Niko Draws a Feeling
Niko loves to draw his world: the ring-a-ling of the ice cream truck, the warm of sun on his face. But no one appreciates his art. Until one day, Niko meets Iris . . .

Niko Draws a Feeling Details

TitleNiko Draws a Feeling
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 1st, 2017
PublisherCarolrhoda Books (R)
ISBN-139781467798433
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Art

Niko Draws a Feeling Review

  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know if I've ever read a children's book singing the praises of abstract art. It was kind of neat, though, showing kids that art doesn't have to just be representations of things we see; it can also be about things we perceive with our other senses... or even about our feelings. Nobody in Niko's life seems to understand this, which leads to him feeling rather lonely and sad (which, of course, inspires more artwork). It isn't until a little girl moves in nearby that he finds someone who a I don't know if I've ever read a children's book singing the praises of abstract art. It was kind of neat, though, showing kids that art doesn't have to just be representations of things we see; it can also be about things we perceive with our other senses... or even about our feelings. Nobody in Niko's life seems to understand this, which leads to him feeling rather lonely and sad (which, of course, inspires more artwork). It isn't until a little girl moves in nearby that he finds someone who actually gets it.While I wasn't wowed by the illustrations, they told the story well enough. I guess they fit the overall tone of the book and what it was trying to convey.This is one instance of a children's book that tackles an ambitious topic and actually makes it work. For that reason alone, I'd recommend it.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the way this book captured the artistic process and what it feels like to have an idea you want to express, a feeling you want to capture. A beautiful book about art-making and finding a kindred spirit to share that art with.
  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    Niko loves to draw. He carries around his supplies until a feeling or an inspiration strikes him. When he draws a picture, it is not what he sees, it is what he feels or hears, the sensations he gets. When he shows his pictures to people, they do not understand his work, they assume it is what he sees and ask questions about the obvious. They can't see past what he didn't draw. Everytime someone takes a look at his pictures and doesn't see what he created, Niko becomes disappointed. He draws a p Niko loves to draw. He carries around his supplies until a feeling or an inspiration strikes him. When he draws a picture, it is not what he sees, it is what he feels or hears, the sensations he gets. When he shows his pictures to people, they do not understand his work, they assume it is what he sees and ask questions about the obvious. They can't see past what he didn't draw. Everytime someone takes a look at his pictures and doesn't see what he created, Niko becomes disappointed. He draws a picture of himself from looking in a mirror, at least the feelings he has at that time. He does not show this picture to anyone. Then one day a new girl, Iris, moves to town and wants to see his artwork. They discover that they see things the same way and immediately become friends. This is an interesting concept for a children's book. I think it would be a great book when teaching about individuality. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.
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  • Jessica ☕
    January 1, 1970
    Rather than copy the forms of what he sees, Niko draws representations of the feelings that seeing things elicits. He doesn't draw the sun; he draws the warmth of the sun on his face. He doesn't draw the ice cream truck; he draws the sound of the bells.Most people do not understand Niko's drawings until he meets a little girl, Iris, who does. Niko can then make a new drawing -- the feeling of finding a new friend.Niko Draws a Feeling is artistic and imaginative and will inspire children to perce Rather than copy the forms of what he sees, Niko draws representations of the feelings that seeing things elicits. He doesn't draw the sun; he draws the warmth of the sun on his face. He doesn't draw the ice cream truck; he draws the sound of the bells.Most people do not understand Niko's drawings until he meets a little girl, Iris, who does. Niko can then make a new drawing -- the feeling of finding a new friend.Niko Draws a Feeling is artistic and imaginative and will inspire children to perceive their world in a new way.I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Laine
    January 1, 1970
    I FEEL YOUR FEEL NIKO, I REALLY DO. this is a fantastic story about how hard it is to have your vision misunderstood for so long, how wonderful it is to finally meet someone who gets you.
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    A sweet story that would pair well with the Noisy Paint Box or work with several themes in storytime. (Art, friendship, staying true to yourself)
  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    Art is life."It looks like how I feel." - Iris"It's the warm of the sun on my face. ...It's not the sun. It's the warm. ...It's not my face. It's the warm." - Niko
  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    This is a new to me and to our room title. We have just about every other title Raczka has written, but I think we missed this 2017 release because it wasn't a poetry-based title. But after seeing the book land on my radar again this week, I had a sense that I just needed to see it (read "have it"). Niko draws pictures of the feeling associated with the subject he is considering. As a teacher active in social media, I can see this. The request to see more of a project that one is just getting th This is a new to me and to our room title. We have just about every other title Raczka has written, but I think we missed this 2017 release because it wasn't a poetry-based title. But after seeing the book land on my radar again this week, I had a sense that I just needed to see it (read "have it"). Niko draws pictures of the feeling associated with the subject he is considering. As a teacher active in social media, I can see this. The request to see more of a project that one is just getting the feeling of that sounds like, "Can you share the file? Can you share the lesson plans?" I don't know. It's hard to capture the feeling of the idea. Niko runs into--not necessarily resistance or teasing--but a larger audience that is unable to see what he is creating on the page. He is trying to render a feeling. Raczka and Shin work together in the perfect symbiosis of the picture book format. Raczka's depictions weave through and around, over and at arcing lines within Shins "scribbles" of feelings rendered by a young artist.When Niko meets a new neighbor and she discovers a hidden piece of art Niko has created, a relationship begins in appreciation of each other's feelings and what both see in the other. These are the quiet picture books that don't get a lot of celebration out there. While the connections to ISH are readily recognizable, I believe that this book is quiet in the tradition of titles like DANIEL FINDS A POEM. I'm thankful for every person who shares a book that moves them. . .whey they move them. Not when they are buzzworthy, but when they are room and reader ready.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Niko is an artist; he uses the tools of an artist to interpret and respond to his world, but his loved ones don't always understand his work. When Niko draws a picture he is most concerned about getting the feeling right, not necessarily recreating an image or a scene etc. When a new little girl moves in next door, Niko is feeling pretty low about his artwork, but Niko is surprised to learn that the little girl not only likes his artwork, but understands the emotions behind it too.REALLY good st Niko is an artist; he uses the tools of an artist to interpret and respond to his world, but his loved ones don't always understand his work. When Niko draws a picture he is most concerned about getting the feeling right, not necessarily recreating an image or a scene etc. When a new little girl moves in next door, Niko is feeling pretty low about his artwork, but Niko is surprised to learn that the little girl not only likes his artwork, but understands the emotions behind it too.REALLY good story supported by mixed media artwork. The storytelling is perfectly aimed at the audience and the topic is genius!Highly recommended for PreK-2.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    In my 7 years on Goodreads, I have never bothered enter one of the hundreds of picture books I've read to my kids from the library. Not that I haven't read some really good books (and plenty of pretty bad ones), but we take out 10-12 books a week and adding them here would be tedious. But I'm making an exception for this one, because it was truly excellent. One of my criteria for 5 stars is that the book should change my perception of the world, and I think this book may have done that. I'm not In my 7 years on Goodreads, I have never bothered enter one of the hundreds of picture books I've read to my kids from the library. Not that I haven't read some really good books (and plenty of pretty bad ones), but we take out 10-12 books a week and adding them here would be tedious. But I'm making an exception for this one, because it was truly excellent. One of my criteria for 5 stars is that the book should change my perception of the world, and I think this book may have done that. I'm not sure I'll look at abstract or modern art quite the same way again. Well done.
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    Nico is an abstract thinker whose drawings are misunderstood by others. He feels lonely until a new girl moves in next door who is able to sense the feelings from his art, and can relate to him. Pair with Ish, Jack's Worry, I Don't Draw I Color
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Niko draws the sound of an ice cream truck, what the warmth of the sun feels like on his face, he draws and he draws, but no one quite understands what he is seeing, until he meets Iris. A fantastic little book on abstract art and friendship. What a nice surprise.
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  • Peacegal
    January 1, 1970
    I've got a feeling,A feeling deep inside, oh yeah...This is a joyful picture book that celebrates all sorts of art--including drawing what you feel rather than what you see.
  • DezertSuz
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book - it expressed so well the things of those who share feelings of things. Beautiful story.
  • Misbah
    January 1, 1970
    Niko loves to draw and creates beautiful abstract drawings but no one seems to understand what they mean. It's probably because he doesn't draw the types of things that most people draw. Instead of drawing the sunset he illustrates the warmth that he feels when it shines on his face. Then one day his new neighbor, Iris notices that he likes to draw. She asks to see his drawings and he is hesitant but shows her anyways. To his surprise, she understands the emotions that he was trying to illustrat Niko loves to draw and creates beautiful abstract drawings but no one seems to understand what they mean. It's probably because he doesn't draw the types of things that most people draw. Instead of drawing the sunset he illustrates the warmth that he feels when it shines on his face. Then one day his new neighbor, Iris notices that he likes to draw. She asks to see his drawings and he is hesitant but shows her anyways. To his surprise, she understands the emotions that he was trying to illustrate and they become fast friends. I don't think that people see the same things or experience the same emotions when they see abstract art but I love the message that this story conveys. That there is always someone out there that will understand your quirks and your point of view.
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  • Roxanne Troup
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful book that introduced children to art and the idea that art is not just what you see but what you feel.
  • Storywraps
    January 1, 1970
    "Niko loved to make pictures.Everywhere he went, he carried a boxof coloured pencils and a pad of paper.""Because everywhere he looked, he saw something that inspired him."Niko is a little boy with a sixth sense when it comes to looking at his world. He looks at things around him and becomes inspired. When that happens (and it's often) it's like a window opens up in his brain and an idea flits through it like a butterfly. It flutters down to his stomach then along his arms and fingers to his pen "Niko loved to make pictures.Everywhere he went, he carried a boxof coloured pencils and a pad of paper.""Because everywhere he looked, he saw something that inspired him."Niko is a little boy with a sixth sense when it comes to looking at his world. He looks at things around him and becomes inspired. When that happens (and it's often) it's like a window opens up in his brain and an idea flits through it like a butterfly. It flutters down to his stomach then along his arms and fingers to his pencils, where it escapes on to his paper in a whirlwind of colour. He doesn't draw the actual object he is viewing but the feeling that surrounds him while he is observing it. When he shows others his work they just don't get it. They ask him questions about his art and always seem to come away confused at his response as to how he interprets the things that he encounters.Niko becomes disappointed and withdraws into his room asking himself why those around him don't understand the significance of his beautiful drawings. One day a little girl named Iris moves into his neighbourhood and asks to see Niko's pictures. Reluctantly Niko shows her his artwork. She is totally enthralled by his creativity and ideas and understands exactly what he is doing. They become very good friends and happily Niko finally has someone to share his passion with. This wonderful book celebrates our uniqueness and our talents. I have a poster hanging in my office that says:"VISION is the art of seeing things invisible." That's Niko, he's a visionary, which enables him to share his incredible, invisible, gift of expressing his feelings to the world. I truly love the book and the illustrations enriched the text immensely. I highly, highly recommend this book.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    Niko loves to draw. He carries paper and colored pencils with him all the time because he is always finding new inspiration. But he doesn’t draw like other people. If he draws the ice cream truck, he’s actually trying to capture the sound of its bell. Instead of drawing the sun, he draws the feeling of it on his face. The image he makes of the robin building her nest is of the hard work, not the robin or the nest. No one seems to understand his pictures at all. But then he meets Iris, a new girl Niko loves to draw. He carries paper and colored pencils with him all the time because he is always finding new inspiration. But he doesn’t draw like other people. If he draws the ice cream truck, he’s actually trying to capture the sound of its bell. Instead of drawing the sun, he draws the feeling of it on his face. The image he makes of the robin building her nest is of the hard work, not the robin or the nest. No one seems to understand his pictures at all. But then he meets Iris, a new girl, who can understand the feelings he is showing on the page.In his text, Raczka really shows how the mind of young artist works and the different way in which Niko sees and experiences and depicts his world. There is a feeling of isolation when people can’t see what he is trying to convey in his art. That moment soon passes though when Iris can connect with the art that Niko has created. There is a real heart to this book, shown through Niko himself and his connection to the world.Shin’s illustrations help readers understand Niko better and the art too. Children will want to discuss what they feel when they see the abstract swirls of Niko’s art. Shin also shows a vibrant and bustling urban community where Niko gets all of his inspiration. Done in mixed media, digital and acrylics, the illustrations have a solidity that supports the looser illustrations that are Niko’s.A welcome look at artistic process and imagination, this picture book also is about finding kindred spirits. Appropriate for ages 4-6.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Niko loves to draw the world around him. But the things he draws are not always what people expects. He becomes sad that people can't seem to see things the way he does, until he meets a friend who does. It is a beautiful story about the power of the imagination and the power of meeting someone who sees the world the way you do.Niko Draws a Feeling spans a significant portion of the audience we are hoping to reflect in our selections. The longer text caters to older children, the shapeless scrib Niko loves to draw the world around him. But the things he draws are not always what people expects. He becomes sad that people can't seem to see things the way he does, until he meets a friend who does. It is a beautiful story about the power of the imagination and the power of meeting someone who sees the world the way you do.Niko Draws a Feeling spans a significant portion of the audience we are hoping to reflect in our selections. The longer text caters to older children, the shapeless scribbles encourage art exploration at every age, and the feelings Niko expresses throughout the story are felt by readers young and old. Families can use this book as a stepping stone to explore feelings and art in a way they might not consider doing. From art teachers to classroom teachers, this book has a place in school as well, as readers discuss feelings and how one might go about expressing them. Though the main character has a light skin tone, his parents are mixed race and the children depicted around him are every human hue. Additionally, the concept of a boy expressing feelings is one that is not often captured in books and serves to incorporate a wide assortment of readers in its atypical presentation.
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  • storymamas
    January 1, 1970
    Niko Draws A Feeling is wonderful book about a boy who is passionate about drawing and gets frustrated when the people in his life don’t understand his drawings. .Bob Raczka book is centered around Niko who loves to draw, he’s inspired by everything around him, but when he tries to share his creations, he ends up having to explain them to everyone. “So this is the nest?” “It’s not the nest. It’s her hard work.” Niko gets frustrated that he is often having to explain himself and begins to give up Niko Draws A Feeling is wonderful book about a boy who is passionate about drawing and gets frustrated when the people in his life don’t understand his drawings. .Bob Raczka book is centered around Niko who loves to draw, he’s inspired by everything around him, but when he tries to share his creations, he ends up having to explain them to everyone. “So this is the nest?” “It’s not the nest. It’s her hard work.” Niko gets frustrated that he is often having to explain himself and begins to give up. This books would be a good read to kick start a new year for #classroombookaday. Reminding kids not to loose hope when things are frustrating. Also, a way to remind kids to embrace their passions. It also can show students that have a hard time expressing themselves with words, that their voice can be heard in other ways, just like Niko using abstract concepts. It would also make a great addition for teachers who teach art.
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  • Kathryn Zebrowski-Wray
    January 1, 1970
    Niko is a special boy who loves to draw.. unfortunately his work is often misunderstood because his drawings are of his feelings and thoughts rather than more concrete representations of things like the sun and ice cream trucks. When his new neighbor Iris arrives, Niko finally has a friend who understands him. I love this book and will introduce it to my third graders who will benefit from the message that it's ok to be different, being unique isn't a deficit, it's an asset. Thank you to the pu Niko is a special boy who loves to draw.. unfortunately his work is often misunderstood because his drawings are of his feelings and thoughts rather than more concrete representations of things like the sun and ice cream trucks. When his new neighbor Iris arrives, Niko finally has a friend who understands him. I love this book and will introduce it to my third graders who will benefit from the message that it's ok to be different, being unique isn't a deficit, it's an asset. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley who graciously let me review this book so I could give it an honest review!
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I received this arc from Netgalley for an honest review.Niko loves to draw. He carries around his supplies until a feeling or an inspiration is discovered. When he draws a picture, people often can't see past what he didn't draw. Like when he drew the ring-a-ding-ding of the ice cream truck and his friends wanted to know where the ice cream truck was. Every time someone takes a look at his work and doesn't see what he created, Niko becomes disappointed. Then one day a new girl moves to town and I received this arc from Netgalley for an honest review.Niko loves to draw. He carries around his supplies until a feeling or an inspiration is discovered. When he draws a picture, people often can't see past what he didn't draw. Like when he drew the ring-a-ding-ding of the ice cream truck and his friends wanted to know where the ice cream truck was. Every time someone takes a look at his work and doesn't see what he created, Niko becomes disappointed. Then one day a new girl moves to town and they see things the same way and become fast friends. This is one of the better picture books that I have read this year.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    My youngest granddaughter in kindergarten chose this book, found on the shelf, said her teacher had read it to the class, then they "drew their feelings". What a great teacher! Niko has a unique way to draw, loves the doing, and hangs his pictures all over his room. But, his family, teacher, and friends don't quite understand. He seems sad about it but doesn't quit. And then, a lovely thing happens. . . This makes me wonder if Boy Rasczka has written a story about himself? He wrote the story an My youngest granddaughter in kindergarten chose this book, found on the shelf, said her teacher had read it to the class, then they "drew their feelings". What a great teacher! Niko has a unique way to draw, loves the doing, and hangs his pictures all over his room. But, his family, teacher, and friends don't quite understand. He seems sad about it but doesn't quit. And then, a lovely thing happens. . . This makes me wonder if Boy Rasczka has written a story about himself? He wrote the story and Simone Shin illustrated it, not quite like Rasczka, but with delightful swirling colors in the midst of realistic scenes.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations were great. It was kind of nice to have emotions that were not so easily described. I am sure everyone feels like that sometimes. The emotion isn't always a clear picture, but that doesn't mean they are inconsequential. I am not sure what made me read the author bio in the back, but it made me laugh. "Bob...hopes his books help kids to appreciate creative people like Niko, while encouraging them to be creative themselves. Bob lives with his family in the Chicago area and enjoys The illustrations were great. It was kind of nice to have emotions that were not so easily described. I am sure everyone feels like that sometimes. The emotion isn't always a clear picture, but that doesn't mean they are inconsequential. I am not sure what made me read the author bio in the back, but it made me laugh. "Bob...hopes his books help kids to appreciate creative people like Niko, while encouraging them to be creative themselves. Bob lives with his family in the Chicago area and enjoys watching the Cubs, a team that always finds creative ways to lose." You have to love that guy!
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  • Jordan Blake
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like this book could not only be read to young children, but also to older art students being introduced to abstract expressionism. Nobody other than Iris even tried to understand Niko's drawings, so it is a reminder that we adults need to take children seriously and try to understand how they feel. There is a lot to be learned from a child's drawing and I think it is beautiful that Niko and Iris were able to use art as a way to express how they feel. I love that the art came out of his p I feel like this book could not only be read to young children, but also to older art students being introduced to abstract expressionism. Nobody other than Iris even tried to understand Niko's drawings, so it is a reminder that we adults need to take children seriously and try to understand how they feel. There is a lot to be learned from a child's drawing and I think it is beautiful that Niko and Iris were able to use art as a way to express how they feel. I love that the art came out of his papers and into his real world on the pages. Those illustrations allowed us to see directly how Niko viewed the world around him.
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  • Nari
    January 1, 1970
    Niko Draws a Feeling is a unique spin on the topic of feelings for preschoolers. I feel like there are so many talking points and applications for this book with young children. It can encourage reluctant drawers to start scribbling, it can open the doors to observation about our days and especially about how we feel in the moment. Its a great book about being present and being aware of ourselves at some of the most simplest moments. Its also a book about friendship and finding someone who under Niko Draws a Feeling is a unique spin on the topic of feelings for preschoolers. I feel like there are so many talking points and applications for this book with young children. It can encourage reluctant drawers to start scribbling, it can open the doors to observation about our days and especially about how we feel in the moment. Its a great book about being present and being aware of ourselves at some of the most simplest moments. Its also a book about friendship and finding someone who understands you when no one else does.
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  • Elaine Fultz
    January 1, 1970
    Nico draws how hard the bird WORKS to build the nest -- his art shows neither a bird nor a nest. He draws the SOUND of the ice cream truck -- picture includes no truck and no ice cream. Every art instructor K-12 and beyond must share this book with every student and colleague. This is the perfect example of how excellent, deceptively simple, children's literature can express a complex concept. With the bonus inclusion of the importance of the loneliness someone can feel when they are misundersto Nico draws how hard the bird WORKS to build the nest -- his art shows neither a bird nor a nest. He draws the SOUND of the ice cream truck -- picture includes no truck and no ice cream. Every art instructor K-12 and beyond must share this book with every student and colleague. This is the perfect example of how excellent, deceptively simple, children's literature can express a complex concept. With the bonus inclusion of the importance of the loneliness someone can feel when they are misunderstood and the power of connection when they are recognized.
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  • Stephanie Watson
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful introduction to abstract art for kids. Niko draws his interpretation of the way things sound, feel, or act, rather than the objects themselves. No one around him gets it, until he finds a new friend, who also focuses on how his artwork feels instead of what it looks like. The artwork is done at a young child's level, so the audience can relate to Niko's abilities. Very naturally leads to some extension projects where kids can look around and draw how things in their world make them f A wonderful introduction to abstract art for kids. Niko draws his interpretation of the way things sound, feel, or act, rather than the objects themselves. No one around him gets it, until he finds a new friend, who also focuses on how his artwork feels instead of what it looks like. The artwork is done at a young child's level, so the audience can relate to Niko's abilities. Very naturally leads to some extension projects where kids can look around and draw how things in their world make them feel.
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  • Brandy Watkins
    January 1, 1970
    Niko loves drawing and he inspires the readers to come along with him and draw as well. I loved the way this book captured the artistic process and what it feels like to have an idea you want to express. It helps give the reader a feeling to capture and draw. It is a nice book about art-making and finding a kindred spirit to share that art with. It reminds me of some of the elements of lines that we went over in class.
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  • Nicola
    January 1, 1970
    Miss 3 (ASD) loves picture books like this. She hates colouring in and being constrained by other people's lives; she doesn't try to draw proto-forms of houses, trees, or people. She loves expressing herself through colour, soft lines, circly lines, jagged lines, and capturing the feeling of the sun shining on her, or a circus, or the stars and planets. This was the perfect book to show her that she's not the only one and that a modern art / expressionist style is perfectly okay.
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