The Revolution of Robert Kennedy
A groundbreaking account of how Robert F. Kennedy transformed horror into hope between 1963 and 1966, with style and substance that has shaped American politics ever since.On November 22nd, 1963, Bobby Kennedy received a phone call that altered his life forever. The president, his brother, had been shot. JFK would not survive.In The Revolution of Robert Kennedy, journalist John R. Bohrer focuses in intimate and revealing detail on Bobby Kennedy's life during the three years following JFK's assassination. Torn between mourning the past and plotting his future, Bobby was placed in a sudden competition with his political enemy, Lyndon Johnson, for control of the Democratic Party. No longer the president's closest advisor, Bobby struggled to find his place within the Johnson administration, eventually deciding to leave his Cabinet post to run for the U.S. Senate, and establish an independent identity. Those overlooked years of change, from hardline Attorney General to champion of the common man, helped him develop the themes of his eventual presidential campaign.The Revolution of Robert Kennedy follows him on the journey from memorializing his brother's legacy to defining his own. John R. Bohrer's rich, insightful portrait of Robert Kennedy is biography at its best--inviting readers into the mind and heart of one of America's great leaders.

The Revolution of Robert Kennedy Details

TitleThe Revolution of Robert Kennedy
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherBloomsbury Press
ISBN1608199649
ISBN-139781608199648
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreHistory, Biography, Politics, North American Hi..., American History, Nonfiction

The Revolution of Robert Kennedy Review

  • Caroline
    June 29, 2017
    Any biography of Bobby Kennedy is very much a study in contrasts, a Tale of Two Bobbys, one might say. There is the early Bobby, McCarthy's attack dog, his brother's hatchet man, hard-edged and ruthless, not a man to be crossed. And there is the later Bobby - the liberal poster child, the man who embodied the hopes and dreams of a generation, the man who reached out to the poor and neglected groups on the margins of the American Dream. So how to account for these two Bobbys? How to account for t Any biography of Bobby Kennedy is very much a study in contrasts, a Tale of Two Bobbys, one might say. There is the early Bobby, McCarthy's attack dog, his brother's hatchet man, hard-edged and ruthless, not a man to be crossed. And there is the later Bobby - the liberal poster child, the man who embodied the hopes and dreams of a generation, the man who reached out to the poor and neglected groups on the margins of the American Dream. So how to account for these two Bobbys? How to account for this revolution in personality and politics? For John Bohrer, the key to Bobby's transformation lies in the shattering, shocking murder of his brother Jack. Bobby became the symbol of the Kennedy legacy, the keeper of the flame, the heir to the New Frontier, automatically placed in unwilling opposition to the man who actually succeeded JFK in the White House, LBJ. Exiled from the centres of influence and power he had so long been used to occupying, Bobby struggled to find a new position for himself, a new identity and focus for the life that had so long been at the service of his brother. In many ways Bobby's turn towards public service, striving to make a difference on a small scale, the 'tiny ripples of hope', where he had been so used before to strategy and political manoeuvring on a national scale, shouldn't have come as a surprise. As JFK himself said years before, "Just as I went into politics because Joe died, if anything happened to me tomorrow, my brother Bobby would run for my seat in the Senate. And if Bobby died, Teddy would take over for him." JFK probably didn't anticipate dying as early as he did, and Teddy had already taken his Senate seat for Massachusetts - but the principle remains. Bobby talked about moving to England, becoming a professor, writing a book - but he was a Kennedy, and politics was always the only option.The revolution was in the scale. For the first time Bobby became exposed to the issues of the everyday, race and poverty and neglect, in a far more intimate and personal way than he had as Attorney General. He was no longer responsible for an entire nation, just the state of New York, and his immersion in local and regional affairs opened his eyes and changed his perspective. His famous speech in South Africa is indicative of that - not grandstanding, not major forces of history, not dominant personalities leading the way.“Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”The Bobby Kennedy in the centre of power could never have made that speech, never realised that the powerless could make a difference. It took his brother's death and his own loss of identity and focus to realise that. His own revolution was only just beginning in 1968, and what it could have accomplished we will sadly never know.
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  • Peter Mcloughlin
    June 17, 2017
    Fairly good book on the transformation of RFK from ruthless bulldog for his brother to finding his own voice outside the shadows of his martyred brother. It goes through his grieving period and his election as a Senator from New York and his move to the left and opposition to Vietnam. Spends most of the time on his transformation after his brother's death and doesn't spend much time on the events of his presidential run and assassination in '68'.
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  • Socraticgadfly
    May 30, 2017
    Somebody will flame me, and I don't care. I'm giving it an initial 3-star rating based just on the editorial blurb review. Bobby Kennedy did not "choose" to leave the Cabinet as much as he was, er, encouraged to leave after he blatantly tried to shove himself into the Veepstakes. Let's hope this isn't an entirely hagiographic book.
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