Collared (Andy Carpenter, #16)
Lawyer Andy Carpenter's true passion is the Tara Foundation, the dog rescue organization he runs with his friend Willie Miller. All kinds of dogs make their way to the foundation, and it isn't that surprising to find a dog abandoned at the shelter one morning, though it was accompanied by a mysterious anonymous note. But they are quite surprised when they scan the dog's embedded chip, and discover that they know this dog. He is the -DNA dog.-Two and a half years ago, Jill Hickman was a single mother of an adopted baby. Her baby and dog were kidnapped in broad daylight in Eastside Park, and they haven't been seen since. A tip came in that ID'd a former boyfriend of Hickman's, Keith Wachtel, as the kidnapper. A search of his house showed no sign of the child but did uncover more incriminating evidence, and the clincher that generated Wachtel's arrest was some dog hair, notable since Wachtel did not have a dog. DNA tests showed conclusively that the hair belonged to Hickman's dog. Wachtel was convicted of kidnapping, but the dog and baby were never found.Now, with the reappearance of the dog, the case is brought back to light, and the search for the child renewed. Goaded by his wife's desire to help a friend and fellow mother and Andy's desire to make sure the real kidnapper is in jail, Andy and his team enter the case. But what they start to uncover is far more complicated and dangerous than they ever expected.

Collared (Andy Carpenter, #16) Details

TitleCollared (Andy Carpenter, #16)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250055354
Rating
GenreMystery, Animals, Dogs, Fiction, Audiobook

Collared (Andy Carpenter, #16) Review

  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of David Rosenfelt’s Andy Carpenter series since the first book. It's a winning formula - smart aleck lawyer (low on energy but high on smarts), dogs and a good mystery. These are light, fun books. They won't have you on the edge of your seat but they always bring a smile to your face. And for as light as these books are, the mystery is always well thought out. Rosenfelt has done it again. Collared starts off when a border collie is left at the doors of the Tara Foundation. Tur I have been a fan of David Rosenfelt’s Andy Carpenter series since the first book. It's a winning formula - smart aleck lawyer (low on energy but high on smarts), dogs and a good mystery. These are light, fun books. They won't have you on the edge of your seat but they always bring a smile to your face. And for as light as these books are, the mystery is always well thought out. Rosenfelt has done it again. Collared starts off when a border collie is left at the doors of the Tara Foundation. Turns out this dog was stolen, along with an adopted baby, three years ago. The baby was never returned or recovered. A man, the ex-boyfriend of the adoptive mother, was convicted of being the abductor. Andy agrees to investigate what the return of the dog means for the case. There are lots of twists and turns along the way. You are given glimpses to know some but not all of the story. Anyone who enjoys Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum or Nelson DeMille’s John Corey series would do well to check out these books. It's not necessary to read them in order but it will flesh out certain relationships and provide the background that Rosenfelt doesn't reiterate like some authors always feel the need to do. My thanks to netgalley and Minotaur Books for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    With Collared, the Andy Carpenter series now consists of 16 books. This author thing must be working out for David Rosenfelt. He's found a formula that works and his books are consistently good. There is a bevy of reliable characters who support Andy the Reluctant Lawyer, Dog Lover, and Wiseacre. There’s always a dog involved somehow. What varies are the cases and the criminal suspects. The investigations move along quickly, and the action in the courtroom is not filled with legalese or overly d With Collared, the Andy Carpenter series now consists of 16 books. This author thing must be working out for David Rosenfelt. He's found a formula that works and his books are consistently good. There is a bevy of reliable characters who support Andy the Reluctant Lawyer, Dog Lover, and Wiseacre. There’s always a dog involved somehow. What varies are the cases and the criminal suspects. The investigations move along quickly, and the action in the courtroom is not filled with legalese or overly dramatic. I'm always captivated by these books.This book starts off with a border collie being left at the front door of Andy’s dog rescue foundation. The dog is microchipped, which is how we learn who this dog’s owner is and her involvement in a crime from three years ago. The story branches out from there. There are some killings, but no gore. And no harm comes to the dog.Reading a series from the beginning gives the best experience, but these books, especially the later books, could be read as stand alones. There’s not much backstory or history given and new readers probably won't miss it.In real life, David Rosenfelt does run a dog rescue called the Tara Foundation. Tara was David’s beloved golden retriever. David and his wife live with a herd of about 27 dogs that is ever changing as older or ill dogs pass and new elderly or sick dogs are adopted. Wherever his book readings are scheduled, they are benefits for local animal shelters. This guy is going to heaven with all the dogs.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Good Lord, is this really #16? I can’t believe I’ve been reading the series for so long but I guess that’s a testament to this author’s winning formula. This is one of those series where if you enjoy one, you’ll enjoy them all.The beginning made me think of that old book “The Cat Came Back”. Substitute a canine & you’ve got Cody, a loveable Border Collie found outside the Tara Foundation dog shelter one morning by Willie Miller. After Willie scans him for a microchip, his next call is to par Good Lord, is this really #16? I can’t believe I’ve been reading the series for so long but I guess that’s a testament to this author’s winning formula. This is one of those series where if you enjoy one, you’ll enjoy them all.The beginning made me think of that old book “The Cat Came Back”. Substitute a canine & you’ve got Cody, a loveable Border Collie found outside the Tara Foundation dog shelter one morning by Willie Miller. After Willie scans him for a microchip, his next call is to partner Andy Carpenter. Turns out Cody is a bit of a celebrity. Almost 3 years ago, Jill HIckman’s nanny Teresa was assaulted while on an outing with Cody & Dylan, Jill’s adopted baby son. Teresa identified the attacker as Keith Wachtel, a scientist who worked for Jill’s company & her former lover. The most damning evidence came when dog hair found in Keith’s car & home was DNA matched to Cody. Keith was convicted but Dylan & Cody were never found.As it happens, Jill is friends with Laurie, Andy’s wife & while she’e overjoyed to see Cody, she’s also hopeful this will lead to Dylan. Reluctantly, Andy agrees to poke around & begins by giving the heads up to Det. Pete Stanton. Pete worked the original case & is sure they got their man but after visiting Keith in prison, Andy’s not so sure. From here, the plot stretches out in multiple directions as more players are introduced. The underlying conspiracy is complex & there are several sneaky twists that’ll catch you off guard. It’s not long before Andy’s worst fear is realized….yup, he’ll have to dust off a suit & be a lawyer. Oh the horror! The only person more distraught about this turn of events is Edna, Andy’s “office manager”. This will seriously cut into a strict training regime for her next run at the crossword puzzle title.Rosenfelt’s books are always cleverly constructed but for me, at least half the reading pleasure comes from spending time with characters that have become old friends. Andy is the heart of the eccentric cast & narrates the story with a self deprecating voice. His interactions with other characters & sly internal observations provide much of the humour. As usual, Laurie is the voice of reason & Marcus continues to scare the bejeezus out of anyone smarter than a house plant. Who am I kidding…plants are afraid of him, too.The author is a master of pacing & interspersed with the laughs is a cleverly plotted mystery that clips right along. Besides wanting to know how it all shakes out, you’ll keep reading because it’s just so darn entertaining.Like other authors with long running series such as John Sandford, Janet Evanovich or Lee Child, Rosenfelt has a distinctive style. They all contribute to the same genre but have found their own niches by creating signature characters who inhabit stories that run the gamut from grit to humour. You may have your favourites among their books but picking up the next instalment is a no-brainer. This author is one of my go-to’s when I’m in the mood for familiar faces, witty dialogue & genuine laughs all wrapped around a smart mystery.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in the series that I have read. I would not suggest it as I felt there were things the author assumed you knew. The story was good and kept me guessing. I love dogs so that was a fun addition.
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    When you read an Andy Carpenter story you know just what you’re getting… humor, sarcasm, mystery, courtroom shenanigans. And of course there is always - in some way, shape, or form - a dog involved. Although the books generally tend to follow a formula, I think that Collared is one of his better stories. There were a couple of revelations that I didn’t see coming, and I think we saw a new side to Andy. One that will push up against the edge of his ethics in order to see the justice done in the e When you read an Andy Carpenter story you know just what you’re getting… humor, sarcasm, mystery, courtroom shenanigans. And of course there is always - in some way, shape, or form - a dog involved. Although the books generally tend to follow a formula, I think that Collared is one of his better stories. There were a couple of revelations that I didn’t see coming, and I think we saw a new side to Andy. One that will push up against the edge of his ethics in order to see the justice done in the end. I adore David Rosenfelt for his unabashed love of dogs. Just about every month I see him posting on Facebook about a new addition to his canine brood, all of whom are larger breed senior dogs with no other place to go. He and his wife Debbie have created a sanctuary for these sweet and gentle giants, even knowing that their time on earth is limited. Five weeks ago we lost one of our own gentle giants to cancer, and it has affected nearly every aspect of my life, including my ability to spend quiet time reading like I used to. Life is not normal without Ellie, but it’s a bit of comfort to read something written by a man who clearly shares this bottomless love for his four legged kids, and considers them to be part of his family.
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  • Yodamom
    January 1, 1970
    I picked it up for the cover alone. I found this while shelf surfing at my library. I read the authors blurb, he has 35 dogs, runs a rescue. My kind of human, I had to give the book a try. It was a fun quick mystery with realistic drama.The main character is lawyer who doesn't need to work for a living, he does it because it's the right thing to do. He is married to a PI, has and adopted child and several dogs. His humor is snarky and intelligent. His relationship with his family and coworkers w I picked it up for the cover alone. I found this while shelf surfing at my library. I read the authors blurb, he has 35 dogs, runs a rescue. My kind of human, I had to give the book a try. It was a fun quick mystery with realistic drama.The main character is lawyer who doesn't need to work for a living, he does it because it's the right thing to do. He is married to a PI, has and adopted child and several dogs. His humor is snarky and intelligent. His relationship with his family and coworkers was believable and relevant to the story. I liked the guy, liked his wife, his wacky coworkers and how they went about getting things done.This was book #16 in this series. Why not start towards the end right ? I have a lot more books to read in this series, and that is good. I have plans to start from book 1 and slowly work my way through them
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  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    This series is a lighter legal read than a legal thriller, more mystery but not quite a cozy. Regardless of that, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Andy Carpenter is a reluctant defense lawyer, who was not even sure he wanted to renew his licence at the beginning of the book. His wife and partner in the dog rescue foundation convince him he should. When a border collie is left at the foundation with a cryptic note, the mystery begins. When the dog is checked for a micro-chip, they determine that i This series is a lighter legal read than a legal thriller, more mystery but not quite a cozy. Regardless of that, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Andy Carpenter is a reluctant defense lawyer, who was not even sure he wanted to renew his licence at the beginning of the book. His wife and partner in the dog rescue foundation convince him he should. When a border collie is left at the foundation with a cryptic note, the mystery begins. When the dog is checked for a micro-chip, they determine that it is the same dog that was stolen when a young adopted child was kidnapped, three years earlier. The ex-boyfriend of the adoptive mother was tried and sent to prison for the kidnapping and the child was never found. This tweaks Andy's curiosity. His wife Laurie had befriended Jill when the crime was committed as she lived in their neighbourhood. If Cody, the dog, is still alive, what about Dylan. Andy goes to the prison to question Keith and ends up believing in his innocence. Can Andy get a new trial for Keith? Will they find Baby Dylan? Who left Cody at the foundation? The usual characters are back with a few new additions to flesh out the story. Andy is the heart of the eccentric cast & narrates. His interactions with other characters & sly internal observations provide a lot of humour. Laurie is the steadying influence for Andy and keeps him in line. She makes sure he is safe and honest as well as keeping him protecting using Marcus. Marcus who has skills like a one man army, scares everyone and keeps Marcus safe from harm, because Laurie asks him to. Sam, Hike and the rest of the team are there working in the background to help Andy investigate and prepare his case. Rosenfelt does a great job with pacing in this clever plot with enough humour to keep you smiling. Not only do you want to find out the answer to the mystery, but you want to keep reading to spend more time with the characters. This is a story with plenty of mystery, suspense, wit, skill, and detective work. A definite must read for those that like a legal mystery with a little less violence and darkness to it. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.
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  • Hobart
    January 1, 1970
    ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up)This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- I know I take dog-loving to a somewhat absurd degree, but what he just said pleases me. Someone who doesn’t care about dogs, or this one in particular, would have said, “It’s about the dog being found.” But he said Cody instead of the dog, which to me is a sign of respect and caring.I may need to get out more.Cody has been assumed to have been one of two victims of a kidnapping -- the other was the baby the dog's owne ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up)This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- I know I take dog-loving to a somewhat absurd degree, but what he just said pleases me. Someone who doesn’t care about dogs, or this one in particular, would have said, “It’s about the dog being found.” But he said Cody instead of the dog, which to me is a sign of respect and caring.I may need to get out more.Cody has been assumed to have been one of two victims of a kidnapping -- the other was the baby the dog's owner had recently adopted. It's been two and a half years, with no trace of either. The mother's ex-boyfriend and ex-employee has been convicted for the crime, on some pretty flimsy evidence. Now Cody has been left at the front door of The Tara Foundation. Naturally, once Andy is told about this, he brings in the police and the dog's owner (a friend of Laurie's, as coincidence would have it). The question at the front of everyone's mind is: can the dog somehow lead to answers about her son?Jill, the boy's mother and Cody's owner, asks Andy to look into this for her. Almost as soon as he begins, Andy uncovers some evidence that leads him to become Keith's attorney and get him a retrial. Andy is pretty clueless (as is everyone) why someone would kidnap the boy and the dog (and return the dog), not to mention frame Keith for the crime. But while he can't answer that, he can chip away at the evidence that put Keith behind bars -- the only hope the boy has is that by doing so, someone may stumble on an explanation for what happened to him. Along the way, Andy's associate Hike has to go down to North Carolina to do a little research. While there, something happens to him -- I won't ruin anything for you, but it's a lotta fun for people who have been around since Hike's introduction -- you will enjoy it. Laurie does what Laurie does, ditto for Marcus (who might be his most-Marcus-y here) and Sam. I do worry that Rosenfelt isn't doing much with these characters beyond their regular heroics and chuckle-worthy antics, but we got some good Hike material this time, maybe it'll be someone else's turn to shine next. I don't think the addition of Ricky to things added that much to the series, and that's the last major change since Hike came along.I really would've appreciated a little more courtroom action, but I'm not sure what else could've happened. It just seems like less time is being given to the courtroom lately -- maybe I'm wrong. I can't imagine that Andy would approve of someone doing the work to determine if I'm right or not -- he sure wouldn't -- so let's just assume I am.I sound like I'm complaining about the book -- that's not really my intention. I wouldn't expect so much from it if I wasn't such a fan. Collared has a clever mystery, some funny moments, a nice twist or two, and we get to spend time with characters that readers have come to know and like. For a series 16 books in, that's pretty good. Where else are you going to get a friend of the protagonist describe a potential suspect like this?“Because Kaiser is a bad guy— a very bad, very dangerous , very evil guy . He might even be a Cardinals fan.”It's a fun read -- from the moment that Andy assembles the family to help him decide if he'll renew his law license to the party at Charlie's, Rosenfelt keeps you turning the pages with a smile on your face. Disclaimer: I received this eARC from St. Martin's Press via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this. N.B.: As this was an ARC, any quotations above may be changed in the published work -- I will endeavor to verify them as soon as possible.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    The last Andy Carpenter book is one of his best. A border collie is left at the Tara Foundation. A scam reveals that this is the dog that was stolen when a baby was kidnapped a few years ago. A boyfriend of the Mother was convict of the crime but the child and dog were never located. In order to help resolve the case, Andy becomes the attorney of record for the convicted party. Before long Andy feels that the man was not guilty and sets out to find answers. He wants to know if the child dead or The last Andy Carpenter book is one of his best. A border collie is left at the Tara Foundation. A scam reveals that this is the dog that was stolen when a baby was kidnapped a few years ago. A boyfriend of the Mother was convict of the crime but the child and dog were never located. In order to help resolve the case, Andy becomes the attorney of record for the convicted party. Before long Andy feels that the man was not guilty and sets out to find answers. He wants to know if the child dead or where he is now. The answers give no satisfaction and become dangerous. Marcus is called to defend Andy. A new trial is ordered for the convicted man. I highly recommend this book and series.
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  • Judy Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow.
  • Fredrick Danysh
    January 1, 1970
    Almost three years ago a baby boy and the mother's dog were abducted. Suddenly the dog turns up at the Tara Foundation and the case reopens as Andy Carpenter defends the man convicted of the abduction in an effort to find the boy. Someone is willing to kill to keep that from happening.
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  • Viccy
    January 1, 1970
    Andy Carpenter is a reluctant lawyer. He would much rather spend time at the Tara Foundation, a charity he founded that takes care of homeless dogs, run by his friend Willie Miller and his wife, Sondra. But, then again, Andy inherited a lot of money, so he really does not need to work for a living. But, Andy's wife, Laurie, knows Andy needs to keep his head in the game, so she makes him send in his application for renewing his license to practice law. And, it's a good thing she does because one Andy Carpenter is a reluctant lawyer. He would much rather spend time at the Tara Foundation, a charity he founded that takes care of homeless dogs, run by his friend Willie Miller and his wife, Sondra. But, then again, Andy inherited a lot of money, so he really does not need to work for a living. But, Andy's wife, Laurie, knows Andy needs to keep his head in the game, so she makes him send in his application for renewing his license to practice law. And, it's a good thing she does because one morning, Willie and Sondra arrive at the rescue to find a border collie tied to the door. When they scan the dog for a chip, it turns out to be a dog that was supposedly taken in a famous kidnapping case, three years ago. Jill Hickman runs Finding Home, a DNA testing company. Three years ago, when the company was desperate for money, Jill did some things that were not quite ethical and a lot of people paid the price. Keith Wachtel, the chief scientist was tried and convicted as the kidnapper of Dylan Hickman, Jill's adopted son. But now that Cody has been found at the Tara Foundation, it appears there may be a lot more going on behind the scene. Can Andy get Keith's freedom back? Another entertaining visit with the world's best reluctant lawyer.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter series rocks! Rosenfelt manages to make the reading pure adrenaline, edge-of-your-seat suspenseful as well as laugh-out-loud humorous. The protagonist, lawyer Andy Carpenter, is self-effacing with droll humor that is endearing and appealing to readers. Along with that sharp wit he is also a dedicated officer of the court who wins cases for his down-and-out clients through his genius. It is a treat to listen in on his thought processes, gut instincts, and skillful David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter series rocks! Rosenfelt manages to make the reading pure adrenaline, edge-of-your-seat suspenseful as well as laugh-out-loud humorous. The protagonist, lawyer Andy Carpenter, is self-effacing with droll humor that is endearing and appealing to readers. Along with that sharp wit he is also a dedicated officer of the court who wins cases for his down-and-out clients through his genius. It is a treat to listen in on his thought processes, gut instincts, and skillful courtroom tactics. The plot in COLLARED is unique and clever. Mystery fans will love the puzzle! It kept me entertained and enthralled until the very end! Great story! If you like dogs, courtroom drama and crime fiction with a smattering of humor, you will LOVE the Andy Carpenter Mystery series! I always eagerly await his next installment! COLLARED is the 16th in the series.
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  • LInda L
    January 1, 1970
    This was my very first David Rosenfelt/Andy Carpenter book. I LOVED IT. I am more a cat person than a dog person, but this was hysterical. The story kept me reading and reading all through a nasty rainy sleety day, and I can hardly wait to see how many Rosenfelts the local library has in stock. I loved all the characters -- well, not Jill so much, but the rest of them. How did I miss the first 15 Andy Carpenters?? Guess there are just too many mysteries out there. Looking forward to more .
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  • Angie Boyter
    January 1, 1970
    Andy Carpenter (and David Rosenfelt) does it again. A sweet #16!When a border collie is abandoned at the Tara Foundation, no one is especially surprised. After all, lawyer Andy Carpenter founded the foundation as a shelter for homeless dogs. Things become much more interesting when a microchip scan identifies the collie as a dog that disappeared three years earlier during the abduction of a baby and the beating of the baby’s nanny. The baby’s mother, Jill Hickman, is a successful businesswoman, Andy Carpenter (and David Rosenfelt) does it again. A sweet #16!When a border collie is abandoned at the Tara Foundation, no one is especially surprised. After all, lawyer Andy Carpenter founded the foundation as a shelter for homeless dogs. Things become much more interesting when a microchip scan identifies the collie as a dog that disappeared three years earlier during the abduction of a baby and the beating of the baby’s nanny. The baby’s mother, Jill Hickman, is a successful businesswoman, and the crime had received wide publicity. She is also a friend of Andy’s wife Laurie, which gives Andy a second reason to delve into the mystery. Although Jill’s former boyfriend, Keith Wachtel, was convicted of the kidnapping, baby Dylan has never been found. The more Andy and his team learn, the stranger the case becomes. Soon Andy is trying to prove Keith’s innocence and learn who was behind the baby’s disappearance and perhaps even a murder or two.David Rosenfelt's legal thrillers featuring wise-cracking New Jersey defense lawyer Andy Carpenter and an array of lovable canines and quirky humans are favorites of mine. They have interesting plots, likable characters, and a quiet but sassy humor that provokes more smiles than guffaws. A special feature is how Rosenfelt's own love for dogs (He and his wife founded a dog rescue foundation in real life.) shines via Andy's love for his Tara and the reliable involvement of dogs, even if they are in the background . These are not cozies, but they do NOT have the level of gore and grittiness common in urban mysteries today.Narrator Andy is always at center stage in the book, but his faithful team members add color as usual. In this book, the terminally morose Hike, the only other lawyer in Andy’s firm, takes the investigation to South Carolina and becomes infected by Southern friendliness and courtesy, to the bewilderment of all who know him.In Collared, Rosenfelt’s many devoted fans can be reassured that narrator Andy (and Rosenfelt) is still at the top of his game, both at solving crimes and delivering his low-key witticisms. The introductory opening scene was both saddening and intriguing, as a guilt-ridden woman drops off a dog at the Tara Foundation, but then narrator Andy took over and soon had me smiling as he described the interplay at the Carpenter breakfast table between Andy, his wife Laurie, and their adopted son Ricky. As usual, Andy provoked a final smile with the closing line. And there were plenty of smiles in between, whether Andy is at Charlie’s bar with his friend Police Captain Pete Stanton or annoying the judges and opposing counsel in court. If you are new to the series, you can enjoy this book very much without reading any of the others, but I would suggest you read the first book, Open and Shut, to get the background for Andy’s team and their circumstances, after which you can enjoy them in any order. There’s not a bad one in the bunch.Andy’s cases are always interesting, but this one was especially suspenseful, with some very unexpected twists and surprises. As I neared the end of the book I wondered how Rosenfelt was going to take all the loose ends and weave them into a plausible conclusion, but, by golly, he (and Andy) did it again. Andy may be a self-described “reluctant lawyer”, but he can’t resist a puzzle or ignore injustice, so I have every hope and expectation that he and his team will soon be at work again solving cases and entertaining his many readers.NOTE: I received an advance reader copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Ruth Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    Come on how can a book with that cover not be adorable! Actually it is a story that involves a kidnap child (with the dog) gone for three years while a man who says he is innocent sits in jail. Andy and his team begin the case not trying to prove the man's innocence. They are hoping the reappearance of the dog means there's a slim chance the boy is still alive. It will take a trial and several dead bodies before the truth is known. But with an interesting plot a sense of humor and plenty of dogs Come on how can a book with that cover not be adorable! Actually it is a story that involves a kidnap child (with the dog) gone for three years while a man who says he is innocent sits in jail. Andy and his team begin the case not trying to prove the man's innocence. They are hoping the reappearance of the dog means there's a slim chance the boy is still alive. It will take a trial and several dead bodies before the truth is known. But with an interesting plot a sense of humor and plenty of dogs it is the story you will enjoy.This is number 16 in the series that I now have to go back to book one for.
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  • Connie D
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't a super tense or complex murder mystery, but it was quick and fun. Rosenthal definitely had me chuckling quite a few times.
  • Westminster Library
    January 1, 1970
    A call from Willie, at the Tara Foundation, to Andy Carpenter is the beginning of this new investigation and case. “Do you think it’s real?” Willie asks. I [Andy] nod. “Seems like it. This is definitely her address, and I remember she had a border collie named Cody. If it’s a scam, it’s a beauty.” After three years, during a kidnapping, Cody and Dylan, an adopted baby, were taken. Where has Cody been? Can Cody’s return help them find Dylan?Find Collared at the Westminster Public Library.
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  • Freda Malone
    January 1, 1970
    Whenever I read an Andy Carpenter novel, I have learned to set the bar pretty high in the plot of the story and this one was brilliant. I don't know where David Rosenfelt gets his ideas, but he hardly disappoints and I'll say it again from the summary:What Andy and his team uncover is something more dangerous and complicated than you'll ever expect and Rosenfelt doesn't make it easy for you to figure it out on your own. Every time a dead body showed up, poor Andy was losing evidence of the one t Whenever I read an Andy Carpenter novel, I have learned to set the bar pretty high in the plot of the story and this one was brilliant. I don't know where David Rosenfelt gets his ideas, but he hardly disappoints and I'll say it again from the summary:What Andy and his team uncover is something more dangerous and complicated than you'll ever expect and Rosenfelt doesn't make it easy for you to figure it out on your own. Every time a dead body showed up, poor Andy was losing evidence of the one thing he needed to win his case and exonerate Jill's ex-boyfriend and kidnapper, Wachtel. You'll play the guessing game right up until the last chapter and you'll wonder why you didn't think of THAT.
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  • June
    January 1, 1970
    I love Andy Carpenter, his family, friends, all the dogs and of course, Marcus! These are always "feel good" books which have me laughing out loud. This story has Andy defending a kidnapper who he believes is jailed unjustly, has many twists and turns you don't see coming, with a stunning ending.Loved it.
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  • 3 no 7
    January 1, 1970
    “Collared” by David Rosenfelt is book sixteen in the Andy Carpenter series. Never fear new readers, you will enjoy this book even if you haven’t read any of the previous books, but once you finish this one, you will absolutely want to go back to read the series from the beginning; it’s just that entertaining. Andy Carpenter is a lawyer with so much money that instead of practicing law, he runs a dog rescue foundation. (Note: details of that journey are in the previous books.) A woman drops off “Collared” by David Rosenfelt is book sixteen in the Andy Carpenter series. Never fear new readers, you will enjoy this book even if you haven’t read any of the previous books, but once you finish this one, you will absolutely want to go back to read the series from the beginning; it’s just that entertaining. Andy Carpenter is a lawyer with so much money that instead of practicing law, he runs a dog rescue foundation. (Note: details of that journey are in the previous books.) A woman drops off a dog at the shelter, and when staff runs the chip, they find this dog has a history that includes kidnapping, corporate connections, and a culprit in jail. The plot is treacherous and intricate and yet every detail falls nicely into place at the end. The action moves quickly without being bogged down by distractions, and even the drama and danger is softened with humor.The story includes multiple murders, organized crime, child abduction, and sabotage, and while that scenario might seem to be a typical one for a mysteries series, the characters make this tale far from typical. They are a funny, easy-going, realistic group of people, and we want them to be our friends; we support them despite their flaws. The little details of their lives matter to us, and we keep turning the pages to find out what they are doing.I have read the whole Andy Carpenter series and loved every one. I started with one of the books in the middle, and when I finished, I just had to go back and read them all from the first one. Rosenfelt has found an astonishing way to make every book different, compelling and above all fun, even though he basically tells the same story each time. The characters grow and change in every book, but they are still the same dependable, fun group. They want truth, justice, and the American way to prevail even if they have to go to court to right the wrongs, punish the guilty, and free the innocent. Oh, and save dogs. Seriously, you will love this book, but watch out, you might just laugh out loud while reading it.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I am giving this a solid three stars for the mystery because it kept me going and interested in what was going to happen. I also added points for the whole NJ Hike vs. SC Pod Hike part of the story, which struck me as genuinely funny.What never strikes me as funny is Andy Carpenter's constant interior monologue, which has the depth and breadth of...the musings of a socially lacking 10 year old boy. Andy muses about how he hates all vegetables. Andy hopes he is going to get lucky with his wife. A I am giving this a solid three stars for the mystery because it kept me going and interested in what was going to happen. I also added points for the whole NJ Hike vs. SC Pod Hike part of the story, which struck me as genuinely funny.What never strikes me as funny is Andy Carpenter's constant interior monologue, which has the depth and breadth of...the musings of a socially lacking 10 year old boy. Andy muses about how he hates all vegetables. Andy hopes he is going to get lucky with his wife. Andy and his best friends have relationships that are 100% about sports, insults, and Andy paying for everything. Andy is glad he has millions so he doesn't have to do real work. Andy is tedious. Mr. Rosenfelt plots good stories, but Andy Carpenter comes off as a low-rent Myron Bolitar, and Myron is more interesting.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    David Rosenfelt has done it again with his latest, Collared. In this book, a border collie is left at Andy Carpenter’s Tara foundation for abandoned dogs. This border collie is a long-lost dog that, along with a baby, was kidnapped two years before in a well-publicized case. The baby, Dylan, was in the care of his nanny and was the son of an entrepreneurial woman who owns a well-known, important DNA company. After a trial, her ex-boyfriend was convicted of the kidnapping and sent to prison. In t David Rosenfelt has done it again with his latest, Collared. In this book, a border collie is left at Andy Carpenter’s Tara foundation for abandoned dogs. This border collie is a long-lost dog that, along with a baby, was kidnapped two years before in a well-publicized case. The baby, Dylan, was in the care of his nanny and was the son of an entrepreneurial woman who owns a well-known, important DNA company. After a trial, her ex-boyfriend was convicted of the kidnapping and sent to prison. In this case, Andy Carpenter, working with his crew of would-be misfits, discovers clues that lead them to wonder if the man in prison was falsely accused and convicted, and if the truth about the kidnapping still remains to be uncovered. In his mercurial way, Andy sets about figuring out what really happened the day the dog and baby were kidnapped and who is really responsible and why. As he pushes from clue to clue, Andy unravels a fascinating mystery, with a myriad of twists and turns until he figures out what really occurred. I have read most of the other Andy Carpenter books and found this one as enjoyable as the rest. If you love dogs and a good, light mystery, with none of the sex themes that so often fill mysteries, this one is a good one for you. Andy may come across as a bit lazy, but he is clever and smart—and rich enough not to really worry about costs or money, as he delves into his case. His is a solid, down-to-earth character, a lawyer who is fighting for compelling causes, and most of these involve dogs in some way shape or manner. This one involves both the newly found lost border collie and a baby. The story moves along at a good clip—Andy and his cohorts are never dull. I found it as entertaining as every other Andy Carpenter story I have read, and it only made me eagerly anticipate the next in the series. If you enjoy dogs (or even if you don’t) and a good cozy Collared will make for a great summer/vacation/beach read. I highly recommend it. I received this from NetGalley to read and review.
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    #16 in the Andy Carpenter series. Andy is back for another installment in this quirky series about a likeable, brilliant, lazy lawyer who having come by a fortune would rather spend his time with the dog rescue service he funds then in court. Luckily (as usually happens), an unusual case gets him interested and we're off on another adventure. A light touch by author Rosenfelt and a complex cold case featuring a kidnapping and wrongful imprisonment had me enjoyably turning pages.Andy Carpenter se #16 in the Andy Carpenter series. Andy is back for another installment in this quirky series about a likeable, brilliant, lazy lawyer who having come by a fortune would rather spend his time with the dog rescue service he funds then in court. Luckily (as usually happens), an unusual case gets him interested and we're off on another adventure. A light touch by author Rosenfelt and a complex cold case featuring a kidnapping and wrongful imprisonment had me enjoyably turning pages.Andy Carpenter series - Independently wealthy New Jersey lawyer and dog rescue enthusiast Andy Carpenter is contemplating letting his law license lapse. His alarmed wife, Laurie, who loves him dearly, doesn't relish the prospect of having to live with a very bored and cranky spouse. Luckily, a mysterious woman abandons a border collie at Andy's dog rescue organization, and a complicated case unfolds that requires the services of a licensed attorney. An implanted microchip identifies the dog as belonging to businesswoman Jill Hickman, whose infant son was abducted from a park three years earlier along with the dog. Neither was ever found until now. With the animal's sudden reappearance, the investigation is reopened, and Andy, plus his crack team of irregulars, gets on the Hickman kidnapping case
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  • David Crawley
    January 1, 1970
    PURE ENTERTAINMENT ... This David Rosenfelt novel is one in his Attorney Andy Carpenter who-done-it series. It is a wild and complicated tale that will keep you guessing almost to the last page. He frequently lightens the tone of the story by injecting some humor using Andy’s somewhat corny and often self-deprecating quips, and the colorful cast of characters comprising his investigative team add to the entertainment. The author is a dog lover, and, in each of this series, you can expect a canin PURE ENTERTAINMENT ... This David Rosenfelt novel is one in his Attorney Andy Carpenter who-done-it series. It is a wild and complicated tale that will keep you guessing almost to the last page. He frequently lightens the tone of the story by injecting some humor using Andy’s somewhat corny and often self-deprecating quips, and the colorful cast of characters comprising his investigative team add to the entertainment. The author is a dog lover, and, in each of this series, you can expect a canine or two to be woven into the plot; this book is no exception. This is fun, light reading and I recommend it for anyone who enjoys an entertaining mystery story. – David B. Crawley, M.D., author of "Steep Turn: A Physician's Journey from Clinic to Cockpit" and "A Mile of String: A Boy's Recollection of His Midwest Childhood."
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  • Roberta
    January 1, 1970
    My rating is pretty subjective on this one. I enjoyed reading the book. It defies logic. I had read less than 40% of the book when I had totally solved the crime and knew, without a doubt, not only who did what, but how it was done. It made me want to grab Andy and shake him "What is wrong with you, Andy?" Normally, wanting to yell the solution at a character before I was even half way into a book would make me wonder if I should keep reading but I still enjoyed finishing this one. Go figure. Th My rating is pretty subjective on this one. I enjoyed reading the book. It defies logic. I had read less than 40% of the book when I had totally solved the crime and knew, without a doubt, not only who did what, but how it was done. It made me want to grab Andy and shake him "What is wrong with you, Andy?" Normally, wanting to yell the solution at a character before I was even half way into a book would make me wonder if I should keep reading but I still enjoyed finishing this one. Go figure. The dogs play a role in this book, as usual, but not as large as in some of the earlier books. My usual nit picking: page 63 "I'm going to have to go to Maine. As much as I'd like to avoid it..." OMG! Who doesn't want to go to Maine!?! That's just crazy talk.
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  • Dad
    January 1, 1970
    This the 16th book in this series further establishes David Rosenfelt as a very entertaining novelist—able to spin yarns like the gifted authors of years past. He has refined a formula which fits his personality and skills. As an attorney, he weaves complex courtroom strategies into his works in humorous and entertaining ways. But his true skill is writing and making dogs the hero’s of his stories. Once again, he’s done it. A fun, lighthearted book and a great companion on my daily us commute.
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  • Sharyn
    January 1, 1970
    Loved, loved , loved this book. First of all, I admire Rosenfelt as a person because he puts his money where his mouth is and saves older abandoned dogs. Second, I love Andy Carpenter and his snappy dialogue. This was a really good story and a completely surprising ending. Every character is well thought out, and the secondary characters always show up and are appreciated. If you are a reader of this series, you will really appreciate pod Hike, as he is particularly hilarious in this book. And o Loved, loved , loved this book. First of all, I admire Rosenfelt as a person because he puts his money where his mouth is and saves older abandoned dogs. Second, I love Andy Carpenter and his snappy dialogue. This was a really good story and a completely surprising ending. Every character is well thought out, and the secondary characters always show up and are appreciated. If you are a reader of this series, you will really appreciate pod Hike, as he is particularly hilarious in this book. And once again, a dog saves the day.
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  • Janet Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Another well-written and fun episode in this series, but nothing to raise it above Rosenfelt's already high quality standard. Not his best, but well worth spending a few hours listening to Grover Gardner interpreting an already fine novel
  • Suzy (ereaderuser)
    January 1, 1970
    Another great Andy Carpenter story. And as with previous books this one had a nice little mystery to solve, and a ton of that Andy humor. Loved it!
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