Let the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan #7)
"Casey is a true craftswoman, a writer who beguiles one through the most twisted of plots with a confident and seductive hand. Let The Dead Speak is sharp, complex and gripping to the very end"Alex Marwood, bestselling author of Wicked Girls and The Killer Next DoorWhen eighteen-year-old Chloe Emery returns to her West London home she finds her mother missing, the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder, except for one thing: there's no sign of the body.London detective Maeve Kerrigan and the homicide team turn their attention to the neighbours. The ultra-religious Norrises are acting suspiciously; their teenage daughter and Chloe Emery definitely have something to hide. Then there's William Turner, once accused of stabbing a schoolmate and the neighborhood's favorite criminal. Is he merely a scapegoat, or is there more behind the charismatic facade?As a body fails to materialize, Maeve must piece together a patchwork of testimonies and accusations. Who is lying, and who is not? And soon Maeve starts to realize that not only will the answer lead to Kate Emery, but more lives may hang in the balance.With Let the Dead Speak, Jane Casey returns with another taut, richly drawn novel that will grip readers from the opening pages to the stunning conclusion.

Let the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan #7) Details

TitleLet the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan #7)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJul 25th, 2017
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN1250100836
ISBN-139781250100832
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction

Let the Dead Speak (Maeve Kerrigan #7) Review

  • Purple Country Girl (Sandy)
    February 28, 2017
    Thanks so much to HarperCollins, Netgalley and Jane Casey for the opportunity to read an e-ARC of Let the Dead Speak in exchange for an honest review.Let the Dead Speak is the seventh book in the Maeve Kerrigan series by Jane Casey. It’s my first time reading this series but being unfamiliar with it did not stop me from devouring the book. It did, however, make me wish I’d read a few others first for a little background information. Casey gives the reader a very good impression of all her main c Thanks so much to HarperCollins, Netgalley and Jane Casey for the opportunity to read an e-ARC of Let the Dead Speak in exchange for an honest review.Let the Dead Speak is the seventh book in the Maeve Kerrigan series by Jane Casey. It’s my first time reading this series but being unfamiliar with it did not stop me from devouring the book. It did, however, make me wish I’d read a few others first for a little background information. Casey gives the reader a very good impression of all her main characters and they are a pretty interesting lot, all unique with meat on their bones but previous books would help me to understand the complicated relationship between Maeve and Derwent. There is also a past incident referred to several times that led to the death of a fellow officer and it has affected Maeve in more ways than one and I really want to know the details. None of that affects how much I enjoyed Let the Dead Speak. I was hooked from page one. For one thing, it feels very authentic. Also, I really like Maeve and her first person POV. She’s a great character and I like getting inside her head. She’s a bit uncomfortable with her new place on the team - as a newly promoted Detective Sergeant. I also like the humor that Casey weaves throughout the book. There were actually some LOL moments. All the characters are complex and nicely fleshed out. The pace is quick with good dialogue and plot twists galore. Maeve’s first case as DS is definitely a strange one. When eighteen year old Chloe Emery returns home early from a visit with her father and her stepfamily, she finds the house she shares with her mother, Kate, on Valerian Road covered in blood. There is no sign of her mother, living or dead. Her neighbor, Oliver Norris, calls the police as Chloe has some mental challenges and is not quite grasping what has happened. The house and surrounding area are searched but there is no sign of Kate. The amount of blood makes it seem unlikely that Kate could have survived the attack and the police begin investigating the case as murder with Maeve and Detective Inspector Josh Derwent taking the lead with Detective Constable Georgia Shaw, a rather irritating individual, assisting. Maeve knows Chloe has answers but she cannot get Chloe to talk to her. Her neighbors, the Norris family, have grudgingly taken her in and it is hard to get through to Chloe because of the ultra-religious Norris clan but their fifteen year old daughter, Bethany, who is Chloe’s best friend, is a major hindrance as well. She is openly hostile towards Maeve and does not cooperate when questioned. She and Chloe are suspiciously close-mouthed, obviously hiding something from everyone. Oliver’s brother, Morgan, is a seedy character as is their reverend friend Gareth Selhurst. Maeve is pointed in the direction of a young man who lives on Valerian Road named William Turner, who was arrested for stabbing his best friend but the charges were dropped when the alleged victim claimed repeatedly that William was innocent. The neighborhood still believes he is an attempted murderer and are happy to steer the detectives in his direction. Complications spin the case onto another possible avenue when it is indicated that the reason Chloe came home earlier than expected is due to some unwanted “attention” from her stepbrother. They find Chloe’s stepmother is a domineering, unpleasant woman who is not a particular fan of Chloe or her mother. Chloe’s father, who is a successful businessman, is fairly meek around his wife. The stepbrothers, especially the oldest, are nasty, spoiled brats. The detectives do not have the warm fuzzies after meeting with them. With so many possible suspects and with the realization that there were some dirty secrets in Kate’s closet, Maeve and the murder squad have their hands full of a lot suspicious people who will not talk. If Maeve can get one person to talk and give her a small piece of the puzzle, the rest will fall into place but it proves a difficult task.Let the Dead Speak is a fantastic police procedural that pulls you in a many different directions but not just in possible motives and culprits. It made me laugh and it made me cringe. It made me angry and it made me sad. It made me want to comfort some characters and throttle others (I’m definitely looking at you, Georgia - I think a lot of us have encountered a Georgia-like individual). Everything from the characters to the procedure to the office politics feels very real. Casey’s such a great writer, infusing her story with so much tension that it is hard to put down. I highly recommend this wonderfully complex and suspenseful novel to anyone who loves a good mystery with loads of twists and some great characters - and with a satisfying ending.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 15, 2017
    I just want it to be known that Jane Casey is now forgiven for making me wait over a year for this (how did I COPE) because it was worth the wait (and then some) it turns out that delayed gratification really is a thing. Just to be clear I’d rather really that she wrote a book a week but we can’t have everything in life. Never mind.ANYWAY Let The Dead Speak then – another outing for Maeve and Derwent (swoon) and of course all the rest, much as I adore the main pair the group dynamic over the cou I just want it to be known that Jane Casey is now forgiven for making me wait over a year for this (how did I COPE) because it was worth the wait (and then some) it turns out that delayed gratification really is a thing. Just to be clear I’d rather really that she wrote a book a week but we can’t have everything in life. Never mind.ANYWAY Let The Dead Speak then – another outing for Maeve and Derwent (swoon) and of course all the rest, much as I adore the main pair the group dynamic over the course of the novels has ingrained itself on my brain, in fact this time it was Chris Pettifer who made me snort a giggle with a throwaway comment that happened to mirror exactly what I was thinking in that moment. But I digress…In this instalment a young girl arrives home unexpectedly to find her house covered in blood and her mother gone. A murder enquiry is launched even with the lack of a body. Derwent is back from holiday, meanwhile Maeve is fretting her new power and responsibility whilst dealing with a incomer who doesn’t seem terribly useful. The neighbours are all a bit barmy, everyone is hiding something, so you know. Best get untangling that mess then which is exactly what our guys set out to do. Things are going to be somewhat fraught. WELL it wouldn’t be any fun if they solved it CSI style in an hour would it?Look what I love about this particular series is the intensely absorbing writing with it’s ironically humerous undertones and the characters that do almost literally live off the page. I honestly have to remember sometimes that they are all fictional, not just those we see every time but anyone caught up in the current investigation. Jane Casey has a character writing superpower, nobody does it better. And I do mean nobody.Added to that the plotting is so gorgeously realistic and tightly drawn that you never disbelieve any of it. TWISTED too, I do love a good twisty tale and this one had that in spades, especially with reference to some of the personal relationships and goings on. The emotional trauma is in there too, fair warning given, every time I go into a new Kerrigan novel I say SHE WON’T GET ME AGAIN but every time. Bam. Dammit!I’m not going to say this is the best one yet because I always say that and whilst it may even be true, that is not the point. The point is that this series is consistently of the highest quality and improving ever more with age – Let The Dead Speak is simply one more pearl in an oyster bed chock full of them, it stole my Saturday (I love a good book thief) and I was happily immersed for the entire journey. Never one for backing off from the thought provoking occasionally controversial central themes, always moving her series characters forward and enveloping the reader more into their world, for me Jane Casey is the cream of the crop of UK crime writers. I look forward to each new novel with the fervour of a true believer and I have never once been let down. Not even for a moment, not even with a word.On a personal note my love for Derwent STILL knows no bounds. Also a new respect developed for Una Burt during this read. I kind of like her. Mainly because I think Maeve really does too. YES I KNOW they are not real…Sharp, clever, nuanced writing with a truly addictive flair and a deeply delicious dark heart.HIGHLY recommended.
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  • Gary
    March 25, 2017
    I have been a fan of both author Jane Casey and the Maeve Kerrigan series for some time so when I had the opportunity to read the latest instalment, I couldn't wait. One thing I like about this author is that she is so consistently good and this book proved to be up to the same high standard. In this latest story 18 year old Chloe Emery discovers her mother missing from her West London home with the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder but there is no sign of a body.Detective Maev I have been a fan of both author Jane Casey and the Maeve Kerrigan series for some time so when I had the opportunity to read the latest instalment, I couldn't wait. One thing I like about this author is that she is so consistently good and this book proved to be up to the same high standard. In this latest story 18 year old Chloe Emery discovers her mother missing from her West London home with the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder but there is no sign of a body.Detective Maeve Kerrigan and her team investigate the neighbours and discover some very suspicious characters. With no body the investigation proves to be far from straight forward and Maeve tries to decide who is lying in an effort to discover the truth.This is an excellent series and although the books can be read as one offs, I like that having read them in order from the very start I have got to know the characters better and any subplots make perfect sense. I would highly recommend both this author and this series of books.I would like to thank Net Galley and Harper Collins UK for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Emma
    February 21, 2017
    Another compulsive read from Jane Casey. This one was especially skilful and I loved the ending: this author doesn't let her characters get away with anything, even the sly, think-i'm-so-damn-clever ones. In fact, there are some particularly awful examples of humanity in the book, enough that it's difficult to guess just who's involved in the killings. I pretty much disliked everyone except Maeve and Derwent. And Pettifer, who seemed to be of the same opinion.I come for the strange and compellin Another compulsive read from Jane Casey. This one was especially skilful and I loved the ending: this author doesn't let her characters get away with anything, even the sly, think-i'm-so-damn-clever ones. In fact, there are some particularly awful examples of humanity in the book, enough that it's difficult to guess just who's involved in the killings. I pretty much disliked everyone except Maeve and Derwent. And Pettifer, who seemed to be of the same opinion.I come for the strange and compelling relationship between the two lead characters, but I stay for the writing and the well constructed plot. This instalment was a good addition to both.ARC via Netgalley.
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  • Louise Wilson
    March 6, 2017
    Chloe Emery returns to her West London home to discover her mother is missing and the house is covered in blood. Detective Sargent Maeve Kerrigan and her murder squad must find out the truth. There is no body but all the evidence points to a murder. With door to door inquiries taking place, are the neighbours hiding somethings?An easy book to pick up but it's a lot harder to put back down. A decent murder mystery with plenty twist and turns that will keep you guessing.I would like to thank NetGa Chloe Emery returns to her West London home to discover her mother is missing and the house is covered in blood. Detective Sargent Maeve Kerrigan and her murder squad must find out the truth. There is no body but all the evidence points to a murder. With door to door inquiries taking place, are the neighbours hiding somethings?An easy book to pick up but it's a lot harder to put back down. A decent murder mystery with plenty twist and turns that will keep you guessing.I would like to thank NetGalley, HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction and the author Jane Casey for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Malia
    March 27, 2017
    As a long-time fan of the Maeve Kerrigan series, I was not disappointed by the latest, Let the Dead Speak. I read a lot of mysteries and psychological thrillers, so they sometimes blur into one, and I forget about them again. Not so with this series. The plot is consistently engaging and the characters feel real and well fleshed out. I especially place value on the fact that they develop, time passes, things change in their lives, relationships evolve. Strong characters are, for me, what make st As a long-time fan of the Maeve Kerrigan series, I was not disappointed by the latest, Let the Dead Speak. I read a lot of mysteries and psychological thrillers, so they sometimes blur into one, and I forget about them again. Not so with this series. The plot is consistently engaging and the characters feel real and well fleshed out. I especially place value on the fact that they develop, time passes, things change in their lives, relationships evolve. Strong characters are, for me, what make stories memorable, and that is certainly the case with Jane Casey's books.The story starts very eerily with eighteen-year-old Chloe returning home to find her mother gone, and the house looking like the scene of a horror film. Maeve and Derwent are put on the case, trying to locate the body of Chloe's mother, Kate, and to uncover what happened to her. The neighbors seem strange and almost everyone connected to the case appears a little suspicious, so that I kept guessing who might be guilty and what their motive could be. At first I thought the book moved a little slowly, and it took a little while for the story to really take hold of me, but when it did, I couldn't put it down. I don't want to give away too many details, but this story has quite a few clever twists and turns and the ending definitely came as a shocking surprise.Casey is very good at creating a mounting atmosphere of tension, which makes you keep turning the pages, anxious to know what will happen next, who is safe, who is guilty and who is dead.I read this book on a long international flight, and it was so gripping, I only watched forty minutes of a film before abandoning it to this better entertainment. After seven books, I feel I really know these characters and I was happy that Derwent had such a prominent role, as he is my favorite and really balances out Maeve (whom I also like, I should mention). This is a series I will happily return to as long as Casey keep writing it. I m such a fan, that I even turned my dad onto it, and he was very excited when I told him a new "Maeve" book had been published, for us to read and chat about. Highly recommended for fans of psychological thrillers, clever plotting, engaging writing and memorable characters!You can find more reviews and bookish fun here: https://www.princessandpen.com
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  • Kirsty White
    February 25, 2017
    I'm not sure I would rate this book as highly as everyone on goodreads. It's good but not great. The bad guys were suitable bad and there were enough of them that it was hard to decide just which one of them committed the horrible crimes in this book. However I couldn't really connect with any of the good guys. I've complained before about not enough back story in books for anyone coming into the titles late and this one is guilty of that too. I sort of spotted that Maeve was in some kind of lif I'm not sure I would rate this book as highly as everyone on goodreads. It's good but not great. The bad guys were suitable bad and there were enough of them that it was hard to decide just which one of them committed the horrible crimes in this book. However I couldn't really connect with any of the good guys. I've complained before about not enough back story in books for anyone coming into the titles late and this one is guilty of that too. I sort of spotted that Maeve was in some kind of life threatening situation in a previous book but it was a throwaway line. I don't want reams of details but a little something to go on would be nice. Because of that I just found her to be a miserable bugger rather than being able to understand the way she works.In fact I don't think there was one happy person in the whole book except Pettifer and he didn't actually say much.The story itself moves quite quickly and there are plenty of twists and turns to keep the plot moving and the reader interested. I liked how it was hard to choose which bad guy did it and which crime belonged to them as well. I liked the religious angle and would like to know more about Maeve's Catholicism (I should probably read the other books right?) and whether it was for only this book or if it's part of any deeper characterisation.Overall it's a great story but I don't think the characters evolved very much to really keep me hooked
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  • Laura
    March 14, 2017
    Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com As someone who hasn’t read any of the other books in the Maeve Kerrigan series, I was approaching Let The Dead Speak with completely fresh eyes, hoping to judge it as a standalone book in its own right. I have to say, I LOVED this book and am so glad I gave it a go – I only wish I hadn’t waited this long to read it!As this was my first encounter with Maeve Kerrigan I wasn’t sure if I’d warm to her, but she is truly a great character; sharp, witty, p Book reviews and more on www.snazzybooks.com As someone who hasn’t read any of the other books in the Maeve Kerrigan series, I was approaching Let The Dead Speak with completely fresh eyes, hoping to judge it as a standalone book in its own right. I have to say, I LOVED this book and am so glad I gave it a go – I only wish I hadn’t waited this long to read it!As this was my first encounter with Maeve Kerrigan I wasn’t sure if I’d warm to her, but she is truly a great character; sharp, witty, prone to rash decisions (but most fictional Detectives seem to be!) but with a heart of gold. However she’s not perfect, which I like – she seems to really dislike new recruit Georgina and doesn’t seem to try and hide it. I liked her no-nonsense attitude and loved her relationship with Derwent – they are great to read about as a pair and I found some of their interactions really comical. Derwent himself seems like a likeable, if grumpy and irritating, character and his dry humour made me laugh at various points. Great characters are what I feel elevates a crime novel from good to great – and Jane Casey has certainly managed that with Let The Dead Speak!The storyline itself is so well written – tightly plotted and believable but whilst still retaining plenty of drama and tension. It really keeps you guessing - packed full of characters who you constantly wander about (not about the police themselves, just the civilians!)… and with very good reason! There’s plenty going on in the neighbourhood where Kate Emery has gone missing and where the investigation is taking place, and everyone seems to have something to hide. It throws up plenty of questions and kept me completely enthralled, racing through the novel in no time at all. What a brilliant read – bring on the rest of the series!* Many thanks to HarperCollins UK and Netgalley for providing a copy of this novel, on which I chose to write an honest and unbiased review. *
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  • Mairead Hearne (swirlandthread.com)
    March 14, 2017
    'A House Full of SecretsA Life Full of Lies’ Let The Dead Speak is the latest in the Maeve Kerrigan Series from Irish Crime writer Jane Casey. Unbelievably, this is Jane Casey’s seventh in the series, yet it was a first for me!!Published on 9th March by Harper Collins UK, I can honestly say that this was a pure page turner that kept me completely immersed as I swiftly ‘swiped’ each page at speed.Please read on for my full thoughts…Chloe Emery arrives out of the station on her way home with the 'A House Full of SecretsA Life Full of Lies’ Let The Dead Speak is the latest in the Maeve Kerrigan Series from Irish Crime writer Jane Casey. Unbelievably, this is Jane Casey’s seventh in the series, yet it was a first for me!!Published on 9th March by Harper Collins UK, I can honestly say that this was a pure page turner that kept me completely immersed as I swiftly ‘swiped’ each page at speed.Please read on for my full thoughts…Chloe Emery arrives out of the station on her way home with the rain pouring down.‘The rain poured off the awning, splashing onto the pavement in front of her. It coursed into the gutters where filthy water was already swirling, dark and gritty, freighted with rubbish and twigs and dead leaves.'Immediately, as a reader you can feel the sense of impending doom. The atmosphere is dark and consuming from the get-go.Chloe is eighteen years old. Returning home earlier than expected from her father’s house she discovers, on entry to her own home, that all is not right. The house resembles something out of a nightmare with blood everywhere and no trace of her mother anywhere.Chloe’s parents split up many years previously, with her Dad, Brian, now settled elsewhere with a new family. Chloe has lived a very sheltered life with just her mother, Kate, for company. Chloe is immediately removed from the scene, as the police arrive to investigate what tragedy befell Kate Emery. But with no body and no trace of a murder weapon, the police are confounded in their search for the truth.DS Maeve Kerrigan arrives on the scene. With the assistance of her colleague DI Josh Derwent, they search for clues in the house. But this is most certainly not a straight forward case.Through hearsay and follow up investigations they soon discover that Chloe had lead quite a challenging life. In and out of psychologists from a very young age, Chloe seemed to have the mental of age of a much younger child. Without the natural ability to process information and with a father who appears a little estranged from her, Chloe is temporarily left in the care of her neighbours, the Norris family.Oliver, his wife Eleanor and their fifteen-year old daughter Bethany live a very religious life with very strict rules to abide by. They are very heavily involved in a local church and they strongly adhere to the teachings of this community on a daily basis. Morgan, Oliver’s brother, is also living in the house, albeit temporarily.Bethany and Chloe have been friends for years, with the age difference never really being an issue. There are a lot of complex issues dealt with here and it’s not long before Maeve Kerrigan realises that the key to unlocking what befell Kate Emery may lie with Chloe and Bethany.As secrets are revealed and truths uncovered, Maeve and her colleagues are exposed to the twisted and crazed side of humanity.I had no history of Maeve Kerrigan coming into this book and, while I’m sure it helps with a few of the backstories, it really did not affect my overall impression of Let The Dead Speak.This is a wonderful example of a fast-paced, heart-pounding, page-turning novel. It is pure crime fiction with many twists and turns that keep the reader completely enthralled to the end.Multiple layers with an extremely riveting plot-line, Jane Casey has written a gripping novel that I thoroughly enjoyed and would highly recommend to all looking for a captivating read.
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  • Joanne Robertson
    March 15, 2017
    I feel like I have been waiting forever for the new Maeve Kerrigan book by Jane Casey but this series is one I will happily wait for if the plots are as good as this one! Seven books into this series and it’s just getting better and better! In fact, I’m pretty sure this is the best so far.The plot here is a well thought out and meticulously planned police procedural that will work for you even if you have never read any of the previous books in the series. The personal threads are kept to a mini I feel like I have been waiting forever for the new Maeve Kerrigan book by Jane Casey but this series is one I will happily wait for if the plots are as good as this one! Seven books into this series and it’s just getting better and better! In fact, I’m pretty sure this is the best so far.The plot here is a well thought out and meticulously planned police procedural that will work for you even if you have never read any of the previous books in the series. The personal threads are kept to a minimum this time but I always recommend going back to the start of a series as you will get so much more out of the characters when you understand their backstories and have watched how their relationships develop.Whilst the investigation here is carried out by the newly promoted DS Maeve Kerrigan alongside DI Josh Derwent, I liked the addition of some new blood to their team with the latest recruit DC Georgia Shaw. This girl has a lot to learn, however I was quite proud of Maeve and how she interacted with her and enjoyed watching their scenes together. Josh was his usual politically incorrect self but there was a new depth to him as we discover that a new relationship with his girlfriends son has had an unexpected effect on him. But don’t worry, his charisma and bad boy persona aren’t far away! And I just love him exactly the way he is!But the main focus here was on the case of a missing mother, presumed murdered due to the slaughterhouse scene found at her home by her teenage daughter, Chloe. The daughter, a beautiful 18 year old, discovers the crime scene but she has some learning difficulties so Maeve struggles to get information from her about her mother’s habits or any enemies she may have. In fact the whole neighbourhood seemed to have something to hide-it was like trying to get blood from a stone for Maeve and the poor investigation team.Once you pick up one of Jane Casey’s books you will find it difficult to put down, she has an enviable way of grabbing your attention right from the off. This enthralling crime drama will keep you in suspense with some twisty plot details and creepy suspects right up until the satisfying finale. I always recommend this series whenever I can and I can’t believe some people still haven’t had the pleasure of discovering it. I’m rather envious that they are able to start at book one and have the whole Maeve Kerrigan experience ahead of them. Highly recommended by me!I received a copy of Let the Dead Speak from the publisher via netgalley.
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  • Roman Clodia
    January 22, 2017
    Another one-sitting read from Casey, though best approached in relation to the earlier books in the series. The plot is a complex one that explores the sometimes twisted and perverse nature of love between lovers and within families, not uncharted territory for crime fiction but always approached by Casey with a mix of empathy and a chillingly cool eye. That said, long term fans may find the relationship between Maeve and Derwent seems to be suffering a slight form of book amnesia: at one point Another one-sitting read from Casey, though best approached in relation to the earlier books in the series. The plot is a complex one that explores the sometimes twisted and perverse nature of love between lovers and within families, not uncharted territory for crime fiction but always approached by Casey with a mix of empathy and a chillingly cool eye. That said, long term fans may find the relationship between Maeve and Derwent seems to be suffering a slight form of book amnesia: at one point she tells a colleague that she never trusts him - surely those of us who have been following this series know perfectly that when Maeve is really in trouble Derwent is the *only* person she trusts; and that when he underwent his own trial by fire earlier in the series, she believed in him utterly? Of course, theirs is a complicated relationship and with more latent, at least on his side, than can be spoken out loud (though, as usual, there are some fine giveaway moments) - still, an odd vibe.Nevertheless, this remains one of my favourite crime series: for the unobtrusively smooth writing, but mostly for the fine characterisations that give the books real personality and emotional depth oh, and the snarky humour that balances even the grimmest scenes with something wayward and authentic.
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  • Leah
    March 13, 2017
    Maeve's back!When Chloe Emery returns home early from a visit to her dad's new family, she is horrified to find her house covered in blood and her mother missing. Maeve Kerrigan has been promoted to Detective Sergeant, and is called to the scene by Una Burt, who's still acting head of the team. The sheer volume of blood suggests there's no hope the victim could have survived, so they're treating it as a murder case, with the first item on the agenda being to find the body. I was quite unhappy wi Maeve's back!When Chloe Emery returns home early from a visit to her dad's new family, she is horrified to find her house covered in blood and her mother missing. Maeve Kerrigan has been promoted to Detective Sergeant, and is called to the scene by Una Burt, who's still acting head of the team. The sheer volume of blood suggests there's no hope the victim could have survived, so they're treating it as a murder case, with the first item on the agenda being to find the body. I was quite unhappy with the way the previous book ended, with Maeve and Josh turning into typically unbelievable vigilante-style mavericks, so I'm delighted to say that in this one Maeve's back on track. There are lots of reasons this series stands out from the herd, and one of the major ones is Maeve's refreshing normality. Of course she's affected by her experiences, but she's basically a good cop who works well within a team and tries to stick within the rules as much as possible. And for my money, the books are better when she does.Now that she's a sergeant, Maeve has supervisory responsibilities and in this one is looking after the newest team member, Gloria, a graduate entrant. Maeve's not finding it easy – Gloria's pretty annoying, ready to feel herself slighted for the smallest reason. But she also seems ready to develop a bit of hero-worship for Josh and Maeve's horrified to find herself feeling a little bit jealous. It's professional jealousy though – Maeve is still hoping that she and Rob can get back together, and every girl's favourite male chauvinist Josh (amazingly!) has his own little family now, having taken on the role of father to his girlfriend's young son. (My mind still boggles at the idea of him giving the boy dating advice a few years from now!)Plotting is another of Casey's major strengths and this one is particularly convoluted. It soon transpires that the street is filled with people with secrets and jealousies, and Kate, Chloe's mum, seems to have been at the centre of many of them. Chloe is staying with her friend Bethany and her parents, an ultra-religious family who belong to a church that’s not quite a cult, but is tending in that direction. Chloe herself is, perhaps, a bit slow intellectually – certainly her mother had been keen to have her diagnosed as such – but some people think she's more intelligent than she seems. She's also physically attractive, all of which makes her vulnerable to any unscrupulous predators she might meet. As always, the writing is excellent and there's plenty of humour to lighten up the tone. It's narrated by Maeve in the first person, past tense, so that we're privy to her thoughts and her rather spiky comments about her colleagues. Her relationship with Josh is more equal now that she's been promoted – he's still her superior, but she's no longer the new girl. He's still just as protective towards her though, which she appreciates even though it annoys her sometimes. And it's nice to see his softer side peeking through now that he has his little family to humanise him. This one would work fine as a standalone, though as usual I'd recommend reading this series in order to get the full benefit of the characterisation, and especially the development of Maeve's unlikely friendship with Josh. Great to have them back in action, and here's hoping we don't have to wait too long to see them again!NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, HarperCollins.www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com
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  • Angela
    March 23, 2017
    Although “Let the Dead Speak” is the seventh in a series of crime novels featuring Police Officer Maeve Kerrigan, this is the first that I have read……..and it certainly will not be the last!Jane Casey’s superb crime novel is so full of intrigue and suspense, that it is difficult to describe the plot in great detail without spoiling the book for others. What appears at first to be a classic case of a bloody and vicious murder turns into much more. Child abuse, fraud, blackmail – all appear as the Although “Let the Dead Speak” is the seventh in a series of crime novels featuring Police Officer Maeve Kerrigan, this is the first that I have read……..and it certainly will not be the last!Jane Casey’s superb crime novel is so full of intrigue and suspense, that it is difficult to describe the plot in great detail without spoiling the book for others. What appears at first to be a classic case of a bloody and vicious murder turns into much more. Child abuse, fraud, blackmail – all appear as the plot unfolds.The maze of intrigue and investigation begins when young Chloe Emery returns home unexpectedly, to find her mother is missing and her home looking like an abattoir. The murder squad team, which includes newly promoted D.S. Maeve Kerrigan and D.I. Derwent, are called in and the investigation begins. What appears at first to be a fairly straightforward case becomes anything but when Kate Emery’s body cannot be found and neighbours act suspiciously when questioned.With each new piece of evidence, with each apparent dead end, the suspense and intrigue grows, making this an unputdownable crime novel. As I said earlier, I have not read the previous six books in this series, but it worked well as a standalone. It has piqued my interest and curiosity to find out more about Kerrigan and Derwent and other cases they have been involved in.I enjoyed Jane Casey’s writing style. Without being too wordy, she portrays characters and scenes in such a way as to make them live in my imagination. The characters all have depth and are “real”, to the extent that I cared about what happened to them – or I detested them! I am particularly interested in the past relationship of Kerrigan and Derwent and look forward to back-tracking.I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good crime novel and would like to thank NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review it.
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  • Lainy
    March 7, 2017
    Time taken to read - over 5 days Publisher - Harper CollinsPages - 352Blurb from GoodreadsWhen eighteen-year-old Chloe Emery returns to her West London home she finds her mother missing, the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder, except for one thing: there's no sign of the body.London detective Maeve Kerrigan and the homicide team turn their attention to the neighbours. The ultra-religious Norrises are acting suspiciously; their teenage daughter and Chloe Emery definitely have som Time taken to read - over 5 days Publisher - Harper CollinsPages - 352Blurb from GoodreadsWhen eighteen-year-old Chloe Emery returns to her West London home she finds her mother missing, the house covered in blood. Everything points to murder, except for one thing: there's no sign of the body.London detective Maeve Kerrigan and the homicide team turn their attention to the neighbours. The ultra-religious Norrises are acting suspiciously; their teenage daughter and Chloe Emery definitely have something to hide. Then there's William Turner, once accused of stabbing a schoolmate and the neighborhood's favorite criminal. Is he merely a scapegoat, or is there more behind the charismatic facade?As a body fails to materialize, Maeve must piece together a patchwork of testimonies and accusations. Who is lying, and who is not? And soon Maeve starts to realize that not only will the answer lead to Kate Emery, but more lives may hang in the balance. My ReviewChloe arrives home sooner than expected and finds a blood covered house and no sign of her mother. The police arrive and despite there being no body, it is clear someone has died and Chloes mother is missing. Detective Maeve Kerrigan is on the case with her team and whilst the body is MIA the detectives need to knuckle down, question everyone and breakdown the barriers and lies to find what happened. With one religious family and a neighborhood lad who everyone seems to suspect, the real detective work has to sort out who has something to hide and is it murder?The opening chapter pulls the reader in and gets the hairs on the back of your neck standing. The two main detectives Derwent and Kerrigan have a complex relationship, seemingly hostile at times they have each others back with humour and cheek on equal balance. Chloe is eighteen but seemingly much younger than her years, unlike her friend Bethany, younger in age but wiser than her years. Chloe is taken in by Bethany's family whilst the investigation proceeds and slowly unravels the complexity of the relationships with the characters and their families.I would have read this book in one sitting had work not gotten in my way, as it was I was having to snatch moments where I could to find out what was happening next. The book kept me guessing right up to the last chapter, this is part of an established series but my first book of this authors. I don't think I was at a loss not having read the previous books but I will be buying them up, 4/5 for me this time. This book is out to buy this week, 9th of March 2017, from all good retailers, if you are a fan of the series already you will love this one.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    February 14, 2017
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Harper Collins UK for an advance copy of Let The Dead Speak, the seventh police procedural to feature Maeve Kerrigan.18 year old Chloe Emery returns home to find blood all over the house and her mother, Kate, missing. Chloe is a bit slow so it is her neighbour, Oliver Norris, who calls the police and takes Chloe in. Although there is no body the amount of blood suggests foul play and the police launch a murder enquiry. Who would believe a suburban street in Pu I would like to thank Netgalley and Harper Collins UK for an advance copy of Let The Dead Speak, the seventh police procedural to feature Maeve Kerrigan.18 year old Chloe Emery returns home to find blood all over the house and her mother, Kate, missing. Chloe is a bit slow so it is her neighbour, Oliver Norris, who calls the police and takes Chloe in. Although there is no body the amount of blood suggests foul play and the police launch a murder enquiry. Who would believe a suburban street in Putney could hide so many secrets?It has been a few years since I read a novel in this series so it was like starting fresh and I can assure new readers that it works well as a stand alone with a clever plot and some interesting characters.The plot has plenty of twists and turns with 2 very big twists, one of which I guessed almost immediately and then spent chapters wondering why the police were so slow to pick up on it, the second I didn't guess at all. Otherwise the team spend their time picking apart the lives of Kate and her neighbours, none of whom turn out to be pleasant individuals.I like Maeve and the team. Her love/hate relationship with her immediate boss, Josh Derwent, is prickly and adds a bit of spice to the narrative. It is unusual to see a working relationship where home truths are the order of the day. I also liked newly promoted to sergeant Maeve's ambivalent attitude to newest team member DC Georgia Shaw, a shiny with an attitude problem. I think I'd have done a bit more than tell her that respect has to earned!Let The Dead Speak with its fairly intricate plotting and sparky inter-personal dialogue is a good read and I have no hesitation in recommending it.
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  • Sarah
    March 7, 2017
    I read a few glowing reviews of this novel before starting to read it. Perhaps I shouldn't have, because I was really expecting to adore it. In actual fact it took me ages to get halfway through it, and I found myself making excuses for not reading it: I felt the undiluted police procedural subject matter was all very stuffy and I couldn't get into the story, nor care much about the characters.Then, about two-thirds into the novel, everything seemed to change pace and come together. DS Kerrigan I read a few glowing reviews of this novel before starting to read it. Perhaps I shouldn't have, because I was really expecting to adore it. In actual fact it took me ages to get halfway through it, and I found myself making excuses for not reading it: I felt the undiluted police procedural subject matter was all very stuffy and I couldn't get into the story, nor care much about the characters.Then, about two-thirds into the novel, everything seemed to change pace and come together. DS Kerrigan stopped moping about and got her act together. The religious self-righteousness of one nasty character and the conceited teenage spoiled brat who thinks he has a right to all he can get, including impunity… These people just flew off the pages: we've all met them in real life! The last part of the story was intriguing, very cleverly plotted and I was well satisfied with the way it ended.This is the first novel I have read by Jane Casey, and the 7th in the Maeve Kerrigan series. Although it can be read as a standalone, I would probably have better appreciated the main protagonists if I had started from the beginning.I received this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Christine
    February 22, 2017
    Welcome back Maeve and Derwent! You have been missed SO much!Let the Dead Speak is the latest in the exciting Maeve Kerrigan series, written by Jane Casey! Well it’s more Maeve and the gorgeous Derwent, the dynamic crime solving duo. I’d give them equal billing. He is gorgeous, isn’t he? Who doesn’t find Derwent that little bit attractive, in a bad boy way? Moving on…The story starts with a bang, and with one of the best introductions to a crime scene ever. Someone arrives home to a horrific blo Welcome back Maeve and Derwent! You have been missed SO much!Let the Dead Speak is the latest in the exciting Maeve Kerrigan series, written by Jane Casey! Well it’s more Maeve and the gorgeous Derwent, the dynamic crime solving duo. I’d give them equal billing. He is gorgeous, isn’t he? Who doesn’t find Derwent that little bit attractive, in a bad boy way? Moving on…The story starts with a bang, and with one of the best introductions to a crime scene ever. Someone arrives home to a horrific blood bath. The house shows evidence of a deadly fight and blood literally dripping everywhere. There is no body. This turns a nice neighbourhood, inside out. Curtains twitch. Neighbours puzzle. People get nervous. Where is the victim? Who knew her? What are her secrets? Derwent and Maeve are on the hunt for a killer, as well as a body in suburbia.This was fun! Lots of gloriously twisted family relationships, a dollop of religious extremism thrown in and secrets a plenty. Josh Derwent and Maeve are on top form, with their razor sharp banter and lively approach to crime. Maeve even has a newish sidekick to dislike, in the form of a young pretty Detective Constable. And we have wit and subtle humour lurking beneath every surface.Jane Casey is on top form in Let the Dead Speak. When does she ever disappoint us though? I’ve loved every instalment of Derwent and Maeve’s adventures so far. This time, I was left literally crying for more. I laughed, I glared at the suspects and cheered at the cleverness of the author. I wanted to stay hidden beneath the covers of the book forever.Crime to die for! Recommended.
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  • Heidi
    March 15, 2017
    Having compulsively followed the Maeve Kerrigan series since Book 1, Let the Dead Speak was on my wishlist before it had even been written. It was therefore like early Xmas when Netgalley granted me an early preview copy – time for a happy dance around the kitchen! This was the last exercise I was going to get for a while, until I had devoured it in a massive one-night read-a-thon. In Let the Dead Speak, Maeve has been promoted to Detective Sergeant, and has a new detective constable, Georgia Sh Having compulsively followed the Maeve Kerrigan series since Book 1, Let the Dead Speak was on my wishlist before it had even been written. It was therefore like early Xmas when Netgalley granted me an early preview copy – time for a happy dance around the kitchen! This was the last exercise I was going to get for a while, until I had devoured it in a massive one-night read-a-thon. In Let the Dead Speak, Maeve has been promoted to Detective Sergeant, and has a new detective constable, Georgia Shaw, under her wing. The pair is dispatched to investigate a potential murder scene after 18-year old Chloe Emery returns home from a weekend visit to her father’s place, only to find the house covered in blood and her mother gone without a trace. However, there is no body, no suspect and no obvious motive, and with Chloe reluctant to talk to police, the detectives are at loose ends as to where to start their investigation. Enter DI Josh Derwent, and the investigative team is now complete, with its usual interesting dynamics. As the detectives start to canvass the neighbourhood for any leads, it soon becomes obvious that the quiet, middle class street is rife with secrets and unsavoury characters that make your blood curdle, even more so since they come in the guise of ordinary model citizens. These people could be your neighbours, your colleagues, your friends, people you trust. As Kerrigan and Derwent slowly chip away at the lies, tensions build and people get nervous. Soon the investigation takes a different direction they did not seen coming, and the body count mounts ....In Let the Dead Speak, Casey once again proves why she is firmly engraved on my list of favourite crime authors. With her unsettling talent for looking into the darkest corners of the human soul and bringing them out for everyone to see, her tales are all the more chilling in their ordinariness. These are normal people, in ordinary neighbourhoods, pushed to extraordinary acts of violence by anger, greed, misguided love or arrogance. Humans were still animals when it was all said and done. Strongly character-driven, with vivid dialogue and non-stop action, the investigation carries the reader along in its wake to its shocking finale (which I did not see coming, by the way). The dynamic in Kerrigan’s and Derwent’s relationship is as sparkly and snarky as ever, and I felt like I was re-visiting old friends (or foes). He frequently threw himself into my private life with all the delicacy of a Labrador bounding into a stagnant pond, but it wasn’t something I encouraged. There is something about the dry and often obnoxious Derwent that gets under my skin (in a good way), and sometimes his abruptness and political incorrectness is laugh-out-loud funny: “But then, I don’t know how much the cat ... er ...”“Shits?” Derwent suggested, sitting down again. I am not the right person to judge whether the book would work well as a stand-alone novel, as I have hungrily devoured each one of Casey’s books, and would recommend other readers do the same. Whilst the murder-mystery would work well in its own right, part of the fun comes from watching the relationships between the detectives evolve over time. Kerrigan herself was the one I felt had changed the most in this latest instalment, with her new responsibilities making her not only more mature but also weighing her down to a point where it seems that burn-out is not too far away. Still prepared to take risks for the sake of finding justice, this new Kerrigan is somewhat more tired and disillusioned than in previous novels, which makes me wonder how her career will progress in future books in the series. Derwent, whilst still blundering into action with the finesse of an elephant in a china shop, has acquired a few new soft edges with his new relationship with Melissa and being a step-dad to Thomas from After the Fire. Adding new blood in the form of DC Shaw added a new dimension to the team and made for some interesting dynamics – I will be watching this space very closely to see how it plays out. Let the Dead Speak is a cleverly constructed mystery by a master on top of her game. As each layer of lies gets stripped away, a new truth is uncovered, like a whole series of Russian dolls cleverly slotted into each other, each with a different face and new reality. Slowly, carefully, each thread of the story is woven together to form a whole, which is totally different from the one first constructed when I started to read the story. This is not a book where you can be complacent for a single moment. Packing punch after punch, it left me somewhat stunned and exhausted after a night of compulsive reading like only the best of the best can do. I thoroughly enjoyed Let the Dead Speak and recommend it highly to all lovers of the series. If you have not read any books by Jane Casey yet, you are definitely missing out!Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a free electronic copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. *blog* *facebook*
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  • Jane
    March 19, 2017
    Eighteen year old Chloe Emery was unhappy.She had been to stay with her father, but his new wife and her two sons had made her so uncomfortable that she couldn’t stay, and so she was making her way home to her mother. Rain was pouring down and so she couldn’t turn down the offer of a lift from her neighbour, Oliver Norris, even though he made her rather uncomfortable too.It was clear that something terrible was going to happen.When Chloe stepped through her front door she began to realise that t Eighteen year old Chloe Emery was unhappy.She had been to stay with her father, but his new wife and her two sons had made her so uncomfortable that she couldn’t stay, and so she was making her way home to her mother. Rain was pouring down and so she couldn’t turn down the offer of a lift from her neighbour, Oliver Norris, even though he made her rather uncomfortable too.It was clear that something terrible was going to happen.When Chloe stepped through her front door she began to realise that that something had happened while she was away. Her mother wasn’t there, the mess was appalling and the smell was dreadful. When Oliver Norris reappeared – because Chloe had left her bag on the back seat of his car – he realised straight way that the mess was blood.Maeve Kerrigan and Josh Derwent are sent to the scene. She is newly promoted to DS, she is eager to prove herself in the her new role, and she is equally determined that Derwent is going to stop treating her as a junior. That doesn’t quite happen, but it is clear their wonderfully combative relationship is underpinned by mutual respect.Though there is no body they are at the beginning of a murder enquiry. Chloe’s mother, Kate Emery, is nowhere to be found, all of her belongings are still at home, and the physical evidence is compelling.Chloe was staying with the Norris family, they were protective of her and she was unwilling to say very much at all. That might be quite natural, but it might be that the Norris family had something to hide, it might be that Chloe was withholding facts that could help to reveal what had happened to her mother.The police were left to wonder is Chloe was a slow-witted as they had been told. Because if she was her obvious physical attractions might make her very vulnerable. Because if she was her close friendship with Bethany Norris, who was very bright and a few years younger than her, was very hard to understand.But at least Chloe was safe …Understanding the kind of woman Kate Emery was might help the police to discover what had become of her, but hard facts were hard to come by and they heard a great many conflicting opinions.The picture that emerged was of a complex character who might have been beginning to run out of options …The story was set up so cleverly, it was full of drama and incident, and the plotting and the pacing were immaculate.It rings true. The details are right, the characters are utterly believable,and the twists, when they come, are in no way contrived. They flow naturally out of that story. And whenever I thought I had things figured out something else came to light to make me think again. It really is very well judged.I’ve grown to like Maeve Kerrigan over the course of seven books in this series now. She is good at her job, she works well with her colleagues, but she is still a little inclined to rush in without thinking things through. Her role as a mentor to a new graduate recruit was an interesting element of this book, and I’m still enjoying the development of her working relationship with Josh Derwent.The story is a little too dramatic to be true, but I can quite believe that Maeve is in London at work.I’m just a little sorry that her own story hasn’t moved forward, and that I’ll have to wait for the next book in the hope that it will.That’s my only small disappointment with this book.A couple of books ago I wrote:“Oh Jane! I just want you to get everything right, because when you do you could have an outstanding piece of crime fiction on your hands, you really could.”This time she did and she does!
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  • Kate
    February 21, 2017
    Superb. A review: https://forwinternights.wordpress.com...
  • Margaret
    March 8, 2017
    The first book in Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series was The Burning, published in 2010, but I didn’t get round to reading it until February 2015. I was hooked immediately and read the next five books in quick succession by the end of August 2015. These are all police procedurals, fast-paced novels, with intriguing and complex plots and developing the relationships between the main characters. So, I think that although the books read well as stand-alones, it helps enormously to read them in orde The first book in Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series was The Burning, published in 2010, but I didn’t get round to reading it until February 2015. I was hooked immediately and read the next five books in quick succession by the end of August 2015. These are all police procedurals, fast-paced novels, with intriguing and complex plots and developing the relationships between the main characters. So, I think that although the books read well as stand-alones, it helps enormously to read them in order.Let the Dead Speak is the seventh Maeve Kerrigan book and it is no less intriguing and complex than the earlier books. I loved it. It continues to develop the detectives’ personal lives as well as detailing the investigations into Kate Emery’s disappearance. Maeve has been promoted and is now a detective sergeant (a long over-due promotion I think) and the murder investigation team has a new member, DC Georgia Shaw, a graduate on a fast-track scheme. Maeve finds her rather irritating. DI Josh Derwent is still her boss and neither he nor Maeve stick to the rules, but act independently as they see fit. The chemistry between the two of them is still there and is still full of undercurrents. DCI Una Burt is acting up as their Superintendent and the working relationship between her and Maeve is now improving.There are several strands to the investigation – first of all if Kate was killed where is her body and who had the motive and opportunity to kill her? If she was not killed why is there so much blood in the house, whose blood is it, and where is Kate?I enjoyed the fast-paced action, the interaction between the characters, both the police and the other characters. Chloe, who is very shy and lacking in confidence as well as in social skills is of little help in discovering what has happened to her mother. I liked the portrayal of the Norris family, Bethany and her parents and uncle, who are all members of an evangelical church, the Church of the Modern Apostles. Bethany refuses to answer Maeve’s questions and is openly hostile. Then there is the local ‘bad boy’ William Turner – what is his involvement? Similarly are Chloe’s father and stepmother and her step-brothers responsible in any way?I kept changing my mind about what had happened and who was the guilty party, but it had me foxed. And then when I had it worked it out the last chapter surprised me yet again with the twist at the end. Maeve Kerrigan really is an excellent detective.Thanks to the publishers via NetGalley for my copy.
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  • Tucker
    March 15, 2017
    I’ve been eagerly awaiting the next book in Jane Casey’s outstanding series featuring Maeve Kerrigan and Josh Derwent. In “Let The Dead Speak,” Kerrigan is investigating the disappearance of of a London woman. Because there is blood throughout her house it appears that she was murdered, but there is no body. Kerrigan has been newly promoted to Detective Sergeant and is adjusting to her new role and increased responsibilities, aided by the exasperating and protective Derwent. As Kerrigan and her I’ve been eagerly awaiting the next book in Jane Casey’s outstanding series featuring Maeve Kerrigan and Josh Derwent. In “Let The Dead Speak,” Kerrigan is investigating the disappearance of of a London woman. Because there is blood throughout her house it appears that she was murdered, but there is no body. Kerrigan has been newly promoted to Detective Sergeant and is adjusting to her new role and increased responsibilities, aided by the exasperating and protective Derwent. As Kerrigan and her team delve into the case, they find several potential perpetrators, all of whom have something to hide. The plot takes several surprising turns and the conclusion is a stunner. One of the delights of this series is the relationship between Kerrigan and the sometimes prickly and annoying Derwent. Yet there is much hidden behind Derwent’s cantankerous exterior as Casey reveals through his relationship with his new girlfriend Melissa Pell and her 4 year old son Thomas. In a poignant and heartfelt conversation with Kerrigan, Derwent reveals his fears for young Thomas. Those fears are exacerbated by Derwent’s exposure to the worst that people can do. Casey also reveals more about Kerrigan and her missing boyfriend Rob. “Let the Dead Speak” is a well-written, dramatic, and suspenseful British police procedural with excellent character development of both the police and the suspects. Another great book in this fine series.Thank you to Harper Collins, UK and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Kath Middleton
    February 22, 2017
    Chloe, an eighteen year-old, returns early from a visit to stay with her dad and his family, to find her mother missing and the house splashed with blood. Her neighbour who has given her a lift home from the station rings the police. DS Maeve Kerrigan finds herself looking at two dysfunctional families whose lives have become involved. The neighbours accuse one another and Chloe and her friend Bethany refuse to speak. There is no body, yet they have to conclude it’s murder from the amount of blo Chloe, an eighteen year-old, returns early from a visit to stay with her dad and his family, to find her mother missing and the house splashed with blood. Her neighbour who has given her a lift home from the station rings the police. DS Maeve Kerrigan finds herself looking at two dysfunctional families whose lives have become involved. The neighbours accuse one another and Chloe and her friend Bethany refuse to speak. There is no body, yet they have to conclude it’s murder from the amount of blood. It all seems hopeless.I enjoyed this so much and was impressed enough to have a quick look at what else the author has written. It was only at this point that I realised the book is seventh in a series. To me, that means it’s very well done. It was obvious that there was some back-story with Maeve and her DI but the plot never at any point depends on it. It’s a very twisty and highly exciting story and I enjoyed it very much.I received a review copy from Netgalley.
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  • Louise
    January 16, 2017
    Let the Dead Speaker is a cracker of a novel - smart, fast-paced, and a compulsive read from a crime writer at the top of her game. It's a story that will keep you hooked until the very last line.
  • Katherine
    March 7, 2017
    I was totally gripped by the opening of this book. It was so horrifically unnerving, so gruesome, so visual and so confusing. It is graphic and would make any hardened horror fan hide behind their kindle cover.Chloe Emery arrives home - Chloe a girl who "wasn't supposed to be at home," a girl who doesn't know things "other people took for granted," a girl who gets into a car with a neighbour but seems distinctly uncomfortable......to find her mother missing and the house completely covered in bl I was totally gripped by the opening of this book. It was so horrifically unnerving, so gruesome, so visual and so confusing. It is graphic and would make any hardened horror fan hide behind their kindle cover.Chloe Emery arrives home - Chloe a girl who "wasn't supposed to be at home," a girl who doesn't know things "other people took for granted," a girl who gets into a car with a neighbour but seems distinctly uncomfortable......to find her mother missing and the house completely covered in blood. It looks like a terrible murder has taken place except that there is no body. The first chapter is utterly compelling and quite simply, fantastic. I was hooked. This was a murder story I could not afford to ignore!Leaving us falling off the edge of our seats, Casey begins Chapter 2 by introducing us to our protagonist who narrates the story. Detective Maeve Kerrigan. I took to her straight away. I liked her directness, her frank and plain speaking."We are murder detectives. By the time we turn up at a crime scene, by definition, nothing can be done to save anyone. So what's the rush?"This voice is a great contrast to the opening chapter. Chloe's story had left me feeling a little unsure as there was something I couldn't fathom about her voice (a deliberate ploy by Casey we find out later) but as soon as I was in the hands of Kerrigan I felt confident and reassured."I didn't look like a murder detective, I'd been told. Too pretty, they said. Not tough enough. Too tall. Such nonsense."Yes. This detective is going to get the job done. I believe in her and I like her."Fear hung in the air like smoke. Don't think about it now. The facts came first. The emotions would come later."As the narrative unfolded Casey reveals more about Chloe and we see that this unease about her behaviour and actions at the beginning of the story are very intentional. Chloe has some learning and behavioural difficulties which create a further layer on tension as the detectives try to solve the mystery of her missing mother and the blood bath to which she returned home."'Speech delay. Developmental delay. Attention deficit disorder. Anxiety. Oppositional defiant disorder.' Derwent snorted. 'That just means you don't like doing what you're told.'"There are a lot of wry comments in the novel and as with all compelling police procedurals there is an entertaining dynamic between the detectives. These are intelligent, three dimensional characters who are experienced and who will be able to uncover the truth however confusing and however many unsavoury characters they come across.Kerrigan and her colleagues investigate the neighbours who all seem to have motives against the missing Kate Emery. The Norrises behave suspiciously and their daughter definitely seems to have something to hide. And what about William Turner, already with a history of violence and a reputation of criminal behaviour? As the investigation to solve an apparent murder without a body continues, more and more pieces of a jigsaw fall on to the table and it's only by working out who is lying and who is telling the truth that Kerrigan and her team have any hope of solving the crime and preventing any more deaths.I found Let the Dead Speak much more character driven than I expected. Each character has depth and each makes starling revelations which show just how complex and clever Casey's crime thriller is. The beginning and the ending are amazingly jaw dropping but the bulk of the novel is given over to characters and looking at what drives people to behave in certain ways. Rather than a constant bombardment of sensationalist shocks and surprises, this book is full of 'ooohhhh' moments when you rub you hands together with glee and watch with baited breath as the story ties itself up in knots and Kerrigan tries to untangle it."You spent a few hours judging someone else for how they lived and it gave you perspective on your own life, whether you wanted it or not."I found it fascinating watching how the each of the revelations lead to peeling back more and more layers. There is depth to this novel and it is an excellent, dramatic thriller. As I have said already, I loved the opening and yet the ending is also as fantastic - it is as hard hitting, unnerving and chilling and as much of a cliffhanger as the first chapter.I picked this book because I was intrigued by the title and had read a sample opening. The premise is captivating. Kerrigan is a likeable, relatable, intelligent character. But most of all this book surprised me in that it wasn't quite what I was expecting. It surprised me, it intrigued me, it baffled me and it completely impressed me. It was better than anything I was expecting. It is a clever, multilayered plot which packs a good punch and leaves you gasping. As one of the characters says themselves:"Nothing works out the way you think it will does it?"I'm off. I've got 6 books to go back and binge read as I can't wait to see Maeve Kerrigan in action again and read more of Casey's thrilling crime novels
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  • Rosemary Standeven
    March 21, 2017
    This was the first Maeve Kerrigan crime novel that I had read, and I was impressed. In a crowded genre, it is difficult to find a new story line, but Jane Casey has achieved it. Of course, many of the traditional tropes do appear: the irascible, old school cop, Derwent, who has a surprising soft side when no-one is looking; the heroine cop, Kerrigan, putting herself in danger and nearly dying (twice!); newbie cop, Georgina, trying desperately to impress the old hands; suspicions falling on every This was the first Maeve Kerrigan crime novel that I had read, and I was impressed. In a crowded genre, it is difficult to find a new story line, but Jane Casey has achieved it. Of course, many of the traditional tropes do appear: the irascible, old school cop, Derwent, who has a surprising soft side when no-one is looking; the heroine cop, Kerrigan, putting herself in danger and nearly dying (twice!); newbie cop, Georgina, trying desperately to impress the old hands; suspicions falling on everybody in turn (neighbours, local bad boy, ex-husband, religious nutters …). But then come the differences. Firstly, Derwent seems to be the token male cop. Several other male cops get minor mentions, but are really just wallpaper. ALL the other cops – the ones in charge, the ones doing all the work, the ones making the breakthroughs – are strong female characters. Very refreshing! Secondly, there appears to have been a murder – but no body. No-one could lose so much blood and still be alive – so where did the body go? And whose body is it? Then there is Chloe, the daughter, who comes home to the blood-spattered house. Is she as mentally challenged as her mother has maintained, or is that just a ploy to get extra funding – at school, from her father, from relations – and extra sympathy from everyone, while keeping Chloe cloistered as a naïve child of eighteen. Conversely, could Chloe be the wily, manipulative perpetrator of the murder? Or are there two murderers? You do expect in a crime novel that appearances will be deceiving, but in this book, it is taken to new levels of deception and intrigue. At many stages, you think you have the mystery solved, you “know” who deserves sympathy and who doesn’t – and then another twist comes along. Few come out of this story guiltless – but, not until the end is the full extent of their guilt, and of their crimes, apparent. The crimes are not always those that could be tried in a court of law. Sometimes a lie, hypocrisy, denial, betrayal, or over-zealous religious fervour can have as devastating an effect as a stabbing. And yes, the body is eventually found – as well as some others for good measure. But not in the ways you might have guessed. This is a fast-paced tale of ever-changing perceptions, with some excellently drawn characters, motives and scenarios. I can highly recommend this book, and look forward to reading more novels in this series. I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Olga Miret
    March 12, 2017
    A good read, entertaining and that will keep readers guessing. Thanks to NetGalley and to Harper Collins for providing me with an ARC copy of this novel that I’ve voluntarily chosen to review.This is the seventh novel in the Maeve Kerrigan series, and although it’s a standalone book that can be followed without difficulty even without having read any of the rest (as that was the case for me) I wondered about how I would have felt about the characters if I had known their background. As is the ca A good read, entertaining and that will keep readers guessing. Thanks to NetGalley and to Harper Collins for providing me with an ARC copy of this novel that I’ve voluntarily chosen to review.This is the seventh novel in the Maeve Kerrigan series, and although it’s a standalone book that can be followed without difficulty even without having read any of the rest (as that was the case for me) I wondered about how I would have felt about the characters if I had known their background. As is the case in police-procedural series (this one set in London, UK), we have the case that is being investigated on the one side, and, on the other, those doing the investigating.The case in this novel is quite original (although not unheard of). There is a crime scene without a body and a pretty bloody and dramatic one at that. The owner of the house has disappeared and her daughter, Chloe, who has learning difficulties (although the specific diagnosis is a matter of debate), suddenly comes back early from her stay at her father’s (her parents are divorced) and walks into a nightmarish scene. The first chapter, that follows Chloe’s return home and what she finds there, is told in the third person from her point of view, and due to her cognitive difficulties, we get to sense the confusion and chaos of her not assimilating or understanding fully what she’s seeing. It reminded me (although the effect was far less disorienting and shocking here) of the beginning of Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, where we also see things from the point of view of a character who has little understanding of what is happening.Most of the rest of the story is told in the first person from the perspective of Maeve Kerrigan, now detective sergeant, who is still trying to get used to her promotion and has mixed feelings about the new detective she’s been assigned (Georgina, who doesn’t have much experience on the job but seems to know important people and has ticked the right boxes). We get some hints at previous events, like the fact that Kerrigan feels guilty for the death of one of the members of the team, that her boyfriend moved out a long time ago but she’s still hopeful he might come back and we see and experience her interesting relationship with Derwent, who is one of the most entertaining characters, although I did feel there was a lot of background information I was missing, that might have helped me enjoy the nuances of their interactions more. The last chapter is again told in the third person, from the point of view of another one of the characters in the case, Bethany, a girl of fifteen, and that creates a nice symmetry in the structure of the novel.The case has all the elements one could wish for: complex family relationships, secrets and lies, blackmail, suspects galore, alternative religious organisations, action, chases, dead-ends, adultery, love stories, risky and dangerous situations, twists and turns, and yes, a final twist.The book is well written, a page-turner, flows well and although it follows the requisite investigative procedures, is not heavy on terminology and offers enough details without being too gore. I only missed feeling more connected to Kerrigan and the rest of the team (perhaps because I’d missed too much of the background story up to that point).A good read, entertaining and that will keep readers guessing. Recommended to lovers of police procedural novels set in the UK, looking for a fast read, full of action and heavier on plot than on characterisation.
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  • Jill's Book Cafe
    March 12, 2017
    4.5 starsI love a good police procedural and this series is one of the best. Consequently I was delighted when I discovered that detective Maeve Kerrigan was back, and back with a vengeance. In Let the Dead Speak, Maeve is now a Detective Sergeant, but thankfully still part of the Major Investigation Team. I say thankfully, as connoisseurs of this series will appreciate, that means she’s still working with DI Josh Derwent. Derwent is a potent blend of handsome machismo with latent sympathetic te 4.5 starsI love a good police procedural and this series is one of the best. Consequently I was delighted when I discovered that detective Maeve Kerrigan was back, and back with a vengeance. In Let the Dead Speak, Maeve is now a Detective Sergeant, but thankfully still part of the Major Investigation Team. I say thankfully, as connoisseurs of this series will appreciate, that means she’s still working with DI Josh Derwent. Derwent is a potent blend of handsome machismo with latent sympathetic tendencies which has you loving him one minute and happily wanting to throttle him the next.Maeve is still settling into her new role when a major murder case breaks. Chloe Emery arrives home to carnage and her mother Kate is missing. When the police arrive at the scene all the evidence (for that read copious amounts of blood and alarming blood spatter patterns) suggests there ought to be a body, but where is it, and more importantly who is responsible.Chloe, may, or may not be, as intellectually challenged as everyone claims but she certainly appears to have a secret, but does it relate to the case in hand? The problem for the team, is that once investigations get under way, most of the people who Kate and Chloe came into contact with also appear to have secrets. So the race is on to find the body and uncover the truth.I was gripped with this story line from the beginning page when the slightly creepy neighbour picked up Chloe and gave her a lift home from something she was clearly escaping from. From the outset, there was an underlying sense of unease which set the tone for what was to follow. Once the murder is discovered the pace picks up and doesn’t drop until the very end. As the team worked through the secrets and lies I was no wiser as to what the outcome would be and I’d be surprised if anyone else reading would piece it together either.Other than the clever plot lines, the star of this series has always been Maeve and her relationships with her team. As ever, her relationship with Josh is ambiguous and I still sense an underlying sexual tension especially from Josh. Am I reading too much into the fact that with his new-found relationship, he talks more lovingly about his partner’s son than his partner, thereby leaving the door open for Maeve? Whatever the truth, it’s a relationship that is realistic, believable and intriguing. Maeve however has new team member that she is less ambivalent about, namely her new DC Georgia Shaw. Onto a loser from the start due to being a fast track candidate, Maeve observes she’s also young, pretty, ambitious, articulate, confident and damningly not interested in hard work. I have to say I’m with Maeve on this one, DS Shaw will need to up her game if she’s staying around. On the plus side PC Pettifer only made a few appearances, but we definitely need more of this sensible but wry observances.So in short, this offers everything I want in a police procedural, a taut and clever plotline, multiple suspects, brilliant (if not always likeable) characters, realistic working relationships, some humour to balance the darkness and most importantly a satisfactory outcome. Highly recommended.I received an ARC via NetGalley to enable this review.
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  • Julia Wilson
    March 25, 2017
    Let The Dead Speak by Jane Casey is a nail biting thriller that had me hooked from the start. It is the seventh book in the Maeve Kerrigan series but can be read as a stand-alone.Written from the point of view of Maeve Kerrigan, the reader easily engages with the open and honest style from the start. The reader views all the action and evidence as Maeve 'sees' it. I tried to guess the outcome but failed miserably. The book was full of twists and turns that had me on the edge of my seat. The stor Let The Dead Speak by Jane Casey is a nail biting thriller that had me hooked from the start. It is the seventh book in the Maeve Kerrigan series but can be read as a stand-alone.Written from the point of view of Maeve Kerrigan, the reader easily engages with the open and honest style from the start. The reader views all the action and evidence as Maeve 'sees' it. I tried to guess the outcome but failed miserably. The book was full of twists and turns that had me on the edge of my seat. The storyline was fabulous and it would make a wonderful movie.The novel shows that all is never as it seems. People show one face to the world and are quite another person underneath. Trying to uncover the truth can be a difficult job.There are many themes including that of the sins of the parents. These should not be passed down the generations. This also links to the theme of guilt. It seems like everyone has something to hide.Let The Dead Speak was definitely a roller coaster of a thriller which I really enjoyed. It was a very different genre from my usual choices but I shall be hunting out and devouring more by Jane Casey.A fabulous read that will keep you guessing and gasping.I received this book for free. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own
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  • Sharon
    March 19, 2017
    Sergeant Maeve Kerrigan is investigating a murder. From the minute 18 year old Chloe Emery arrived home from her Dad's a day early to find her home looking like a bloodbath, people have not been straightforward with the Police. Maeve and her team need to find out what happened, which proves harder than usual when there's a massive web of lies to untangle...and no body.I requested this from Netgalley, not realising it was #7 in a series. This, I felt, should be put on the cover of the book for th Sergeant Maeve Kerrigan is investigating a murder. From the minute 18 year old Chloe Emery arrived home from her Dad's a day early to find her home looking like a bloodbath, people have not been straightforward with the Police. Maeve and her team need to find out what happened, which proves harder than usual when there's a massive web of lies to untangle...and no body.I requested this from Netgalley, not realising it was #7 in a series. This, I felt, should be put on the cover of the book for those of us who are unfamiliar with the author/series. Still, I went in with an open mind and hoped it would work as a standalone. It did, for the most part - there were a lot of characters to keep track of but it all came together well and it was a good enough story. The problem for me was Maeve - I felt like she was unnecessarily harsh at times, and I felt like past events were alluded to but not explained. I felt like there was some massive traumatic experience that had made her the way she was, but I wasn't privy to it having only joined the series at this stage. I'd love to know more about her as a person, more about her past with Derwent, and more about her life. I would read the first couple of books in the series, and I'm sure those who have followed it all along will be delighted with this one, but for me I felt like I had come in too late, and didn't really form a connection with any of the characters. Thank you to the publisher for providing me with a digital ARC via Netgalley.
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