The Calculus of Change
A poignant and empowering teen novel of grief, unrequited love, and finding comfort in one's own skin.Aden isn't looking for love in her senior year. She's much more focused on things like getting a solo gig at Ike's and keeping her brother from illegal herbal recreation. But when Tate walks into Calculus class wearing a yarmulke and a grin, Aden's heart is gone in an instant. The two are swept up in a tantalizingly warm friendship, complete with long drives with epic soundtracks and deep talks about life, love, and spirituality. With Tate, Aden feels closer to her mom—and her mom's faith—than she has since her mother died years ago. Everyone else—even Aden's brother and her best friend—can see their connection, but does Tate?Navigating uncertain romance and the crises of those she loves, Aden must decide how she chooses to see herself and how to honor her mom’s memory.

The Calculus of Change Details

TitleThe Calculus of Change
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 27th, 2018
PublisherClarion Books
ISBN-139781328830258
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Romance

The Calculus of Change Review

  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars I expected Calculus of Change to be light-hearted contemporary, where math meets romance and trivial high school problems create light drama and much fun. Instead, Calculus of Change is a deep novel and touches on numerous heavy issues, from sexual assault to body image, relationship problems and self perception. It is thought provoking and written in an original style. When Aden falls she falls. Head over heels, totally discombobulated falls in love. That's what happened when Tate wa 3.75 stars I expected Calculus of Change to be light-hearted contemporary, where math meets romance and trivial high school problems create light drama and much fun. Instead, Calculus of Change is a deep novel and touches on numerous heavy issues, from sexual assault to body image, relationship problems and self perception. It is thought provoking and written in an original style. When Aden falls she falls. Head over heels, totally discombobulated falls in love. That's what happened when Tate walked into their calculus classroom wearing a yarmulke and a smile that seemed only for her. But Tate has a girlfriend, and as Aden and Tate become friends and spend increasing amounts of time together, Aden finds it harder to hide her true feelings. But her unrequited love isn't the only thing not going to plan, like her father's endless grief and anger, her brother's impending destruction, and her best friend's own dangerous relationships. As Aden struggles to reconcile her feelings with her perceived self worth, she must decide how she will view herself, her family, her friendships, and her memory of her mother. Aden's feelings for Tate come across a little like insta-love. Her attraction to him and her developing feelings towards him as she gets to know him are fast, deep, and all consuming. But as the reader gets to know Aden a little more, it is easier to view all this through her personality and her lack of confidence. In fact, it's kind of comforting to read about a character who falls apart in the face of flirting and attraction and who isn't someone who is amazing, smooth, and all-together (because, I know I'm not). Aden's thoughts about her weight form a large part of this book. How she thinks about herself, how she views other girls, even if she believes she is loveable or likeable is all intertwined with thoughts about her body shape, her thoughts about beauty and size.The chapters follow a sequential timeline, but each chapter has a different focus, titled accordingly. So a chapter titled Tate will be about a meeting with Tate. A chapter called Dad will be about a night when her father gets out-of-control angry. It all flows time wise, but it is focused on specific events rather than daily events and comings and goings. There are also a few chapters that highlight an event from the past, like Aden's eighth grade musical audition, to fill in more of the backstory.When I first started reading this book I wasn't sure if I was going to like it. Was it a fun, lighthearted contemporary about love, maths, and life? By the middle of the book I was dissatisfied, angry, and confused. How could so many issues like drug use and inappropriate relationships be ignored? But the end of the book completed redeemed the story.There are so many issues raised in this book. Teen pregnancy, body image, abusive relationships, inappropriate student-teacher relationships, grief, drug use, even sexual assault. But any one of which that might have been the focus of an entire book simply becomes just another layer to this story. And for that, some of these issues don't get much focus. They are perhaps brushed aside a little. But maybe that's more true to life. When things go bad and start spiraling they can become uncontrollable and crash and burn. But Aden doesn't crash or burn. She is a such a strong character. And maybe not in the way one might first think. She has huge body doubts, her self confidence is low, she is focused entirely on her feelings for Tate. But she stands up for herself. She knows what is right. She is there for her friends and family, and at the end she knows that her worth is not wrapped up in how other people view her, but rather in how she views herself. Could a guy like her? He'd be crazy not to. So while some of the issues raised may be just one more in a pile, so while Aden couldn't stop her friend from irrevocably changing her life, or stop her brother from self destructing, she was there for them throughout the fallout. Strong and never wavering. And it is Aden herself who redeems this story, who takes control of her life and her thoughts and makes a choice about who she is and how she views herself. And it is that journey that makes Calculus of Change worth reading. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Pernille Ripp
    January 1, 1970
    I usually do not share negative opinions of books and yet there were a couple of things that led me to not want to hand this to a teenager; the book is without consequence and handles pretty serious matters much too casually. Some examples are when the best friend has a relationship with a teacher and then gets pregnant, oops, no big deal, we will just do a paternity test and hope it is not his because she happened to have slept with another guy as well. When the main character is sexually moles I usually do not share negative opinions of books and yet there were a couple of things that led me to not want to hand this to a teenager; the book is without consequence and handles pretty serious matters much too casually. Some examples are when the best friend has a relationship with a teacher and then gets pregnant, oops, no big deal, we will just do a paternity test and hope it is not his because she happened to have slept with another guy as well. When the main character is sexually molested by a fellow student and she just shrugs it off because she was drunk. The angry dad, the brother that does drugs, the dead mom - all of it seemed like no big deal and yet clearly it was. There are great books out there that handle all of this tough issues with much more grace, and not in a preaching way, this book does not.
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  • SandraK
    January 1, 1970
    oh wow. this book is beautifully written and too true. the narrator/main character is edgy and real. if you're like me and have had a 'what is this' romance (to use a phrase from the book) that left you wondering if you were just crazy, this book is so affirming. honestly the book was equal parts painful and empowering. and totally delicious in ways that made me wish it would never ended. highly recommended :)
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    The author really brought me back to my days as a 17 year old girl by reaching into the mind of Aden. The sarcastic look at the outside world, the insecurities, very real family dynamics, eclectic friendships, what it's like to feel a connection with the opposite sex and then second-guess everything about those feelings and yourself. Without revealing any spoilers, Aden definitely comes out on top which is a moment of pride for those of us adult readers who accomplished the same back in the day The author really brought me back to my days as a 17 year old girl by reaching into the mind of Aden. The sarcastic look at the outside world, the insecurities, very real family dynamics, eclectic friendships, what it's like to feel a connection with the opposite sex and then second-guess everything about those feelings and yourself. Without revealing any spoilers, Aden definitely comes out on top which is a moment of pride for those of us adult readers who accomplished the same back in the day and will be a moment of inspiration for teenage readers struggling alongside her.
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  • Rendz
    January 1, 1970
    Me: Expects fluff.Book: Imma just leave this hardcore stuff for you right here.Me: Ouch.Solid read. RTC
  • Jaclyn
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet and moving realistic YA. Starts off somewhat as an unrequited romance, but goes far beyond that. There's also:- coming to terms with grief - Aden is attracted to Tate partly b/c of his spirituality which makes her feel connected to her Jewish mother who passed away)- family - Aden, her brother Jon and their father have a somewhat loving but strained relationship, partly because they haven't come to terms with her mom's death, and her father in particular has a hair-trigger temper that neve Sweet and moving realistic YA. Starts off somewhat as an unrequited romance, but goes far beyond that. There's also:- coming to terms with grief - Aden is attracted to Tate partly b/c of his spirituality which makes her feel connected to her Jewish mother who passed away)- family - Aden, her brother Jon and their father have a somewhat loving but strained relationship, partly because they haven't come to terms with her mom's death, and her father in particular has a hair-trigger temper that never quite gets violent but still keeps his children on edge- body image - Aden feels insecure next to thinner (and seemingly prettier) girls like Tate's girlfriend- romantic power dynamics - Aden's best friend Marissa is in a relationship with her English teacher (who is married with children) and seriously considering having sex with him. I like how realistically this plays out, with Aden clear-eyed about the inappropriateness of this relationship but neither she nor Marissa find it easy to report the teacher.- sexual assault, sex with regrets, sex with consequences - again, all feeling very real- financial barriers - both Aden and Jon want to go to prestigious colleges but their father can't afford tuition. Jon's dilemma of going to his dream school for his dream program or going to a college where he may have a shot at a sports scholarship is very relatable, as is Aden's being torn between supporting her brother and wishing he chooses the scholarship to increase her chances of her father being able to send her to her dream school.- even the central romance and somewhat love triangle felt real. I love the part where Aden reflects on how it'd be easy to typecast Tate's girlfriend as bitchy cheerleader and herself as the girl next door who gets the man in the end just like in a Taylor Swift song, but the truth is that there's a bit of both types in both of them.Beautifully written and compellingly told. This is a powerful, moving story with so much packed inside. I loved it.
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  • Misty
    January 1, 1970
    3.75/5 starsI was expecting this to be a cosy romance full of clichés about the nerdy high school girl falling in love with the popular guy. But God was I wrong. It’s touching much more than that, and is deep on so many levels. It goes from body shaming, drug abuse, sexually assault and dealing with the loss of someone you love. This book is all about opening up about your feelings instead of hiding them inside and be happy with who you are as a person. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. Al 3.75/5 starsI was expecting this to be a cosy romance full of clichés about the nerdy high school girl falling in love with the popular guy. But God was I wrong. It’s touching much more than that, and is deep on so many levels. It goes from body shaming, drug abuse, sexually assault and dealing with the loss of someone you love. This book is all about opening up about your feelings instead of hiding them inside and be happy with who you are as a person. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. All in all, this was such an enjoyable read.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a YA fiction fan since before the genre actually existed. But every now and then I come across a special book that isn't just a fun read—it's like a tiny, potent time capsule, capturing just exactly the FEELING of being a teenager in all its confusing, awkward, painful, exhilarating glory. Jessie Hilb's THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE is one of those books. She's masterful at capturing those emotions: the consumingness of a crush, the angst of not knowing what you are—friends or more than frien I've been a YA fiction fan since before the genre actually existed. But every now and then I come across a special book that isn't just a fun read—it's like a tiny, potent time capsule, capturing just exactly the FEELING of being a teenager in all its confusing, awkward, painful, exhilarating glory. Jessie Hilb's THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE is one of those books. She's masterful at capturing those emotions: the consumingness of a crush, the angst of not knowing what you are—friends or more than friends?—the unequal power between teen boys and teen girls that so often exists. Jessie takes huge, heavy topics and deals with them unflinchingly, in a nuanced and realistic way that never comes off as excusing bad behavior but also doesn't feel like moralizing. A masterful debut!Trigger warning—there is a brief but disturbing date rape scene, a side character involved in a disturbing statutory rape/affair with an adult, and a fair bit of substance abuse.
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  • KayCee K
    January 1, 1970
    The Calculus of Change by Jessie Hilb was refreshing. Yes, it's a YA Contemporary and yes it does have teen drama, but it's more than that. ..Overall, this was a strong read for me that brought both smiles and saddened too. Yes, it was filled with characters making bad choices but everyone makes bad choices, small or big and they all have an effect. The title of this book could be any better.Full review, with spoilers, will be live on my blog Feb 4st. http://wonderstruck-kcks.blogspot.comI recei The Calculus of Change by Jessie Hilb was refreshing. Yes, it's a YA Contemporary and yes it does have teen drama, but it's more than that. ..Overall, this was a strong read for me that brought both smiles and saddened too. Yes, it was filled with characters making bad choices but everyone makes bad choices, small or big and they all have an effect. The title of this book could be any better.Full review, with spoilers, will be live on my blog Feb 4st. http://wonderstruck-kcks.blogspot.comI received a NetGalley ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This doesn't in any way influence my opinion on it. So, this is a 100% honest review by me.
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  • Janette Lennon
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky to be passed an early copy of this one. Looked up the reviews here first and was intrigued. I read it in short bursts and felt amazed, sometimes frustrated. I often laughed out loud. Didn't know what to make of it but have decided it's genius. Definitely plenty of real life messy issues. PG-13. I would say I couldn't put the book down, but in reality I found myself closing it with my jaw dropped wondering how the author hit so close to home. I've been there just like Aden in too many I was lucky to be passed an early copy of this one. Looked up the reviews here first and was intrigued. I read it in short bursts and felt amazed, sometimes frustrated. I often laughed out loud. Didn't know what to make of it but have decided it's genius. Definitely plenty of real life messy issues. PG-13. I would say I couldn't put the book down, but in reality I found myself closing it with my jaw dropped wondering how the author hit so close to home. I've been there just like Aden in too many ways, nothing quite fitting right at the darn department store and wondering if there was something wrong with me, falling for guys who strung me along when sparks were flying on both sides but decided I was a darn good friend, probably because I wasn't thin enough. I could go on and on.Bottom line: Aden is amazing, a powerful voice for American teen girls. I wouldn't give the book to my 7-year old daughter, at least not yet. But I would gladly give this to every 13+ y/o girl I know, including my 30-something friends.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent a physical ARC by Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review.I’m not really sure how I feel about this book to be honest. One part of me likes it, another part of me doesn’t. And my feelings have been going on like this for over a week now. I guess I was expecting much more than I received. I expected a cutesy contemporary with boy meets girl, unrequited love, plus a mix of cheesy interactions between friends and family and the end. But when I first started reading this, I was I was sent a physical ARC by Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review.I’m not really sure how I feel about this book to be honest. One part of me likes it, another part of me doesn’t. And my feelings have been going on like this for over a week now. I guess I was expecting much more than I received. I expected a cutesy contemporary with boy meets girl, unrequited love, plus a mix of cheesy interactions between friends and family and the end. But when I first started reading this, I was confused by a lot of things and I felt incredibly let down by the end of the story. I guess in a sense, I didn’t enjoy this as much as I thought I would.Since I didn’t know much about the book before going into it, I’ve read a few reviews from other readers to make sure I was aware of what other people have thought about it. I noticed that most of the readers addressed the problematic elements within the story such as how the topics of certain heavy subjects were handled. And to be quite honest, I actually agree with what the readers had to say on the matter.Throughout the story, I thought there were too many issues present to begin with. (view spoiler)[There are issues such as: sexual assault, teen pregnancy, grief, body image, unrequited love etc.. (hide spoiler)] I felt these problems were coming at me all at once, like a gust of air when opening a heavy door. I would’ve been okay with this except if all these issues were handled differently. Okay, at this point you may be wondering, what the hell is she talking about? How were they handled? Well to be honest, I thought they were dealt with in a way as if they were swept under a rug and it was no big deal. Plus those topics were never fully resolved (view spoiler)[(especially with Marissa’s pregnancy). Like who was the actual father? Where was Marissa going to end up? To me, that was never fully determined. (hide spoiler)] Like these are serious issues, I would like to think that they would get a resolution and to be dealt with in a more professional manner.For me personally, I felt the characters were underdeveloped and I didn’t get to know them as much as I’d like. I also didn’t particularly connect with the main character; I was actually annoyed with her for most of the story. At first she was okay to read about, but then after a while she got on my nerves and I wanted to throw my book across the room because she was that irritating. As for the supporting characters, it seemed as if they had their roles; for example Sabita was portrayed as a beautiful, artistic Indian girl who was absolutely perfect in the eyes of our main character. That’s it. After that, I didn’t know a lot about her. Maggie was another character who was another perfect girl in the eyes of our main character. That’s all Maggie’s known for. I could go on like this for all the side characters (yes, her brother and father to). Even Marissa, Aden’s best friend, doesn’t get a lot of development besides being your typical “damsel in distress.” My main point: I just wanted the side characters to be more developed.The possible romance between Tate and Aden was a little insta-lovey for me (on Aden’s part). At first it seems like, Tate and Aden are going to become a thing. But later it becomes obvious Tate does not reciprocate Aden’s feelings. Once this was established, I was frustrated with Aden’s (somewhat) obsessive behaviour and I just wanted her to stop being so “head over heels” for a guy who only liked her as a friend. But I will admit, I did like Aden and Tate together a whole lot, they really complimented each other.What really kept me reading was how short some of the chapters were. But to be honest, I was a little confused on the style of the chapters; like for example, one chapter would say Marissa, then another would say Jon (Aden’s brother). At first, I thought the story was told through different perspectives. I later realized each chapter is when Aden is interacting or thinking about those said characters. Once that was established in my mind, the story was easy to get through.Overall, this was not my favourite book of the year. I did like certain aspects of the book, but for the most part, I did have a ton of issues with it. To be honest, there are better contemporaries out there that represent these heavy issues mentioned better and are handled in a more mature way.Okay, I think I’ve said too much on this book. Those are pretty much all my opinions anyway. I do apologize for all the spoilers, I had lots of thoughts I needed to mention that I couldn’t actually explain without spoilers. You can also find this review on my blog: NicoleHendersonReads
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  • Crystal♛
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher via netgalley for this arc. Wow. This book. It was way more than I expected. I was thinking this would be just a cute contemporary. But it is so much more than that. It is about loving yourself. Knowing your worth. Things will be okay no matter the mistakes you make. If someone doesn’t love you the way you deserve then you don’t need them. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. Once you learn to love yourself then I think you will realize you’re worth so much more tha Thank you to the publisher via netgalley for this arc. Wow. This book. It was way more than I expected. I was thinking this would be just a cute contemporary. But it is so much more than that. It is about loving yourself. Knowing your worth. Things will be okay no matter the mistakes you make. If someone doesn’t love you the way you deserve then you don’t need them. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. Once you learn to love yourself then I think you will realize you’re worth so much more than what you were settling for.The plot hit me hard. I feel like I was reading about my past self through Aden’s eyes. Aden doesn’t love her self but loves others with her whole heart. But still doesn’t see what she deserves. Her family are still trying to learn to live without her mother. As time goes on she learns that change is okay. Sometimes for the best. I would like more explanation from the romance. I needed more detail from the guy later on in the book. But I am happy with it. I can’t say too much without spoilers.I loved the character development. Aden struggles with body image almost through the whole book. Like she can’t imagine someone loving her because she isn’t thin. Girls, please never feel like this. Or anyone for that matter. Tate thinks he has found himself but really he has no idea. Her best friend Marissa has troubles of her own. Her parents are pretty much non-existent. Jon has the pressures of a teenage boy fall on him.Actual Rating: 4.5/5
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    The Calculus of Change really resonated with me. The story chronicles the life of Aden and her relationships with others (living and departed), but most of the plot actually serves to show the relationship she has with herself. I loved the short chapters. It took me a little while to get used to the writing style (e.g. a prepositional phrase is often used to represent an entire sentence). However, once I let the story fully captivate me, the music and the math elements of the story melded togeth The Calculus of Change really resonated with me. The story chronicles the life of Aden and her relationships with others (living and departed), but most of the plot actually serves to show the relationship she has with herself. I loved the short chapters. It took me a little while to get used to the writing style (e.g. a prepositional phrase is often used to represent an entire sentence). However, once I let the story fully captivate me, the music and the math elements of the story melded together to make the prose read like a lovely, exact melody and the way it was written made absolute sense.I expected to read a love story and I was not disappointed. However, this book is not a formulaic, YA, love story--it's much more. If you are a teen or adult and enjoy reading books that incorporate humor to discuss topics like loss, family, regret, and overcoming self doubt, I recomment this short, easy read to you.Note: I won this book as an advanced copy giveaway, but I am not required to post a review, do not have an affiliation with the author, and am not compensated for any good or bad reviews (only posting this note since my review date is prior to the official release date.)
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  • diana
    January 1, 1970
    I expected this to be a light-hearted book with the usual teenage angst and swoony romance. Boy was I surprised when I got so much more than I anticipated. The Calculus of Change deals with a lot of real life, heavy issues. From drug abuse and sexual assault to teenage pregnancy and self-image, this book is thought-provoking with its raw honesty. Aden was an interesting character. I admit I didn't get her at first and found her quite annoying but throughout the book as I got to know her and unde I expected this to be a light-hearted book with the usual teenage angst and swoony romance. Boy was I surprised when I got so much more than I anticipated. The Calculus of Change deals with a lot of real life, heavy issues. From drug abuse and sexual assault to teenage pregnancy and self-image, this book is thought-provoking with its raw honesty. Aden was an interesting character. I admit I didn't get her at first and found her quite annoying but throughout the book as I got to know her and understand her better she grew on me.The Calculus of Change is a poignant novel that deals with timely, important issues. My one complaint is that I didn't feel like the author gave some of the issues the gravity they deserved. Some were handled well but others were brushed off like they didn't mean anything and had no impact in the characters' lives at all. It really bothered me.
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  • Christina (Ensconced in Lit)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really torn with this book. There are things I really like about it. I like the fact that it wasn't simple, it was about an ordinary but smart girl figuring out how to like and respect herself, and that the love interest wasn't automatically requited. That said, the internal monologue of her looking down on herself went on for most of the book and I wanted to see that change earlier. The other side characters were frustrating and everyone seemed to go through a story trajectory at the same t I'm really torn with this book. There are things I really like about it. I like the fact that it wasn't simple, it was about an ordinary but smart girl figuring out how to like and respect herself, and that the love interest wasn't automatically requited. That said, the internal monologue of her looking down on herself went on for most of the book and I wanted to see that change earlier. The other side characters were frustrating and everyone seemed to go through a story trajectory at the same time. Almost too much was attempted and it seemed to wrap up too neatly at the end. Overall, I wasn't in love with it, but I liked aspects of it.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Very good family/friendship relationship drama for fans of Sarah Dessen, Deb Caletti, etc. about falling in love with the wrong person and reconnecting broken families.
  • Heather Ezell
    January 1, 1970
    The Calculus of Change struck me with its sharp honesty, gorgeous prose, and how true it portrays the pains of growing up. It doesn't sugar coat and it doesn't hold back. Aden feels so familiar and I found both myself and my friends within her story.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Confession time: I'm a huge math nerd. When I was in high school and college, I would use math problems as a way to relax. There's just something so magical about the way numbers come together. Therefore, when I discovered Jessie Hilb's THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE, a 2018 debut that involved a character that loved math (i.e. a girl after my own heart!) I knew I had to have it! Going into THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE I was expecting a sweet, cutesy romance; however, that's not exactly what I received. Inste Confession time: I'm a huge math nerd. When I was in high school and college, I would use math problems as a way to relax. There's just something so magical about the way numbers come together. Therefore, when I discovered Jessie Hilb's THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE, a 2018 debut that involved a character that loved math (i.e. a girl after my own heart!) I knew I had to have it! Going into THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE I was expecting a sweet, cutesy romance; however, that's not exactly what I received. Instead, THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE was much more gritty, focusing on grief, change, complex relationships, student/teacher relationships, self image, and even teen pregnancy. In some ways, this worked well, and in other ways it didn't work at all. At its heart, THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE is a coming-of-age. It primarily focus on Aden's growth over the course of her senior year as well as the numerous obstacles she faces and relationships she cultivates along the way. When THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE starts, one this is clear: Aden hasn't been the same since her mother passed away. She feels incredibly responsible for her family's wellbeing, and she craves the guidance and love that only a mother figure can offer. Aden's situation is heartbreaking. If there's one girl who needs a huge hug, it's definitely Aden. Over the course of the book, Aden struggles with balancing her responsibilities as well as making time for herself. She knows she doesn't have to be the one to take care of her family as well as her friends, but she does so regardless. She's the constant shoulder to cry on as well as the girl to help clean up after a mess. Over the course of the book, Aden begins to let go - she lets her brother and father clean up their own messes and lets her best friend make her own decisions. It's hard for her, but at the same time, its vital. I loved the growth that came with this. Aden slowly becomes stronger as well as more decisive, standing up for herself along the way. I will say that I enjoyed the focus on relationships here. Jessie includes a variety of important ones: daughter and father, sister and brother, best friends, etc. It was interesting to see how each played a part in Aden's overall life, and I especially liked the introspection that came with each. I thought the unrequited love one was especially well done. It was incredibly bittersweet, and while I didn't like the love interest for the majority of the book, I think the relationship was important for the overall feel. Now for the bad. As mentioned above, Jessie Hilb sets out to accomplish a lot in THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE, and while I appreciated her determination, the plot and character development suffered as a result. There was A LOT going on here: grief, change, complex relationships, student/teacher relationships, self image, and even teen pregnancy. My head was reeling at times, especially when it came to keeping each storyline straight. The storyline involving Aden's best friend lacked the most development, in my opinion. Honestly, I felt that it was introduced as a shock factor, and I hated that so little time was spent on the fall-out as well as the consequences. Also, I didn't like how some things were swept under the rug. Yes, they sometimes had a conclusion, but it was almost too easy of a conclusion in some respects. Overall, THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE wasn't what I had expected. In some ways, THE CALCULUS OF CHANGE worked well and other ways it feel short, which was disappointing given the potential it contained. So do I recommend it? Sort of. I think other YA books cover these topics better; however, I still think fans of gritty, emotionally charged YA may like this.*ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review* Book Blog | Twitter | Bloglovin | Goodreads
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  • Maja Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Clarion Books and Jessie Hilb for an ARC of this book.This is a hard book for me to rate. On one hand, I like that the author approached some big topics in a YA book. On the other hand, I don't think they were all presented with the amount of gravity that, in my opinion, they should have. Without getting into spoilers, here are some of my thoughts.PROs:-The writing is easy to read, clear, and keeps the story moving.-I believed the narration was coming from a 17 year-old-Aden is an inte Thanks to Clarion Books and Jessie Hilb for an ARC of this book.This is a hard book for me to rate. On one hand, I like that the author approached some big topics in a YA book. On the other hand, I don't think they were all presented with the amount of gravity that, in my opinion, they should have. Without getting into spoilers, here are some of my thoughts.PROs:-The writing is easy to read, clear, and keeps the story moving.-I believed the narration was coming from a 17 year-old-Aden is an interesting character and I like her relationship and interest in religion-The descriptions of romance and connection are so spot on an electrifying!CONs:-Some serious topics, such as very inappropriate relationships, are treated as no big deal. It left a bad taste in my mouth.-Some trigger warnings for sexual abuseOverall, I would rate 3.5 stars. I think it's worth a read.
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  • Nicole Strand
    January 1, 1970
    This is a novel about grief, unrequited love, and becoming comfortable in your own skin.Aden isn't looking for love in her senior year. She's more focused on getting gigs and keeping her brother from getting high. But when Tate wearing a yarmulke walks into class, she is smitten instantly.The two develop a strong friendship. Complete with long drives and road soundtracks. Being around Tate and his faith makes her feel closer to her mother who passed away several years ago. Everyone else sees the This is a novel about grief, unrequited love, and becoming comfortable in your own skin.Aden isn't looking for love in her senior year. She's more focused on getting gigs and keeping her brother from getting high. But when Tate wearing a yarmulke walks into class, she is smitten instantly.The two develop a strong friendship. Complete with long drives and road soundtracks. Being around Tate and his faith makes her feel closer to her mother who passed away several years ago. Everyone else sees their connection, but does Tate?This book covers some pretty heavy issues, so proceed with caution because stuff gets real. Aden has alot going on and has many issues she tries to help her family and friends through. Some circumstances are completely ridiculous and really dark. Proceed with caution guys.
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  • Amber (Books of Amber)
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t really have too much to say about this book because it failed to draw me in, which meant I ended up skimming most of it. My biggest issue with the book was that there was no draw for me. I just didn’t connect with the writing style, and I had no interest in the characters or the plot because of that.I also didn’t like the way the student/teacher relationship was dealt with in this book. The teacher wasn’t punished or fired or anything for what he did, in fact it was completely brushed ov I don’t really have too much to say about this book because it failed to draw me in, which meant I ended up skimming most of it. My biggest issue with the book was that there was no draw for me. I just didn’t connect with the writing style, and I had no interest in the characters or the plot because of that.I also didn’t like the way the student/teacher relationship was dealt with in this book. The teacher wasn’t punished or fired or anything for what he did, in fact it was completely brushed over. I didn’t like that there were no repercussions for his actions.Obviously, I don’t recommend picking this one up.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    There is a LOT of bad decision making in this book. More so then there really needs to be. Even with all the bad decision making I could have liked this book if our heroine who is rightly concerned about the bad decisions EVERYONE around her is making didn't think that getting drunk at parties and subsequently making bad decisions there was a good idea. She went with the plan to get drunk and make bad decisions. No one should plan drunken bad decisions, let alone teens.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKxiF...Aden didn't want to fall in love with Tate but she did. She feel for him the moment he walked into their class wearing a yarmulke. The only problem is that Tate didn't fall in love with Aden. The two become fast friends, best friends, but Aden's feelings never waiver. Can she show Tate that the two of them should be together?"The Calculus of Change" is one of those books that are better written then its story. Hilb wrote t For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKxiF...Aden didn't want to fall in love with Tate but she did. She feel for him the moment he walked into their class wearing a yarmulke. The only problem is that Tate didn't fall in love with Aden. The two become fast friends, best friends, but Aden's feelings never waiver. Can she show Tate that the two of them should be together?"The Calculus of Change" is one of those books that are better written then its story. Hilb wrote the book in a lyrical freestyle that felt almost poetic but the characters were not particularly well developed and several plot points felt unnecessary. However, the final message of trying accept oneself is strong and did slightly redeem the book. I received an eARC of this book through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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