The Beloved Wild
Harriet Winter is the eldest daughter in a farming family in New Hampshire, 1807. Her neighbor is Daniel Long, who runs his family's farm on his own after the death of his parents. Harriet's mother sees Daniel as a good match, but Harriet isn't so sure she wants someone else to choose her path—in love and in life.When her brother decides to strike out for the Genesee Valley in Western New York, Harriet decides to go with him—disguised as a boy. Their journey includes sickness, uninvited guests, and difficult emotional terrain as Harriet comes of age, realizes what she wants, and accepts who she's loved all along.

The Beloved Wild Details

TitleThe Beloved Wild
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 27th, 2018
PublisherFeiwel & Friends
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult

The Beloved Wild Review

  • emma
    January 1, 1970
    you can win a copy of this book for FREE on my blog right now??? and if you don't like books, what are you doing on this website, and if you don't like free stuff, you are not a person.
  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight First, I have no idea why I thought that this was a fantasy, but spoiler alert, it isn't. Oops? This is what happens when I don't read blurbs, but that is okay! I actually liked it better this way, so it's a win. Anyway. I found this to be an enjoyable and quick book! Most of my thoughts are positive, and as always, we'll start with those. The Good: There's an enormous focus on family You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight First, I have no idea why I thought that this was a fantasy, but spoiler alert, it isn't. Oops? This is what happens when I don't read blurbs, but that is okay! I actually liked it better this way, so it's a win. Anyway. I found this to be an enjoyable and quick book! Most of my thoughts are positive, and as always, we'll start with those. The Good: There's an enormous focus on family in this book. I love that the family relationships are complicated. Some of the relationships are super close and loving, and some frankly aren't, which seems incredibly realistic. I really enjoyed Harriet as a main character. She has tons of strengths, but also tons of flaws. I especially loved that she was willing to accept her flaws, acknowledged when she was wrong, and tried to do better. She was also not okay with the time period's nonsense way of treating women, which... I feel you, girl. It's still nonsense, but in Harriet's day... well, obviously it was an even hotter mess. And she wasn't here for it. There was adventure and pioneer trips! I love a trek through the wilderness, especially in pre-automotive eras. It's all so... daunting and perilous! And in Harriet's case, clearly this is all new to her. Even though I did have a minor qualm with the relationship (see below) it really was super cute. I liked that the love interest liked Harriet for who she was, and not some ideal of who he wanted her to be. "'Oh, no. That's just it. He loves you because of your nature.' She sighed. 'Rare thing, that.'" Speaking of relationships, there were some fabulous friendships that formed along the way. I became really invested in all the characters, even the more minor ones. And they added a lot of humor and fun to the story. Loved the historical and rural setting! If you've ever been in the Batavia, New York area... well, I was having fun imagining it as more rural back in the day. The Not As Good: The plot did feel a bit predictable at times. Which wasn't terrible even, in this case, since I was mostly here for the history and relationships anyway! I don't really understand what made Harriet start liking Daniel after wanting to be rid of him. I didn't really buy it, she was just apathetic until she wasn't, but... Idk, didn't feel super authentic. However, I did like it a lot after I got over that bit! Bottom Line: I definitely enjoyed this historical fiction novel with an incredibly heartwarming cast of characters, and a lot of love shared among them!*Quote taken from uncorrected proof, subject to change**Copy provided for review
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely historical look at farming and making your way in uncharted territory.PLUS, I do love some good "girl dresses up as a boy" action!
  • mith
    January 1, 1970
    I WANT THIS
  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Grade: B-An ARC was provided by Macmillan in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Listen, I am always here for YA historical fiction. There needs to be more of it, in my opinion. So The Beloved Wild was definitely right up my alley.In a lot of ways, it didn't fit into what I normally expect from YA historical fic. In other ways it did, especially when Harriet disguised herself as a boy. Harriet didn't feel that unique to me. She was just...there. I was more interested i Grade: B-An ARC was provided by Macmillan in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Listen, I am always here for YA historical fiction. There needs to be more of it, in my opinion. So The Beloved Wild was definitely right up my alley.In a lot of ways, it didn't fit into what I normally expect from YA historical fic. In other ways it did, especially when Harriet disguised herself as a boy. Harriet didn't feel that unique to me. She was just...there. I was more interested in Gideon and Rachel as characters. In fact, I really wanted more from Harriet and Rachel's developing friendship. I appreciated how Harriet protected Rachel at the end, but it didn't feel like quite enough. Also, I didn't feel the chemistry between Harriet and Daniel Long. I know I was supposed to, but I felt more like I was being told they had chemistry and I should think they were a good match. I did feel the chemistry between Rachel and Phineas, and I was pleasantly surprised by the direction Gideon's story took.I did enjoy all the parts about life in rural New York. It was nice to see a pioneering historical fiction book set some place besides the West or the Plains states. It did take a little while for Gideon and Harriet to actually set off for Genesee Valley, which wasn't necessarily a problem...I just wish the book's synopsis hadn't made it sound like that was the main part of the book.Finally, this is a bit nitpicky, but ages were vague, and if they were stated, they didn't quite fit the characters. Most of them seemed much older than their stated ages.I don't remember any foul language or extreme violence. There's some sexual innuendos, and a character is abused off-page.The Verdict: Pretty good. Worth the read, especially if you like historical fiction.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    The Beloved Wild by Melissa Ostrom is the story of Harriet Winter and how she doesn't want to become a wife that is used and abused and not cherished. She doesn't want to be sold off as livestock to the highest bidding husband. So she decides to strike out with her older brother while he starts his own farm. Harriet thinks this will be a wonderful adventure. Sadly, she finds out that life outside of her tiny little town might not be what she was hoping for.Harriet is one of those girls who doesn The Beloved Wild by Melissa Ostrom is the story of Harriet Winter and how she doesn't want to become a wife that is used and abused and not cherished. She doesn't want to be sold off as livestock to the highest bidding husband. So she decides to strike out with her older brother while he starts his own farm. Harriet thinks this will be a wonderful adventure. Sadly, she finds out that life outside of her tiny little town might not be what she was hoping for.Harriet is one of those girls who doesn't believe that the firstborn son should be entitled to inheriting everything. It sucks even more for her when her older brother is a gambling idiot and not mature enough to run a farm. Harriet doesn't want to be married off to live a life of servitude. She doesn't want to pop kids out and possibly die in childbirth. She wants to be more. This leads her to strike out with her older brother as he tries to start his own farm in Genesee Valley, NY.This book was a tad bit slow and boring for me. It was really just about a girl who wanted more in life than her gender allotted her for the time period. Her humor and the overall feel of the book made me think of Little Women if it had taken place on a farm. I really don't have much else to say about the book. It was pretty straightforward without many added twists and turns. The plot was pretty basic and I just think the book wasn't exactly my cup of tea but I know plenty of people who would enjoy the book.In the end, Harriet learned that sometimes, what you already have is the best thing for you. It's not wrong to want to explore your options but not everything is greener on the other side. Also, the way the synopsis read, it seemed like Harriet would realize she loves someone ELSE. I didn't think it would be the same person. Overall, I gave the book 3.5/5 stars.
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  • LOURDES (ChaptersWeLove)
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction is always a difficult sell to students, and this slice of life in New Hampshire/Western New York State is slow, deliberate and predictable, which may mean it's even less likely to get picked up. Having said that, the atmosphere and setting are wonderfully done - if readers can stick with it, they'll be rewarded. The comparisons to Pride and Prejudice aren't deserved, btw, but the idea that a first impression or opinion can be incorrect is woven throughout.ARC provided by publi Historical fiction is always a difficult sell to students, and this slice of life in New Hampshire/Western New York State is slow, deliberate and predictable, which may mean it's even less likely to get picked up. Having said that, the atmosphere and setting are wonderfully done - if readers can stick with it, they'll be rewarded. The comparisons to Pride and Prejudice aren't deserved, btw, but the idea that a first impression or opinion can be incorrect is woven throughout.ARC provided by publisher.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    *Formal Review To Come * I snapped this up for its comparison to Cold Mountain. I really liked Harriett, and the central ship of the book. Harriet's exploration of gender identity was interesting.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    A great read that focuses on Harriet, a girl who is determined to forge her own path, no matter the cost in a time when that was unacceptable for girls. Can't wait to see where this series goes..Thanks to Macmillan for the ARC!
  • Michelle (Undeniably Book Nerdy)
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Undeniably Book Nerdy:Reading The Beloved Wild brought all kinds of nostalgic feelings for when I used to be obsessed with the Dear America series, many of which featured stories of pioneer life through the eyes of girls like Harriet, and The Little House on the Prairie books when I was in middle school. In any case, The Beloved Wild was a gem of a book--it's rare to find new books like it being published in YA these days and I'm so happy I came across it.The Beloved Wild is Originally posted on Undeniably Book Nerdy:Reading The Beloved Wild brought all kinds of nostalgic feelings for when I used to be obsessed with the Dear America series, many of which featured stories of pioneer life through the eyes of girls like Harriet, and The Little House on the Prairie books when I was in middle school. In any case, The Beloved Wild was a gem of a book--it's rare to find new books like it being published in YA these days and I'm so happy I came across it.The Beloved Wild is a coming of age story of Harriet Winter, who was living with her farming family in Middleton, New Hampshire in 1807. Although she loved her family and her home, Harriet felt unfulfilled, wondering if helping out her mother in the kitchen and her family with farming was all there was in her life. It doesn't help that she's been paired up with her neighbor, Daniel Long, who runs his own farm after the death of his parents, for as long as anyone remembers and everyone in town expecting them to eventually marry. When her brother, Gideon, decided to journey to Western New York and purchase land in the untamed Genesee Valley, Harriet decided to go with him dressed as a boy. For the first time, Harriet, now called Freddy, experiences freedom to become her own and also discover what's really important in life and love.I love the mix of history, journey and adventure, family, romance, friendship, and growing up. It was divided into three parts, and it did start slow with Part One being a lot about Harriet's family farm and the work that they do. I personally found their farm life interesting, but it was admittedly slow reading. Once you get to Part Two, which was Harriet and Gideon's journey to Genesee Valley, and then to Part Three, which was when they got to their destination, the pacing did pick up and varied secondary storylines were added. Also, the addition of other characters who Harriet and Gideon met along the way livened up the story. Phineas was my favorite and I actually would've liked more about him and his pairing with Harriet's friend, Rachel. However, the author did a really good job transporting the reader to the wilderness of Western New York in 1807. It was interesting getting a glimpse of pioneer life in that part of the country, both the exciting promises of it as well as the dangers and how it could all go wrong for some. And since everything was based on real places, I had a ball Google mapping Harriet's journey and looking at pictures of all the places mentioned.Just like with the Dear America books back in middle school, I devoured The Beloved Wild. I know it won't be for everyone, but it was my kind of historical YA read. If you like slower paced historical novels with a spunky heroine, pioneer life, journeying through the wilderness, a dash of romance, and growing up, The Beloved Wild is for you.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Quite the Novel Idea https://quitethenovelidea.com https://quitethenovelidea.com/blog-to... I love historical romances and Ostrom's The Beloved Wild has a Jane Austen vibe that I adore. Harriet is a strong character, she sees the unfairness of the way men treat women and she's vocal about it.  Too bad that back then (1800s?)  society was not ready for it.  I did love that through her adventure with her brother, she was able to find herself and find friendship and love to boot. The writing was Quite the Novel Idea https://quitethenovelidea.com https://quitethenovelidea.com/blog-to... I love historical romances and Ostrom's The Beloved Wild has a Jane Austen vibe that I adore. Harriet is a strong character, she sees the unfairness of the way men treat women and she's vocal about it.  Too bad that back then (1800s?)  society was not ready for it.  I did love that through her adventure with her brother, she was able to find herself and find friendship and love to boot. The writing was sublime.  So good, historically accurate, and insightful. The plot is slow to start, going about the life a typical farmers in New Hampshire, but then turns into an adventure. Characterization!  Phineas is a hoot, Rachel is a good friend, Marian is a strong female character too. LOVE! Daniel is a sweetheart and good to the chore!  I'm so glad for his perseverance :) Not enough romance!  There wasn't a lot of Harriet - Daniel time. Harriet was sometimes irrational and was a bit prejudiced, snobbish and jealous. The ending was not very definite, which makes me think there must be another book and this is a series. I really enjoyed The Beloved Wild.  I love that Harriet was a strong character and that took matters into her own hands.  I can't wait to read more!This review was originally posted on Quite the Novel Idea
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Harry is a girl fed up with her prospects in life. Mr. Long—a fellow farmer not much older than her—has set his eyes on her, and he is D U L dull. While Harry loves her farm (and the seasons) and her family (from a distance), she's disgruntled that she can't inherit land and is expected to marry. After Mr. Long decides to court every other girl in town, Harry, in an attempt to ignore her growing not-feelings for the frustrating boy, decides that what she needs is a fresh start. She takes her fir Harry is a girl fed up with her prospects in life. Mr. Long—a fellow farmer not much older than her—has set his eyes on her, and he is D U L dull. While Harry loves her farm (and the seasons) and her family (from a distance), she's disgruntled that she can't inherit land and is expected to marry. After Mr. Long decides to court every other girl in town, Harry, in an attempt to ignore her growing not-feelings for the frustrating boy, decides that what she needs is a fresh start. She takes her first opportunity to flee with her brother Gid, and they set off to the Genesee Valley in a homesteading ploy...which turns out to be quite different than Harry had expected.I don't normally read historical fiction, particularly not fiction taking place sometime during Madison's presidency, but I ended up enjoying it quite a bit. So much of historical fiction is written through the male gaze, and while there is a lot of histfic written by women with women in mind (Laura Ingalls Wilder springs to mind in a LOT of this book), this one nails it by showing the women. While the men get to head out and have a night with their buddies after a long and physically taxing day, their women are stuck slaving away in the house: watching babies, canning, cooking, sewing, darning, etc., etc., etc., it never ends. Plus, a woman without a man or family was dependent upon the goodwill of others—and she was expected to repay this generosity with good cheer and hard work. So terrifying.I also really liked Harry. She has a very steep learning curve, has a hot temper, gets jealous and makes some very bad mistakes, but she learns from them and eventually apologizes for her actions. The romance is slow-burn, but completely believable (and reminiscent of a Jane Austen novel).When all is said and done, this was a fascinating look into farm and homesteading life in New York in the early 19th century.I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Kester Nucum
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: Thanks so much to Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group and my publicity contact there for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.Before I begin this review, I have two things to point out. The first one is that Ruta Sepetys (yes, THE Ruta Sepetys, my favorite author in the entire world) blurbed this book, which is awesome and well-deserved. The second one is that Melissa is one of the kindest and most supportive a Disclaimer: Thanks so much to Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group and my publicity contact there for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.Before I begin this review, I have two things to point out. The first one is that Ruta Sepetys (yes, THE Ruta Sepetys, my favorite author in the entire world) blurbed this book, which is awesome and well-deserved. The second one is that Melissa is one of the kindest and most supportive authors I have ever met online, and she has said and done so many things for me that has warmed my heart greatly. But it was actually through Twitter where I began to rave about The Beloved Wild when we first began to communicate.Now onto why I love The Beloved Wild so much!The Beloved Wild is a stark yet gripping account of the prejudices women had to endure in the 19th century, a time before the Industrial Revolution prompted new reforms and changes. It is YA historical fiction and literature at its finest. A great novel is one that enlightens you and influences your viewpoint, and I am proud to consider Ostrom’s debut novel as one. The Beloved Wild teaches readers how to embrace who they are and find their inner strength when encountering the toughest of obstacles. It has the perfect combination of adventure, romance, family, and friendships that will appeal to many readers and give each of them a memorable experience.I knew I was in for a great story from the first page, and this book exceeded my initial expectations. I just could not put this book down at this time. It was as if I became a part of the action and was in the Genessee Valley with Harriet and Gideon and everybody else. I became so enraptured in the plot that I became very emotionally invested in the novel. The Beloved Wild placed me on an actual roller coaster ride filled with different emotions. One chapter I would become enraged by the bigotry and the next I would laughing out loud at Harriet concealing her identity as “Freddy.” I could feel my heart being wrenched by the romance, and watching Harriet’s and Daniel’s slow burn made me want to go “Awww….” so many times. They are now one of my favorite ships. There was never a dull moment, very unlike Daniel’s initials (read the book and you’ll get the joke).I fell in love with the whole setting of the novel. It was as if I was transported back in time to the era of Manifest Destiny, where the unknown allured the young and the old, the rich and the poor to leave their familiar surroundings for a life full of adventure and potential success. I could feel myself riding along with Harriet, Gideon, and Phineas through the rough woods of the Genesee Valley, which I picture to wild yet beautiful in my mind. Because of the prose and unique narration, I became swept away by the vivid imagery and the fascinating world-building, and the novel tempts you to stay in the wilderness and settle in. It’s a great break from the technology-filled, stressful society of today (a reason why I love historical fiction).Harriet is a very strong and caring protagonist, one that readers will fall in love with the moment they meet her. She disguises herself as a boy named “Freddy” to be able to travel with Gideon through the heartlands of upstate New York, only to find so much prejudice against women. Through Harriet’s unique and witty narration will you become more sympathetic to characters such as her and Rachel, who deals with many problems in their personal and their family lives. From a guy’s point of view, Harriet sees how much hatred and condescendence men at the time had towards even their own wives and daughters, yet she faces this sexism head on, regardless of whether she’s pretending to be a man or actually being a woman at the time. Harriet’s perseverance and fighting spirit inspires readers to never give up regardless of the trials ahead and to always be there for one another.The Beloved Wild is a novel of not only overcoming prejudices and obstacles but also finding both adventure and oneself. As Harriet grows up and accepts the love of her life, readers will also discover the inner strength that they always have had. I am very glad I had the opportunity to read The Beloved Wild, and I am so excited to see what the author has in store for the future. This novel is a perfect example of the power and greatness of historical fiction, and it’s one that will stick with readers for a long time.
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    Harriet, or better known as Harry, is a strong, independent woman who wants more than just to be the person who's supposed to have children. Because of this, she pushes Daniel Long-a family friend-away because she doesn't want to "settle". Everyone expects them to marry, which only makes Harry fight it more.When Harry finds out her brother Gideon is traveling to claim some wild land to make it his own, she decides to go with him. Feeling adventurous and excited for a change, she also begins dres Harriet, or better known as Harry, is a strong, independent woman who wants more than just to be the person who's supposed to have children. Because of this, she pushes Daniel Long-a family friend-away because she doesn't want to "settle". Everyone expects them to marry, which only makes Harry fight it more.When Harry finds out her brother Gideon is traveling to claim some wild land to make it his own, she decides to go with him. Feeling adventurous and excited for a change, she also begins dressing like a boy. She says it's so Gid won't have to worry about her, but the reader can tell there's much more to it. On this journey, she discovers what's truly important in life, especially who.Reading this book made me feel like I was in Jane Austen's time. The women are suppressed and only supposed to cook, clean, manage the house, and raise children, but Harry wants so much more. When Daniel is first introduced, I wasn't sure if I was going to like him. But as Harriet did, the love was there, not sure how or when it got there, but it was hard to deny.Final Verdict: I would recommend this to fans of Jane Austen, historical romance, and coming-to-age. I look forward to seeing more from this author.
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  • kglibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    This charming early-19th-century tale brings to mind Laura Ingalls Wilder, only with a modern, feminist twist. The female protagonist, though living during a time when women have few rights, fights for equality and recognition as she travels with her brother from New Hampshire to western New York to help him set up a home in undeveloped territory. There is humor, romance, beautiful landscapes, and a bit of drama scattered throughout this enjoyable story.
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  • Amanda (MetalPhantasmReads)
    January 1, 1970
    *I was sent this from the author via the publisher in exchange for review. This doesn't influence my opinion.*Mini ARC review is now on my blog! This was good with a good message and clean content but not very memorable like some other historical fiction I've read. I think Jane Austen fans will enjoy this.https://metalphantasmreads.wordpress....
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  • Brenda Schneider
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable story. A little romance, alittle drama, and some humor. Good characters. I won this book through goodreads.
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    If you're looking for a book that brings you back to your LITTLE HOUSE days but with more cross-dressing and less saccharine, check out this book. Read my full review over at Forever Young Adult.
  • Forever Young Adult
    January 1, 1970
    Graded By: StephanieCover Story: O-Face, LiterallyBFF Charm: YaySwoonworthy Scale: 5Talky Talk: Little House NostalgiaBonus Factors: Cross-Dressing, Supporting CastAnti-Bonus Factor: No JusticeRelationship Status: Friendly NeighborsRead the full book report here.
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