The Wendy Project
16-year-old Wendy Davies crashes her car into a lake on a late summer night in New England with her two younger brothers in the backseat. When she wakes in the hospital, she is told that her youngest brother, Michael, is dead. Wendy — a once rational teenager – shocks her family by insisting that Michael is alive and in the custody of a mysterious flying boy. Placed in a new school, Wendy negotiates fantasy and reality as students and adults around her resemble characters from Neverland. Given a sketchbook by her therapist, Wendy starts to draw. But is The Wendy Project merely her safe space, or a portal between worlds?

The Wendy Project Details

TitleThe Wendy Project
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherSuper Genius
ISBN1629917699
ISBN-139781629917696
Number of pages96 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Fantasy, Retellings, Comics

The Wendy Project Review

  • Courtney
    May 10, 2017
    The Wendy Project by Melissa Jane Osborne is a wonderfully told modern retelling of the classic tale Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie. Wendy gets into a terrible car accident while driving with her two brothers, John and Michael, veering off a bridge and into water. When she wakes up in the hospital and hears that her youngest brother Michael is dead gone , Wendy goes into a state of denial. She shocks her family by insisting that Michael is still alive and out there somewhere, lost, with a boy who The Wendy Project by Melissa Jane Osborne is a wonderfully told modern retelling of the classic tale Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie. Wendy gets into a terrible car accident while driving with her two brothers, John and Michael, veering off a bridge and into water. When she wakes up in the hospital and hears that her youngest brother Michael is dead gone , Wendy goes into a state of denial. She shocks her family by insisting that Michael is still alive and out there somewhere, lost, with a boy who can fly.Soon, her parents move her to another school, but Wendy is finding it increasingly difficult to differentiate between reality and fantasy as the people in her life being to resemble characters from Neverland. Meanwhile, she finds out that she isn't the only one who believes Michael may still be out there, so she searches for him at every given chance. Using the notebook her therapist gave her, Wendy draws her visions, but are her drawings a coping mechanism or can her journal really transport her to another world? I love Peter Pan retellings so much that I didn't even realize that The Wendy Project is a graphic novel when I requested it. I don't normally read graphic novels, but I enjoyed this and I'm so glad I gave it a chance. I loved how Melissa Jane Osborne took a classic tale (one of my favorites) and retold it in a more modern and believable way. Sometimes, though, it felt like there were missing parts to this story. I would have loved to see why she saw certain characters as ones from Neverland. I also really would have liked to see her relationship with Eben to be more developed than it was; to see more of a connection between them. The author uses quotes from J. M. Barrie and the original Peter Pan story which I thought was great and helped tie this novel together.Veronica Fish's artwork is wonderful. I loved the expressions in her work and I especially enjoyed her use of color. I found myself staring quite a bit at her illustrations - great work! This is perfect for anyone who enjoys graphic novels and Peter Pan retellings. I hope there is another volume to come because I would love to see more to The Wendy Project! **** I received an eBook copy of this title via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. ****
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  • Tabby
    July 14, 2017
    Received from: Super GeniusReceived Via: NetGalley.com Why this book?I love retellingsWhat I thoughtOne of the best graphic novels I have read! The graphics are beautiful and the storyline heart breaking. Can't wait for the next one.
  • Manon
    July 4, 2017
    I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I’m speechless.I threw myself into this graphic novel without knowing what to expect and I’m very glad I did…It was incredible. The drawings are magnificent (for their designs as much as their coloring) and the story grabbed me and transported me.I was saying to two friends recently that I had trouble getting into comics because the characters weren’t as layered than in novels and I couldn’t really form a connection to them.Wel I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I’m speechless.I threw myself into this graphic novel without knowing what to expect and I’m very glad I did…It was incredible. The drawings are magnificent (for their designs as much as their coloring) and the story grabbed me and transported me.I was saying to two friends recently that I had trouble getting into comics because the characters weren’t as layered than in novels and I couldn’t really form a connection to them.Well, I should have shut up because I was just proved wrong...
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  • Kendall
    July 3, 2017
    Wendy drifts between fantasy and reality in this lovely and heartbreaking modern take on a classic. A poignant story of loss, fear, family, and hope--Wendy loses herself within her journal, the journal that is the graphic novel itself, and must find the strength within herself to return to reality and her family. While the retelling itself is brilliantly done, the artwork is the star here--using the slightest bits of color throughout black & white graphics, the reader feels Wendy's back and Wendy drifts between fantasy and reality in this lovely and heartbreaking modern take on a classic. A poignant story of loss, fear, family, and hope--Wendy loses herself within her journal, the journal that is the graphic novel itself, and must find the strength within herself to return to reality and her family. While the retelling itself is brilliantly done, the artwork is the star here--using the slightest bits of color throughout black & white graphics, the reader feels Wendy's back and forth pull between her reality and fantasy and the complexity of her emotions...just gorgeous.Received as an ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Sesana
    July 17, 2017
    An interesting retelling of Peter Pan as an exploration of guilt and grief. The art is fantastic, and I love the way limited color is used to differentiate mundane from magical.
  • Kailey (BooksforMKs)
    May 30, 2017
    This is so beautiful and sweet and sad. Gorgeous artwork and a bittersweet story.Wendy and her brothers are in a car crash, and Wendy swears she saw her youngest brother Michael flying off with Peter Pan, but no one believes her. She gets in trouble at school, and sort of connects with a weird guy named Peter. He's enigmatic and unreliable, only interested in having fun, but Wendy believes he could lead her to her brother. Wendy's therapist tells her to draw in a journal, and she begins to docum This is so beautiful and sweet and sad. Gorgeous artwork and a bittersweet story.Wendy and her brothers are in a car crash, and Wendy swears she saw her youngest brother Michael flying off with Peter Pan, but no one believes her. She gets in trouble at school, and sort of connects with a weird guy named Peter. He's enigmatic and unreliable, only interested in having fun, but Wendy believes he could lead her to her brother. Wendy's therapist tells her to draw in a journal, and she begins to document the things she sees that makes her believe her brother is alive somewhere in Neverland. Wendy's family is grieving, Wendy can barely sort through fact or fiction, and it's Wendy's other brother, John, who suffers the most. Can they find their way to Neverland and bring Michael back? or is he really dead?This little book broke my heart in 96 pages. It's a surprisingly full story for such a short one. I love how such dark subjects like grief, the nature of reality, guilt, anger, and desire are all dealt with so gently and yet with a raw and honest quality. Wendy's reality is woven so delicately together with the story of Peter Pan, including characters, scenes, dialogue, and magic from the original Peter Pan story.Wendy has such an original voice! Her character is immediately lovable and relatable, because she's broken and rebellious and full of faith. I think what throws the story forward is Wendy's forceful desperation to KNOW. I'm so in awe of the brilliant writing that created this deep and complex character!The artwork is indescribably beautiful, and the way that the colors show the alternate reality that Wendy sees, while the world of other people remains in black and white... simply genius. I'm so delighted with every page! I just had to stop and stare at some of the illustrations for a little minute and drink it in.Disclaimer: I received an ecopy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.
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  • Alyson Kent
    January 28, 2017
    Beautiful, poignant and heartbreaking.
  • Michelle Hart
    May 24, 2017
    full disclosure: i work at the company that produced this book so...the story: the art:
  • Maxine
    July 12, 2017
    *Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review*After a terrible car accident, sixteen year old Wendy Davies wakes up in hospital and is told that her youngest brother, Michael, died in the accident. However, Wendy is convinced that Michael is alive and is in the custody of a mysterious flying boy. Convinced that Wendy is in shock, her parents move her to a new school and Wendy starts seeing a therapist. The Davies family members are all de *Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review*After a terrible car accident, sixteen year old Wendy Davies wakes up in hospital and is told that her youngest brother, Michael, died in the accident. However, Wendy is convinced that Michael is alive and is in the custody of a mysterious flying boy. Convinced that Wendy is in shock, her parents move her to a new school and Wendy starts seeing a therapist. The Davies family members are all dealing with their grief in their own way, but Wendy and her brother, John, aren't ready to say goodbye just yet.Osborne has created a mystical and chilling Peter Pan retelling that had me trying to figure out the story at every twist and turn. Original J.M. Barrie quotes were used here and there, with a word or two altered to fit this new story, and it worked really well. Heavy emotions like anger and guilt were gently and wonderfully dealt with. I really appreciated how much depth Wendy's character held and how complex the story was without being very wordy.This story captured so much of what it's like when you allow something to take over your life so much that you become isolated from the world. At some point, Wendy's behavior became self destructive and I could feel her confusion between reality and fantasy to the point at which I was tempted to stop reading. It was so powerful. I only wish that Wendy's relationship with Eben could have been explored more. I feel like that was a mini plot hole that could've been filled a bit more.Veronica Fish, the illustrator, did an absolutely magnificent job. The artwork and the colors and shapes and lines were all so consuming and really blended well with the story. I would totally buy this graphic novel just to rip some of the artwork out and put it up on my walls.This story was thought provoking and the illusion of reality was incredibly well done. So much was said in so few words and the way in which Fish's artwork entwined with the story was amazing. I was enthralled, to say the least. This was one of my first steps into the world of graphic novels and it has definitely encouraged me to read more of this genre! If you like graphic novels or are thinking of venturing into the genre but don't know where to start, this is a good place.This review and others over at https://theroguestoryteller.wordpress...
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  • Leah
    July 14, 2017
    The illustrations are amazing in this comic and the story is a unique and compelling look at loss and fantasy. Throughout the book beautiful color is used to show the fantasy along side of the day by day reality. Osborne creates a vibrant story through images and words.When Wendy is driving with her brothers, John and Michael, late one night she crashes her car into a lake. Wendy wakes up in the hospital to learn that Michael has died, but they have not been able to find his body. While in thera The illustrations are amazing in this comic and the story is a unique and compelling look at loss and fantasy. Throughout the book beautiful color is used to show the fantasy along side of the day by day reality. Osborne creates a vibrant story through images and words.When Wendy is driving with her brothers, John and Michael, late one night she crashes her car into a lake. Wendy wakes up in the hospital to learn that Michael has died, but they have not been able to find his body. While in therapy, Wendy is given a journal to fill with her thoughts and ideas which is what we are now reading. In the journal, Wendy is convinced that Michael is not really dead, just somewhere else with a mysterious flying boy. Wendy must navigate a new school, family, and this magical boy that she keeps seeing, which can all be seen in her journal.Thank you to NetGalley who gave me a copy for an honest review.
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  • Lexie
    May 10, 2017
    What attracted me originally to this graphic novel was the beautiful cover. I was walking down the aisle at a book conference and the colors just grabbed me. Throughout the book Veronica Fish uses color--bright vivid color such as you see on the cover--sparingly to illustrate the "real world" (in monochromatic grays, blacks and white) versus the world that when Wendy needs to escape from her grief. Its telling that when the story shifts to Neverland (later on) its a complete explosion of colors What attracted me originally to this graphic novel was the beautiful cover. I was walking down the aisle at a book conference and the colors just grabbed me. Throughout the book Veronica Fish uses color--bright vivid color such as you see on the cover--sparingly to illustrate the "real world" (in monochromatic grays, blacks and white) versus the world that when Wendy needs to escape from her grief. Its telling that when the story shifts to Neverland (later on) its a complete explosion of colors and when we come back to the real world those colors slowly introduce themselves into the comic as Wendy learns to accept her choices.I felt for Wendy and I wondered how much was truly happening and how much was her need for closure. Sometimes, especially when grief is strong and the world seems so...hostile, its easy to believe something so fantastical is preferable. And the guilt she carried...I've never made secret my intense dislike of Peter Pan. Finding out Barrie meant him to be the actual villain of the book originally made my day because he's always, always, come off that way to me (in the actual book, many versions of him paint him less creepy/malevolent and more careless/oblivious/selfish). Here...he's not the problem. Not really. Oh he's not helpful, but he does make several good points to Wendy that she doesn't want to believe and he does help her in the end.This story is very much a handbook of what happens when you become so wrapped up in something it isolates you. Several times throughout Wendy neglects to think of the consequences of her actions in an effort to prove her belief right. She pushes people away and behaves self destructively. When she does realize how her actions have maybe not been the best for her brother John, she attempts to pull away...only to give in and go deeper.At times the book was confusing - it never really answers whether this is all a delusion to comfort herself or if it really happens. There's some high school drama that gets in the way a little and her parents come off not very sympathetic for most of the book. As we see things from Wendy's point of view, their actions come off cold and abrupt, with little nuance into their own feelings until nearer the end when Wendy starts to recognize how much she's ignored.
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  • Adam Di Filippe
    May 26, 2017
    This is a fantastic graphic novel. The color-work is beautiful and the story is heart wrenching.
  • Gargi Sharma
    May 18, 2017
    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review!The Wendy Project is a beautiful and heartwarming tale of love and loss, all told in a graphic format. It's a very well done retelling of the Peter Pan story, but better. Wendy loses her brother in a car crash, but cannot accept that he might be gone forever. She spends time in therapy, still convinced that he's there somewhere and if he is in a bad place, it's because of her. Only when she finally meets him that she realises she had b I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review!The Wendy Project is a beautiful and heartwarming tale of love and loss, all told in a graphic format. It's a very well done retelling of the Peter Pan story, but better. Wendy loses her brother in a car crash, but cannot accept that he might be gone forever. She spends time in therapy, still convinced that he's there somewhere and if he is in a bad place, it's because of her. Only when she finally meets him that she realises she had been holding on to false hopes, and decides to let things be the way they are.The illustrations here are absolutely gorgeous and I loved the use of colour. Wendy's world is colourful only when she's thinking about her brother; a complete lack when she's out in the world. The authors did a wonderful job with the story, and for that I'd recommend it to anyone looking for a nice escape.
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  • Sam Kozbial
    June 24, 2017
    Rating: 4 StarsThis is my first graphic novel, so it took me a little bit to get into the groove, but once I did, I really started to see this story coming together. Wendy had been in an accident with both her brothers in the car. One brother is so traumatized, that he becomes mute, while the other is assumed dead. Since his body was not found, With no body found and Wendy believing she saw her brother "fly" away, she sets out on a mission to find him. First things first, the illustrations were Rating: 4 StarsThis is my first graphic novel, so it took me a little bit to get into the groove, but once I did, I really started to see this story coming together. Wendy had been in an accident with both her brothers in the car. One brother is so traumatized, that he becomes mute, while the other is assumed dead. Since his body was not found, With no body found and Wendy believing she saw her brother "fly" away, she sets out on a mission to find him. First things first, the illustrations were very beautiful, and I loved the deliberate use of color. Both the author and illustrator did a wonderful job of keeping me guessing. Is Wendy suffering from PTSD? Is she in denial? Or was her brother really wished away to another dimension? You really are not sure until the very end if this is fantasy or reality. What I was sure about, was the pain Wendy was suffering from. She was carrying so much worry and grief related to the accident. I was quite amazed at how well these feelings of loss and helplessness were conveyed with so little text and so few pages. I also loved the use and placement of the quotes from Peter Pan. Where they appeared and which pictures they accompanied really made them have a meaning that was specific to this tale. Overall: A beautifully illustrated tale of grief and loss, which left me with with shiny eyes.
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  • Wayne McCoy
    July 20, 2017
    'The Wendy Project' by Melissa Jane Osborne with illustrations by Veronica Fish is a story about loss and grief. I found it to be beautiful and moving.When Wendy crashes her car into the lake, her two younger brothers, Michael and John, are in the back seat. Michael can't be found, and Wendy thinks he is still alive and lost. Wendy finds herself with a therapist who wants her to keep a journal. She also finds herself getting in to trouble at school and with a boy. Will she find Michael?The names 'The Wendy Project' by Melissa Jane Osborne with illustrations by Veronica Fish is a story about loss and grief. I found it to be beautiful and moving.When Wendy crashes her car into the lake, her two younger brothers, Michael and John, are in the back seat. Michael can't be found, and Wendy thinks he is still alive and lost. Wendy finds herself with a therapist who wants her to keep a journal. She also finds herself getting in to trouble at school and with a boy. Will she find Michael?The names of the kids are no accident as Peter Pan is heavily involved in the story. The art is mostly black and white with clever uses of color. The art is free flowing and feels like sketching done in one sitting.I absolutely loved this story. Grief has it's stages. This story is about denial as well as forgiving yourself. The story tells it so well, that you don't even realize it as you are reading.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Super Genius, Papercutz, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
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  • Theediscerning
    June 30, 2017
    There's some great stuff here, and some awkwardness. I really liked the balance of the new story about a new Wendy, and the old one about Peter Pan - a lot more than I expected to, if truth be told. It's certainly a distinctive mix, and the modern tale doesn't suffer in comparison with the Barrie. I think the awkwardness is with the presentation - certainly the artwork can be wonderful, especially when it brings in colours in subtle places, or ramps them up for full splash pages as opposed to th There's some great stuff here, and some awkwardness. I really liked the balance of the new story about a new Wendy, and the old one about Peter Pan - a lot more than I expected to, if truth be told. It's certainly a distinctive mix, and the modern tale doesn't suffer in comparison with the Barrie. I think the awkwardness is with the presentation - certainly the artwork can be wonderful, especially when it brings in colours in subtle places, or ramps them up for full splash pages as opposed to the black and white of the regular art. But it doesn't make for clarity of character or who is speaking at times. With so much going on about what is fantasy and what reality, what is old and what is new, we needed more concise and simple ways to work out what we were looking at. Still, it's commendably brave even when it's not a perfect success.
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  • Hope Nicholson
    July 27, 2017
    This is a lovely, sensitive portrayal of a family that is lost in grief, using the filter of the familiar Peter Pan story as a framing device. Though reality and imagination are blurred throughout the book, it never loses clarity, and the plot elements are well-woven. The art is lovely and guides you well through the plot. A book best suited for slightly older readers as it deals heavily with the concepts of death and grief.
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  • Izza
    May 26, 2017
    3 stars | This was a beautiful Peter Pan retelling! Full review will be up closer to the release date.
  • Sarah A
    June 27, 2017
    The Wendy Project, written by Melissa Jane Osborne & illustrated by Veronica Fish,  follows 16-year-old Wendy Davies in the horrible aftermath of a car crash during which she was driving. One of her brothers drowned in the crash, but Wendy refuses to believe it. Instead, she tells everyone that she saw Michael flying away with another boy. When school starts, she starts to view everything around her as belonging to Neverland (e.g. the cute boy she has a crush on becomes Peter Pan), and docum The Wendy Project, written by Melissa Jane Osborne & illustrated by Veronica Fish,  follows 16-year-old Wendy Davies in the horrible aftermath of a car crash during which she was driving. One of her brothers drowned in the crash, but Wendy refuses to believe it. Instead, she tells everyone that she saw Michael flying away with another boy. When school starts, she starts to view everything around her as belonging to Neverland (e.g. the cute boy she has a crush on becomes Peter Pan), and documents it all in a sketchbook given to her by her therapist, many pages of which are shown in the novel in addition to the story. The question that remains throughout is whether the sketchbook is a place to process her emotions or whether it can take her to another world. This graphic novel was a loose retelling of Peter Pan, with many elements from the original story making appearances. The art was beautiful and the story was heart-wrenching. Wendy's emotions are vivid throughout the book, as are the colors and occasional black and white illustrations. You can feel her pain reflected throughout, and also see a young girl truly trying to deal with trauma and what she may have seen. At times, I teared up, and really took myself in and out of the story trying to process everything. It was a really in-depth reading experience, very similar to reading a prose novel. I admit I occasionally have trouble getting emotionally invested in the graphic novel format, but that was not a problem here. I am also a sucker for retellings or books influenced by fairy tales and children's books. This did not disappoint in that area. From Wendy's family structure and names to the ways she imposes Neverland on her world, it's all very poignantly connected. I could also see this, thanks in large part to the illustrations, as an animated short or film. The way the art focuses in on reality and draws back to show how Wendy's seeing it is simply phenomenal. I don't know how else to describe it.Overall, this was a stupendous graphic novel. If you have a hard time getting invested in graphic novels, you should try this one. It's beautifully illustrated, with an intense and interesting story, with interplay between reality and the world of Neverland. It will make you cry and empathize and understand the characters, particularly Wendy. I highly recommend it.Note: I received this book from Netgalley & the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Jeimy
    July 12, 2017
    Gorgeously illustrated Peter Pan reimagining!
  • Sarah Cass
    May 20, 2017
    Heartbreakingly lovely take on the Peter Pan/Neverland story. I thought I'd read a little and then go to bed, but I couldn't stop once I'd started. The illustrations perfectly captured the disconnect between real and fantasy along with the spillover. *I received a copy free via netgalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Rachel
    May 31, 2017
    This is the first graphic novel I've ever read so I wasn't really sure what to expect. The book is a lovely rendition of Peter Pan and it so beautifully illustrated. Very impressed for my first foray into graphic novels.
  • Ashley
    July 11, 2017
    Absolutely beautiful - made me cry. Fantastic illustrations with a lovely, heartbreaking yet hopeful story. A modern graphic take on Peter Pan, made into a story about grief and loss.
  • Clacie
    May 13, 2017
    A beautiful reimagining of Peter Pan. So full of emotion. And those splashes of color, just wow. I definitely want to get a hard copy for my book shelf. **This book was obtained via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**
  • Michelle
    February 6, 2017
    This story overlays a contemporary teen story of a girl (Wendy) mourning her brother John's death but the Peter Pan imagery and theme are laid over it as talking about her coping with it and how she believes Peter Pan has took her brother to Neverland. I don't think it dealt well with the themes initally, but by the climax it comes together beautifully, but throughout the book the real world is the weakest part. Jenny Wren and Eben Peters were underwritten characters, s o the comparisons didn't This story overlays a contemporary teen story of a girl (Wendy) mourning her brother John's death but the Peter Pan imagery and theme are laid over it as talking about her coping with it and how she believes Peter Pan has took her brother to Neverland. I don't think it dealt well with the themes initally, but by the climax it comes together beautifully, but throughout the book the real world is the weakest part. Jenny Wren and Eben Peters were underwritten characters, s o the comparisons didn't work as well.I would have liked them to be a bit more fleshed out. I also wish the dialogue had more distinctive voices. The adults sound alike except for the counselor, Jenny Wren was the only teeen that didn't sound like Wendy, and Peter Pan's dialogue was stiff. The I loved the use of color to connote fantasy and vibrancy of life. I liked Veronica Fish's art. The faces were expressive and realistic. I enjoyed the lack of panel border for fantasy or emotional scenes. I liked how the art looked like it was drawn in pencil and colored pencils, so it has a nice realism and relateability. The colophon said it was Volume 1, but this was a self-contained story. I look forward to more books from Emet Comics, a comics publisher that bills itself as "comic books by women for everyone." It makes sense in the direct market of comic book stores, but among bookstores where there are lots of women creating comics/graphic novels, it will see what they had offer readers.
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  • Jocelyn
    January 25, 2017
    A story filled with loss and love. A reality of ones belief. A really great quick read.
  • Hilary
    June 10, 2017
    *I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*The Wendy Project is a graphic retelling of Peter Pan. It is a heart-breaking story about family, love, and how we deal with traumatic events. The art is different than most graphic novels out there, but in a good way. However, the jagged development of the story makes me lower my initial rating.Our protagonist, Wendy, was in a car crash with her brothers and then she is told one of them died. However, they cannot find his body. *I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*The Wendy Project is a graphic retelling of Peter Pan. It is a heart-breaking story about family, love, and how we deal with traumatic events. The art is different than most graphic novels out there, but in a good way. However, the jagged development of the story makes me lower my initial rating.Our protagonist, Wendy, was in a car crash with her brothers and then she is told one of them died. However, they cannot find his body. Wendy insists she saw Michael being taken away by someone in the middle of the accident and that she must find him and bring him home. Concerned, her family takes her to a therapist and she asks Wendy to draw in a sketchbook. That's why it's called The Wendy Project and the whole book is told in both her reality and fantasy.The story makes me really sad. I think no one can guess what really happened in the accident until the last pages. You will be wondering if it's all inside Wendy's head or not.Peter Pan is not one of my favorite tales. I still don't know the whole story because I have neither read the original nor watched the Disney movie in whole. I just know bits and bits. Based on what I know, I think this is a very refreshing retelling because it isn't all bright, dreamy or innocent. The two stories blend really well together with a realistic setting.However, the development is too quick and jagged. There were times I wondered how much time has passed in the story because it was never clear. Also, I'm not sure what the main male character is there for. There aren't many interactions between him and Wendy and I feel like he is created for the purpose of showing there is someone who makes Wendy less lonely, but the connection isn't convincing. I wish the writer and illustrator could do more pages so the story can be richer.The art is amazing, though. I have read some graphic novels before but they are either in the traditional precise lines and colouring style or manga style. The Wendy Project is a hand-drawn watercolour graphic novel and I really love the coloured pages. I just realised the colours might have been used to differentiate fantasy from reality.The last and most wonderful thing I love about this story is how it brings out the message that art can heal. Wendy is going through tough times and she is using art to help her make sense of things. Throughout the story, there are other people who have glimpses of the sketchbook, which gives them another perspective. I really love this concept because I am a believer in art therapy.To sum it up, with pretty illustrations and a heart-wrenching story, The Wendy Project was quite enjoyable, but it would have been better if the book wasn't that short so there can be more details in the development. If you are looking for a quick Peter Pan retelling to read, this upcoming graphic novel might just be it.------------Also posted on Ravishing Tales.
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  • Lauren
    June 9, 2017
    This is beautifully illustrated and told. The sketchy art style and the use of watercolor are stunning and bring a real magic to it, and the concept that this is a visual diary kept by Wendy [Darling] is a really imaginative, enjoyable retelling of the original; and what's more, what this does so well is that it takes on a heavy sort of subject matter and places it into a (mostly) light-hearted story, and manages an amazing job of balancing that through much of the work. It never feels too whims This is beautifully illustrated and told. The sketchy art style and the use of watercolor are stunning and bring a real magic to it, and the concept that this is a visual diary kept by Wendy [Darling] is a really imaginative, enjoyable retelling of the original; and what's more, what this does so well is that it takes on a heavy sort of subject matter and places it into a (mostly) light-hearted story, and manages an amazing job of balancing that through much of the work. It never feels too whimsical or flippant in regard to (view spoiler)[Michael's death, (hide spoiler)] and it also never feels like it's excessively weighing down the Pan story with doom and gloom.The first half had me completely enthralled. I adored the use of color to signify a sort of magic to things, and I loved the included quotes. I especially loved how Wendy was told: she's both true to the original, and a stronger more modern iteration. The pacing once she gets to "Neverland," though, starts to feel rushed. It pulls you back out of the story, and things feel a little off the beat. Even the art began to struggle a little (or I was pulled out of the story enough that I started to nit-pick): frames were less beautifully detailed, expressions and figures grew somewhat awkward. The very ending, when she returns to "reality," was what felt the most awkward. I think just another 2-3 pages would've rounded it out and made it feel whole: Wendy really needed more of a closing-statement-style monologue at the end. Rather than feeling like she had answers, or closure, or even acceptance that it would be a mystery or a secret: none of that is stated, and the ending feels a little like the story died rather than ended. That being said, my qualms with the second half don't bring this down to any less than 4 stars. It's beautifully rendered, and it's absolutely lovely. It's a wonderful and meaningful take on a classic: it doesn't exist just for the hell of it, rather it takes something we know and love and uses it as a vehicle to say something important.
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  • Bruce Gargoyle
    July 17, 2017
    I received a copy of this title from the publisher via Netgalley for review.Ten Second Synopsis:Wendy and her family are involved in a car accident in which her younger brother Michael is killed – although Wendy is certain that she saw Michael fly away from the crash and is therefore still alive. Understandably concerned, her parents involve Wendy in therapy, in which she is encouraged to keep a visual diary in order to make sense of her thoughts about the loss of her brother.The Wendy Project i I received a copy of this title from the publisher via Netgalley for review.Ten Second Synopsis:Wendy and her family are involved in a car accident in which her younger brother Michael is killed – although Wendy is certain that she saw Michael fly away from the crash and is therefore still alive. Understandably concerned, her parents involve Wendy in therapy, in which she is encouraged to keep a visual diary in order to make sense of her thoughts about the loss of her brother.The Wendy Project is a thoughtful and fast-paced graphic novel dealing with themes of grief, loss and the pressure to move on after losing a loved one. Despite the heavy subject matter, the author and illustrator have infused this story with magical realism based upon the Peter Pan story. Different characters, as well as sharing names with characters from Peter Pan, take on characteristics of their fantastical namesakes, culminating in a trip to Wendy’s very own Neverland. It is through this experience that Wendy comes to terms with who she is now and how her life will change.This one does borrow heavily from the Peter Pan narrative, and I will be the first to admit that Peter Pan is one of my least favourite stories (what with Peter himself being the poster boy for man-children everywhere)…but this didn’t put me off as much as I thought it would, and I think the creators of The Wendy Project have achieved a good balance between original story content and content based on the more famous work.This turned out to be quite a quick read but one that manages to explore serious themes with some depth despite this. With a balanced blend of fantasy and real life, the authors have done well to highlight the difficulties that can be faced by young people, and all of us really, in the situation of a sudden bereavement, particularly when, as Wendy is here, there is guilt, be it actual or misplaced, about the circumstances in which their loved one died. I would recommend this to those who enjoy graphic novels about real life issues told in creative ways.
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  • Kimber
    July 13, 2017
    This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.I received a copy of this book from Papercutz on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.When Wendy's little brother disappears following a car accident she sees him everywhere. No one will believe her when she says that Peter Pan took her little brother away so she sets out to prove her point. Together with her brother John she needs to figure out and come to terms with the loss of her little brother d This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.I received a copy of this book from Papercutz on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.When Wendy's little brother disappears following a car accident she sees him everywhere. No one will believe her when she says that Peter Pan took her little brother away so she sets out to prove her point. Together with her brother John she needs to figure out and come to terms with the loss of her little brother during the accident.I really enjoyed this book. It combined Peter Pan (one of my favourite books) with drama, realism, and really excellent art by Veronica Fish who is one of my favourite artists working in comics right now. There was a good mix of drama and magic and beautiful art that really kept me engaged.Wendy is seeing images from Peter Pan following the disappearance of her youngest brother and is unable to determine what is real and what is delusion. The set up keeps the reader from knowing what is real too which makes for an interesting read as you never know if the magic exists or not.The art really adds to this magic/realism of the whole book as there are colours splashed in throughout the book ("astonishing splashes of colour" even). Veronica Fish continues to create some of the most interesting art in comics in my opinion and this book just highlights that fact.I highly recommend this book.
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