natural, easy, and fun. Characters are generally quick-witted and likable. Plot is fun, and did not expect the outcome. A quick, fun read. I'll definitely pick up more by Housewright. But... needed one more pass by an editor. Some internal descriptions are mutually inconsistent. There are some extremely questionable comma choices, and despite the author's making all the relevant characters except his detective female, essentially every one of those female characters i Very well done. Dialogue is natural, easy, and fun. Characters are generally quick-witted and likable. Plot is fun, and did not expect the outcome. A quick, fun read. I'll definitely pick up more by Housewright. But... needed one more pass by an editor. Some internal descriptions are mutually inconsistent. There are some extremely questionable comma choices, and despite the author's making all the relevant characters except his detective female, essentially every one of those female characters is viewed through a sexual lens. I don't know if that is the author or his keeping faithful to a character he created many years ago, but I could have stood to get that sexualization cranked down a few notches.
    more
  • Susan
    June 28, 2017
    Cop turned millionaire McKenzie can't say no to his stepdaughter, so when she brings home a friend whose father was murdered, he agrees to see why the police investigation has stalled. Easy--no evidence, but McKenzie is led to the company where the dead man had been HR director, and whose president had been murdered several years previously. And then there's the lovably ditsy woman and the secrets she's hiding. And someone is following Mac through the wintry Twin City streets. A bit more violenc Cop turned millionaire McKenzie can't say no to his stepdaughter, so when she brings home a friend whose father was murdered, he agrees to see why the police investigation has stalled. Easy--no evidence, but McKenzie is led to the company where the dead man had been HR director, and whose president had been murdered several years previously. And then there's the lovably ditsy woman and the secrets she's hiding. And someone is following Mac through the wintry Twin City streets. A bit more violence than I usually care for, but not bad at all.
    more
  • Barbara Nutting
    June 23, 2017
    It was barely a two star. The authors depiction of women is despicable, I can't believe his portrayal in this day and age. Rape is rape, forget the job. Erica is a spoiled brat and I'm sick of hearing how beautiful Nina is, isn't there any more to her than a pretty face and an available body? I've read all the previous McKenzie novels but this will be my last.
    more
  • Julie Hobus
    June 9, 2017
    Better with Every BookThis is one of those rare series that gets better with every book. Strong regional Minnesota flavor, a twisty plot that keeps the reader guessing, and well-drawn characters contribute to an excellent mystery "whodunnit".
  • Janet Martin
    May 25, 2017
    Minneapolis has spawned many fine mystery writers--I don't know how I've missed Housewright for so many years. Will be picking up earlier episodes in this fine series!
Write a review