League of American Traitors
Those who don’t know history are destined to repeat it. . . .When seventeen year-old Jasper is approached at the funeral of his deadbeat father by a man claiming to be an associate of his deceased parents, he’s thrust into a world of secrets tied to America’s history—and he’s right at the heart of it.First, Jasper finds out he is the sole surviving descendant of Benedict Arnold, the most notorious traitor in American history. Then he learns that his father’s death was no accident. Jasper is at the center of a war that has been going on for centuries, in which the descendants of the heroes and traitors of the American Revolution still duel to the death for the sake of their honor.His only hope to escape his dangerous fate on his eighteenth birthday? Take up the research his father was pursuing at the time of his death, to clear Arnold’s name.Whisked off to a boarding school populated by other descendants of notorious American traitors, it’s a race to discover the truth. But if Jasper doesn’t find a way to uncover the evidence his father was hunting for, he may end up paying for the sins of his forefathers with his own life.

League of American Traitors Details

TitleLeague of American Traitors
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherSky Pony Press
ISBN-139781510707351
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Fiction

League of American Traitors Review

  • Dayle (the literary llama)
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: ★★☆☆☆ / 2 Wanted-to-Like-it-but-Didn't StarsREVIEW: I received this book from Sky Pony Press in exchange for an honest review.In general, I loved the idea for this book. The notion that the descendants of America's most famous and infamous figures are still embroiled in a war of duels and intrigue is a solid place to start. I want to know more. I want to read the heck out of that idea. Unfortunately the details and execution didn't add up to a winning book for me.LEAGUE OF AMERICAN TRAIT RATING: ★★☆☆☆ / 2 Wanted-to-Like-it-but-Didn't StarsREVIEW: I received this book from Sky Pony Press in exchange for an honest review.In general, I loved the idea for this book. The notion that the descendants of America's most famous and infamous figures are still embroiled in a war of duels and intrigue is a solid place to start. I want to know more. I want to read the heck out of that idea. Unfortunately the details and execution didn't add up to a winning book for me.LEAGUE OF AMERICAN TRAITORS begins with a strong opening. A funeral, a desperate main character, and a mysterious man appears. Sabotage and an attempted kidnapping...this is our introduction and it's intriguing and action-packed. Once the explanations start rolling out though, it started to lose me. The motivations were just so thin and without depth. It went beyond reasonable belief.I stuck with it though, hoping that more information would be added and the new characters would flesh out the plot. But here was another area that continued to baffle me. The adults and leaders just abandon our hero, Jasper, at a boarding school to be aided by other students in an incredibly serious quest, and then they disappear for seemingly no reason. Here is a 17 year old with a target on his back and no prior knowledge to the events in play and they just leave.I read an interview with Mark Schwahn (the creator of the TV show One Tree Hill) once, and he talked about the importance and necessity of fully realized adult characters in teenage stories. He made a lot of great points, but the summary was, essentially, that even though the teenagers or young adults are the center, without strong adult characters influencing and fueling the story line, it will die. And I definitely think that theory applies to LEAGUE OF AMERICAN TRAITORS. Even though there are adults flitting in and out, they needed more backstory and presence in this book. There needed to be one constant intermixed with the teenagers, helping them research from beginning to end.I didn't hate the book, there were some fun parts. The secondary characters were an interesting mix of personalities (although I wish we got a little more about them) and Nora was a great character. Understandably damaged and torn. I really enjoyed what she added to the story. But the rest of the school atmosphere, outside of the characters, fell a bit flat.The writing is quick and to the point. Given the lack of depth that I mentioned before I would probably place it more in the Middle Grade readers area, except that there is smoking, and since the plot deals with duels, there is obviously a lot of gun play. So probably not appropriate for young readers after all.I think that it was the lack of questioning that ultimately sunk this book for me. So many things are happening, and not just within the societies but out among the population, and it all just gets swept under the rug without any explanations. Murder and mayhem and everyone just seems to blindly go along with it, it just didn't make sense to me. Overall, it was a great idea, but there needed to be stronger motivators.
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  • Svenka
    January 1, 1970
    *breaks down the door* DID SOMEBODY SAY HAMILTON?????
  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars “Deception is our only ally now.” This was a really fun take on American History. There was a lot of humor and action, with a big cast of characters. We follow Jasper Mansfield, the last living descendant of Benedict Arnold, as he’s brought into a world where the families of American heroes and traitors still battle it out. Jasper learns more about his history as he tries to change his future in this quick and engaging read. Things I Liked There was some really great action in the st 3.5 Stars “Deception is our only ally now.” This was a really fun take on American History. There was a lot of humor and action, with a big cast of characters. We follow Jasper Mansfield, the last living descendant of Benedict Arnold, as he’s brought into a world where the families of American heroes and traitors still battle it out. Jasper learns more about his history as he tries to change his future in this quick and engaging read. Things I Liked There was some really great action in the story! We get a really intense action in the beginning of the story, starting it off with a bang, and then more in the later half as well. It’s well balanced and keeps the stakes high.I really love the entire premise; it’s so much fun. It’s original, unique, and it just works. I loved that there were these secret societies based around American heroes and traitors. And they have all this bad blood between them. I like how the traitors grouped themselves by time periods and hung out with other descendents from those eras. I also liked that some tough topics like slavery and the Native American genocide were addressed.There are some really funny moments throughout the story. Sheldon, Jasper’s roommate is the biggest source of comedic relief, but other characters bring some humorous bite as well.I really like the trial that happens. It was one of my favorite parts. We really see some growth in Jasper’s characters, and I felt like this was one of the only moments - outside of his grief over his parent’s death in the beginning - that showcased him and his personality, allowing me to connect with him. Things I Didn’t Like I wanted more about the culture of the True Sons of Liberty and the League of American traitors. We obviously got a little more backstory about the League, but I felt like the True Sons (or Libertines) were really glossed over. Even the school where Jasper goes, a school for the League, felt really isolated.I also wanted more from the characters. As a largely character driven reader, this was a more personal issue that others might not have problems with. Like I said above, I felt that Jasper really only had two moments were I felt really connected to him: grief from his parent’s death and courage at the trial. Otherwise he mostly felt like he was just there. The other characters also felt like they were a little flat - I just didn’t really connect with any of them. And I actually found that Lacy got more annoying to me as the story progressed. I found her to be a little too indignant for my tastes.I also never really became invested in the romance in the story. This could partially be because I didn’t really connect with any characters, but I also found that there wasn’t as much buildup as I would have liked. This was such a quick, easy, and fun read. I almost knocked it out in one sitting. It’s filled with humorous takes on history that have huge implications for our characters present day. It’s historical without being to stuffy, and really just completely takes you away when reading it. It’s so easy to just get into the story and it’s a lot of fun.I received a copy of the book from Sky Pony Press via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Bunny theshybooks
    January 1, 1970
    League of American Traitors by Matthew LandisRelease Date | August 8th 2017Amazon Publishing | Skypony PressMy Rating | 3.75Review | Spoil FreeI was sent an ARC of this book from the lovely people over at Skypony Press! I was super excited when they sent me a copy because it is said to be a mashup between Hamilton and National Treasure!“A fun story that twist history and conspiracy into a tale of friendship and danger!”I had a lot of different feelings about this book! I liked it but at the same League of American Traitors by Matthew LandisRelease Date | August 8th 2017Amazon Publishing | Skypony PressMy Rating | 3.75Review | Spoil FreeI was sent an ARC of this book from the lovely people over at Skypony Press! I was super excited when they sent me a copy because it is said to be a mashup between Hamilton and National Treasure!“A fun story that twist history and conspiracy into a tale of friendship and danger!”I had a lot of different feelings about this book! I liked it but at the same time I had a few issues with it. Therefore, I will be giving this book a 3.75 rating. I want to clarify that this isn’t a low rating but a happy medium! I love Young Adult Fiction and American History. So, I enjoyed that this story brought them together.This book was completely different from what I thought it would be! I thought it was going to be set back in the 1700s-1800s but no! So, this book threw me through a loop because it wasn’t what I was expecting. But I loved the characters because they were fun and a bit quirky.Now here would be where I would talk about the issues I had with the book but I can’t explain them! I have been trying to write this review for an hour now and I am lost. I think I was expecting more depth from the conspiracy and then I was a bit disappointed that the book ended so fast and cleanly. I wanted more from this story.I think this book would be great for middle schoolers! I would put this in Middle Grade and not Young Adult Fiction but that’s my opinion.Check out this book because it was fun and I enjoyed the characters.
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  • Celeste_pewter
    January 1, 1970
    Nope. I wanted to like this book. I think the author has frankly created a brilliant premise, which deserves to be explored. Unfortunately, the absurd writing and characterizations make the book tedious, and close to impossible to read. Whomever edited this book did Landis an extreme disservice, by not recommending another pass. I bought the book on Tuesday, and am I'm still trying to dig my way through it. There are:* Disjoined paragraphsThere's a paragraph where the character watches someone w Nope. I wanted to like this book. I think the author has frankly created a brilliant premise, which deserves to be explored. Unfortunately, the absurd writing and characterizations make the book tedious, and close to impossible to read. Whomever edited this book did Landis an extreme disservice, by not recommending another pass. I bought the book on Tuesday, and am I'm still trying to dig my way through it. There are:* Disjoined paragraphsThere's a paragraph where the character watches someone walk away, then it jumps to him with someone else, and then it jumps back to the character going after the character that's watched away.* Poor dialogueCharacters will routinely talk about giving bro hugs? Why? * Bad characterizationsJasper is possibly the most annoying character I've encountered within the last four months.* Lack of plotI'm 66% in, and they're still trying to figure out a concrete direction for their actions? * And absolute absurd treatment of female characters. They're either happy-go-luck, or emo beyond all belief. At one point, a self-described emo character puts her cigarette out on someone's neck because she's mad at him, and no one does anything.I can get emo, I can get rage, I can't get someone committing acts of violence against someone else, and everyone else collective shrugging. I was so intrigued by the idea of this book, I bought the Kindle version on release day, and am now thinking that was an absurd $9.99 spent.
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  • Trisa
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of League of American Traitors as part of the FFBC Blog Tour in exchange for an honest review.Enter the GIVEAWAY on my blog, Absolute Bookishness. (Ends 8/11/2017.)Seventeen-year-old Jasper and his father, James, weren’t on the best of terms. Still, despite years of neglect, strange behavior, and drunken bouts, his father’s sudden death comes as a surprise. As does a strange presence at his father’s funeral, a man claiming to know James. But Jasper quickly dismisses him a I received a free copy of League of American Traitors as part of the FFBC Blog Tour in exchange for an honest review.Enter the GIVEAWAY on my blog, Absolute Bookishness. (Ends 8/11/2017.)Seventeen-year-old Jasper and his father, James, weren’t on the best of terms. Still, despite years of neglect, strange behavior, and drunken bouts, his father’s sudden death comes as a surprise. As does a strange presence at his father’s funeral, a man claiming to know James. But Jasper quickly dismisses him and any connection to his delinquent father; he has more pressing concerns. Now an orphan, Jasper faces losing all that remains of his past, his home, and his freedom.Reluctant to accept an uncertain future in foster care, Jasper sells most of his valuables, saves what he can, and attempts to run away–to take control and survive on his own. But when he least suspects it, he’s ambushed for reasons he has yet to grasp–reasons related to his father. After their last-minute rescue spares his life, Jasper takes refuge in the League of American Traitors–a secret society comprising the heirs of American history’s most treacherous citizens.Once among them, Jasper learns he is the last remaining descendant of Benedict Arnold, the notorious American traitor. His father was on the trail of a hidden truth, one a rival organization has and is willing to kill to keep from coming to light. One that could save Jasper and all those around him. And Jasper may hold the keys to it all.Jasper and his new friends–Sheldon, Lacy, Tucker, and Nora–must work together to finish what his father started to bring to an end a centuries-long battle between the sons and daughters of America’s heroes and traitors, before they pay for their failure with their lives. Escape is not an option, but a lifelong game of cat and mouse. The clock is ticking. But, who can you trust when your only hope is a group with a treasonous heritage, and when loyalty is so easily bought?With a combination of top secret organizations, American history, historical clues, and deception, League of American Traitors reads more like a dystopian novel than a typical historical mystery or thriller–with teens facing an inevitable fate of dueling to the death. Filled with pop culture references, drama, sarcasm, and humor, it simultaneously broaches challenging topics in history and the modern era.* Landis’s quick-paced narrative of thrills and treachery would only benefit from a thicker plot and a longer, less tidy conclusion.Jasper and his friends are realistic (flaws and all) and offer a playful dynamic to what would be an otherwise grim tale. Their blunders in casual and dire circumstances will make readers groan and grimace with and for these characters. Though they endure some cliched characterizations and want further development, Jasper and crew work well together, and invite interest to the story and empathy to their plight. With her independent spirit, keen observations, no-nonsense attitude, and exceptional skills, Nora is bound to be a favorite. Their nemeses, on the other hand, are bad enough that you want them to lose. Landis has crafted an entertaining historical treasure hunt brimming with enough peril and intrigue to divert young readers during the dog days of summer.*Though, I can’t say I agree with how everything was handled–such as how suicide and mental health issues and sufferers were presented and discussed, or how slaves were regarded in terms loyalty through a historical lens. Or how recompense is implied for past actions against natives through activity that has nothing to do with them or that they don’t benefit from. I see the intent in the last case but it still falls short. I can only hope the finished copies of this book improves in these areas before publication.The original review was posted on Absolute Bookishness.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, how I wanted to love League of American Traitors. It had such a promising premise but the execution just didn’t work for me. While it’s a quick read that definitely has it’s fun moments, there just didn’t anything that makes it stand out among the many other young adult novels available these days.From the very beginning of the book, I had issues with the plot. Everything was just so unbelievable. I’m sure there are many descendants of American heroes and traitors but for them to get togethe Oh, how I wanted to love League of American Traitors. It had such a promising premise but the execution just didn’t work for me. While it’s a quick read that definitely has it’s fun moments, there just didn’t anything that makes it stand out among the many other young adult novels available these days.From the very beginning of the book, I had issues with the plot. Everything was just so unbelievable. I’m sure there are many descendants of American heroes and traitors but for them to get together and duel each other seems a little sketchy. Also, why the heck are the descendants of these people so angry? These people can seriously hold grudges. We’re talking about descendants of George Washington challenging the descendant of Benedict Arnold even though they are all just teenagers who have no control over what their ancestors may or may not have done.The teenage characters were very easy to like and had fun personalities, even if some were a little over the top. Lacy and Sheldon were definitely my favorites. Lacy was kind of the ringleader. She took charge of the investigation into Benedict Arnold. Sheldon was the comic relief of the group. Tucker was the whiz kid with an odd personality. He didn’t interact with many people and he didn’t seem to have many emotional reactions to people or things. He was hard to get a good read on. As for Jasper, the main character, he didn’t have much of a personality either. I didn’t understand most of his motives or his reactions to things. For instance, his dad died and all Jasper could talk about was how much he hated the guy. Then he spent the whole book discovering tiny little details about his dad that made him immediately forgive him and think that maybe he didn’t know him after all. I could possibly understand this if he discovered some huge secret about his dad that made up for 17 years of abandonment but that wasn’t the case.The historical aspect of the book was really what drew me in and while it was a fun part of the story, it wasn’t developed well at all. I understand the National Treasure reference but don’t let that get your hopes up. National Treasure has a much more believable backstory than League of American Traitors and it’s actually fleshed out, unlike this story. The whole Benedict Arnold conspiracy theory was so flimsy and had almost nothing to back it up. This whole story was based on the truth but Matthew Landis had the chance to add to history in any way he wanted. Instead, he added very little and what he did add wasn’t anything substantial or all that interesting.Overall, League of American Traitors read kind of like the first draft of a book. The details needed to really make this a unique and interesting read just weren’t there.
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  • Les Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    *4.5 action packed stars!*Who knew a history lesson could be SO MUCH FUN?!?! Matthew Landis has written one hell of a roller coaster ride of awesome that's for sure. A brilliant mix of past and present blended with humor and life or death situations made League of American Traitors one the best books I've read this summer. Sure you have to suspend belief a little, but not THAT much. Jasper, Nora, Sheldon, Cyrus, Byron and the rest are all just wonderfully developed (barring the mystery that of c *4.5 action packed stars!*Who knew a history lesson could be SO MUCH FUN?!?! Matthew Landis has written one hell of a roller coaster ride of awesome that's for sure. A brilliant mix of past and present blended with humor and life or death situations made League of American Traitors one the best books I've read this summer. Sure you have to suspend belief a little, but not THAT much. Jasper, Nora, Sheldon, Cyrus, Byron and the rest are all just wonderfully developed (barring the mystery that of course has to be present) and from the very first sentence I couldn't put this book down. So much so I read it from start to finish in one go that's how engrossed and on the edge of my seat I was! Holy moly it was one heck of a ride. Be sure this is on your TBR!! *Full review to come closer to release day on www.swoonyboyspodcst.com
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  • Neil (or bleed)
    January 1, 1970
    I think my very limited knowledge of American Revolution and History contributes to why I didn't enjoy this book so much. It's not boring, mind you, but I felt just so uninterested with the book.
  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    The cover is obviously very political. Which begs the question, will I like this? ---For once a title change that I actually kind of like: The Judas Society ----> The League of American Traitors I'm down with this
  • rachel • typed truths
    January 1, 1970
    This sounds kind of like Alex Rider, aka my favourite childhood series... colour me excited!
  • Roxanne
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Sky Pony Press for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.Jasper has just buried his father when a strange man approaches him about his father's will. Jasper figures there isn't anything worthwhile and blows the guys off. A few days later the brakes on his car fail and he ends up in the river. A woman saves him, but then they start torturing him asking him questions about IT, whatever it is. Jasper has no clue but when Cyrus saves him from the woman and her par Thank you to Sky Pony Press for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.Jasper has just buried his father when a strange man approaches him about his father's will. Jasper figures there isn't anything worthwhile and blows the guys off. A few days later the brakes on his car fail and he ends up in the river. A woman saves him, but then they start torturing him asking him questions about IT, whatever it is. Jasper has no clue but when Cyrus saves him from the woman and her partner he realizes he needs to find out. That is when he learns that he is the last direct descent of Benedict Arnold, and his father was looking for information that could change the whole game. The game is that the True Sons of Liberty duel with the descendants of American Traitors and have been doing that for the last 200 plus years.Before long Jasper is on the hunt to find that information that changes everything, if only he lives that long. After several attempts on his life, the League knows that they have traitors in their midst and someone will do anything to keep Jasper from finding out the truth.This was a promising book with an interesting concept. I can't say too much because it will spoil it, but if fell a little short for me. I just didn't quite love it, but I did devour it and I loved the alternative history. I am not sure if I can put into words, but basically, it seemed a tad anticlimactic. All the dueling and the attempts on his life just to find out that. More like a 3.6 for me.
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  • Jessi ♡
    January 1, 1970
    while i don't particularly care about USA history, the premise of secret societies pulled me in. it was interesting enough, and it began action packed, except at some point it became too mellow for me.
  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a great mix of history and adventure, and I enjoyed it thoroughly. I know my middle grade students will, too!
  • Sara Vessichelli
    January 1, 1970
    Really well written. I enjoyed the storyline even though I'm not a super big fan of American history. Nora was my favorite character. I especially loved the epilogue.
  • Paige Green
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3/5Genre: YA Historical Fiction/Contemporary?Recommended Age: 14+ (violence and suicide/mental illness issues were present, and gun play)Pages:242Author WebsiteAmazon LinkDisclaimer: I received this book courtesy of KidLitExchange. Thanks! All opinions are my own.Synopsis: When seventeen year-old Jasper is approached at the funeral of his deadbeat father by a man claiming to be an associate of his deceased parents, he’s thrust into a world of secrets tied to America’s history—and he’s ri Rating: 3/5Genre: YA Historical Fiction/Contemporary?Recommended Age: 14+ (violence and suicide/mental illness issues were present, and gun play)Pages:242Author WebsiteAmazon LinkDisclaimer: I received this book courtesy of KidLitExchange. Thanks! All opinions are my own.Synopsis: When seventeen year-old Jasper is approached at the funeral of his deadbeat father by a man claiming to be an associate of his deceased parents, he’s thrust into a world of secrets tied to America’s history—and he’s right at the heart of it.First, Jasper finds out he is the sole surviving descendant of Benedict Arnold, the most notorious traitor in American history. Then he learns that his father’s death was no accident. Jasper is at the center of a war that has been going on for centuries, in which the descendants of the heroes and traitors of the American Revolution still duel to the death for the sake of their honor.His only hope to escape his dangerous fate on his eighteenth birthday? Take up the research his father was pursuing at the time of his death, to clear Arnold’s name. Whisked off to a boarding school populated by other descendants of notorious American traitors, it’s a race to discover the truth. But if Jasper doesn’t find a way to uncover the evidence his father was hunting for, he may end up paying for the sins of his forefathers with his own life.Like a mash-up of National Treasure and Hamilton, Matthew Landis’s debut spins the what-ifs of American history into a heart-pounding thriller steeped in conspiracy, clue hunting, and danger.This book is a lot like National Treasure, but in a different way. The book focuses on Jasper and how he finds out his past which has serious repercussions for his future. He runs away and joins others that are in his similar position. The book sounded really interesting and the premise deserves to be explored and I felt that the characters were fairly well developed, but I just couldn’t get into this book.Okay, this book had a lot of issues in my opinion. The dialogue and characterizations are not well written, the plot isn’t present until over halfway through the book, the way female characters are written is deplorable, and the lack of regard to violence against fellow teammates is unrealistic. Not only were the female characters not written well, but there were, what I felt to be, racist and ablest beliefs/actions in the book.Verdict: This book has issues, but the premise is intriguing.
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  • Belle Brennan
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.What if it doesn't take a professional historian to unearth one of our nation's biggest secrets? What if it just takes a seventeen-year-old boy with a devastating fate to dig up the secret that would change the way we think about our founding fathers? What I loved most about this book was that it was written by an eighth-grade social studies teacher who clearly has a passion for bringing history to l Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.What if it doesn't take a professional historian to unearth one of our nation's biggest secrets? What if it just takes a seventeen-year-old boy with a devastating fate to dig up the secret that would change the way we think about our founding fathers? What I loved most about this book was that it was written by an eighth-grade social studies teacher who clearly has a passion for bringing history to life for his students. This story reads like a mystery with a National Treasure style twist as it takes you on a journey to help Jasper Mansfield discover the secret that will free him from having to defend his life for the sake of his ancestor's actions, and he only has a matter of months to do it.The book grabbed me from the beginning with the funeral of Jasper's deadbeat father. I was intrigued by his situation and needed to know how history was going to be pieced into this story. As the story progressed, the historical elements were a bit lacking for me, and I felt that I needed to have a deeper understanding of the American Revolution and the historical figures that played a part in it to keep pace with the storyline. However, I loved that the book had a Hamilton-like feel. As I read, I became more engrossed in the characters of American history and I enjoyed how Landis brought together the past and present through Jasper's journey.Despite not being able to totally keep up with the historical aspects of the novel, I found the story exciting and engaging. I wanted to keep reading because I had to know if Jasper would discover the secret that might save his life. This is work is clearly historical fiction, which I am always skeptical of for younger readers, but I think that it puts the right twist on history that makes it exciting without creating misconceptions.I would love to be in Mr. Landis's class and as I read this I couldn't help but picture the conversations he must have had with his students to gain inspiration for this book. As this is his debut novel, I know his writing will only get better, and I am looking forward to reading what he puts out in the future. Kudos to him for bringing this fun twist to American history to gain the interest of students, we can always use more of that in our classrooms.
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  • Ashley Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to love this book and just no... The concept is awesome, I love National Treasure and Hamilton and it's blurred as a mix of both and it just didn't deliver. Jasper was an okay main character but he's the only one with close to a personality. The guns got way more time than any of the side characters and it felt really unnecessary. Also there was a lot of violence that just didn't make a lot of sense. You had 2 girls Lacy the girly girly all the guys love kinda I guess, then Nora the coo I wanted to love this book and just no... The concept is awesome, I love National Treasure and Hamilton and it's blurred as a mix of both and it just didn't deliver. Jasper was an okay main character but he's the only one with close to a personality. The guns got way more time than any of the side characters and it felt really unnecessary. Also there was a lot of violence that just didn't make a lot of sense. You had 2 girls Lacy the girly girly all the guys love kinda I guess, then Nora the cool mean girl. She put a cigarette out on a guys next and tells him she wanted it to her and nobody is like wow she's horrible? Then Sheldon and Tucker the 2 guy side characters, ones bigger and wears sweats all the time and the other is super smart and obsessed with things from the 80s but never explains why. Also I hate to say this but secret organizations from the revolutionary war aren't going to let 17 year old kids argue their ends for them. I tried to get into it but by the last 70 pages I quit reading anything but the dialogue just to finish the book because it wasn't enjoyable. Jasper's constant thinking about nonsense didn't really add to the storyline and the time frame some times confused me. You'd be reading about one person and all of a sudden your doing something else with no clear direction, the chapters weren't separated well enough. I tried, I did, I love historical story's but this just wasn't good for me. It got 2 stars for the concept.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Jasper is orphaned after the mysterious death of his father. At the funeral he is approached by a lawyer who wants to discuss his father’s inheritance: not money, but a matter of life and death. Given that his father was very absent, Jasper is not interested. Trying to escape the inevitability of foster care, Jasper sells everything in his house and runs away, but the brakes on his vehicle don’t work and Jasper ends up running off the road into a lake. He is quickly rescued by an ambulance that Jasper is orphaned after the mysterious death of his father. At the funeral he is approached by a lawyer who wants to discuss his father’s inheritance: not money, but a matter of life and death. Given that his father was very absent, Jasper is not interested. Trying to escape the inevitability of foster care, Jasper sells everything in his house and runs away, but the brakes on his vehicle don’t work and Jasper ends up running off the road into a lake. He is quickly rescued by an ambulance that saw the accident, only the people on board are not EMTs. Guns pointed at him, defibrillator threatening to shock him, Jasper is rescued by the lawyer who tells him that he is the last descendent of Benedict Arnold. Jasper’s dad, a member of the League of American Traitors made it his life’s mission to research Arnold’s traitorous past to try to free himself and his son from being challenged to a duel from a descendent of a True Son. Jasper is whisked away to a boarding school for the League where he will continue his dad’s research and train to duel to the death.Fun alterna-history/conspiracy theory look at the traitors of American history. The dialogue at times felt a little unnatural, but the premise was fun. The blurb on my copy compared it to National Treasure, and I think that’s highly appropriate.
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  • Kelsey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I am really not a big fan of history, but Matthew Landis has made learning a little about it fun. I really enjoyed all the mentions of the different historical figures. League of American Traitors is a roller coaster ride that’s for sure. A mix of past and present. I loved the main characters sense of humor. He also had great sarcasm. The writing is all around both humorous and serious.Every character in this book is defined by what their ancestor did and for some, like the True Sons of Liberty, I am really not a big fan of history, but Matthew Landis has made learning a little about it fun. I really enjoyed all the mentions of the different historical figures. League of American Traitors is a roller coaster ride that’s for sure. A mix of past and present. I loved the main characters sense of humor. He also had great sarcasm. The writing is all around both humorous and serious.Every character in this book is defined by what their ancestor did and for some, like the True Sons of Liberty, that person is all they are. They live in the past, embrace it, but never want to be more than that. Meanwhile Jasper is trying to change everything for these two Leagues.I think the ending was pretty satisfying and I wouldn’t mind a sequel. 😉I think this would also make a great action movie. I really liked all the gun-slinging scenes. Reminded me of National Treasure a little bit. If you’re a fan of History or not, Action, or a good thriller, I think you’d like this book.Full Review on my blog :https://criticuncriticalbookwormblog....
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    3 & 1/2 stars Overview "We all die, Jasper. The question is, what will we die pursuing, and is that cause worthy of our lives?"This was an interesting story. The first half was a little dull to get into but once it picked up it really got interesting. I love historical fiction so much but, American history doesn't excite me that much. Matthew Landis really got me interested in the topic though. I never thought I would enjoy reading about the American Revolution as much as I did. The cast of 3 & 1/2 stars Overview "We all die, Jasper. The question is, what will we die pursuing, and is that cause worthy of our lives?"This was an interesting story. The first half was a little dull to get into but once it picked up it really got interesting. I love historical fiction so much but, American history doesn't excite me that much. Matthew Landis really got me interested in the topic though. I never thought I would enjoy reading about the American Revolution as much as I did. The cast of characters was so fun to read about they were all so different and distinct. It was a really big mystery and I liked trying to figure out what was happening.The writing was pretty good for a debut novel. There is always room for improvement and I have no doubt that Mr. Landis will get better. I felt that things would go way too fast at times and I didn't get to process what was happening. I mean it was awesome because it wasn't super slow but it wasn't paced well. The plot and premise were so cool and I loved it so much. It was a dope story and it had some flaws but it was enjoyable none the less."And there was a future, a place he hadn't even let his thoughts wander to before now because it had always seemed too elusive or too horrible to think about. But he was in it now — the rest of the story. Post-epilogue; or was it Chapter One? Whatever came next had to be better because it was exactly that: next." What I Liked 1) Jasper's Character & GrowthI liked his smart-ass sarcastic attitude. He was super comical. I really loved how the author showed the truth in someone not knowing how to handle a gun. I hate how sometimes in movies someone who has never held a gun or shot someone will automatically know everything. The author showed how Jasper really struggled with the thought of killing someone and being scared of holding a gun. But, I loved seeing the growth in his character and how he did what he had to when the time was ready. 2) The Mystery of the NovelThe moment the story started there was an air of mystery. I liked not knowing what would happen and the multiple SHUT UP NO WAY moments were amazing like the one with Sheldon (sad sad sad). I like guessing what might happen and seeing if I was right or wrong.3) The CharactersThe ensemble of characters was great because everyone had a distinct personality and voice even with the story being told in Jasper's pov. I feel like I still would've known who the author was speaking about even without the names. They were all also incredibly hilarious. The kids reminded me of the kids from IT.4) The Cute RomanceIt was slow burning and I actually wasn't expecting it. I didn't see it coming because it wasn't front and center the plot was the main focus. The author didn't center his story on it but rather weaved it into the overall plot. 5) Historically AccurateI liked how the author gave us notes at the end to see how many things were accurate to history. As someone who loves history and historical fiction, this pleased me very much. What I Didn't 1) Dull BeginningIt is an enjoyable story but, I probably wouldn't reach for it tons of times because the beginning is sort of a bore. It was a chore to read because it wasn't exciting. A lot was happening but not in that action-packed way it was more like when you have a busy day but you're still bored. Now when it got about half way it picked up and got a lot better and ended on a high note.2) The PaceIt's not that it's slow because as I stated a lot happens but it's almost too rushed. Since it's not action packed it's like the story was moving from one thing to the next but you can't enjoy anything that is happening. One minute you're at Jasper's dad's funeral the next he's being almost killed. It was just too fast. It wasn't paced in a way that kept you on your toes but also let you enjoy what was taking place.3) Son's of LibertyThis didn't take away stars lol I just didn't like these people. I felt their whole issue/deal was so stupid lol. The whole traitor issue was literally so long ago I thought these people needed a life.  End Note Well, I hope you liked this review. I enjoyed the book and recommend it to people who enjoy historical fiction. What are some historical novels you've read?Love, Kathryn
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  • Kyera
    January 1, 1970
    The premise of this book is much more intriguing than its actual execution. Jasper is the descendant of Benedict Arnold, the most notorious traitor in American history. After the death of both of his parents, Jasper learns that there is more to his world than he ever knew. He learns that for hundreds of years, the descendants of both the heroes and villains from American history have been on opposing sides. The heroes' descendants, who call themselves the Sons of Liberty, challenge the descendan The premise of this book is much more intriguing than its actual execution. Jasper is the descendant of Benedict Arnold, the most notorious traitor in American history. After the death of both of his parents, Jasper learns that there is more to his world than he ever knew. He learns that for hundreds of years, the descendants of both the heroes and villains from American history have been on opposing sides. The heroes' descendants, who call themselves the Sons of Liberty, challenge the descendants of the villains to a duel when they come of age. Unbeknownst to Jasper, his father was searching for a way out of the duel for his son. His untimely death leads Jasper down a path that forces him to question everything he's ever known. I would like to mention that I was provided with an uncorrected e-galley to review this book. The fact that I was provided with the galley didn't affect my review, but the quality of the galley certainly influenced my enjoyment of the book. There were a number of grammatical or spelling errors throughout and that's something that pulls me out of the story. That is just a personal problem with the book and one I hope will not be present in the book when it is released on August 8th.As a huge fan of history, I was incredibly intrigued by the premise of this book. It was sold as a mash-up of Hamilton and National Treasure - and who doesn't love those two things? It wasn't quite as fast-paced and thrilling as the premise would lead you to believe, but it is enjoyable. I wish there was more character development in the novels because at times it was difficult to understand each character's motivations. They might have a complete change in perspective or opinion and it wasn't adequately explained leaving the reader questioning what was happening. There were so many characters in the book, many of which were quite prevalent that I understand that it probably wasn't possible to develop them all. That's just not feasible when writing a book, but I do think that the story would have benefitted greatly had there been just a bit more development.The world that the author built was intriguing as he was able to blend authentic U.S. history in with his more dramatic narrative. Of course, settling one's qualms via a duel is a bit dramatic but he managed to raise the stakes. His characters' lives are on the line if they are not successful and yet the entire organization's framework could be altered if they are. The plot of the book follows the course of American history with traitors and spies, secrets and betrayals, love and heartbreak. There are pacing issues with the book as it has moments that drag and others that seem to jump forward without enough context. There are some scenes that seem unnecessary to the plot and could be shorted to give more opportunities for character development. Overall, I feel that it is a good debut novel that could have been improved by culling extraneous scenes and delving more deeply into the world and characters. Although it suffers from pacing issues and underdeveloped characters - it is still an entertaining read. I would recommend it to fans of history and action/adventure books, as it melds elements of both into a novel about the heroes and traitors of American history (and their descendants). There is a lot of violence in the book, but as it is not graphic I would not hesitate to allow a YA/teen reader to pick up this book. If you're a fan of historical fiction or action/adventures then you should definitely check out this book!
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  • Bret Applequist
    January 1, 1970
    League of American Traitors is a wonderful read, especially for its intended audience. I suggest keeping that in mind as you read. Too often, as book lovers, we lose sight of this. It is easy to interpret the author’s relational personality as you read. As stated in the back of his book, Matthew Landis is a middle school educator, and that comes through in his first novel. Relevant characters, witty sarcasm, and dry humor play a big part in making this tale an exciting read. I felt that Matthew League of American Traitors is a wonderful read, especially for its intended audience. I suggest keeping that in mind as you read. Too often, as book lovers, we lose sight of this. It is easy to interpret the author’s relational personality as you read. As stated in the back of his book, Matthew Landis is a middle school educator, and that comes through in his first novel. Relevant characters, witty sarcasm, and dry humor play a big part in making this tale an exciting read. I felt that Matthew Landis was able to accomplish what many authors struggle to do – relate directly to the genres audience. Landis has no better background for his characters and their voices than his own classroom. I am certain middle schoolers will devour this book, and people of all ages will find this novel fast-paced, poignant, thought enticing. Thank you for telling a wonderful story, Matt!
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  • Andrew Jason
    January 1, 1970
    SECRET SOCIETIES, YESSSS.
  • Jaina Rose
    January 1, 1970
    This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.Okay, let me start by getting rid of the elephant in the room: Hamilton. I have actually never seen Hamilton (or listened to its full soundtrack), but I know enough about the musical to hazard a pretty good guess that League of American Traitors is nothing like it. Sure, the book's got some mentions of Revolutionary War-era historical figures, but they're definitely not the focus of the book. Instead, League of American Traitors is basical This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.Okay, let me start by getting rid of the elephant in the room: Hamilton. I have actually never seen Hamilton (or listened to its full soundtrack), but I know enough about the musical to hazard a pretty good guess that League of American Traitors is nothing like it. Sure, the book's got some mentions of Revolutionary War-era historical figures, but they're definitely not the focus of the book. Instead, League of American Traitors is basically a modern-day adventure/spy novel trying hard to capture some of the vibe of National Treasure while really reminding me of a rather watered-down nonmagical Harry Potter. I'm sorry, was that overly negative? I don't mean to be, but I'm having a hard time swallowing my disappointment. I was really excited for League of American Traitors, I thought it would be thrilling and realistic and educational at the same time. It may have been education at parts (when the author wasn't, you know, making stuff up to serve the plot), and thrilling occasionally, but I just couldn't get past all the unrealistic and ridiculous stuff that the book expected me to accept. My biggest issue with the plot is the whole premise: a league of the descendants of "good guys" from history decided to hunt down every single descendant of the "bad guys" of American history and force them to participate in one duel. If they win, they're left in peace; if they lose, they're dead; if they flee, they spend the rest of their life on the run.You know what my biggest problem with this premise is? The idea that people who are descended from famous figures from 300 years ago care so much about some ancient grudge that they're willing to make all of their children participate in duels to the death. That just wouldn't happen. Also, why is everyone so hung up on the past, anyway? We are not our ancestors. We are not responsible for what they did in the past. If you trace my family tree far enough back, I've got some bad people back there, too. But I don't define myself by the choices made by my distant ancestors hundreds of years ago, and I don't see why the people in the book do either!The other issue I have with the book is the fact that it takes all of history at face value. All the historical figures are sorted into either the "good guy" or the "bad guy" category with no room for nuance. Jasper does bemoan this at one point, when he questions why Benedict Arnold is remembered only for his betrayal and not for any of the amazing battles he won for the cause before then, but I would have liked to take things a step further: why does everyone assume that the "good guys" were good? Why is fighting against Britain inherently better than remaining a Loyalist? Is it just because we won the Revolutionary War, so history was written by the victors? I for one would have probably been a Loyalist, if we're being perfectly honest–I just don't really think our excuses for breaking off from Britain were as great as everyone thought. And some of the classifications seemed very arbitrary, like the fact that Thomas Paine (author of the extremely patriotic Common Sense) was classified as a traitor for a pamphlet he wrote after the war that the patriots didn't agree with, or that one "traitor" ancestor was a slave who fled his patriot owners and fought for the British because he was promised freedom afterword. I think it's frankly horrible that this poor man was branded a "traitor" to some cause he really couldn't care less about and his descendants were forced to participate in this gruesome tradition of deadly duels. And setting all this aside, I think it's ridiculous that all of these people who pride themselves on being descended from the people who fought for American freedoms (only for white male landowners at the beginning, but still) are completely disrespecting those same freedoms to force people into duels against their will.Honestly, though, I should stop and talk about the positives. I did like some of the side characters, though Jasper seemed like a very bland character without much personality of his own–and I completely disagree with an immoral choice that he made during the climax. I would say that the book could be good for younger kids who love spy stories and history, but it's got some pretty terrible languge (including several instances of the f-word), so I don't want to recommend it to anyone who's not ready for that. Basically, if you've read my semi-ranting review and still think you'd like to read the book, and you don't mind some bad language, then go ahead and give League of American Traitors a try. Maybe you can find something in it that I couldn't.Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cassi
    January 1, 1970
    This book combined so many things that I absolutely love and I couldn't help but be excited about reading it. I am such a fan of historical mysteries and one involving traitors and the American Revolution is so completely up my alley. And this was definitely a good read but it didn't totally blow me away.One thing I really liked about League of American Traitors is that it is an extremely plot-driven book. It's a much more thrilling and action-packed book than I expected. There is a lot of tensi This book combined so many things that I absolutely love and I couldn't help but be excited about reading it. I am such a fan of historical mysteries and one involving traitors and the American Revolution is so completely up my alley. And this was definitely a good read but it didn't totally blow me away.One thing I really liked about League of American Traitors is that it is an extremely plot-driven book. It's a much more thrilling and action-packed book than I expected. There is a lot of tension and drama throughout the book with plenty of narrow escapes, thrilling heroics, and twists and turns along the way. In this way it definitely lives up to the National Treasure comparison. At times it read way more like an action movie than anything else. And honestly, I'm totally cool with that. I am a plot-driven reader. I like my books to slowly build to a thrilling conclusion and that's what this one did.However, the extreme plot-driven nature of this book was at the detriment of the character development. There was definitely the opportunity here for some coming-of-age heroes journey type plot points but it didn't really quite hit those notes. Or if they did, it was much later in the book than I would have liked it. I think for the most part the characters just didn't jump off the page. I liked the main character of Jasper well enough. I think he was interesting and I definitely connected with him and his sarcastic demeanor. I just felt like his development could have been more pronounced. As for the rest of the characters, they honestly all blended together. I will say, Nora was super interesting. I wanted to know more about her. But all the other characters I kept getting confused by. I couldn't tell who was who and if they should matter. They all just sort of blended together. I did like the references to their historical ancestors though.Because that was another thing that was really great about this book, the historical references. You can tell this book is written by someone who loves American History, particularly someone who loves the American Revolution. There were all kinds of great and somewhat obscure references to historical figures and even more information about people who we think we know so well. You can tell that the author did his research into the period and the figures he was using. But he also took that and made it into an interesting piece of historical fiction. That is what I love about historical fiction and that is one of the things I really enjoyed here.I will say however that I think this book is a little bit on the simpler side. That's not a bad thing, it's just not a very complex read. I read it over the course of two days on a family camping trip where I couldn't devote more than a few hours a day to reading. I think if you wanted to, you could easily finish this 240 page read in a day. I would probably say that it's more on the younger side of YA. Middle Grade readers would probably enjoy it a lot as well. But if you are looking for a really complex and intricate YA historical mystery this may not do it for you.On the whole, League of American Traitors was a good read. It was an action-packed plot driven read with great historical fiction elements. It was a little on the simpler side for YA and I didn't love the characterizations but it was a totally engaging read.
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  • Jennifer Mays
    January 1, 1970
    Seventeen year old Jasper Mansfield is used to traitors. His father abandoned his mother and him, and now that he's dead, Jasper couldn't care less. But then, a mysterious stranger comes to meet him at his father's funeral and tells him about his infamous American legacy: Jasper is the sole surviving descendant of the American traitor Benedict Arnold. Jasper is in the mist of a war between the heroes and traitors of American history that has been going on for centuries. One in which the descenda Seventeen year old Jasper Mansfield is used to traitors. His father abandoned his mother and him, and now that he's dead, Jasper couldn't care less. But then, a mysterious stranger comes to meet him at his father's funeral and tells him about his infamous American legacy: Jasper is the sole surviving descendant of the American traitor Benedict Arnold. Jasper is in the mist of a war between the heroes and traitors of American history that has been going on for centuries. One in which the descendants of heroes and traitors of the American Revolution duel to the death for honor. The only hope Jasper has of escaping his dangerous fate is to continue the research his father was working on up to his death to protect his son and clear Benedict Arnold's name. It's a race for the truth as Jasper is whisked off to a boarding school for the descendants of American traitors. If he is unsuccessful in uncovering the evidence his father was hunting, he may end up paying for the sins of his forefathers with his life. I liked this book. It had action, mystery, deception, and a little romance. One thing that bothered me was how Juniper Hill was rundown and how Headmistress Chillingsworth only cared about weapons and security than the way the students were treated and provided for. Juniper Hill was a run down school that had poor food, overgrown fields, poor dorm rooms, and few resources in which the students can use. With all the money they have, the League of American Traitors should have provided for their students better. I liked the secrecy and betrayal mentioned throughout the book. I kept wondering who the traitor was and I wasn't disappointed. I would never have guessed it. I like books that keep me guessing. It gives me a thrill while reading. The action throughout the book was really good. To me, it brought the story to life and kept the story going. One thing I really liked was the power of friendship. Jasper was only throughout most of his life and he didn't have friends. When he goes to Juniper Hill, he makes friends with his team as well as Colton and Nora. Jasper comes to rely on his friends and starts to trust them. Through his experiences with his friends, he finds it hard to keep secrets from them. It shows he cares about them and doesn't want to hurt or betray them. However, no one is as they seem. The only problems I had with this book is that it was a little slow and it had a few dull moments. Other than that, it was a good book.
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  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    If you're reading this, this book is not in any shape or form like the film NATIONAL TREASURE, or the Broadway play HAMILTON as written on the cover by Bustle. It is extremely misleading. At best, this book is similar to the Harry Potter series in that we, the readers, follow a recently orphaned boy whose parents have died. This all being in the opening chapters. And as you progress, this boy is later admitted into a private boarding school for descendants of those who were deemed as traitors th If you're reading this, this book is not in any shape or form like the film NATIONAL TREASURE, or the Broadway play HAMILTON as written on the cover by Bustle. It is extremely misleading. At best, this book is similar to the Harry Potter series in that we, the readers, follow a recently orphaned boy whose parents have died. This all being in the opening chapters. And as you progress, this boy is later admitted into a private boarding school for descendants of those who were deemed as traitors throughout United States History. Although, this book only includes his first year, or first semester specifically, other years could easily be explored in potential sequels give or take. And during his first year, this orphaned child -- Jasper, is being hunted down by this book's antagonists who also played a role in killing his father who was getting too close in discovering the truth about their family history. Sound familiar? Harry + His Parent's Boldness + Voldemort. While in this story, Jasper happens to be a descendant of Benedict Arnold. But anyway, the writing is on-point and considering how the author, Matthew Landis, almost self-published this five years ago (read acknowledgments) was not surprising to me. It was probably in a very rough state, and I applaud his efforts in making it readable, especially since this book is considered to be teen historical fiction. This is something that is not typically seen in the "YA" market as far as I'm concerned. Regardless, it was a good story and a good read. However, there were flaws and those flaws were his writing style being a little loose as well as his visuals being implicit for the reader. This may be something common in YA as I am not a normal reader of this genre. But anyway, I'll have to say this was a solid debut and it kept my attention. I would be looking forward in reading his next book and hopefully his visuals would be more explicit and accessible. And to note, there were spots where I felt were clearly filler and that the third act (or last chapter specifically) felt like a legal thriller. This may have been intentional but I felt a little bit disappointed in the outcome a bit. It felt a bit rushed with no real lasting impact.
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  • Justicereads
    January 1, 1970
    What an exciting historical fiction novel! I remember reading that League of American Traitors was a mash up between National Treasure and Hamilton, and it was just that! I couldn’t have been happier, as I am an avid National Treasure fan! I like history more and more as I’m experiencing it through these types of novels specifically. This was the first historical fiction novel that I read that wasn’t WWII based, so I was a little nervous to give it a shot, but I am so glad I did. I loved Jasper! What an exciting historical fiction novel! I remember reading that League of American Traitors was a mash up between National Treasure and Hamilton, and it was just that! I couldn’t have been happier, as I am an avid National Treasure fan! I like history more and more as I’m experiencing it through these types of novels specifically. This was the first historical fiction novel that I read that wasn’t WWII based, so I was a little nervous to give it a shot, but I am so glad I did. I loved Jasper! His resilience and determination reminded me so much of myself! And a descendant of Benedict Arnold?! Yes please! I need all of the notorious historical figures discussed in YA fiction the way this one was!I loved how the story opens in a funeral. I think it’s dark but real and when it's real, it grasps on to you. The first two chapters were absolutely filled with action and I knew this book was going to be good. As the chapters continued and the story and characters developed, my assumptions were confirmed. Landis is great story teller and knows exactly how to write about history for YA!I also read that Landis was a history teacher and so I knew that the facts would be just that, facts. I felt that because of his expertise in his field, he was able to really open up the world of U.S. history in a very unique and entertaining way. There are not a lot of authors like that, in my opinion. Sometimes children are looked down upon because of their parents’ actions, I really enjoyed how Landis develops his characters with their pasts held over their heads. Nora was definitely a favorite of mine, but I do wish I would have heard a little more about her. I felt that Jasper was well thought out and handled situations, exactly how you’d expect a 17 year old descendant of Benedict Arnold to handle things, struggling to maintain honor, maturity, and responsibility.With such a clever premise, and so much action, it was pretty difficult to not turn the page. I thoroughly enjoyed the adventures and the clues given throughout the story that ultimately lead to a very satisfying ending.
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  • Lisa Holloway
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for high school students, especially boys! Sometimes it can be hard to find books for this age group. It was fast paced, action packed, and one wild story. There were traitors, duels, mysteries, chases, gunfights, and secret societies. It was one of those books that I looked forward to reading because I really wanted to know what was going to happen. It was not predictable.Although the main character was well developed, I would have liked it if the author put a bit more int This is a great book for high school students, especially boys! Sometimes it can be hard to find books for this age group. It was fast paced, action packed, and one wild story. There were traitors, duels, mysteries, chases, gunfights, and secret societies. It was one of those books that I looked forward to reading because I really wanted to know what was going to happen. It was not predictable.Although the main character was well developed, I would have liked it if the author put a bit more into the minor characters. They had quirks and personalities, but their history was missing, so the reader did not seem to get to know the whole characters. I can see how this would have slowed the pace, though. Also, since the book was really plot driven, I could easily picture the action, but sometimes when the action slowed it wasn't as easy to picture the settings.I expected more of a historical fiction book from reading the summary and knowing that the author was a history teacher. I would not consider this historical fiction. It was more of an action story with some history in it. I actually would have loved more history about the American traitors and heroes, but I can, again, see how that would have slowed the pace.I really liked the themes and some of the thought provoking ideas in this book. I think they are great, especially for teens. For example, one of the questions the main character had was if it was better to kill someone or be killed. My favorite theme was that people are not all good or all bad. I liked the question of why we remember traitors just for the bad things they did. What about the good things?I recommend this book for any age, but especially for teens. This was Matthew Landis' debut novel and he has more coming. I am looking forward to see what else he creates!I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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