The Secret of Shambhala (Celestine Prophecy, #3)
Continuing the exciting adventures of The Celestine Prophecy and The Tenth Insight, this new book takes you to the snow-covered Himalayas, in search of the legendary Tibetan utopia of Shambhala. As you follow a child's instructions, are pursued by hostile Chinese agents, and look for a lost friend, you will experience a new awareness of synchronicity...and discover, hidden among the world's highest mountains, the secrets that affect all humanity. For Shambhala not only actually exists, but is destined to be found in our time-and will reveal powerful truths that can transform the world.

The Secret of Shambhala (Celestine Prophecy, #3) Details

TitleThe Secret of Shambhala (Celestine Prophecy, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2001
PublisherGrand Central Publishing
ISBN-139780446676489
Rating
GenreFiction, Spirituality, Philosophy, Self Help

The Secret of Shambhala (Celestine Prophecy, #3) Review

  • Jess Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book when I first moved to Sacramento from San Francisco and was going through some major changes in my life. The authors intentions are clear throughout the Celestine Prophecy series: the world is in your hands, you can make of it what you please, the world is a wonderful place, and life is to short for negative thoughts.
    more
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start by saying that I loved The Celestine Prophesy. It's one of my favorite books of all time. I love how it talks about human relationships and interactions. Even though it's all presented in a very spiritual way, I also found it very relatable on a personal level.I didn't understand the second book at all, since it felt so esoteric and there was nothing in it that I could relate to. I'd put this third book somewhere in the middle. In it our hero goes to Tibet, on a quest for the myt Let me start by saying that I loved The Celestine Prophesy. It's one of my favorite books of all time. I love how it talks about human relationships and interactions. Even though it's all presented in a very spiritual way, I also found it very relatable on a personal level.I didn't understand the second book at all, since it felt so esoteric and there was nothing in it that I could relate to. I'd put this third book somewhere in the middle. In it our hero goes to Tibet, on a quest for the mythical city of Shambhala (Shangri-la) and all the awareness that goes with it. (I love how we never learn the narrator's name. He'd meet someone new, and the author would write something like "I told him my name, and he told me his name was XYZ.")The insight in this book has to do with prayer fields, which is a field of expectations that we send out into the world. The author claims that our expectations can actually make things happen. I liked his example of how this worked: A teacher who expects the best of a student seems to get it, and a teacher who expects the student to fail seems to get that too.On the flip side, the author seemed a bit paranoid (or should I just say concerned?) about governments taking over the world, monitoring our phones and internet usage, installing microchips in us, etc, which was a bit distracting.I enjoyed this book and the adventure in Tibet. I liked the idea of trying to send out positive energy into the world, such as the author's example of people who seem to light up a room just by entering into it. I just wish there were more in the book that I could relate to myself. Hmm...Maybe it's just because I personally haven't quite reached the eleventh insight. One day, perhaps...
    more
  • Jakob Masic
    January 1, 1970
    This gets a big 5 stars, not entirely for the the story itself but for the message of how to use ones power to help create a change in this world. I have practiced the works described in this book for the better part of 20 years now, what I call my Spitural Work. It is rewarding to think that everyone who has held this book in their hands now possesses the knowledge of how to create their thoughts to be the single most important thing in the universe at that moment in time.Everything means This gets a big 5 stars, not entirely for the the story itself but for the message of how to use ones power to help create a change in this world. I have practiced the works described in this book for the better part of 20 years now, what I call my Spitural Work. It is rewarding to think that everyone who has held this book in their hands now possesses the knowledge of how to create their thoughts to be the single most important thing in the universe at that moment in time.Everything means something. What that something is made out to be is the responsibility we all live with, but only the few live for. I hope that we all start to live for LOVE and truly understand that is the only thought ever worth expanding on.
    more
  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Redfield's books are to spiritual seekers what the romance novel is to single women. They're so fun to read, even if they're a little over the top. This one is infinitely better than the 10th Insight. I love the idea of the prayer field, although I don't care for the terminology, and how we must deal with our negative emotions or else we'll be running into our projections of them all over the "real world." The idea of paradise presented in this novel is exciting, creative, and inspiring. That al Redfield's books are to spiritual seekers what the romance novel is to single women. They're so fun to read, even if they're a little over the top. This one is infinitely better than the 10th Insight. I love the idea of the prayer field, although I don't care for the terminology, and how we must deal with our negative emotions or else we'll be running into our projections of them all over the "real world." The idea of paradise presented in this novel is exciting, creative, and inspiring. That alone makes it worth digging into.
    more
  • Susie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a fairly easy read and pretty enjoyable. I did appreciate the insight into the situation with Tibet/China as well. While I don't buy into the whole "one day we'll all be vibrating at the highest level" thing I do think he makes some good points and I like the idea of setting positive intentions, being on the lookout for "coincidences" and sending out positive energy. It has been a while since I read "The Celestine Prophecy" and "The Tenth Insight" but I seem to remember that I real This book was a fairly easy read and pretty enjoyable. I did appreciate the insight into the situation with Tibet/China as well. While I don't buy into the whole "one day we'll all be vibrating at the highest level" thing I do think he makes some good points and I like the idea of setting positive intentions, being on the lookout for "coincidences" and sending out positive energy. It has been a while since I read "The Celestine Prophecy" and "The Tenth Insight" but I seem to remember that I really liked The Celestine Prophecy and was pretty disappointed with The Tenth Insight. From my limited memory I'll say that I didn't like this installment as much as the first book but it was much better than the second.
    more
  • Todd R
    January 1, 1970
    This is not meant to be great fiction, Redfield merely tries to divulge his ideas via fiction in order to make them more palatable. He does a decent job of describing his ideas of Intention..which he calls prayer fields. The last few chapters drag and most of the story is pretty boring. Redfield doesn't challenge his characters in any of his fiction, they just meander along from incident to incident, and because of this they never feel real. I always take away a few good thoughts from Redfields This is not meant to be great fiction, Redfield merely tries to divulge his ideas via fiction in order to make them more palatable. He does a decent job of describing his ideas of Intention..which he calls prayer fields. The last few chapters drag and most of the story is pretty boring. Redfield doesn't challenge his characters in any of his fiction, they just meander along from incident to incident, and because of this they never feel real. I always take away a few good thoughts from Redfields books, they are worth a read just for the few tidibits I get from them.
    more
  • Devika Koppikar
    January 1, 1970
    Of the three Celestine Prophesy series, I liked this best.... because it told of an ideal spiritual society. To me, it was a glimpse of spiritual potential, even if this is a fiction book. Since reading this book, I've had a fascination with Tibet, prayer flags, the Himalayas. Too bad Redfield won't have a sequel to until early 2011 next year...it is about time!
    more
  • Flower
    January 1, 1970
    This is the best one of the series of 3. Very spiritual in a differnt sort of way. I don't know if you would call it new age or no, but maybe. Really interesting ideas even though of the 3 this on is the most far out for sure.
  • Acacia
    January 1, 1970
    This book gives a lot of insight into how we as individuals are responsible for our own energy and how it affects others. A look at the world's situation now and how it could change into something much greater whe we each learn compassion and look for the highest good in each other.
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    What a wild ride! In order to really understand the (intended) progress of this book you have to start with The Celestine Prophecy, and then the following book, The Tenth Insight – overall, it’s a six-book series, folks. The four books tell the story, the fifth book is The Celestine Vision, and the sixth is a workbook. This time, our hero finds his way through his friend Wil and synchronicity, to Kathmandu, to go to Tibet – his friend Wil, who was in the previous book, is already there. Our her What a wild ride! In order to really understand the (intended) progress of this book you have to start with The Celestine Prophecy, and then the following book, The Tenth Insight – overall, it’s a six-book series, folks. The four books tell the story, the fifth book is The Celestine Vision, and the sixth is a workbook. This time, our hero finds his way through his friend Wil and synchronicity, to Kathmandu, to go to Tibet – his friend Wil, who was in the previous book, is already there. Our hero, of course, knows via Wil, that he is to be there, but the mechanics of how and crucially why, are unclear. Moreover, it is understandably jarring to be someplace where you don’t know anyone, where you are actually going, and why you are there – but only that you are to meet your friend there and well, proceed with another chapter of a familiar ongoing adventure, but in an unknown, and potentially dangerous setting. Add to the mix, that Wil cannot meet our hero when he arrives in Tibet, and another person, Yin, is the last-minute, stand-in and guide for the next phase of the adventure. As the two proceed to go to various monasteries, the reality of the Chinese occupation of Tibet is not overlooked. It’s part of the plot. Yin and our hero must quietly, yet decisively avoid the Chinese checkpoints as well as Chinese suspicion in trying to learn the Eleventh Insight. The Chinese also want to keep the under its control, and therefore, it has no toleration for legends of peaceful people who are somehow more powerful than the might of the Chinese. What’s ironic about this is on one hand, the Chinese present and impose its might on the Tibetans, yet internally, they are afraid of the possibility of the legends being true. In any case, during the course of the journey to the monasteries to learn the Eleventh insight, we find that the insight itself is broken down into four extensions: (1) to realize one’s own prayer energy, positive and negative; (2) to focus the positive and keep it up so it can do the most (communal ) good; (3) to realize that the energy can affect others (for good or ill in terms of what we expect, via judgement, and what we expect via judgement IS returned to us). Moreover, we do not control another’s choice to remain/maintain in a perceived position of power, but crucially we are not to feed into it, as doing so will reinforce that person’s remaining/maintaining the perception of power; Judgement and expectation are incompatible, and (4) We have a connection, contact with higher beings, who can help us; we must re-condition ourselves toward acknowledging and crucially asking for that divine help (trust it). OK: colloquially: (1) our initial energy must be brought to consciousness – how are you today (at the moment)?: angry, tired, scared – and recognize that your emotional state dissolves into the energy one puts outward; (2) that the emotionally –charged energy at that moment can be focused for communal good (or ill), but only if we are honestly aware of how we are actually feeling at that moment; (3) Ever walk into a room and everyone is down, or up? Where does that energy come from? It’s like a cold: if one person has it, other people have the potential of catching it, and, (4) we all know in our religious experience that there is a higher power out there. In religions this power has many names. Further, some religions also purport a connection to that higher power, as well as the divine within us – as referenced by the first extension. The crucial and potential quest is, what if we all consciously directed our respective energies for the communal good, acknowledged and asked that higher power to help us and intercede where we cannot, or should not, as humanity in its interferences is taken (for good or ill) by other people for manipulation and/or imposition – ulterior motives. Of course, our hero and Yin are separated, but by synchronicity, our hero reaches Shambhala where he receives a first-hand experience as to what humanity could be if it individually and collectively became honest with itself in where it really is, why it’s really there, and actually wanted do what is necessary (using all ten +the Eleventh Insight(s)) to change the self-destructive paradigm that it is now actually in! What is creepy about this book is that the book was copyrighted in 1999, and it already told you about the NSA and the world plan to hack into and monitor the population’s computers; it already outlines the paradigms of law as exacerbating conflict, not resolving it. The same is true of medicine in treating symptoms, but not the causes of disease/illness because there is no money and crucially, no power in service! Humanity needs to learn and respond (not react) to the difference! In any case, the Chinese close in on Shambhala, but our hero with Wil, and Tashi (a teenage resident of Shambhala), who wants to go into the world cultures to learn more about them, return to our hero’s home and learn, via trial-by-fire the mechanics of the fourth extension … but the previous paragraph says it all. If/when will people learn more about themselves and honestly face that, and in turn, connect with other people to honestly face a paradigm that cares nothing for humanity, irrespective of any affiliation we respectively have?To some, the book seems fantastic, unbelievable, because it does not stem from what people consider to be the best, only and ultimate paradigm to work from - that in which is mundane: the physical and that registers with the five senses. Yet, we also know in our very being that there is more to life than that; that is where religions and mythologies come in. Yet even they can only take us but so far, as they have limiting concepts and standards in what makes that particular religion/mythology resonate with people; receptive to that particular religion/mythology. The paradigmal shift work requires honest self-exploration in terms of what makes one tick, why and how the religions/mythology resonates with people. It helps to take the time and learn about them all, as they all do have truth from their respective perspectives to tell. It’s when we give ourselves to the practice and limitations and worse, putting that brand of religion/mythology and politics above all others that we become no better than the political dictators we say we abhor … and now, secretly seek to enslave us all! So the fantastic aspects of the book are an insight – no pun intended- toward what we can still do to break out of the ‘only’ one way of thinking, doing, reacting to things paradigms that we have be conditioned to accept. In responding to what on sees as just for the one and the many, one must maintain the drive (positively-calibrated energy) and discipline despite what is thrown at one in reaction to one’s quest for justice, in order to achieve that justice.
    more
  • Jacob Petrossian
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book, I had my doubts that after the Celestine Prophecy the sequels wouldn't live up to it. I was wrong. This book is a brilliant sequel and portrays spiritual values effectively through the story. I recommend the reader to apply these principles to every day life.
    more
  • Matthew Jay
    January 1, 1970
    Another fantastic book by James Redfield! If you read the Celestine Prophecy then you must read this as it is the next steps of using your energy to progress your life. Once you can achieve that great loving energy in yourself then you use that to expand it into the world. This influences people and your environment into your favor if done correctly. I apply these methods and can atest for positive loving energy. It works!!
    more
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Synopsis:The Secret of Shambhala was written by James Redfield and published in 1999. It is the third book in The Celestine Prophecy series. This is a spiritual adventure series. The first book was about a man who found out about a manuscript that was discovered that described better ways for humans to live their lives and to realize that there is more to life than just the material world. Now in the third book this man travels to Tibet in search of a legendary place called Shabhala ( also Synopsis:The Secret of Shambhala was written by James Redfield and published in 1999. It is the third book in The Celestine Prophecy series. This is a spiritual adventure series. The first book was about a man who found out about a manuscript that was discovered that described better ways for humans to live their lives and to realize that there is more to life than just the material world. Now in the third book this man travels to Tibet in search of a legendary place called Shabhala ( also known as Shangri-La). While there, he discovers more insights that are important for humans to learn as they spiritually evolve. Most importantly, how important it is for us to learn how powerful our thoughts are and to remain positive in order to attract the right experiences into our lives. Storyline:I really enjoyed the story in this one. I loved the further insights that have practical use in our lives. The power of our thoughts is so important and this point was illustrated very well in this book. It was a good reminder to stay positive! This also continued on a theme from the second book in the series The Tenth Insight about shifting humanity as a whole into a more spiritual culture and away from the materialistic madness that is going on now. I love the vision of a better earth that was contained within this book. Yes this is fiction and is shown to us in a more fantastical light, but I feel like the hope of a better future is important and if you try to remain optimistic could be possible. Setting:The Secret of Shambhala was set in Tibet. Part of the setting took place in the legendary land of Shambhala or Shangri-La. I really liked that setting. It was my favorite setting in the series so far! I thought the way Redfield created Sharmbhala and the society there was so cool. I could have spent a longer time reading all about descriptions of that place. The inclusion of Shambhala or Shangri-La reminded me of the book Lost Horizon by James Hilton, which I really like as well.Characters:Our narrator is the same unnamed guy in The Secret of Shambhala as in the first two books. We always go on the journey through his eyes. There were fewer characters in this one I felt, which was interesting. They are always means to an end to help explain and show certain concepts to our narrator and it was no different in this one. Did I Like It?:Yes, I really did! I think the first half was a little slower, but then it really took off and ended up being really good. There is one more book in the series and I will definitely be picking it up. Do I Recommend It?:Yes! I recommend you read The Celestine Prophecy if you haven’t delved into this series yet. I think this series is fantastic for those who are interested in spirituality and would like humans to move in a more positive direction on this planet. If you have already read the first two books, you will not regret picking up the third one, I promise.
    more
  • William Asiata
    January 1, 1970
    Why I read it:My interest in themes of spiritual import has lead me to read the Celestine Prophecy series. I am very interested in understanding the design of the universe, and aligning my energies towards achieving the greatest, most attractive and pivotal outcomes that my life is capable of fulfilling. This book is an excellent tool for helping to conceptualise an ideal, appropriate, and attractive story of my life.How it is written:The novel is an adventure story that Why I read it:My interest in themes of spiritual import has lead me to read the Celestine Prophecy series. I am very interested in understanding the design of the universe, and aligning my energies towards achieving the greatest, most attractive and pivotal outcomes that my life is capable of fulfilling. This book is an excellent tool for helping to conceptualise an ideal, appropriate, and attractive story of my life.How it is written:The novel is an adventure story that follows a man as he leaves his home in America to search for answers and insights in Tibet.The underlying purpose of the novel is to share themes, "insights", as the author calls them, that help facilitate the reader to discover or decide on an appropriate destiny for themselves, as well as to raise up for the reader an attractive vision to work towards, of how humankind could one day live on Earth - given that humanity is able to align to an appropriate path of progress and development.The way that Redfield presents his message is through the novel's dialogue. Basically, Redfield has explained the concepts he wishes to convey to readers by inserting them into quotation marks which actually serve as the dialogue that the characters of his story engage in as they attempt to progress through the trials, twists and turns of their journey.It is interesting to note that the level of detail he uses to describe the environmental setting is not highly descriptive or complex, so there is a certain amount of freedom provided in leaving it up to the reader to imagine and construct gaps in the description for themselves. Building on that, Redfield uses simple descriptions for his environment. This seems like a straightforward technique that would be easy to emulate for newby writers that are looking to develop their talent from basic capabilities, or writers that only wish to convey a story through a simplistic medium.Personal reflection:Considering the diversity of paths that one might conceive that humanity will take, in addition to the path presented by Redfield, it is probably inevitable that humanity will achieve visions that are synonymous or 'metaphorically identical' to the one shared by Redfield in due course.According to my logic and knowledge base, it will only occur on the condition (founded on a basis of upholding human rights and creating global prosperity) that humanity does develop processes and utilise systems that evolve, generate, retain, diffuse, and apply knowledge to every human being and aspires to include every human being.
    more
  • Doris Apala
    January 1, 1970
    This book has opened my eyes to what will be a beautiful world if enough readers believe in what our futureWorld could look like with enough love and compassion , a solid 5 star read that should be read by everyone in the world
  • Juanita
    January 1, 1970
    Review: The Secret of Shambhala by James Redfield. 08/08/2017This is the third book of The Celestine Prophecy Trilogy. I enjoyed all three books and thought they were all inspiring, thought provoking, and interesting. In this third book James Redfield wrote compelling spiritual wisdom, insight, with adventure throughout the book. He wrote about the snow covered Himalyan Mountains of Tibet which was interesting and educational. The principles he writes about are truly justifiable in many older Review: The Secret of Shambhala by James Redfield. 08/08/2017This is the third book of The Celestine Prophecy Trilogy. I enjoyed all three books and thought they were all inspiring, thought provoking, and interesting. In this third book James Redfield wrote compelling spiritual wisdom, insight, with adventure throughout the book. He wrote about the snow covered Himalyan Mountains of Tibet which was interesting and educational. The principles he writes about are truly justifiable in many older mystic traditions from many Prophets. Throughout the land of the Himalyans Redfield observe residents while they explain their lifestyle which has emerged from a complete spiritual culture and he included opinions about technology, parenting, and even genetic testing. Rather than preach his spiritual beliefs he likes to portray himself as a naïve pilgrim receiving wisdom and insight from varies guides and teachers he meets on his metaphysical journeys. In this book he is in search of a mythical place called Shambala (Shangri-La), which is only in the mind. Redfield and a group of followers has some trouble avoiding armed Chinese soldiers that shadow that area and they have some heavenly encounters amidst their travels. I find the beliefs of different cultures very interesting and I don’t criticize because I learn from their beliefs and understand everyone has their own insight, opinions, and explanations. Reading or listening about their beliefs does not harm me and I believe their beliefs are as true as mine. I also believe cultures and traditions come from many generations in the past.In this book James Redfield observe hidden powers of the mind and energy. His themes cover a metaphysical journey, spiritual quest, spirit body travel, auras, intuition, synchronicity, spiritual awakening of the human mind, divine guidance, vivid perception experiences and nature lifting human energy and spiritual wisdom and spiritual power….
    more
  • Ana
    January 1, 1970
    I must admit I immediately succumbed to the flow this book transmits. Being someone highly predisposed into believing in energy and the power of pray, the action behind it was something I kind of neglected. Rather, I spent most of the time looking into all sorts of information James would write on how the Universe works and how Shambhala is portrayed. It was beyond amusing or entertaining, it was enriching, like food to the soul. James' writing skills are highly precise, describing magnificent l I must admit I immediately succumbed to the flow this book transmits. Being someone highly predisposed into believing in energy and the power of pray, the action behind it was something I kind of neglected. Rather, I spent most of the time looking into all sorts of information James would write on how the Universe works and how Shambhala is portrayed. It was beyond amusing or entertaining, it was enriching, like food to the soul. James' writing skills are highly precise, describing magnificent landscapes in an imaginary world, filling our senses with creativity. Nonetheless, its simplicity caught my eye, contributing to a fluidity, just like the energy processes James' himself describes. It penetrates our soul and fills it with the same love James asks the reader profoundly to start sharing and cherishing.
    more
  • Riobhcah
    January 1, 1970
    This book contains some awesome ideas about the power of our minds being much more than we think it is...energy that actually extends beyond what most people think they are (the body, rather than the True Self, the Mindstream). The Buddha said that "we create our reality with our thoughts" and this book elaborates on that, discussing how we can learn to turn the world towards a higher plane using thoughts focused on positivity. Although it is couched in a fictional setting, the ideas are from th This book contains some awesome ideas about the power of our minds being much more than we think it is...energy that actually extends beyond what most people think they are (the body, rather than the True Self, the Mindstream). The Buddha said that "we create our reality with our thoughts" and this book elaborates on that, discussing how we can learn to turn the world towards a higher plane using thoughts focused on positivity. Although it is couched in a fictional setting, the ideas are from the mystical traditions of Buddhism as well as other ancient eastern faiths and philosophies. It definitely give us something to consider with regards to becoming more aware of our thoughts and how they might affect the world more than we consciously realize.
    more
  • Original Doll (Lea Martinuš)
    January 1, 1970
    Not so interesting for me as The Celestine Prophecy.The book is constantly repeating parts of the first book and it drived me crazy. Like he wrote same book twice but this time act is taking place in another country, and I must admit that adventure of traveling was better in first part, too. (although it's really not bad)Also, there are 10 insights in The Celestine Prophecy so book is full of new knowledges, witch are repeated in this book and the eleventh insight is explained about Not so interesting for me as The Celestine Prophecy.The book is constantly repeating parts of the first book and it drived me crazy. Like he wrote same book twice but this time act is taking place in another country, and I must admit that adventure of traveling was better in first part, too. (although it's really not bad)Also, there are 10 insights in The Celestine Prophecy so book is full of new knowledges, witch are repeated in this book and the eleventh insight is explained about 50 times because main character of the story can't understand it properly (really made me nervous to read about it all over and over again).
    more
  • A. Gulden
    January 1, 1970
    "You will learn that at these higher levels of energy, our fields of prayer act very quickly to bring to us exactly what we expect. If we fear, it brings to us what we fear. If we hate, it brings us more of what we hate.""You see, the energy fields of all of us mix together out there, and the strongest ones prevail. That’s the unconscious dynamic that characterizes the human world. The state of our energy, our prevailing expectations, no matter what they are, go out and influence eve "You will learn that at these higher levels of energy, our fields of prayer act very quickly to bring to us exactly what we expect. If we fear, it brings to us what we fear. If we hate, it brings us more of what we hate.""You see, the energy fields of all of us mix together out there, and the strongest ones prevail. That’s the unconscious dynamic that characterizes the human world. The state of our energy, our prevailing expectations, no matter what they are, go out and influence everyone else’s mood and attitude. The level of awareness between humans, and all the expectations that go with it, are contagious. "
    more
  • Vicky
    January 1, 1970
    When we look out at others and make judgements, thinking that they are fat or thin or underachieved or ugly or poorly dressed, we actually send our energy out at these people and they often begin to think bad thoughts about themselves. We are engaging in what can only be called the energy of evil. It is the contagion of negative prayer. Of course we have to see things the way they are, but after that we must immediately shift our expectations from 'what is' to 'what could be'.Humans When we look out at others and make judgements, thinking that they are fat or thin or underachieved or ugly or poorly dressed, we actually send our energy out at these people and they often begin to think bad thoughts about themselves. We are engaging in what can only be called the energy of evil. It is the contagion of negative prayer. Of course we have to see things the way they are, but after that we must immediately shift our expectations from 'what is' to 'what could be'.Humans can find an inner motivation to create good in the world.The new generation must help us unify the religions.
    more
  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    If you've read the other books of the series, Celestine Prophecy, The Tenth Insight, then you know that they're leading to our Evolution as the Spiritual Beings we are. In The Secret of Shambhala, we become informed of our Power to Co-Create through the Prayer Field that surrounds us. That Prayer must be done as Affirmation, not beseeching, in order for the reality of it to Manifest in our Lives. As with all the Redfield books thus far they're good Spiritual adventures which are meant to provoke If you've read the other books of the series, Celestine Prophecy, The Tenth Insight, then you know that they're leading to our Evolution as the Spiritual Beings we are. In The Secret of Shambhala, we become informed of our Power to Co-Create through the Prayer Field that surrounds us. That Prayer must be done as Affirmation, not beseeching, in order for the reality of it to Manifest in our Lives. As with all the Redfield books thus far they're good Spiritual adventures which are meant to provoke our Awakening Consciousness and move the reader from a place of inertia & stagnation to remembrance of the Sacred Laws. If you're on the Path, this is definitely a book for you.
    more
  • Nicola
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it a lot. Lots of great ideas and thoughts about energy and how we affect our environment and life paths. Something that i am curious about.Sad to say though that 15 years later Tibet is not saved as predicted! and the world religions seem to have grown further apart and further consumed with hate for one another. Materialism has even greater appeal and power.Has the new age energy been hijacked?! Maybe been tricked by great advertising campaigns and must have products from t I liked it a lot. Lots of great ideas and thoughts about energy and how we affect our environment and life paths. Something that i am curious about.Sad to say though that 15 years later Tibet is not saved as predicted! and the world religions seem to have grown further apart and further consumed with hate for one another. Materialism has even greater appeal and power.Has the new age energy been hijacked?! Maybe been tricked by great advertising campaigns and must have products from the likes of Nike, Apple & Nespresso!
    more
  • Macoffkilter
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book and am grateful for having read The Celestine Prophecy and The Tenth Insight - Holding the Vision previously. This book was a definite call to action to really live more consciously at all levels. This acknowledges the difficulty that one can have doing that but the story illustrates so much why it is required to get past that fear. I found it so encouraging that I highly recommend it to everyone who is ready for it. Thanks to the author for this work as well as all that is being Loved this book and am grateful for having read The Celestine Prophecy and The Tenth Insight - Holding the Vision previously. This book was a definite call to action to really live more consciously at all levels. This acknowledges the difficulty that one can have doing that but the story illustrates so much why it is required to get past that fear. I found it so encouraging that I highly recommend it to everyone who is ready for it. Thanks to the author for this work as well as all that is being done to keep moving humanity ahead based on the insights.
    more
  • Kalyani Chandrasekar
    January 1, 1970
    This is a quite interesting book. This book deals more with synchronicity and energy extension. Beauty of Tibet and Himalayan regions has been wonderfully described. The most interesting part is the temples in Shambala. The American man, Yin and Tashi are wonderful characters. Their view of the Outer Worlds from the Shambala is simply wonderful. The current state of the Outer worlds and the limitations are revealed. However, questions like what made Dakinis to help people are unexplained. This i This is a quite interesting book. This book deals more with synchronicity and energy extension. Beauty of Tibet and Himalayan regions has been wonderfully described. The most interesting part is the temples in Shambala. The American man, Yin and Tashi are wonderful characters. Their view of the Outer Worlds from the Shambala is simply wonderful. The current state of the Outer worlds and the limitations are revealed. However, questions like what made Dakinis to help people are unexplained. This is really mystical.
    more
  • Cyndy Bradfield
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't tell you when I started or finished this honestly because I read the series then gave them to a friend. Then checked them out at the library and read them again. Then purchased them at a used bookstore so I could have them and read them again. A favorite of mine that inspires me aknew when I read it again. I have believed these things as a follower of Eckankar, but his books made me feel there was another step I hadn't taken.
    more
  • Attila Benő
    January 1, 1970
    The Secret of Shambhala is the third book in the Celestine Prophecy series. Just like the second book in the series, this one examines just one teaching, the entire book being dominantly about that one (although at times it refers to all previous ones). It's not the best stand-alone book, so if you are interested, I suggest you read the entire series, starting from the first book. A great spiritual journey, taking place at beautiful locations.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading books by James Redfield. Like the others, this book focuses on accessing and maintaining our spirituality and our way of being in the world. I always find these books to be enlightening all within an easy and flowing way of writing. I would definitely recommend this book but start with the Celestine Prophecy and work your way through the series or this book may not make sense since each book builds upon the theories in the previous book.
    more
  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    Having read the Celestine Prophecy some time ago I bought this a few months back and only just decided to read it. An interesting parable that focuses on the law of attraction and how our thoughts influence everything around us. I found the ending a little simplistic, but the book in general thought provoking and affirming of my beliefs.
    more
  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    A must read. I absolutely love this book. The author brilliantly wove fact and fiction in an adventure tale that will make you want to turn the page while your still reading. I highly recommend this book! You will have a great time while learning some very valuable lessons on how to enrich your spirit.
    more
Write a review