Blue Beetle, Vol. 1
Bonded to the Blue Beetle Scarab, teenager Jamie Reyes has no idea what he's doing with one of the most powerful weapons in the universe. But he's in luck, because his predecessor--Ted Kord--is back in the DC Universe and here to serve as the young hero's mentor! Alongside fellow teen hero Doctor Fate, this duo will have to learn how to be heroes on the fly!Written by the legendary Keith Giffen (Legion of Super-Heroes) and illustrated by Scott Kolins (The Flash), Blue Beetle is back for a new generation as a part of DC Universe: Rebirth!Collecting: Blue Beetle 1-6, Rebirth

Blue Beetle, Vol. 1 Details

TitleBlue Beetle, Vol. 1
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN1401268684
ISBN-139781401268688
Number of pages160 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics

Blue Beetle, Vol. 1 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    April 23, 2017
    Hear that? That’s the sound of DC scraping the bottom of the Rebirth barrel with a title no-one was looking for: Blue Beetle! Just the name itself conjures up the lazy hackery that superhero comics can too often be. And, yes, Blue Beetle Rebirth is pure hack comics. There’s no real story in this first (and probably penultimate!) volume. Some Latino kid in El Paso called Jaime Reyes is Blue Beetle because diversity and Ted Kord is his tech-savvy/super-rich Alfred. Together they fight probably the Hear that? That’s the sound of DC scraping the bottom of the Rebirth barrel with a title no-one was looking for: Blue Beetle! Just the name itself conjures up the lazy hackery that superhero comics can too often be. And, yes, Blue Beetle Rebirth is pure hack comics. There’s no real story in this first (and probably penultimate!) volume. Some Latino kid in El Paso called Jaime Reyes is Blue Beetle because diversity and Ted Kord is his tech-savvy/super-rich Alfred. Together they fight probably the most obscure villains ever who’re only there to give Blue Beetle something to do. A gang of somehow even more forgettable nobodies called The Posse also join Blue Beetle on his tedious “adventures”. Also Doctor Fate is mysterious as usual for mystery’s sake. Every issue struggles to make an impression on the reader and fails each time. The annoying characters’ dialogue reads like a sixty-something-year old trying hard to write dialogue for teens, which is exactly what it is. It’s the same critique I made with his Scooby Apocalypse series but it’s true: 64-year-old Keith Giffen cannot write convincing young people dialogue at all, it always comes off as forced and fake. And he was never a great writer to start with! Giffen tosses off Blue Beetle’s origin in a handful of piss-poor pages towards the end: Jaime finds a blue scarab floating in some water, it fused to his back and now he’s Blue Beetle. Wow, ain’t that inspired… There’s no defined villain, what I’ll generously call a story was vague and meandering and Scott Kolins’ art was as ordinary as you can get with superhero comics. Blue Beetle Rebirth felt like DC attempting their version of Power Rangers: bad high school drama/characters combined with superhero schlock to make something only dumb kids could possibly find entertaining (and I say that as a former dumb kid, now a dumb adult, who loved Power Rangers once upon a time!). Sheer boredom from start to finish, Blue Beetle, like Power Rangers, is terrible and fit only for the nearest landfill!
    more
  • Sesana
    April 24, 2017
    I've read nearly all of the Rebirth books that have been released so far. There's been a few duds and one or two hits, but by and large, they've just been comics. Decent, serviceable comics, if not exciting then at lot not failures. This is, by far, the biggest failure that I've read in the Rebirth line. Now, I admit that I'm coming in somewhat behind, because I've never read this iteration of Blue Beetle before. I never felt the need to, and nothing about the book looked particularly appealing I've read nearly all of the Rebirth books that have been released so far. There's been a few duds and one or two hits, but by and large, they've just been comics. Decent, serviceable comics, if not exciting then at lot not failures. This is, by far, the biggest failure that I've read in the Rebirth line. Now, I admit that I'm coming in somewhat behind, because I've never read this iteration of Blue Beetle before. I never felt the need to, and nothing about the book looked particularly appealing to me. I decided to give this a shot because I was giving a lot of DC's Rebirth books a shot, and it seemed like this would be as good of a place as any to start. And perhaps it would have been, in the hands of a better writer. Instead, there's a trite story, shallow characterization, and truly awful dialog. Actually, I don't think any one aspect of this book kills it nearly so dead as that dialog, which reads exactly like it was written by an older person who has literally no idea how teenagers speak to each other in real life. A couple of issues in, it turned into a tedious slog. I can't remember the last time I was so happy to see the end of a book. I doubt I would have liked this even if I was up to date on my Blue Beetle. There's simply no redeeming qualities here. Avoid.
    more
  • Batastrophe
    May 23, 2017
    I can only think of one word to really express how I felt about this comic:Okay, actually I could think of quite a few choicer words to describe it, but since Keith Giffen has decided this is his favorite word, I'm going to adopt it here as well.Hey Jaime, it's not me who has the problem. I actually like Blue Beetle. Blue Beetle is cool. Jaime Reyes is cool. I want to read all about Blue Beetle! But when it feels like I'm reading the same trite phrases page after page, things start getting a lit I can only think of one word to really express how I felt about this comic:Okay, actually I could think of quite a few choicer words to describe it, but since Keith Giffen has decided this is his favorite word, I'm going to adopt it here as well.Hey Jaime, it's not me who has the problem. I actually like Blue Beetle. Blue Beetle is cool. Jaime Reyes is cool. I want to read all about Blue Beetle! But when it feels like I'm reading the same trite phrases page after page, things start getting a little tiresome.And you should be embarassed. Nobody even says "dammitall" unless they're making the damitol joke:And I'm going to need some after reading this bookBut seriously. This was terribly written. The writing was utterly repetitive, the dialogue forced, the characters annoying, and the plot didn't really even make sense. What happened to the Blue Beetle I remember from Giffen's 2006 run? Cause this sure ain't it. ...okay, I'm beginning to get on my own nerves now.Suffice it to say, this book was bad. And I wasn't happy about it. I really love Jaime Reyes and I wanted to read a new series that really did him justice and introduced him to a new group of readers. Instead, I got this mess. I thought part of the point of Rebirth was to simultaneously bring in new readers and bring back older beloved characters and storylines: this did neither. I felt like I'd been dropped in the middle of a story and had nothing to hold on to--What the hell is Doctor Fate doing in all this? Should I care? Why is Ted Kord there? I thought he was dead...? And why is he so annoying? But more than all that, why are we starting over? Maybe I haven't read too much of the older Blue Beetle, but this was just tearing apart and rewriting (badly) the parts that I did know. It's a poorly-told origin story that somehow skips the origin part and leaves everyone wondering just how the hell we got here. It honestly feels like Giffen threw together an outline with some placeholder dialogue, but then accidentally sent that instead of the final script. Why else would so much of the dialogue be the same phrases, repeating over and over again, word for word? What other excuse could an author possibly have for such laziness?Because it wasn't official enough the first timeI could make so many critiques of this book, but the biggest one I have to make (other than how stupidly repetitive the phrasing was), is that Giffen for some reason has spurned the use of inner monologue boxes. Y'know, those little boxes that usually float around in comics and tell you what the character is thinking. Now, showing is usually better than telling, but there really is something to be said for having your character have a bit of a coherent narration. Instead, we got scenes like this:Instead of having some good 'ol inner monologue where Jaime tells the audience how he's not the one controlling the scarab, we get this very forced, very incoherent dialogue where Jaime babbles what he's thinking out loud. Because, y'know. That's what you do when you have thoughts. Babble them aloud. The result is that Jaime comes off at best goofy and at worst a bit stupid. It's hard to take someone seriously who's narrating their adventures out loud the whole time. To sum up, this book is bad. The writing is bad. The dialogue is bad. The characters are annoying. The plot is boring and also does a terrible job at bringing in a new reader, not to mention is just kind of stupid. The villain is laughable:"I'll get you next time, you meddling kids! And your dog too!"Anditis repetitive
    more
  • Joe Kucharski
    May 8, 2017
    DC Comics’ Rebirth event, other than a marketing tag, really should be about the exploration of themes. A look at what makes the character appealing and an examination of those personal, internal forces while dealing with the colorfully-ludicrous external. Unfortunately, with the Rebirth collections DC Comics and NetGalley have graciously sent my way, there has not been a sense of regrouping, of growth, or internalization. The stories are an onslaught of constant motion opening with panel one an DC Comics’ Rebirth event, other than a marketing tag, really should be about the exploration of themes. A look at what makes the character appealing and an examination of those personal, internal forces while dealing with the colorfully-ludicrous external. Unfortunately, with the Rebirth collections DC Comics and NetGalley have graciously sent my way, there has not been a sense of regrouping, of growth, or internalization. The stories are an onslaught of constant motion opening with panel one and nary a chance for an asterisked footnote to a Wikipedia article let alone time for introductions, and no more so than Blue Beetle Vol. 1: The More Things Change.Blue Beetle tries, sincerely, and sometimes achieves partial success, to be clever with the pairing of Jaime Reyes, the Blue Beetle, and his mentor/Alfred Pennyworth surrogate Ted Kord, the former, and formerly deceased, Blue Beetle. Their relationship is ripe with all the elements of great buddy-cop entertainment, but man, that fruit just ain’t ready to pick. Blue Beetle Vol. 1, again like other Rebirth titles, are full of these sudden starts, fits of action, with explosions of rat-a-tat dialogue, that don’t go anywhere and have no signs of resolution, which is extremely detrimental to, what should be, a contained graphic novel and an invitation to go further.Keith Giffen, who created the Jaime Reyes character following the massive Infinite Crisis storyline, which began with the surprising murder of Ted Kord, presents dialogue-heavy issues and truly does wish to make Jaime as likeable and as important as his blue alter ego. After all, one of main reasons Spider-Man is immensely popular is due to the relational aspect of Peter Parker, as opposed, for instance, to the Hulk, where the very-human Banner can indeed come off as, well, puny. Alas, Giffen never gives that reader, and presumably a first-time reader at that, the chance to truly enjoy the character because the opportunity is never provided. The shark-like, always-moving-forward motion does not allow that pause for reflection.Giffen and co-plotter/artist Scott Kolins present the Blue Beetle scarab as a threat to Jaime’s well-being, a plot element that will no doubt continue to grow as the series continues. Giffen allows Doctor Fate a co-starring gig in the title, and I, for one, always enjoy Giffen’s Fate. Kolins gives the character an updated makeover, but even the character’s inclusion is sparse and seemingly inconsequential as the mystery for his inclusion, and what should be a build up to this threat, is nearly trivialized away in an is-it-or-is-it-not dream sequence.Comic books have a grand tradition of excelling at the slow burn. How many decades did Superman and Lois Lane flirt? Even Ted Kord’s own Blue Beetle title from the post-Crisis eighties had an over twelve-issue long b-plot that simmered, at varying levels, every issue. The problem with Blue Beetle Vol. 1: The More Things Change is there are too many simmering pots and not enough pasta. The old adage about waiting for that water to boil could very well result in no one bothering to pay attention when supper is ready.
    more
  • Rick Hunter
    May 17, 2017
    **** I received a digital copy of this from DC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Ugh! I don't even know where to start with this one. I guess that I'll start with what was good about the book because that won't take very long. Dr. Fate shows up. That's pretty much the only thing that was good about this book and that's only because Dr. Fate is one of my all-time favorite comics characters. He's definitely one of my favorite DC characters. Without him showing up this book would h **** I received a digital copy of this from DC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Ugh! I don't even know where to start with this one. I guess that I'll start with what was good about the book because that won't take very long. Dr. Fate shows up. That's pretty much the only thing that was good about this book and that's only because Dr. Fate is one of my all-time favorite comics characters. He's definitely one of my favorite DC characters. Without him showing up this book would have been a total bust.That's a little harsh. I could call the art one of the good things about the book too, but there is also some bad to it as well. Artist Scott Kolins has some decent looking art in places. In other places, it's kind of meh. Overall, I thought the art was generic. You'd never go raving to a friend about how fantastic it was. You'd also never say the art was horrendous and that you'd never be able to forget it. It's simply not memorable in any way. I thought the old school Kent Nelson version of Dr. Fate had one of the best looking costumes in all of comics. Scott Kolins' depiction of Dr. Fate looks like some godawful cosplay that was pieced together by pairing the classic helmet with some old lady's muumuu dress that was bought from Goodwill. I abhor the look Kolins' Dr. Fate.Now, on to the bad. One of the worst things about the book was Keith Giffen's dialogue that he wrote for the characters. Jaime Reyes is a teenager that was with his 2 best friends when they all found the Blue Beetle scarab that attached itself to Jaime. These teens are in modern day, but some of the lines Giffen writes for them would be more at home in a 1960's sitcom. Nowadays, who says, "There's no moss growing on you"? Thankfully, the saying was dropped after the first couple of issues. I'm 42 years old and haven't heard that since I was a child. It was a dumb saying then too. That's not the only abysmal dialogue, but it's the one bit that stands out as being the worst. The plot that Giffen and Kolins created together isn't much better than the script. On the closing page of one issue, there is a group that bursts into the room where Blue Beetle and someone else are fighting. They tell Blue Beetle to turn him over as they pose menacingly. It leads you to believe that there is a big battle coming between these people and Blue Beetle in the following issue. The next issue starts and they're all hanging out together looking at a big hole in the ground. What? It makes no sense. How they all became friends isn't in the book and neither is any explanation on the holes. It seems like there is an issue missing. The story telling is told with a staccato cadence that doesn't seem to tie anything together. One issue ends abruptly and the next doesn't seem to precisely fit that ending. Sure, the same people show up most issues, but there is so much left out that should be included to keep this story flowing at a better pace and to be more cohesive. New 52 Blue Beetle wasn't very good. I don't know why the reins of this series were handed over to the same guy again. I've read very few comics with Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle. I fondly remember the time when Ted Kord had that moniker. I thought Ted being a major player in this series would automatically make it better for me. I was wrong. As long as Keith Giffen continues to write this book, it will never get better. The writing for the book gets 1 star. Scott Kolins's artwork gets 2.5 stars. I averaged those 2 separate aspects of this book together to get an overall rating of 1.75 stars. I can't recommend this series to anyone. I know Blue Beetle isn't the most popular character in the DC Universe, but even he deserves better than this. There's no way this series hangs around long.
    more
  • Kevin Lau
    May 27, 2017
    [Read in single issues]Jaime Reyes as the Blue Beetle has interested me and been on my reading list for a while. When I first discovered the character watching Batman: The Brave and the Bold, seeing Jaime as a relatable teen arguing with the sentient suit that gives him his powers, his New 52 line had already been cancelled. Then Geoff Johns wrote Rebirth and added a little scene with Jaime Reyes that I thought was very interesting.In short, Keith Giffen doesn't deliver in this volume until issu [Read in single issues]Jaime Reyes as the Blue Beetle has interested me and been on my reading list for a while. When I first discovered the character watching Batman: The Brave and the Bold, seeing Jaime as a relatable teen arguing with the sentient suit that gives him his powers, his New 52 line had already been cancelled. Then Geoff Johns wrote Rebirth and added a little scene with Jaime Reyes that I thought was very interesting.In short, Keith Giffen doesn't deliver in this volume until issue #6, where he kind of gives a small splice of what the series could be.Getting the obvious out of the way, the dialogue here is absolutely horrible. I tell myself it feels like a first draft, but then there are moments of repetition and sentences upon sentences of nothing going on. By then, it feels more like a very bloated outline with the characters speaking mostly hot air. The dialogue here isn't flat, it's completely empty. This, in turn, makes all the characters just a bunch of background noise, not even close to cementing themselves as prominent characters.I know previous iterations of Blue Beetle gives Jaime Reyes internal monologues, sometimes even arguing with the scarab on his back. None of this is seen here until issue #6 for 2 panels, and it's just Jaime reminding us why he's in the spot he's currently at.So yeah, fair warning: There's a whole lot of nothing going on in this volume. The plot is spread so thin it's hard to keep track of. If it wasn't for the last issue of this volume actually starting a plot and the art itself being serviceable, I would have given this 1 star.I'm still reading this in issue form and am about to start #8. Hopefully this series gets better. I'd hate to see Jaime Reyes get cancelled a second time.UPDATE: Though Keith Giffen still plots the story, issues #8 and #9 (all that are released as of writing this) have a different author that makes the story readable. It's still not great yet, but it has certainly bumped up to a 3-star read.
    more
  • Saoirse Adams-Kushin
    May 31, 2017
    I received a review copy of this book.Like many Blue Beetle fans, the concept of a story where Ted Kord mentors Jaime Reyes is one I've been contemplating and idly hoping for for years. Unfortunately, the reality really does not live up to the Dream Comic I've built up in my head.I haven't read the main Rebirth series but from what I've gathered online, part of the whole point of it is allegedly to restore the several years worth of friendships and emotional attachments that the New 52 erased. E I received a review copy of this book.Like many Blue Beetle fans, the concept of a story where Ted Kord mentors Jaime Reyes is one I've been contemplating and idly hoping for for years. Unfortunately, the reality really does not live up to the Dream Comic I've built up in my head.I haven't read the main Rebirth series but from what I've gathered online, part of the whole point of it is allegedly to restore the several years worth of friendships and emotional attachments that the New 52 erased. Except, for some reason, for Ted Kord. Where's my middle-aged slightly overweight guy with a heart condition and who is this annoying Silicon Valley tech startup guy? Where, more to the point, are his friends? What even is the point of bringing Ted Kord back if Booster Gold doesn't know about it?Jaime is less unrecognisable than Ted but still feels off to me. It's been a long time since I've read his original series (one of the best teen superhero comics of all time) but his complete-zero-tolerance approach to the Posse seemed out of character.Even if you aren't a longtime reader looking for a reunion with your old friends, Giffen's writing here is sloppy. Different characters reuse the same unusual idioms in a way I found distracting. Also, there was a fair amount of 'Could Jaime maybe be.... gay?!' teasing in this volume, which I'm assuming doesn't go anywhere, perhaps unfairly, but I feel like if it had I would have heard about it. Straight writers: Stop doing this. It might have endeared you to queer fans years ago but we expect more than hints and teases now.All that said, I think Scott Kolins is a great choice of artist for this book. I particularly love the way he draws Jaime halfway between civilian and Blue Beetle looks, as shown on the cover. I don't understand why colourist Romulo Fajardo has made Brenda go blonde, though.
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    May 7, 2017
    [Read as single issues]Jaime Reyes seems to struggle to find his feet recently. His last series was decent but ended prematurely, while his best showing remains his original Post-Infinite Crisis series. Back with a vengeance and a sidekick in Ted Kord, this new Rebirth series hopes to rectify that.It doesn't, really. The dialogue always feels a little off, and the relationship between Jaime and Ted comes across very repetitive as they yell the same things at each other over and over. Things pick [Read as single issues]Jaime Reyes seems to struggle to find his feet recently. His last series was decent but ended prematurely, while his best showing remains his original Post-Infinite Crisis series. Back with a vengeance and a sidekick in Ted Kord, this new Rebirth series hopes to rectify that.It doesn't, really. The dialogue always feels a little off, and the relationship between Jaime and Ted comes across very repetitive as they yell the same things at each other over and over. Things pick up near the end as Doctor Fate gets more involved, and the explanations behind the Scarab in later issues (which will be collected in this next volume) help put things into perspective, but this series feels like it's missing something and I can't put my finger on what. I like that there are several plotlines bubbling at once, like the return of La Dama and whatever the hell Ted's actually up to, but it still doesn't feel like a cohesive story, rather lots of little ones squished together.The art is consistently great though, Scott Kolins is always a reliable artist and he fits Blue Beetle with his almost Jack Kirby-ish squareness of visual. Romulo Fajardo Jr's colours are perfect too, lots of earthy tones that make the superhero action pop off the page.A promising start, but not a full on success just yet.
    more
  • Ramón Fernández Ayarzagoitia
    May 7, 2017
    En resumen, aún falta desarrollar demasiados personajes, pero amo que Blue Beetle sea Jaime Reyes, con apoyo de Ted Kord, y que Jaime sea un latino viviendo en texas, pero que no sea un cliché de “crecer en calles peligrosas” y que de hecho tenga familia y amigos que lo apoyen.I wasn’t really sure about this title. Blue Beetle has always been better as a Justice League character, but I loved the fact that this title would include both Ted Kord and Jaime Reyes fighting crime in Austin so I jumped En resumen, aún falta desarrollar demasiados personajes, pero amo que Blue Beetle sea Jaime Reyes, con apoyo de Ted Kord, y que Jaime sea un latino viviendo en texas, pero que no sea un cliché de “crecer en calles peligrosas” y que de hecho tenga familia y amigos que lo apoyen.I wasn’t really sure about this title. Blue Beetle has always been better as a Justice League character, but I loved the fact that this title would include both Ted Kord and Jaime Reyes fighting crime in Austin so I jumped at the chance to read it. The result is admittedly mixed: too many undeveloped characters and a story arc that is not definable in 6-7 issues. So here’s the thing: it works right now as an on-going comic but I really need to read further in order to really know what I think about this series. In trade paperback form it feels more like a prelude than an actual story. Regarding design, I still feel that the full-on beetle mask is weird, but mixing it with other wacky supporting characters really made it feel more at home.I also love the family/friends dynamic in this comic, and how a Latino in Texas actually has a great family background instead of being a tough upbringing kind of cliché. Jaime Reyes is unapologetically a normal teen that just wants a normal life, but must do what is given to him by his circumstances. As a Mexican I really, really enjoyed this.
    more
  • Adam Graham
    May 14, 2017
    I received this book in digital form off of Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.In this book, Jaime Reyes has the Blue Beetle scarab and is working with Ted Kord, the post-Crisis Blue Beetle, who is now sidelined. Kord provides Jaime support in the field while also helping him study the scarab with hopes of getting rid of it. Their dynamic reminds me a bit of the 1990s series Batman Beyond with Kord being a somewhat more easygoing but also less helpful than Bruce Wayne was in that series I received this book in digital form off of Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.In this book, Jaime Reyes has the Blue Beetle scarab and is working with Ted Kord, the post-Crisis Blue Beetle, who is now sidelined. Kord provides Jaime support in the field while also helping him study the scarab with hopes of getting rid of it. Their dynamic reminds me a bit of the 1990s series Batman Beyond with Kord being a somewhat more easygoing but also less helpful than Bruce Wayne was in that series. This book seems to be trying to recapture the spirit of Reyes' original series from the mid-2000s with Jaime being an El Paso-based teenager whose family knows about his superpowers. I liked the series but this just doesn't give the same vibe.In six issues in this book, there's not really a compelling storyline and it doesn't have the same sense of fun as the earlier series. The dialogue is often repetitive which gets old fast.The biggest problem in the book may be Jaime. He's not particularly likable as written. There's one story where he spends several pages being a jerk to a metahuman girl who's just trying to be playful and friendly. Jaime is whiny, a fact that is called out by other characters in multiple issues. It only makes the whining slightly less bothersome.The book has some good supporting characters who sadly don't get enough focus and there are a few moments that call to mind the good old days, but overall, I left the book uninterested in what happens next. I have to say this is one of the more disappointing DC Rebirth titles I've read.
    more
  • Elyssa
    May 15, 2017
    I received this in exchange for an honest review.I was very excited to read this collection of Blue Beetle comic books. I have read several of the series in the Rebirth event and have enjoyed the majority of what I have read. This story fell a bit flat to me and I did not enjoy the art as much as I normally do while reading comics. This was my first time reading anything about Blue Beetle. From that perspective, I did enjoy the comic books because I came into it with no expectation or even knowl I received this in exchange for an honest review.I was very excited to read this collection of Blue Beetle comic books. I have read several of the series in the Rebirth event and have enjoyed the majority of what I have read. This story fell a bit flat to me and I did not enjoy the art as much as I normally do while reading comics. This was my first time reading anything about Blue Beetle. From that perspective, I did enjoy the comic books because I came into it with no expectation or even knowledge of this particular character. I was pleased in one of the later issues in the collection when they flashed back to the origin of how Jamie became the Blue Beetle. I think this book is worth reading if you want exposure to this character or if you are trying to read the entire Rebirth event.
    more
  • Trey
    May 31, 2017
    Sadly, there's really nothing redeeming here. The storyline reminded me of the worst of the '90s, with little plot, bad art, and the introduction of multiple new heroes/villains in terrible costumes with terrible names that are just attempts at driving up the price of the back issues with a "first appearance." I feel bad for Jamie Reyes, because he deserves a better comic, but I fear this one is not long for the shelves.I received a preview copy of this book from NetGalley.
    more
  • Preston Watts
    May 18, 2017
    I like Blue beetle, both the Ted Kord and Jaime Reyes versions, but this book was just ok. First off, this book didn't feel like a Rebirth, but a continuation. And while the story was fine, I didn't really follow the characters or the plotline as well as the other volumes I've read. Kord was a great character, and it had some great imagery regarding the Blue Beetle character, but other than that, it was just ok.
    more
  • Fiction State Of Mind
    May 20, 2017
    Except for the great diversity in the Reyes family I found it really hard to connect with this book. Yes Kord seems more clueless to Jamie's struggles and needs than helpful and I didn't really like the supporting cast. I love the concept of BB but outside of animation I don't enjoy the characters stories in this trade
    more
  • Daniel Butcher
    May 29, 2017
    Probably one of my least favorite Rebirth titles to date.Honestly being a little bit older I want more Ted Kord and less Jaimie.
  • Tim
    May 17, 2017
    I normally really like Scott Kolins art, but it really came across rushed here most of the time.
  • Connor
    May 13, 2017
    Okay. Really has potential, but not there yet. Full review in a day or two.
  • Dave Sammath
    February 23, 2017
    2.5Only staying on board for Dr. Fate if I'm being honest.
  • Dan
    February 25, 2017
    I really dislike that Dr Fate's series was cancelled, and now his character now only plays a minor role in this book. There is nothing compelling about this story at all.
  • Chad Harmon
    May 3, 2017
    Was anyone clamoring for a new Blue Beetle book? The Jamie Reyes version has already flopped twice and this one is actually worse than the previous two. The book doesn't even seem to follow the continuity established in the new 52 version. The Blue Beetle suit no longer comes from space I guess. Now it's magic based because Dr. Fate showed up and mysteriously said so. The previous version was a total ripoff of X-O Manowar, exact same origin.The series has absolutely no direction and hardly any v Was anyone clamoring for a new Blue Beetle book? The Jamie Reyes version has already flopped twice and this one is actually worse than the previous two. The book doesn't even seem to follow the continuity established in the new 52 version. The Blue Beetle suit no longer comes from space I guess. Now it's magic based because Dr. Fate showed up and mysteriously said so. The previous version was a total ripoff of X-O Manowar, exact same origin.The series has absolutely no direction and hardly any villains. Six or Seven plot threads are started and then left dangling. The story just meanders from one boring encounter to another with zero purpose. God, was this bad.Received an advance copy from DC and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
Write a review