Noteworthy
It’s the start of Jordan Sun’s junior year at the Kensington-Blaine Boarding School for the Performing Arts. Unfortunately, she’s an Alto 2, which—in the musical theatre world—is sort of like being a vulture in the wild: She has a spot in the ecosystem, but nobody’s falling over themselves to express their appreciation. So it’s no surprise when she gets shut out of the fall musical for the third year straight.Then the school gets a mass email: A spot has opened up in the Sharpshooters, Kensington’s elite a cappella octet. Worshiped ... revered ... all male. Desperate to prove herself, Jordan auditions in her most convincing drag, and it turns out that Jordan Sun, Tenor 1, is exactly what the Sharps are looking for.

Noteworthy Details

TitleNoteworthy
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2017
PublisherAmulet Books
ISBN1419723731
ISBN-139781419723735
Number of pages400 pages
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Glbt

Noteworthy Review

  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    February 3, 2017
    Thank you to Amulet Books and Netgalley for providing an e-copy for me to review! This book doesn't come out until May *cries*, so I'll just give you a list of reasons why you NEED to buy this book when it comes out. (But before I do, I would just like to mention that the cover seems a little juvenile for the content of this book, and I wish it had a better one, so keep that in mind. This book is a lot more mature than it seems!)1. As my dear friend Kirsti (from melbourneonmymind) put it, this i Thank you to Amulet Books and Netgalley for providing an e-copy for me to review! This book doesn't come out until May *cries*, so I'll just give you a list of reasons why you NEED to buy this book when it comes out. (But before I do, I would just like to mention that the cover seems a little juvenile for the content of this book, and I wish it had a better one, so keep that in mind. This book is a lot more mature than it seems!)1. As my dear friend Kirsti (from melbourneonmymind) put it, this is pretty much the book baby of the movies She's the Man and Pitch Perfect. If that doesn't have you sold....... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯2. The diversity! Our MC is Asian American and coming to terms with the fact that she may be bisexual and what that means for her. Other diverse characters include A Sikh character, a gay character, characters with different body types, plus lots of discussion around transgender people, as our MC encounters a website specifically for trans people on tips and advice and there's a great, respectful discussion around it. There are also different characters living on different socio-economic levels and Jordan's father is also a paraplegic and is in a wheelchair and has chronic pain and one of the Sharpshooters has anxiety!3. It's HILARIOUS. The banter is incredible and you'll be that person who giggles involuntarily in public.4. THE BROMANCE. The 7 other guys that make up the Sharpshooters are such wonderfully developed, complex characters that I grew to love and adore. They are honestly friendship goals and I love them so much.5. There's also a rivalry going on between two A Capella groups and I love that the main 'villain' has a lot of depth and complexity to his character.6. It's an #ownvoices book. Enough said.7. There were certain passages that sent chills down my spine for their relevance and honesty.ARE YOU CONVINCED YET? I could literally go on forever, but alas, my obsession with this book is already at an all time high, so I'll stop for now. JUST GO AND PRE-ORDER THIS WONDERFUL BOOK.
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  • Riley Redgate
    July 19, 2016
    i'm boycotting this bookwhat sort of a MONSTER would write a novel about a cappella and title it with a punsurely this behavior is punishable in some sort of tribunal-----by the way, y'all—the songs in this book are available on my bandcamp to listen (for free!). it felt silly to write the song lyrics and not the songs? anyway, here: https://rioghnach.bandcamp.com/album/...i still gotta write & record a few of them but the complete soundtrack should be done by release day :Dxoriley
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  • Kirsti (Melbourne on my mind)
    January 27, 2017
    I absolutely LOVED this. Like, want-to-reread-it-already kind of loved it. This doesn't come out until May, so for now here are a bunch of bullet points of stuff I loved about it:- Asian-American bisexual protagonist- Who's from an incredibly poor family- Whose father is a paraplegic- Who gets her period unexpectedly and has to kludge together a pad out of toilet paper (Giiiiirl. We have all been there.) - Who has to spend the day with a million dudes while quietly dying from cramps. While prete I absolutely LOVED this. Like, want-to-reread-it-already kind of loved it. This doesn't come out until May, so for now here are a bunch of bullet points of stuff I loved about it:- Asian-American bisexual protagonist- Who's from an incredibly poor family- Whose father is a paraplegic- Who gets her period unexpectedly and has to kludge together a pad out of toilet paper (Giiiiirl. We have all been there.) - Who has to spend the day with a million dudes while quietly dying from cramps. While pretending to be a dude. - Diverse love interest- Diverse best friend- IT'S FUCKING HILARIOUS- A capella- It's literally a cross between She's the Man and Pitch Perfect- But set at an elite performing arts school- Teenage boys having meaningful friendships rather than just "duuuude"- Complex villainsI honestly could keep listing stuff for DAYS and I want to see this turned into a movie immediately. Please and thank you.
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  • Chelsea
    February 26, 2017
    review also posted on Wordpress! spoiler-free review!I received an e-ARC from ABRAMS Kids through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review!Noteworthy was one of my most anticipated releases of the year, so I am very happy this book didn't disappoint! This is a very enjoyable Young Adult contemporary and much more original, fun and entertaining than a lot of other books I've read in the genre. Though the general course of the story is quite predictable, this book still had me gasping out loud m review also posted on Wordpress! spoiler-free review!I received an e-ARC from ABRAMS Kids through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review!Noteworthy was one of my most anticipated releases of the year, so I am very happy this book didn't disappoint! This is a very enjoyable Young Adult contemporary and much more original, fun and entertaining than a lot of other books I've read in the genre. Though the general course of the story is quite predictable, this book still had me gasping out loud multiple times!Jordan, the main character, is Chinese-American, just like the author. She's also bisexual, though I couldn't find out whether that part was #OwnVoices. Jordan grew up poor: her father is in a wheelchair and her family can't afford the hospital bills. The main character's best friend is a lesbian and has "curves you could see from three blocks away", though the reader never meets that character. A lot of the Sharpshooters' members are diverse as well. Nihal is Sikh and gay and he was probably my favourite side-character: too pure for this world! Though I have to admit I completely missed that Isaac is Japanese-American and Trav is black.I absolutely love that the cast of characters was so diverse. Jordan's story isn't about being Chinese-American. Her story isn't about being bisexual. That's not a bad thing! My life doesn't revolve around my bisexuality either. But if you pick up this book thinking it's going to focus on the representation, you might be disappointed. If anyone is doing Diversity Bingo 2017 like me, you can read this book for 'book by author of colour' or 'LGBTQIA+ MC of colour'. Like I've said, I'm unsure whether this book is #OwnVoices when it comes to bisexuality, so I don't know whether it qualifies for 'Bisexual MC (own voices)'. EDIT: Some people told me that this is indeed #OwnVoices for bisexuality as well!Talking about the bisexuality: I love that Jordan is in a relationship with a boy. If books feature bisexual representation, they always feature F/F relationship. It's great that the author shows that Jordan's sexuality is just as valid, even though she is dating a boy. Noteworthy features a lot of amazing quotes, which really reflect how educated Riley Redgate is. No, I don't always think that what a character says, reflects the opinion of the author, but there are so many quotes about equality and feminism in this book, there's no way Redgate doesn't feel the same way. Anyway, here are two quotes I really loved: There was something deeply screwed up about that attitude. There is no world where “you’re wrong” is an acceptable answer to “this hurts.” With so many queer kids at Kensington, people sometimes got weirdly comfortable, like they had a free pass to say anything they wanted about sexuality. I guess it was tempting to stick a rainbow-colored “Ally” pin on your backpack and call it a day, as if that were the endpoint, not the starting line. Jordan cross-dresses in order to join the Sharpshooters and it is made very clear in the novel that she feels uncomfortable doing so, because she is using resources for trans people. Which once again shows that the author did a lot of research and handled every topic with a lot of respect. Finally, there is some under-age drinking in this novel and some of the side-characters smoke weed, though readers don't witness the latter. Still, I am disappointed that every YA contemporary I have read lately features drug and alcohol use, but zero mentions of sex. I find it more realistic that teenagers have sex than do drugs.conclusion: Noteworthy is the reason why I continue to pick up Young Adult contemporaries, even though I tend to dislike those books most of the time. The setting is very unique: the boarding school stands out among other high school contemporaries. I will definitely read other books by Riley Redgate, as she proved to be very educated and well-researched. Make sure to get a copy on March 2nd! I sure will!✿ You can also find me on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest and Wordpress! ✿
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  • Sue (Hollywood News Source)
    January 13, 2017
    Noteworthy is She’s the Man meets Pitch Perfect book with a twist. The story subverted stereotypes and made it even better.This book single-handedly saved me from my slump. I came in for the LGBT representation and I come back with so much more. This is such a stellar story, I am struck with the reverberating otherness of the main protagonist Jordan. She’s Chinese American who is taller than most girls. She’s not perfectly comfortable with her skin. Heck, she can’t even land a role in her school Noteworthy is She’s the Man meets Pitch Perfect book with a twist. The story subverted stereotypes and made it even better.This book single-handedly saved me from my slump. I came in for the LGBT representation and I come back with so much more. This is such a stellar story, I am struck with the reverberating otherness of the main protagonist Jordan. She’s Chinese American who is taller than most girls. She’s not perfectly comfortable with her skin. Heck, she can’t even land a role in her school’s play because of her voice. She’s poor and underprivileged. I love that the author fleshed that out, infusing details what makes her even more othered at her prissy environment. It’s achingly real. Even though, Jordan is a minority, the repercussion of her action was still dealt with. Noteworthy simply have so many layers to unfurl. We have a prim and proper musical director Trav; the resident bad-boy slash enigmatic boy Isaac; a classical music fanatic Mama, the popular kid with learning disability Jon Cox; a visual art Sheikh student Nihal, A fourteen-year-old democrat boy Marcus, and a socially awkward guy Erik. These male characters have a significant role, it’s highly fueled by testerones. I’m letting it slide because Redgate made them more human who deserve empathy. The story filled itself with several faithful, relevant problems we don’t often see in YA; it seems too much. But this is our reality, too.For romance readers, yes there is romance, but alas that’s not the focal point of the book. Review to come.
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  • The Bookavid
    September 28, 2016
    More Reviews on my Book Blog The BookavidIn NOTEWORTHY, Jordan struggles with getting accepted in the musical theatre world because she's an Alto 2, and then applies to the male a cappella octet. What intrigued me: I just heard bisexual. I'm ready. Quiet and Melancholic NOTEWORTHY is that kind of quiet bittersweet story that you have to have a sweet spot for. Looking at the cover I was expecting a loud, joke-y book full of puns and fanfares but this is actually quite the opposite. NOTEWORTHY do More Reviews on my Book Blog The BookavidIn NOTEWORTHY, Jordan struggles with getting accepted in the musical theatre world because she's an Alto 2, and then applies to the male a cappella octet. What intrigued me: I just heard bisexual. I'm ready. Quiet and Melancholic NOTEWORTHY is that kind of quiet bittersweet story that you have to have a sweet spot for. Looking at the cover I was expecting a loud, joke-y book full of puns and fanfares but this is actually quite the opposite. NOTEWORTHY does have its funny moments but at heart this story is very much a coming-of-age contemporary that doesn't sugarcoat anything about growing up.A lot of the themes are very melancholic in nature, I especially loved hearing about Jordan's past relationship and her feelings for her ex-boyfriend. There is so much heart's blood poured into this story that it figuratively drips with authenticity. NOTEWORTHY is one of those books that you have to put down sometimes because it got too real.I think it's also worth mentioning that this an #ownvoices book about a Chinese girl written by a Chinese author. In general I was very positively surprised by the amount of non-white characters and especially by the depth and care that went into creating them. A Love Letter to A Cappella NOTEWORTHY especially impressed me with its nuanced discussion of gender, sexuality, and disability. I certainly didn't expect to find this in this book, but it's absolutely necessary considering that crossdressing is a huge part of the plot, but not necessarily in a trans or drag context. I'm glad that Redgate included a passage about this because this initially worried me when I heard about the book for the first time. Crossdressing is a tricky thing to write about.I initially picked this up solely for the bisexual representation and was a little disappointed to see that NOTEWORTHY doesn't really discuss Jordan's sexuality a lot. This is neither a romance nor a story about Jordan and her growing up, in my opinion it's a love letter to a cappella. NOTEWORTHY is set at college and you definitely don't get a break from that while reading this - this is a specific type of book that you need to be prepared for in order not to be caught off guard. While it is very unique, I think NOTEWORTHY absolutely delivers. This is the book for you if you're a singer, if you like a cappella, if you like stories set at college. NOTEWORTHY definitely stands out positively in the world of books about music.Rating:★★★★★ Overall: Do I Recommend? NOTEWORTHY reads like a love letter to a cappella and is a fairly quiet and calm type of contemporary. If you enjoy these kinds of books, I urge you to read this one. With the nuanced discourse of sexuality, gender, and disability, this book is one of a kind.live on the blog on 03/01/17
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  • J. Bookish
    February 1, 2017
    I was kindly allowed to read this wonderful thing early by Netgalley.This book is so good I have already pre-ordered the physical copy even though I have the eARC file. As with most books I truly love, I don't even know where to start. What is coherent reviewing, AMIRITE?I requested this book because it features a girl named Jordan (I'm Jordyn, in case you aren't aware) who is an Alto 2, the deepest female vocal range in music (I also fall into this category). Low female voices are both rare and I was kindly allowed to read this wonderful thing early by Netgalley.This book is so good I have already pre-ordered the physical copy even though I have the eARC file. As with most books I truly love, I don't even know where to start. What is coherent reviewing, AMIRITE?I requested this book because it features a girl named Jordan (I'm Jordyn, in case you aren't aware) who is an Alto 2, the deepest female vocal range in music (I also fall into this category). Low female voices are both rare and not particularly well utilized in theatre, and Jordan is desperate to find a place her voice will be valued. So, obviously, she pretends to be a boy and auditions for a coveted spot in a male A Capella group. Because, what else? 1. This book is hilarious. Dry humor is my life. 2. SO much diversity. Different cultures, sexualities, religions, mental illnesses and physical disabilities are all accounted for in a completely realistic way because hello, doesn't that sound like the people in your life? 3. MUUUSIIIIC. As a self-proclaimed theatre nerd, I was a tiny bit concerned that maybe the author didn't actually know anything about music and was just riding the Pitch Perfect wave but I WAS SO WRONG. The author herself was a part of an A Capella group in college, so no worries fellow music nerds. 4. The slowest of slow burning romances. 5. Dynamic male teenagers. 6. Moments of gorgeous clarity. 7. ALL THE THINGS.8. Why haven't you decided to read it and abandoned this review yet?!?
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  • lauren ♡ (wonderless reviews)
    March 4, 2017
    You all better put this on your TBRs if it's not already there because OH MY GOD. This is gonna be one of my fave books of the year. I can feel it. There's so many important issues discussed in this. Full review to come.
  • joey via. thoughts and afterthoughts
    April 2, 2017
    Noteworthy gets a lot right. Truly. From the Asian-American experience (see: cultural and familial expectations), to self-discovery with sexual fluidity, to the topic at hand in A cappella, the prose is -- dare I say: pitch perfect -- and manages to bring to life a style of music near and dear to my heart.Whether it provokes thought and feelings or otherwise, every song is its own journey, and what Noteworthy does exceptionally well is take you on the journey of what it's like to be in a vocal e Noteworthy gets a lot right. Truly. From the Asian-American experience (see: cultural and familial expectations), to self-discovery with sexual fluidity, to the topic at hand in A cappella, the prose is -- dare I say: pitch perfect -- and manages to bring to life a style of music near and dear to my heart.Whether it provokes thought and feelings or otherwise, every song is its own journey, and what Noteworthy does exceptionally well is take you on the journey of what it's like to be in a vocal ensemble. Between arranging music and hours of relentless struggles in balancing harmonies to stage presence and mic control, it is as inclusive as you can get without dampening the story with info-dump the how-tos. That in itself deserves all the accolades.Noteworthy is a solid voice into the world of contemporary A cappella from an the academic standpoint of musical groups (see: there is much more than just Pitch Perfect or Pentatonix, which I am also thankful for).For an added bonus in reading experience, the songs featured in this book were created by the author and can be listened to here: https://rioghnach.bandcamp.com-- Full review to come.(And yes, you eyes don't deceive you. This book is hitting mid-to-high 4's for me.)
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  • Shauna (b00kstorebabe)
    January 14, 2017
    Actual rating 4.5/5! Thanks to books like Noteworthy, I am slowly becoming a person who reads contemporary YA. Noteworthy is a fun, mostly happy book about the arts, societal pressure, gender roles, class issues, and of course, a cappella. One thing that intrigued me about this book is that it's an #ownvoices book about a Chinese girl written by a Chinese author. Jordan, after being rejected from the school's musical for the third year in a row, decides to go undercover as Julian Zhang, a male a Actual rating 4.5/5! Thanks to books like Noteworthy, I am slowly becoming a person who reads contemporary YA. Noteworthy is a fun, mostly happy book about the arts, societal pressure, gender roles, class issues, and of course, a cappella. One thing that intrigued me about this book is that it's an #ownvoices book about a Chinese girl written by a Chinese author. Jordan, after being rejected from the school's musical for the third year in a row, decides to go undercover as Julian Zhang, a male a cappella singer, and audition for the school's most prestigious male a cappella group. I want to mention that Jordan has an in-depth and thoughtful conversation with herself about cross-dressing and how it mirrors trans lives. It was a really wonderful addition to the book, which treated trans identity very carefully and respectfully. I also appreciated the way she talks about the separate burdens that young men and young women carry on their shoulders.Now, I'd like to talk about the bisexual representation. I've read a few reviews from people that are disappointed by the fact that (view spoiler)[ Jordan ends up in a m/f pairing, even though she's bisexual. (hide spoiler)]It frustrates me to see that some people only view bisexuality as valid as long as she ends up with a girl. Listen. Bisexual identities are valid no matter what gender the person is with. At first, I was put off by the fact that the only time that Jordan kisses girls is when she's been drinking, but remembering my experience as a teenager and the crushes I've had on girls, it makes a lot of sense that the only time she feels comfortable expressing her sexuality is when she's not overthinking things. Her experience is very similar to my own. Between the way that she felt that she never was able to explore her sexuality because of a past relationship, to the way she sees girls and doesn't know how to feel about them, I felt myself nodding along any time she discussed how she felt about girls. For people who may not have known they like girls until later in life or girls who think they might like girls, this book is for you.Serious issues aside, this book is funny. The jokes are funny, the characters are precious, and the book is wholly entertaining. Make sure you add it to your tbr!
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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 23, 2017
    I received this book from the publishers through Netgalley in exchange of an honest review Actual rating: 4.5 stars GUYYYYS !! Keep your eyes out for this book when it comes out because you want it!It is such a cute, funny and beautifully written book with thoughtful and important messages weaved in. I loved it and you're going to love it too!! The story is fun and feels like watching a movie, the MC is wonderful and I feel like a lot of people can relate to her, her struggles and self doubts a I received this book from the publishers through Netgalley in exchange of an honest review Actual rating: 4.5 stars GUYYYYS !! Keep your eyes out for this book when it comes out because you want it!It is such a cute, funny and beautifully written book with thoughtful and important messages weaved in. I loved it and you're going to love it too!! The story is fun and feels like watching a movie, the MC is wonderful and I feel like a lot of people can relate to her, her struggles and self doubts are real and relatable. THE BOYS MADE MY LIFE !! They're hilarious and they're banter is absolute goals.Full review coming closer to the release date.
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  • Eri (Airy Reads)
    January 5, 2017
    So far, reading wise 2017 has been rather excellent to me. Add this to my favorites pile, I'm definitely picking up a copy when it's pubbed because I am enchanted.I have nothing but glowing praise for this book, it hits high on everything, from the writing to the characters to the relationships and storyline. I really liked getting into Jordan's head and seeing the way her immersion into being a boy changed and adapted her perspective on topics. I related a lot to the pressure she put on herself So far, reading wise 2017 has been rather excellent to me. Add this to my favorites pile, I'm definitely picking up a copy when it's pubbed because I am enchanted.I have nothing but glowing praise for this book, it hits high on everything, from the writing to the characters to the relationships and storyline. I really liked getting into Jordan's head and seeing the way her immersion into being a boy changed and adapted her perspective on topics. I related a lot to the pressure she put on herself through her parents' expectations and her own perfectionist nature, especially with the conception of being that Asian girl with the intense mom/dad. Now onto the other characters, the boys. The Sharpes are overall lovely and imagine my utter delight to meet Isaac Nakahara, because it's honestly rare to see Japanese characters without it being an issue book. His heritage otherwise, he's my favorite character. Charming and attractive, he's the bonafide leader of the group. There's Trav, the dedicated and intense arranger of the group. Next is Nihal, who is a sweetheart, only wanting the best for everyone. Jon Cox, who seems like a poster child for a private school boy, yet is also kind. Mama, his best friend, passionate about Haydn and protective. Rounding out the group are the two freshmen, Erik and Marcus. Of course there's the main dynamic of the Sharpes together, but within that, the individual friendships of the boys was a delight to read. My favorite friendships are the ones between "Julian" and Nihal, and the one that "Julian" shares with Isaac. Spending hours rehearsing, it was nice to see the bond that these boys + girl share with each other, and I felt immensely sad once I finished because I'd fallen in love with these characters. This book was poignant in a way that I haven't seen much in contemporary YA books that don't brand themselves as issue books, and I enjoyed it. It tackles topics that most books don't even bother to flesh out, yet doesn't neglect the characters themselves. Jordan is bi, and I can't vouch for the accuracy of the rep, but being an #ownvoices book, it felt like it was handled respectably.And the romance!!! I loved the ship in this book and it was honestly so nice to see Jordan move past her breakup with Michael and find someone who actually deserves her. Anyway, please pick up this book when you can because it is great. full review to come closer to release date
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  • Kay
    January 19, 2017
    Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for approving my request for a free digital copy in exchange for a review. Noteworthy reminds me of a Usain Bolt 100m race: slow to start, fast in the middle and eases up before the finish line, but still ahead of the pack. Let's do a post-race analysis. Writing: The first thing that jumped at me was the change in Redgate's writing style. When I read Seven Ways We Lie I found it enjoyable but not engaging. Noteworthy is the complete opposite. This book is ut Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for approving my request for a free digital copy in exchange for a review. Noteworthy reminds me of a Usain Bolt 100m race: slow to start, fast in the middle and eases up before the finish line, but still ahead of the pack. Let's do a post-race analysis. Writing: The first thing that jumped at me was the change in Redgate's writing style. When I read Seven Ways We Lie I found it enjoyable but not engaging. Noteworthy is the complete opposite. This book is utterly engaging. Flowery when it needs to be not never over the top. I found myself bookmarking numerous passages and sentences because I thought they were beautiful or simply extremely well written. This made for an entirely enjoyable reading experience. I look forward to seeing more of Riley as she matures as a writer. Plot & Pacing: Noteworthy has a Twelfth Night vibe going for it, but it's easy to love this even if you aren't into Shakespeare :) However, I didn't find myself enjoying this until about halfway through, then, bam! Everything fell into place. I was a bit concerned about the representation of bisexuality and transsexuality (as the character would bind her chest in order to pass for a male), however, there is a passage that does address the concerns regarding appropriating from the trans community and I definitely respect and appreciate the manner in which it was handled. That is, educational and respectfully. Beyond my views as an ally I cannot adequately speak to the bisexual rep in this book but I would love to point out that this is own voices and it is evident that the author created the type of positive representation that she would like to see in YA. Moreover, I like the intricate approach to handling issues relating to wealth, status and familial dynamics. I often find parental figures in YA extremely one-dimensional but Redgate somehow manages to make the interactions between the MC and her parents seem honest to life, and the story is all the more better off for it. The book also addresses issues of gender in a solid way without being preachy. It's interesting to see the MC lose herself in "a man's world." If you find yourself struggling with this book, press on. It's worth it. Characters: Oh boy! One thing Redgate does extremely well is characters. I kept forgetting that they were high-schoolers though. My bad. Nonetheless, I loved all and want to adopt and protect them. Maybe except Dr. Caskey. Him I do not want to protect (or adopt). Overall, Noteworthy, in my opinion, cements Redgate's status as a strong writer who creates beautiful characters. I wholeheartedly recommend Noteworthy and will continue to sing its praises.
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  • Heidi Heilig
    January 3, 2017
    An honest, contemplative book about truth and lies--a story about the things people hide to find themselves--and a love letter to music.Jordan, a Chinese-American scholarship student at prestigious Kensington Performance School, has never found her place in the spotlight. When an opportunity arises to audition for a famous a capella group--and possibly tour Europe, provided they win the winter competition--she sees a chance to prove herself--to find a place where she belongs--and to finally make An honest, contemplative book about truth and lies--a story about the things people hide to find themselves--and a love letter to music.Jordan, a Chinese-American scholarship student at prestigious Kensington Performance School, has never found her place in the spotlight. When an opportunity arises to audition for a famous a capella group--and possibly tour Europe, provided they win the winter competition--she sees a chance to prove herself--to find a place where she belongs--and to finally make her parents proud. The only catch is the a capella group is all-male.Disguising herself as a boy, she infiltrates the group, hoping to let her voice ring out while keeping the rest of herself hidden. But that's harder than she expected in such a close knit group, and secrets start to come out--and not only hers. With lyrical writing about snowy days and swoony kisses along with beautiful musings on friendship, fitting in, and gender/toxic masculinity, Redgate's sophomore book was unputdownable.Representation (possible spoilers, as some of these are revealed throughout the book?): MC is bi, and is Chinese american. Her family is on SNAP/Calfresh and her father uses a wheelchair. Her close friends in the group include a gay Sikh boy, a Japanese boy, and a fat boy. The music director and Jordan's ex, Michael, are both black.
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  • Ava
    January 30, 2017
    Wow, you guys. This is a book to preorder and shout about, and you can bet I'll be doing both. I'm...speechless. I never saw myself loving a book revolving around a cappella, but with the bisexual, Chinese main character and explorations of gender, I wholeheartedly enjoyed it. My one quibble is that it was a bit...slow, but in spite of that, I highly recommend it.
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  • Silvana [The Book Voyagers]
    March 25, 2017
    Noteworthy is going to be big. I expect it to be big, and you all better not sleep on it. This book is so fabulous and fun and you just have a really good time while reading it.It's about Jordan, a theatre kid in a boarding school, who gets the idea to audition for this position in an a capella group in her school. A capella group are very famous in the school and they get this sort of celebrity reputation. But this particular is an all-boys group and they are asking for another boy to audition, Noteworthy is going to be big. I expect it to be big, and you all better not sleep on it. This book is so fabulous and fun and you just have a really good time while reading it.It's about Jordan, a theatre kid in a boarding school, who gets the idea to audition for this position in an a capella group in her school. A capella group are very famous in the school and they get this sort of celebrity reputation. But this particular is an all-boys group and they are asking for another boy to audition, so Jordan crossdresses as Julian Zhang and she gets in. Everything from the very beginning is just wonderful. Riley Redgate has this sort of easy style of writing that you get so caught up in the story. It's so smart too, and you will laugh out loud in some moments (I did that). The Sharps is the a capella group and all the boys are amazing and adorable. Especially Isaac, the cute Japanese-American, man bun wearing boy. He says he is the king of the group but let's be real, he said that himself LOL. I love this kid so much, he's also very very nice and if you want someone to help you with pranks, he's your guy. This book is also about self-discovery. Jordan begins to see that she's bisexual and that because of her past relationship and not really thinking a lot about this, she wasn't sure sure. This book also has gay rep and as I said Isaac is Japanese while Jordan is Chinese.You'll have lots of fun and you will love the whole cast, it's a fantastic book and I recommend it to everyone who loves She's the Man and Pitch Perfect. It also reminded me of Ouran High School Host Club for obvious reasons ~
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  • Casey
    February 12, 2017
    Thoughtful, funny, diverse could I ask for more from a book? Noteworthy is the story of Jordan, an asian american bi sexual teen attending a school for the arts, Jordan is strong, sure of herself, and has great morals. She genuinely kind and thinks all of her actions through and how it effects others. When Jordan can't land a part in a production she starts to become disheartened with school and how she's going to make her college applications standout from 1000's of others. When her teacher com Thoughtful, funny, diverse could I ask for more from a book? Noteworthy is the story of Jordan, an asian american bi sexual teen attending a school for the arts, Jordan is strong, sure of herself, and has great morals. She genuinely kind and thinks all of her actions through and how it effects others. When Jordan can't land a part in a production she starts to become disheartened with school and how she's going to make her college applications standout from 1000's of others. When her teacher comments on her singing she starts to think about what this means to her as an artist, unexpectedly she receives an email for a casting call for a new position in The Sharps a cappella group. The Sharps have been around for years, an all male singing group that competes against in school groups. This years prize is a Europe tour with a famous a cappella group and it's the perfect thing for Jordan, the only problem is she's a she. Jordon decides to go, dressed as a guy she auditions and gets the part. Noteworthy is a story of friendship, of moral debate, of family struggle, of dreams, of rejections, of biased school admin, and of sticking together. The thing that really makes this story are The Sharpshooters, 8 people all come together from different walks of lifes not only to sing together but to support each other, muck around, laugh, make mistakes, forgive. The characters are all so well defined and important in each way. We see a lot of back story on them and it's never to much, we so positive female friendships, positive male friendships, positive girl boy friendships basically All the friendships I could have wanted from a book it made my heart sign with happiness. The reason I loved Jordan so much was her thought process, when dresses as a guy she stumbles upon a transgender website that gives her a tip about how to compress her breasts and she feels wrong. She feels guilty of imitating someones real life changes, she feels bad about imitating trans experiences and explains it all in the book. She goes through conflicting feelings and in so discovers who she is and who she wants to be. (view spoiler)[ The ending was real and emotional, the teachers wanting to reject her because she wasn't the right gender and her friends sticking by her even if she lied to be apart of the group. The real relationships formed are more important then a old school rule and they prevail and succeed. I just wanted Jordan to be happy in all aspects of her life and I'm so happy that she almost is. (hide spoiler)]I need more Jordan's in my books, I need more friendship groups like this, I need more thoughtful and caring characters. This book is just all types of Amazing and I urge everyone to pick it up, I know I'll be ordering a hardcover when I can because I will be re-reading this more than once. thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an e-arc in exchange for a free review.
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  • Laurie Flynn
    December 15, 2016
    I love, love, LOVED this book. I became a Riley Redgate fangirl after finishing her unforgettable debut, SEVEN WAYS WE LIE, and NOTEWORTHY is such a perfect follow-up. It's heartfelt and humorous, the perfect balance of heavy and light. It's a study in gender and what that means, and explores sexuality and sexual orientation with so much nuance and sensitivity. I adored the writing style and descriptions-- Riley's prose made me feel like I was right at Kensington with Jordan, seeing what she saw I love, love, LOVED this book. I became a Riley Redgate fangirl after finishing her unforgettable debut, SEVEN WAYS WE LIE, and NOTEWORTHY is such a perfect follow-up. It's heartfelt and humorous, the perfect balance of heavy and light. It's a study in gender and what that means, and explores sexuality and sexual orientation with so much nuance and sensitivity. I adored the writing style and descriptions-- Riley's prose made me feel like I was right at Kensington with Jordan, seeing what she saw and feeling what she felt. As a main character, Jordan was everything I love to read-- honest and funny, at times self-assured, others vulnerable and insecure. She felt incredibly real to me. The Sharps were fully fleshed out and each had their own personalities, which is tough to do with supporting characters. Riley's writing feels flawless, which is even harder to do-- as a writer, I know that all too well. I cannot wait to read whatever she writes next!
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  • Zaheerah
    September 19, 2016
    Expected publication: May 2nd 2017 EDIT: NOTEWORTHY is on netgalley now. if you don't hear from me ever again, please assume they didn't accept my request and I'm somewhere on a cliffs edge, screaming. EDIT #2: They declined my request so if anyone needs me, I'll be somewhere, on a cliff's edge, screaming.
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  • Kerri
    January 18, 2017
    Five glorious stars + jazz hands and ridiculous amounts of excitement. Loved this!
  • Allison
    January 8, 2017
    Loooooooooooooooooooooove Redgate's voice. She's one of the best in contemporary YA, imo. Reaches that perfect balance of rib-holding humor and heart-wrenching emotion. Longer RTC.
  • Kelly
    December 11, 2016
    Noteworthy is a delight. I want to gather up all the characters and give them huge hugs and also have them sing to me, in a personal concert. I am just gonna keep sighing happily for a while before I leave a longer review later, but this was such a wonderful story with a cast you can't help but root for and it made me all squishy and happy. Add immediately to your TBR - it's just as fantastic as the premise promises.
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  • Luke Reynolds
    July 19, 2016
    ARC Review (1/1/17, received from my school library)Words can't express how much I loved Noteworthy. Riley Redgate has outdone herself from her debut, a novel that was actually really great and that I liked quite a fair bit (heck, a good friend of mine absolutely adored the book). Character complexity and gorgeous writing have carried over, but the driving force of the story is what really makes this an absolute wonder. A book like this may seem simple, but Redgate tackles so much (what society ARC Review (1/1/17, received from my school library)Words can't express how much I loved Noteworthy. Riley Redgate has outdone herself from her debut, a novel that was actually really great and that I liked quite a fair bit (heck, a good friend of mine absolutely adored the book). Character complexity and gorgeous writing have carried over, but the driving force of the story is what really makes this an absolute wonder. A book like this may seem simple, but Redgate tackles so much (what society expects from each gender, toxic masculinity, the patriarchy, heartbreak, poverty among the rich, the power of music, finding your own way) and all of it feels necessary and important and like it matters. Think of the lighthearted She's the Man getting together with the kickass getting rid of gender norms Mulan and having a soundtrack provided by the cast of Pitch Perfect. That's this novel in a nutshell, and it's an absolutely wonderful ride.Jordan Sun is our protagonist, and I absolutely adored her voice and character. Her pain from her breakup, the financial and familial riff among her parents back home in California (a result of their poverty, the expensive private school Jordan goes to that they have to pay for, and the debt left from the paraplegic father's medical bills after a fluid-filled lung), and the fact that she couldn't get into anything at her performing arts boarding school because of her low voice, despite wanting to belong in theater or somewhere, really resonated with me. Her cross-dressing and auditioning for one of the all-male a capella groups just to have a chance at the success she wanted was a move of desperation that I wanted to wrap her in a hug for, but seeing it pay off in a way she hadn't anticipated was also super cool.I also loved her refreshing insight. Jordan recognizes how unfair society is on women and she isn't afraid to point this out, even when she's disguised as her male alter ego Julian Zhang. However, she opens herself up as well once she gets to know the Sharpshooters (shortened to the Sharps) and sees that there's more struggles than just her own. Both men and women are expected to behave a certain way, and Jordan experiences that firsthand while under the guise of a boy. She gets to understand things from the point of view of the opposite sex along with pointing out her own struggles of just trying to figure out where she falls, and it definitely makes for a powerful and emotional read.Additionally appreciated is the treatment of the male characters. All of the Sharps are given ample page time and development, and I feel like in the hands of another writer this wouldn't have happened. Thankfully, Redgate takes no shortcuts and allows us as the reader to grow to everyone alongside Jordan as she slowly makes her way in. Whether it's Isaac, the charming joker, Trav, the incredibly serious but also anxious leader, Jon Cox, the rich boy who likes girls but is also incredibly generous, Mama, Jon's protective best friend, Nihal, the sarcastic Sikh boy, Erik, the snarky percussionist, or Marcus, the bumbling shy boy, the guys aren't one-dimensional and feel like actual humans. Even Connor Caskey, the leader of a rival a cappella group called the Minuets, gets development despite being a slightly unforgivable a-hole. Turns out his introduction didn't introduce his whole character (view spoiler)[(knowing that he was bending underneath his father's expectations because of their high-held family really broke me) (hide spoiler)].The boys also had so many layers, and finding out more about them made me incredibly happy. (view spoiler)[It didn't matter if it was Jon Cox's dyslexia holding him back in school, Isaac's father in the hospital, Trav's incredibly hostile family, or Nihal's secret relationship with Connor. All of those moments gave so much more life to the ensemble that I couldn't believe that the characterization could be that rich. (hide spoiler)] Having everyone else be just as fleshed out as our main protagonist was super interesting and unexpected, and it was phenomenal. After all, not everything is as it appears. People can surprise you.There was also a subtle romantic undercurrent here. Usually with these types of books that tackle serious issues and are more focused on the main character's journey, I find relationships unnecessary. Here I loved it. It was rewarding to see Jordan not only move on from the hold she had on Michael that had dominated her life at Kensington-Blaine but also find new love in the process. Her bisexuality was also written incredibly well, and I loved how it corresponded exactly with what this book conquered. (view spoiler)[But I can imagine some really annoying backlash with this book. Some reviewers are going to say, "Cool, Jordan's bisexual! Then why isn't she ending up with a girl? That proves her bisexuality!" I just want to say that just because Jordan ends up with Isaac, who is in fact a really sweet boy who fit her much better than Michael did, doesn't mean she isn't bisexual. She still likes both girls and guys, and being in a relationship with Isaac won't change that unless fluidity happens (which is up to Jordan). There's a kiss scene with a girl while Jordan is in drag that she has a crush on, but nothing comes out of it because the girl's straight. That's fine. Jordan doesn't have to prove her bisexuality by having both a boyfriend and a girlfriend latched to her, nor does it mean that because with a guy she's now straight. That's not how bisexuality works, and I despise thinking about people stereotyping it that way. The community doesn't deserve it, and neither does Redgate or Jordan. Jordan is a bisexual girl dating a guy now, and there's nothing wrong with it. It doesn't mean she won't date a girl, it doesn't mean she isn't bisexual, and it doesn't mean she's now straight.Sorry for the rant, but that was going to bother me if I didn't say it. It may not happen, and maybe I'm overreacting or not phrasing this in the best way, but it's how I feel. Moving on. (hide spoiler)]Overall, Noteworthy needs to be read. It's a phenomenal book that conquers the unfair patriarchy, the pressure facing both women and men, a girl making her move, and has beautifully written music to boot. I NEED ALL THE SONGS FROM THIS PROJECT STAT!(You can actually find some of the songs uploaded on Redgate's Bandcamp under Ríoghnach Robinson, if you're curious and need some superb music)Maybe I should've waited until May 2nd, but I couldn't wait. When I see something amazing, I need to share it right away. Mark my words: by the time this ride is over, you'll want to clutch this book to your heart and never let it go. Or you'll maybe want to break out in dance. Whatever works.All I know for sure is that Redgate is one of the best YA authors in existence, and you won't want to miss this book. It took me a long time to devour all of it, but it was worth every single page.After ReadingHave you ever had that feeling of nervous anticipation? Maybe it was before the curtains parted for a play or that first step onto creaking rows. There may have been breath that caught in your throat, a nervous smile that could barely hold back all the nervous energy, or the tensing of limbs as they prepare for something extraordinary.That's what Noteworthy was for me. And it was beautiful.Easily one of the best YA books that will come out in 2017, easily one of the best books I have read in 2016, and easily one of the best YA contemporaries of all time--heck, even one of the best YA books of all time. It was complex, heart-wrenching, funny, and above all else, powerful. It's exactly what this world needs right now.Before ReadingI have an ARC now thanks to my school librarians. TBR be darned. This is next by default.I really want an ARC of this before May because OMG THAT SYNOPSIS SOUNDS LIKE AN ABSOLUTE KILLER! Also, Redgate's a very talented singer-songwriter and I really enjoyed her debut, so...gimme.
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    March 27, 2017
    I'm... In tears. I didn't want this to end. I grew so attached to all of the characters and the story was amazing and just AHHH. This book felt like a big hug. I'm going to write a more coherent review for this later. I hope.
  • Jessica
    March 24, 2017
    Super solid contemporary. I really enjoyed this one and binged the heck out of it. Having majored in Music in college, I'm a huge fan of books about musicians. I also delight in anything where a girl has to disguise herself as a boy, so this was practically written for me. NOTEWORTHY is being comped as "She's the Man meets Pitch Perfect" and I think it's extremely accurate - this book captures the awkwardness and hilarity of the former and the musical culture of the latter. I think teens will fi Super solid contemporary. I really enjoyed this one and binged the heck out of it. Having majored in Music in college, I'm a huge fan of books about musicians. I also delight in anything where a girl has to disguise herself as a boy, so this was practically written for me. NOTEWORTHY is being comped as "She's the Man meets Pitch Perfect" and I think it's extremely accurate - this book captures the awkwardness and hilarity of the former and the musical culture of the latter. I think teens will find this engaging, and it's fast paced so it will definitely keep their interest. It certainly held mine.Jordan was such a compelling main character, and I loved being inside her head. All of the supporting characters - especially the Sharpshooters - were well drawn and diverse. There's a bit of a romance but it doesn't dominate the story.Highly recommend!I received an ARC via NetGalley. No monies were exchanged.
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  • Keiko
    February 9, 2017
    This is like if She's the Man was about a cappella but with a MC who is a Chinese American bisexual girl. Also deals with being poor in a rich private school which is something I haven't read before.
  • Katie
    December 16, 2016
    Noteworthy deserves every last bit of those five stars.I liked 7 Ways We Lie, Riley Redgate's debut, pretty well, and I was really impressed by how different the voices of all the characters were. She's a great writer, impressive prose. She says, and I mean I'd have agreed just based on 7WWL which was mostly a character study, that she's weak when it comes to plot.Um, not anymore, apparently. The plot of this book is so intricately constructed, with every single character interaction and line of Noteworthy deserves every last bit of those five stars.I liked 7 Ways We Lie, Riley Redgate's debut, pretty well, and I was really impressed by how different the voices of all the characters were. She's a great writer, impressive prose. She says, and I mean I'd have agreed just based on 7WWL which was mostly a character study, that she's weak when it comes to plot.Um, not anymore, apparently. The plot of this book is so intricately constructed, with every single character interaction and line of dialogue contributing to the outcome of the book, little hints and conversations placed exactly where they needed to be throughout, every character contributing something significant to the overall story and/or the character growth--I'm just. Y'all. Riley Redgate is Not Bad At Plot.And look, I'm a picky reader. Kind of. I'll forgive a weak plot if it the writing is gorgeous, and the writing in Noteworthy is pretty gorgeous. But I don't hand out five stars easily because I have a really hard time connecting with a character if they don't have a distinct, interesting voice and if the prose doesn't impress me. I won't like a book with a great plot if the writing isn't also great. Noteworthy has both.So I loved this book, I loved all the characters in this book, I LOVED the Sharpshooters and how different they all were, I loved Jordan's relationships with all of them (especially Nihal). I loved the writing, and I was super impressed with the plot and how it unfolded. But the thing that impressed me the most was the representation in this book.For one, the characters are super diverse. Multiple sexualities are represented, including the MC, and it was really, really nice to see bisexuality dealt with in a way that didn't fetishize it or misrepresent it. I'm bi, and wow do I rarely see bisexuality written correctly. Like, almost never. Thank you @ Riley. The main character is also Chinese, and about half the members of the Sharps are MOC, including Nihal, who's Indian and Sikh (oh my GOD was I excited to see a Sikh character), Trav who's black, and I assumed Isaac is Japanese from his last name (Nakahara) but I could be mistaken since I don't think it was mentioned. The one thing I can complain about--pretty much the only thing in this whole book--is that since there was discussion of trans issues I would've liked to see on-page trans characters, but that's a minor nitpick. And anyway it could've turned into Jordan asking a trans friend to say it was okay for her to crossdress and use trans resources like binding tips, and not that I think that definitely would've happened? But it could've had weird implications, so I dunno. Small thing anyway.Anyway, the characters weren't the only thing that were diverse. The way the author explores the issues in this book is so thorough and complex and I adored it. Obviously Jordan ends up spending a lot of her time acting like a boy, and the number of times she has to tell herself that there isn't a right way to be a boy, not to fall on stereotypes, the fact that she says being a guy isn't just all effortless confidence and relief from the burdens of girlhood, that there's stuff guys deal with too? That was so important to me going into this book and it was honestly the #1 thing I was worried about.The fact that Jordan second-guesses herself about appropriating trans resources and culture, too, and talking about drag and theater and performance and the way it has its own separate history, was also so necessary to explore for this concept and something I've never seen in a story that features crossdressing (unsurprising, since trans visibility is historically recent compared to crossdressing narratives). Jordan also, when realizing how much more comfortable she is without forcing herself to be super feminine, considers if she might be trans, and there's a line about masculinity not excluding someone from womanhood that made me so happy. Jordan's story is ultimately about finding the space in the middle where she's most comfortable, and that's great. She's cis, she's just not extremely feminine or masculine, and she doesn't have to be. Like, can we let that be a thing more often? Without the stereotypes and the not like other girls and the I grew up with ten brothers so I like to climb trees? Just people who exist in the middle? Damn. It was awesome. I'm still reeling.So yeah, I went into it a little nervous and was absolutely thrilled at the execution of it. Brilliant, necessary read. Like, I'm serious, this is an Important Book. I'm gonna recommend it to everyone I have ever met in my life.
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  • Fafa's Book Corner
    March 16, 2017
    DNF Mini review to come.
  • Madalyn
    January 25, 2017
    This was the book of my DREAMS. A capella + cross-dressing + excellent bi representation + the most lovable and realistic cast of characters on the planet? Plus, it's set at an ARTS SCHOOL??? This is the book high-school-Madalyn desperately needed (although, college-music-major-Madalyn still freaking loved it). Full review to come on the blog closer to release date!
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  • Selene
    January 31, 2017
    I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you NetGalley and ABRAMS Kids for the advanced reading copy of Noteworthy by Riley Redgate. I can't wait to start this book.
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