Bubbles
Twelve-year-old Sophie Mulvaney's world has been turned upside down. Mom lost her job at the TV station and broke up with Pratik, whom Sophie adored. Her teacher is making them do a special project about risk-taking, so Sophie gets roped into doing a triathlon. And to top it all off, she's started seeing bubbles above people's heads that tell her what these people are thinking. Seeing other people's thoughts seems like it should be cool, but it's actually just stressful. What does it mean that Pratik wishes she and Mom were with him to eat dinner? Is her best friend Kaya really going out with their other best friend, Rafael, whom Sophie also has a crush on? And can Sophie's mom ever go back to her old self? In this funny, heartwarming novel, Sophie comes to learn that people are more than what they seem—or what they think.

Bubbles Details

TitleBubbles
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2017
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN0374302901
ISBN-139780374302900
Number of pages288 pages
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade

Bubbles Review

  • Patrick
    November 6, 2016
    How lucky am I? I was able to learn about Abby Cooper and her first novel called Sticks and Stones. I actually got to meet her at #NerdCampMI last July. We ran into each other again at one of her Barnes and Noble book signings. I picked her novel Sticks and Stones to read to my fourth graders. When we were done, she visited my class and answered all of our questions.On top of all this, she left my class with her upcoming novel Bubbles, that will be released next July 2017. This will be our next How lucky am I? I was able to learn about Abby Cooper and her first novel called Sticks and Stones. I actually got to meet her at #NerdCampMI last July. We ran into each other again at one of her Barnes and Noble book signings. I picked her novel Sticks and Stones to read to my fourth graders. When we were done, she visited my class and answered all of our questions.On top of all this, she left my class with her upcoming novel Bubbles, that will be released next July 2017. This will be our next read aloud in my classroom. I couldn't wait to read it so I brought it home this weekend and read the whole book. When you read a first novel by an author and it is good, like Sticks & Stones, you can worry that the sophomore book might not measure up. That was NOT the case with this book. I loved it. Everything about it was so awesome. The new character of Sophie was endearing and warmed my heart. The plot was amazing with lots of energy and spirit. The supporting characters added greatly to Sophie's story. I actually could not put the book down once I started.I know my fourth graders are going to love it just as much as me. Thank you Abby Cooper for allowing us to experience this newest story of yours. We are honored. Once we finish, it will continue its journey and tour!!!
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  • Brooks Benjamin
    November 8, 2016
    I'm always intrigued by how an author follows up a debut, especially if I completely fall in love with it. Sometimes I'm worried that the second just won't hold up. Other times I'm blown away by how they pulled off another story with as much charm and heart.Abby Cooper's BUBBLES holds all the humor and every bit of the magic of her first book, all with a brand new character and concept that is equally original and fresh. Sophie's voice is just as wonderful, and her journey to figure out why she' I'm always intrigued by how an author follows up a debut, especially if I completely fall in love with it. Sometimes I'm worried that the second just won't hold up. Other times I'm blown away by how they pulled off another story with as much charm and heart.Abby Cooper's BUBBLES holds all the humor and every bit of the magic of her first book, all with a brand new character and concept that is equally original and fresh. Sophie's voice is just as wonderful, and her journey to figure out why she's seeing these bubbles, what's going to happen to her mother, and how she's going to pull of this seemingly impossible school project is so entertaining and thought provoking.BUBBLES will spark discussions of being open, being willing to communicate, and understanding that change can be a truly bittersweet concept. I hope this book finds a home in every classroom and in every library.
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  • Kate Olson
    June 14, 2017
    Abby Cooper writes from and for the very core of the middle grade heart, and it is obvious to readers that she knows her audience well. In Bubbles, as in her debut "Sticks and Stones", Cooper infuses threads of magic into her storyline - magic that brings very real topics such as anxiety, depression and having a single parent into a format that tweens can easily read about and relate to. Sophie, like so many other 12-year-olds, often agonizes over problems and attempts to deal with them without Abby Cooper writes from and for the very core of the middle grade heart, and it is obvious to readers that she knows her audience well. In Bubbles, as in her debut "Sticks and Stones", Cooper infuses threads of magic into her storyline - magic that brings very real topics such as anxiety, depression and having a single parent into a format that tweens can easily read about and relate to. Sophie, like so many other 12-year-olds, often agonizes over problems and attempts to deal with them without ever actually talking about them with anyone - this leads her to misunderstand situations and cope with them in less than ideal ways....and those pesky BUBBLES over the heads of people showing their deepest thoughts don't help! Throughout the course of the book, she learns the hard lesson that talking about problems may not always solve the problem, but it will clear things up and make you feel a lot better. The triathlon storyline is a unique and welcome one in the world of middle grade, and the Chicago setting is as well. Sophie's world of family and friends is a diverse one, with no part of the story being a lesson about diversity - this is incredibly appreciated as kidlit tries to provide windows and mirrors for all readers, but doing so in an non-preachy way isn't always achieved in other works. How do I know tweens like these books? My 11 YO daughter has read Sticks and Stones at least 4 times, and after reading an advance copy of Bubbles, gave it a glowing 5 starts. My middle school students won't let Sticks and Stones stay on the shelf for even a day, and I know Bubbles will fly off the shelves as well once school starts again in the fall. Thanks so much to the publisher for an advance reader edition of this book for review purposes! All opinions are my own.
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  • Kimberly Mcdermid
    June 21, 2017
    Abby Cooper has created another wonderful middle grade book! I had the pleasure to get an ARC of her most recent novel Bubbles. Bubbles is the story of Sophie who is trying to navigate middle school, with friendships, a sad mom, and a possible crush. But Sophie has started to see bubbles above people’s heads, letting her in on their inner thoughts. This causes a lot of confusion and problems for her. Although the possibility of seeing thinking bubbles above people’s heads is not reality, this bo Abby Cooper has created another wonderful middle grade book! I had the pleasure to get an ARC of her most recent novel Bubbles. Bubbles is the story of Sophie who is trying to navigate middle school, with friendships, a sad mom, and a possible crush. But Sophie has started to see bubbles above people’s heads, letting her in on their inner thoughts. This causes a lot of confusion and problems for her. Although the possibility of seeing thinking bubbles above people’s heads is not reality, this book feels like it could be realistic fiction. The plot and storylines are easy to see happening in real life. I love how Abby captures what education is like now. In the book the teacher assigns the student’s a project where they have to take a risk, do something they are scared of or don’t normally do. Without any spoilers, Abby uses this storyline to help inspire the characters, which in turn inspired me to take a risk similar to Sophie’s the next day! I know readers of this book will look to Sophie for the encouragement to try something new! Great job again Abby! I highly recommend this book.
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  • Scott Fillner
    April 14, 2017
    Abby Cooper demonstrates a clear strength and talent for writing. She is very strong in developing characters and tapping into the challenges of what it is like to be a middle school aged child.Her last concept in Sticks and Stones dealt with words spoken and the impact they may have on your self-concept, but this time Abby focuses on thoughts which may have impact on our perceptions. Those perceptions, as we will find can be locked on and accurate, or over analyzed and create challenging situat Abby Cooper demonstrates a clear strength and talent for writing. She is very strong in developing characters and tapping into the challenges of what it is like to be a middle school aged child.Her last concept in Sticks and Stones dealt with words spoken and the impact they may have on your self-concept, but this time Abby focuses on thoughts which may have impact on our perceptions. Those perceptions, as we will find can be locked on and accurate, or over analyzed and create challenging situations.I highly recommend this book to any MG reader.
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  • Lee Malone
    March 15, 2017
    Charming and heartfelt, this book explores the idea of what would happen if you could see what people were thinking, and how would that change your relationships? The main character's voice is spot on perfect, and her real concerns mirror those of kids her age, even while she grapples with this strange, newfound ability. Definitely recommend.(I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review)
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  • Jenn Bishop
    December 3, 2016
    Some characters just worm their way into your heart . . . and stay there. I have a feeling that's what Sophie Mulvaney has done to me. This irrepressible twelve-year-old has had her home life shaken, with her mom depressed in an aftermath of her breakup with Pratik, a boyfriend that Sophie cherished as much as Mom. Worse: Sophie feels responsible for both the break-up and Mom losing her job. And then the strangest thing happens. Sophie starts seeing people's thoughts -- beginning with Pratik's - Some characters just worm their way into your heart . . . and stay there. I have a feeling that's what Sophie Mulvaney has done to me. This irrepressible twelve-year-old has had her home life shaken, with her mom depressed in an aftermath of her breakup with Pratik, a boyfriend that Sophie cherished as much as Mom. Worse: Sophie feels responsible for both the break-up and Mom losing her job. And then the strangest thing happens. Sophie starts seeing people's thoughts -- beginning with Pratik's -- displayed in bubbles over their head. What does it all mean? Is she going crazy? (She now has an appointment with a therapist, after all.) And moreover, what's she supposed to do with this new knowledge?In a totally accessible and enthusiastic first-person voice, Cooper sucks readers right into Sophie's world and her predicament. I loved getting to know Sophie's friends -- the anxious Kaya and the goofy Rafael, and even her frenemy Viv -- and following her navigate the treacherous waters of middle school. The runner in me (though, ha, never a tri-athlete, mark my words!) particularly enjoyed seeing Sophie and her friends test themselves by training for a triathlon. I was a huge fan of Cooper's debut STICKS AND STONES, but I think I might be an even bigger fan of BUBBLES. It's everything I want out of contemporary MG: a fun voice, realistic problems, and a heartwarming conclusion.
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  • Monica Tesler
    January 31, 2017
    I adored Sticks and Stones, so I was eager to dive into Abby Cooper's second novel, Bubbles. It did not disappoint. A recent job loss and breakup has left Sophie Mulvaney's mom really depressed, and Sophie is on a mission to fix things, particularly since she thinks she's the cause of her mom's woes. To make matters worse-and a whole lot stranger-Sophie starts seeing bubbles above people's heads that reveal their personal thoughts. The road to cheering up her mom isn't smooth--Sophie's training I adored Sticks and Stones, so I was eager to dive into Abby Cooper's second novel, Bubbles. It did not disappoint. A recent job loss and breakup has left Sophie Mulvaney's mom really depressed, and Sophie is on a mission to fix things, particularly since she thinks she's the cause of her mom's woes. To make matters worse-and a whole lot stranger-Sophie starts seeing bubbles above people's heads that reveal their personal thoughts. The road to cheering up her mom isn't smooth--Sophie's training for a triathlon is challenging, she wrestles with jealousy, and a mistake she makes threatens a grade for her and her friends. Despite Sophie's challenges, she discovers the strength of her friendships, the value of supportive adults, and how there's a lot more to a person than their thought bubbles.Bubbles is a delightful read with a good message and strong but flawed female characters. Fans of Sticks and Stones will love this book.
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  • Jennifer
    December 12, 2016
    What a charming second novel from Abby Cooper! I was a big fan of her first book, STICKS & STONES, because of the vivid voice and awesome positive message, and BUBBLES has those same two winning elements. 12-year-old Sophie Mulvaney has begun to see bubbles above people's heads - you know, the kind you see in cartoons. These bubbles share their thoughts. Pretty cool right? Actually no - it's super stressful and Sophie is having trouble dealing with it. I loved Sophie's passion for history (a What a charming second novel from Abby Cooper! I was a big fan of her first book, STICKS & STONES, because of the vivid voice and awesome positive message, and BUBBLES has those same two winning elements. 12-year-old Sophie Mulvaney has begun to see bubbles above people's heads - you know, the kind you see in cartoons. These bubbles share their thoughts. Pretty cool right? Actually no - it's super stressful and Sophie is having trouble dealing with it. I loved Sophie's passion for history (and for pancakes), the triathlon, and Sophie's relationship with her mom. I think this book would be a perfect fit for kids in grades 4-6 and deserves a place in school and classroom libraries! Fans of Cooper's first book will not be disappointed!
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  • Gail Nall
    January 13, 2017
    I'm a huge fan of Abby Cooper's STICKS & STONES, and her newest work, BUBBLES, didn't disappoint! 12-year-old Sophie is dealing with a lot -- a depressed mom, friends who might not want to be her friend anymore, a "risk project" she has to do for class, and now -- on top of all that -- she's seeing people's thoughts over their heads. Told with a fun, vivid voice, the plot moves along quickly even as the reader becomes more and more invested in Sophie's emotional world. Highly recommended.
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  • Paul Orsino
    January 2, 2017
    Abby Cooper's second novel, Bubbles, establishes her as a master of writing middle grade voice. The insecurities, the new experiences - everything her characters go through ring true. This is a fantastic book about friendship and taking risks. Put Bubbles on your TBR list!
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  • Wendy MacKnight
    June 25, 2017
    What a beautiful, thoughtful, book about the awkwardness, pain, and hope of navigating the middle grade world. Heroine Sophie is struggling: her mom is depressed after losing her job and boyfriend, her friendships seem suddenly fraught with peril, thanks to first crushes and the awful Viv, who's trying to edge Sophie out of her own group of friends. Worst of all? Sophie is seeing thought bubbles over people's' heads, something which is both upsetting and confusing. But is everything exactly as i What a beautiful, thoughtful, book about the awkwardness, pain, and hope of navigating the middle grade world. Heroine Sophie is struggling: her mom is depressed after losing her job and boyfriend, her friendships seem suddenly fraught with peril, thanks to first crushes and the awful Viv, who's trying to edge Sophie out of her own group of friends. Worst of all? Sophie is seeing thought bubbles over people's' heads, something which is both upsetting and confusing. But is everything exactly as it seems? Kids are going to love this book, so perfectly does it capture the changes that occur as they begin to navigate more complicated relationships and feelings. A truly wonderful book!
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  • America
    March 1, 2017
    Sophie worries. She worries about her mom and her exboyfriend. She worries that she ruined their lives. And her worries make bubbles pop out of people's heads, so she can read them. But can Sophie handle knowing more than she should?
  • Janet
    January 19, 2017
    Review to come soon, but spoiler alert, I loved it!
  • Jessica Samuel
    March 26, 2017
    Another fabulous book from Abby Cooper. Her stories always hit home and really force the reader to consider others points of view and the power of words!
  • Amber
    July 1, 2017
    Abby Cooper has done it again! Similar to the problem in her debut novel, Sticks and Stones, Sophie Mulvaney has a unique problem. She can see thought bubbles above people's heads and knows what they're thinking! Sounds good, right? Nope. This is a book about assumptions, perceptions and how to be a good friend. Definitely a book that will spur GREAT conversations with middle grade readers!
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  • C. B. Whitaker
    April 7, 2017
    Abby Cooper's BUBBLES is the follow-up to her strong debut and surprisingly takes every aspect to the next level. I was amazed, chapter by chapter, just how good Cooper’s new middle grade novel truly is. BUBBLES has all the humor, magical whimsy, and lovable characters that were notable in her first outing, but manages to exceed expectations in terms of style, voice, and concept. 12-year-old Sophie has a lot on her plate: her mother is single (again), unemployed and depressed, her teacher is mak Abby Cooper's BUBBLES is the follow-up to her strong debut and surprisingly takes every aspect to the next level. I was amazed, chapter by chapter, just how good Cooper’s new middle grade novel truly is. BUBBLES has all the humor, magical whimsy, and lovable characters that were notable in her first outing, but manages to exceed expectations in terms of style, voice, and concept. 12-year-old Sophie has a lot on her plate: her mother is single (again), unemployed and depressed, her teacher is making her do a challenging project on risk-taking, her best friends convince her to do a triathlon with them, and she’s getting a crush on her childhood friend Rafael. To make matters more interesting, Sophie starts to see other people’s thoughts in balloons over their heads and finds out there are definite pluses and minuses to knowing what on people’s minds.The concept works really well and draws the reader deeper into Sophie’s inner world with every revelation. Most of us can relate to thinking we can read other people’s minds at times, and it’s never more important than when in our young teens. The plot moves along nicely and gathers momentum with every relational complication. In the end, it comes down to learning about communication, and without saying too much more, the results are surprising, funny, and touching. I highly recommend this wonderful and inspiring novel.
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  • Angie Hull
    May 10, 2017
    I was sent an Advanced Reading Copy in order to give this review. Abby Cooper has another amazing story to tell! Sophie is transitioning through middle school, friendships, and life. She begins seeing thought bubbles above other people and makes choices based on those thoughts. This is a quick read that will be loved by all middle grade students and it is one that makes you truly wonder - what really is everyone around me thinking about at this exact moment?Wonderful, well written, and cannot wa I was sent an Advanced Reading Copy in order to give this review. Abby Cooper has another amazing story to tell! Sophie is transitioning through middle school, friendships, and life. She begins seeing thought bubbles above other people and makes choices based on those thoughts. This is a quick read that will be loved by all middle grade students and it is one that makes you truly wonder - what really is everyone around me thinking about at this exact moment?Wonderful, well written, and cannot wait to read it again!
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  • Bridget Hodder
    March 10, 2017
    Review to come!
  • PictureBookPlaydate
    July 16, 2017
    I thought this book was outstanding, a book I really wish I'd had when I was in middle grade. There's a lot of plot I could get into (which is all well paced) but what I wanted to focus this review on are the tough topics that this book handles head on. There are the typical middle school worries about friendships and crushes, and those are done superbly. But, in addition, this book really touches on depression, both at the adult and child level. And it talks about therapy as well, which I thoug I thought this book was outstanding, a book I really wish I'd had when I was in middle grade. There's a lot of plot I could get into (which is all well paced) but what I wanted to focus this review on are the tough topics that this book handles head on. There are the typical middle school worries about friendships and crushes, and those are done superbly. But, in addition, this book really touches on depression, both at the adult and child level. And it talks about therapy as well, which I thought was amazing. SPOILER PART:.....Take this exchange between Sophie and her mother, about her mom's depression, which is a big theme throughout the book. This is toward the end of the book:"You were so sad. You've been so sad all the time!" (Sophie)"I know. The truth is, Soph, sometimes I get really sad like this. It's something I've been dealing with for a lot of my life. I usually don't let you see it, but this time, I don't know...I just didn't have the energy to call someone."And then further on, when Sophie talks to Kaya, her friend who also sees a therapist (also at the end of the book):"Isn't it weird that we're the only people in school who have seen them, but we never talk about it?"I nodded. "I was embarrassed at first. It felt like an embarrassing thing.""Yeah, I get that. But it shouldn't be. I liked going to mine. Did you like yours?""A lot."We sat quietly, looking up at all the people walking by. Maybe we were the only kids in our school who had gone to therapists, but I had a feeling that wasn't even close to being a fact."Any book that can help normalize going to therapy for kids is one that gets thumbs up in my book. Kudos to the author for handling these tough topics and making them accessible to kids who are most in need of the encouragement.
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  • Sam
    June 4, 2017
    Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I will admit, I am unfamiliar with the works of Abby Cooper. She is well loved in the middle grade sphere for her first book Sticks & Stones (which after reading Bubbles I now want to read). I wasn't sure what I was going to get with Bubbles, but what is presented is a very sweet story of friendship with a pinch of magical realism. This is a book entirely looking at perceptions of others. Sophie, our heroine, can see thought bubbles over people's head Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I will admit, I am unfamiliar with the works of Abby Cooper. She is well loved in the middle grade sphere for her first book Sticks & Stones (which after reading Bubbles I now want to read). I wasn't sure what I was going to get with Bubbles, but what is presented is a very sweet story of friendship with a pinch of magical realism. This is a book entirely looking at perceptions of others. Sophie, our heroine, can see thought bubbles over people's heads and she is instantly given an impression of the people that surround her. It's a pretty interesting concept for a middle grade novel, also given that this is a story about risk-taking and essentially trying to be the best version of yourself. There's some wonderful messages in this book that I feel will appeal to middle grade readers, as well as adults who love middle grade.My favourite aspects of this book were Sophie's relationships. She is constantly given reasons to pre-judge people with her 'bubbles' ability, and it's interesting to see her mind fight with the images that she sees. Sometimes she finds herself agree with what the bubbles show, and other times you see that she struggles to see the best in everyone. I think Abby Cooper does a good job of showing this balance, which I think can be hard to do given the novel concept of seeing thought bubbles.Bubbles is a very genuine novel. It's one of those stories where the author does a fantastic job of tapping into the insecurities and impressions that young children can often have as they are growing up. I definitely want to check out Cooper's first novel, but Bubbles definitely left me thinking long after I had closed the book.
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  • Jennifer Druffel
    July 17, 2017
    Imagine yourself as a kid. Not only is it YOUR fault your mom lost her job and broke up with her boyfriend, now you are seeing the thoughts of others around you. You know, like the ones you see above cartoon characters in the comics, thought bubbles. You start to believe maybe something is seriously wrong with you. It is hard enough being a kid, now this?Author Abby Cooper writes an incredible tale about a girl who is so in tune with the people around her it is starting to consume her. As a read Imagine yourself as a kid. Not only is it YOUR fault your mom lost her job and broke up with her boyfriend, now you are seeing the thoughts of others around you. You know, like the ones you see above cartoon characters in the comics, thought bubbles. You start to believe maybe something is seriously wrong with you. It is hard enough being a kid, now this?Author Abby Cooper writes an incredible tale about a girl who is so in tune with the people around her it is starting to consume her. As a reader, I connected with this story and the main character Sophie. I was just like her when I was a kid. I always worried about the people and events around me. I would obsess about the unknown and what I had no power over, but I never let anyone know about it. It did not manifest in the same way as Sophie's feeling did, but none the less, I could relate. Abby Cooper has a way of storytelling that reminds you of the adolescent you. So real, so rich, so tender. A must read for fourth grades and up!
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  • Jana
    May 20, 2017
    Middle grade readers will definitely be able to relate to Sophie, a twelve year old dealing with the stress of her mom's depression after a breakup with a longtime boyfriend, homework, and the complicated social world of middle school. On top of all that, she's started seeing thought bubbles appear over people's heads and reading what's going on in their minds. It's confusing because these thoughts don't always match outward appearances. The author does a great job capturing the dramatic self-ab Middle grade readers will definitely be able to relate to Sophie, a twelve year old dealing with the stress of her mom's depression after a breakup with a longtime boyfriend, homework, and the complicated social world of middle school. On top of all that, she's started seeing thought bubbles appear over people's heads and reading what's going on in their minds. It's confusing because these thoughts don't always match outward appearances. The author does a great job capturing the dramatic self-absorption that is typical of adolescent girls, so I believe this book will resonate with these readers. There are some good messages about honesty, friendship, and standing up for yourself that make this a positive chapter book for kids in grades 5 and up.
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  • Sam
    July 7, 2017
    Expected more and got less. The plot could be more developed.
  • Corabel Shofner
    July 18, 2017
    All things Abby Cooper. Read them, wear them, share them.
  • Michele Knott
    February 18, 2017
    Abby Cooper knows how to write for middle grade readers! In her sophomore effort, she once again has written a book that will be passed around from reader to reader.
  • Nicole Otting
    January 13, 2017
    This was a good story about friendship, caring for others but not letting it consume you, and finding your inner strength.
  • Christina Hanson
    February 13, 2017
    What if one day you could see other people's thoughts coming from bubbles over their heads? Your reaction might be similar to Sophie Mulvaney's: holy chocolate pancakes! In Bubbles by Abby Cooper, Sophie loves historical facts, pancakes, and hanging with her friends. But recently, her mom has become depressed after a losing her job and breaking up with her boyfriend. The Adventurous Girls (Sophie and her mom) are now a thing of the past. One night, Sophie begins to see other people's thought bub What if one day you could see other people's thoughts coming from bubbles over their heads? Your reaction might be similar to Sophie Mulvaney's: holy chocolate pancakes! In Bubbles by Abby Cooper, Sophie loves historical facts, pancakes, and hanging with her friends. But recently, her mom has become depressed after a losing her job and breaking up with her boyfriend. The Adventurous Girls (Sophie and her mom) are now a thing of the past. One night, Sophie begins to see other people's thought bubbles. Initially, she thought it was pretty cool, but Sophie is finding it's now becoming more of a hindrance than a fun hobby. Plus, Sophie may be reading too much into these thoughts than she thinks which causes some friction between those she is close to. Will these bubbles make or break Sophie, and can she help her mom be happy again? Set in Chicago, Bubbles was a fun book about friendship, taking risks, and new experiences. If you liked Abby's first book, Sticks and Stones, you will enjoy this one too! Look for it when it's released in July!
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  • Amara
    March 15, 2017
    Sophie has been having the dreadful six months. When her mom breaks up with Pratik, whom Sophie loved, and loses her job because of Sophie. Then something happens that Sophie can't explain.She starts seeing bubbles on top of peoples heads telling her what they think.To add to that, for her social studies class they have to take a risk. With her friends Kaya and Rafael, they will take a risk together. With crushes, friend , a takers and some serious injuries, Sophie will have to get past these cr Sophie has been having the dreadful six months. When her mom breaks up with Pratik, whom Sophie loved, and loses her job because of Sophie. Then something happens that Sophie can't explain.She starts seeing bubbles on top of peoples heads telling her what they think.To add to that, for her social studies class they have to take a risk. With her friends Kaya and Rafael, they will take a risk together. With crushes, friend , a takers and some serious injuries, Sophie will have to get past these crazy bubbles.READ ABBY COOPERS BOOKS!! I give this book 3 stars
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  • Sarah
    July 19, 2017
    I really like this author's books for middle grade readers. What if we could see people's private thoughts in speech balloons above their heads? Yikes!
  • Shelli
    February 28, 2017
    Cooper has done it again! We fall in love with the main character and root for her louder than ever. Let's hear it for #TeamEverybody!
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