Mapping the Interior
Mapping the Interior is a horrifying, inward-looking novella from Stephen Graham Jones that Paul Tremblay calls "emotionally raw, disturbing, creepy, and brilliant." Walking through his own house at night, a fifteen-year-old thinks he sees another person stepping through a doorway. Instead of the people who could be there, his mother or his brother, the figure reminds him of his long-gone father, who died mysteriously before his family left the reservation. When he follows it he discovers his house is bigger and deeper than he knew. The house is the kind of wrong place where you can lose yourself and find things you'd rather not have. Over the course of a few nights, the boy tries to map out his house in an effort that puts his little brother in the worst danger, and puts him in the position to save them . . . at terrible cost.

Mapping the Interior Details

TitleMapping the Interior
Author
Formatebook
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 20th, 2017
PublisherTor.com
Number of pages56 pages
Rating
GenreHorror, Fiction, Fantasy, Novella, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Mapping the Interior Review

  • Mel (Epic Reading)
    June 22, 2017
    You know when you read a book and you know that at least 50% of the symbolism, comparisons, philosophy and psychology went over your head? That's what Mapping the Interior felt like to me. I know there is obviously a lot of importance and density to this novella but ask me to explain it or pull out snippets and I struggle knowing I missed a lot of somethings I can't articulate. "There are rules, I know. Not knowing them doesn't mean they don't apply to you.This is a story of a Native American bo You know when you read a book and you know that at least 50% of the symbolism, comparisons, philosophy and psychology went over your head? That's what Mapping the Interior felt like to me. I know there is obviously a lot of importance and density to this novella but ask me to explain it or pull out snippets and I struggle knowing I missed a lot of somethings I can't articulate. "There are rules, I know. Not knowing them doesn't mean they don't apply to you.This is a story of a Native American boy whose mourning a lost father, coping with leaving the reserve, trying to protect his damaged little brother and be the man of the house for his mom. It's a sad story and one I have heard variations of from other Natives in Canada many times. Having attended a junior high school where we had reserve kids it was always obvious that us "city kids" (as they called us) had it pretty darn good. Even those who didn't have it so good we're still better off in comparison. So very sad and yet so true. "...like the same stupid person is trying life after life until he gets it right at last."Mapping the Interior is about the cycle of shame, loss and how you are destined to be your fathers son whether you want to be or not. And while, again, I'm not sure I understood all the nuances of the book I'm glad I read it. If only for a reminder, in the year that Canada celebrates 150 years as a nation, that we built this nation on top of others existing culture and life. Be it right or wrong at the time it happened, and given we can't change that, we should at least remember and reach a hand out to help break the cycle and provide opportunities for those children and adults who are stuck in a life of poverty and helplessness. It's difficult to give literature like this a rating. It almost feels inappropriate to rate it. Like I can't put a value on something I can't entirely understand. So I will give four stars because it's an important story told in this novella, but the deep metaphorical overlay of the story leaves me feeling inadequate and doesn't make its point in an easily accessible way. To read this and more of my reviews visit my blog at Epic Reading Please note: I received an eARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. This is an honest and unbiased review.
    more
  • Char
    June 10, 2017
    Mapping the Interior touched me in a way that's hard to define. A young man, missing and thinking of the father who died before he could really be known, believes he saw his father coming through a doorway. From there, we learn more about this young man, his family, Native American culture, and superstitions. In a way, this could be interpreted as a ghost story. In another interpretation it could be thought of a coming of age story-with perhaps a little psychological horror on the side. Howeve Mapping the Interior touched me in a way that's hard to define. A young man, missing and thinking of the father who died before he could really be known, believes he saw his father coming through a doorway. From there, we learn more about this young man, his family, Native American culture, and superstitions. In a way, this could be interpreted as a ghost story. In another interpretation it could be thought of a coming of age story-with perhaps a little psychological horror on the side. However it's interpreted, whatever genre it's labeled, the fact remains that it moves the reader. It's a powerful piece of work. I'm not going to go further into the plot, because I think the reader should discover it for themselves. I know that it brought me back to certain points in my childhood and how I felt about things, but I can't seem to adequately explain how it made me feel. Mapping the Interior resonated deeply with me and I'll have to leave it at that. I give it my highest recommendation. You can order a copy here: Mapping the Interior*Thanks to Tor and to NetGalley for the e-ARC of this novella, in exchange for my honest review. This is it.*
    more
  • Richard
    June 19, 2017
    This elegiac but dragging new novella by Stephen Graham Jones features a haunting in the way that I believe it would actually occur. Not with translucent, floating apparitions banging on walls, levitating over you while you sleep, or chasing you down the halls of your house, but a haunting by something much more personal, quiet, and understated the way it is here.Jones uses weaves together elements of horror, superstition, family conflict, and Native American culture and lore to tell a coming of This elegiac but dragging new novella by Stephen Graham Jones features a haunting in the way that I believe it would actually occur. Not with translucent, floating apparitions banging on walls, levitating over you while you sleep, or chasing you down the halls of your house, but a haunting by something much more personal, quiet, and understated the way it is here.Jones uses weaves together elements of horror, superstition, family conflict, and Native American culture and lore to tell a coming of age story about a young boy searching for ways to connect with his dead father, who has begun to visit him and his brother late at night. In many horror books, the haunting is an external thing, a disturbance that our main character has to overcome. But here, I believe that the haunting is more interior, more a product of Junior's insecurities, fears, and desire for memories and closure than anything else. And to overcome it he has to overcome something within himself.I do feel like it could've been a little more efficient in it's storytelling though. It feels extra-wordy and bloated and dulled the experience a bit. It would've been much more memorable if it was focused a bit more in the delivery. Big ups to Netgalley and Tor Books for the Advance Reader Copy in exchange for this honest review.
    more
  • Book Riot Community
    June 21, 2017
    This is a creepy Native American horror novella from one of the most inventive writers working today! A teenage boy wakes in the night to see his father going through a doorway. There’s a problem: his father is dead, having died under mysterious circumstances before his family left the reservation. Still, he follows him through the doorway, only to discover the house is much bigger than he thought. And if he goes the wrong way, he will find things that were better off hidden. Dun-dun-dunnnnnnnnn This is a creepy Native American horror novella from one of the most inventive writers working today! A teenage boy wakes in the night to see his father going through a doorway. There’s a problem: his father is dead, having died under mysterious circumstances before his family left the reservation. Still, he follows him through the doorway, only to discover the house is much bigger than he thought. And if he goes the wrong way, he will find things that were better off hidden. Dun-dun-dunnnnnnnnn!Backlist bump: After the People Lights Have Gone Off by Stephen Graham JonesTune in to our weekly podcast dedicated to all things new books, All The Books: http://bookriot.com/listen/shows/allt...
    more
  • Michael Hicks
    June 18, 2017
    I know this one is getting a lot of love, but it just doesn't do much for me. It's a short read, so I don't feel particularly cheated by the time spent with it, and although I found it pretty dull overall, I feel largely ambivalent about the work as a whole. The biggest barrier between me and the story was the writing style. The writing was just too choppy for my tastes, and the sentence constructions irked me. How so? Well, a lot of the sentences, it was written like this. "Our house, like I sa I know this one is getting a lot of love, but it just doesn't do much for me. It's a short read, so I don't feel particularly cheated by the time spent with it, and although I found it pretty dull overall, I feel largely ambivalent about the work as a whole. The biggest barrier between me and the story was the writing style. The writing was just too choppy for my tastes, and the sentence constructions irked me. How so? Well, a lot of the sentences, it was written like this. "Our house, like I said, it was modular." "Anyway, the house we were renting, it was 1140 square feet." "The difference, it was that I wasn't asleep." "The reason I didn't, it was that I think I finally went into shock." "The reason she got a different lightbulb, it was that when she'd turned it on..." There's a sentence like this on damn near every page, and frankly it irked the shit out of me. This style of writing, it was something that got old for me fast.I did appreciate the focus on Native American myth and culture, though, and the ways in which it fueled this particular ghost story. And while there were a couple really good scenes, their impact was dulled with unnecessary wordiness. This might have worked better as a short story, but as a novella it feels too padded.[Note: I received an advanced copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley.]
    more
  • Lori
    May 14, 2017
    Stephen Graham Jones skillfully combines American Indian lore with the innocence of childhood in this novella about a teenage boy who fears his long-deceased father has made a home for himself beneath their modular home. SGJ teasingly blurs the line between reality and imagination.. and it was exactly that quiet horror of what *might* be that kept me hooked!
    more
  • Monica **can't read fast enough**
    June 20, 2017
    Mapping the Interior is a chillingly hair raising, yet emotional read. This novella grabbed me from the beginning and kept me locked in until the very end. This was my first time reading a story by Stephen Graham Jones, but I will be grabbing some of his backlist titles soon. I have most definitely been missing out. I won't go into any plot details so as not to give away spoilers. I think that it is best to go into this one knowing as little as possible. The fun of reading stories like this is t Mapping the Interior is a chillingly hair raising, yet emotional read. This novella grabbed me from the beginning and kept me locked in until the very end. This was my first time reading a story by Stephen Graham Jones, but I will be grabbing some of his backlist titles soon. I have most definitely been missing out. I won't go into any plot details so as not to give away spoilers. I think that it is best to go into this one knowing as little as possible. The fun of reading stories like this is the uncertainty of exactly what is unfolding and which turn the story will take. Although this is a quick read, it isn't an 'easy' one. Jones writes in a way that makes the reader pay attention or be left behind. Jones doesn't spoon feed nuanced information, he allows his reader to make the necessary connections on their own. If you are looking for a read with a little creepiness without being an outright horror story, I would recommend picking up Mapping the Interior and experiencing a ghost story that will stick with you long after you finish. I recieved an ARC in exchange for an honest review.**You can find me at:•(♥).•*Monlatable Book Reviews*•.(♥)•Twitter: @MonlatReaderInstagram: @readermonicaFacebook: Monica Reeds
    more
  • Rana
    June 28, 2017
    Briliant short story that took a decidedly unexpected turn at the end.
  • USOM
    May 24, 2017
    Wow. This novella. It is amazingly rich, full of details and a phenomenal main character. There's not much I can say without spoiling the plot, and even now I still don't know what the 'truth' is - a true stroke of a good writer. There are twists and turns that leave you questioning everything, the protagonist, the story, the reality of his world. Truly excellent. Additionally, the perspective that Jones brings into his character and his heritage is refreshing. Having never read anything like th Wow. This novella. It is amazingly rich, full of details and a phenomenal main character. There's not much I can say without spoiling the plot, and even now I still don't know what the 'truth' is - a true stroke of a good writer. There are twists and turns that leave you questioning everything, the protagonist, the story, the reality of his world. Truly excellent. Additionally, the perspective that Jones brings into his character and his heritage is refreshing. Having never read anything like this, I am utterly blow away.Disclaimer. I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
    more
  • Nthato Morakabi
    February 28, 2017
    Well that was a great read. This pulled me back to my younger days, reading Stephen King for the first time and drawing into the lives and horrors of a family. Of a boy who sees a shadowed ghost of his father. Of a boy with hope. Of a boy who does not understand horror until it pulls him into the murky, tepid waters until it's too lateA wonderfully written novella by a talented man. The writing has a few odds and ends that make it difficult to follow exactly, some things that could have been sai Well that was a great read. This pulled me back to my younger days, reading Stephen King for the first time and drawing into the lives and horrors of a family. Of a boy who sees a shadowed ghost of his father. Of a boy with hope. Of a boy who does not understand horror until it pulls him into the murky, tepid waters until it's too lateA wonderfully written novella by a talented man. The writing has a few odds and ends that make it difficult to follow exactly, some things that could have been said better, but it does not take away from the overall story. And what an ending too.
    more
  • Barry
    May 22, 2017
    NOTE: This review originally appeared on New York Journal of Books: http://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book-...There’s something profoundly upsetting in the thought of being able to interact with a late family member—upsetting and disturbing. Such is the twisted, black, beating heart at the center of Stephen Graham Jones’ latest tale, Mapping the Interior.Jones has always had a knack for telling unusual stories that challenge and break through a wide variety of genres; yet there is often a theme of NOTE: This review originally appeared on New York Journal of Books: http://www.nyjournalofbooks.com/book-...There’s something profoundly upsetting in the thought of being able to interact with a late family member—upsetting and disturbing. Such is the twisted, black, beating heart at the center of Stephen Graham Jones’ latest tale, Mapping the Interior.Jones has always had a knack for telling unusual stories that challenge and break through a wide variety of genres; yet there is often a theme of profound loss, and all the emotions that surround it, which recurs in many of his works, making for tales that are as emotionally powerful as they are unsettling, and Mapping is no exception to this.A dark and surreal coming-of-age story (most definitely geared toward adults, however, and not the YA crowd), Mapping is the narrative of Junior, a 15-year-old boy living with his mother and seizure-prone younger brother, Dino, in a small trailer in the southwest. Junior occasionally sleepwalks—which is how he discovers a man, who looks like his late father, dressed in traditional Blackfeet regalia, walking through the house late one night.Faced with a possible ghost in his house, Junior begins to question everything he thinks he knows, from the truth behind his father’s death to what the ghost wants . . . and the deeper into the mysteries (and the house) Junior goes, the darker and more disturbing the answers become.Over the book’s short span (only barely over 100 pages), Junior’s explorations take some very surprising and eerie turns, including an absolutely unnerving expedition in the dark spaces beneath the house. This sequence is full of claustrophobic terror, and not for the squeamish, if only for its many unseen and implied horrors of what Junior touches (or is touched by) in the shadows.Although a short tale, with most of the plot centered around Junior’s dark quest for truth, there is a heavy emphasis on his emotional journey, pondering life, death, and what he believes must come after.“When you come back from the dead,” Junior ponders at one point, “you’re a spirit, you’re nothing, just some leftover attention, some unassociated memory. But then, what if a cat’s sneaked into some dark space like this, right? What if that cat comes here to die, because it got slapped out on a road or hit by an owl or something, so it lays back in the corner to pant it out alone. Except, when it’s in that state, when it’s hurt like that, when this cat isn’t watching the way it usually does, something else can creep in. Something dead.”Why is Junior’s father back from the dead? Why is he dressed in “fancydancer” clothing? And what does it all mean for Junior, who seems to be the only person in his family aware of his father’s return? These questions and more are raised through the course of this novella, in Jones’ signature, stream-of-consciousness narrative style, and although some are answered, they only raise more questions.Despite these many larger questions being raised from a young perspective, there are some truly disquieting and gruesome sequences that keeps one foot of this novella planted firmly in the realm of horror fiction. Junior’s journey takes him far beyond the heart of darkness beating beneath his family’s home, concluding on a bleak note that is sure to give even the most steadfast reader a shiver. Mapping the Interior is a darkly meditative tale of innocence, family, and ghosts that only Stephen Graham Jones could tell.
    more
  • Books, Vertigo and Tea (Danielle)
    June 14, 2017
    Mapping the Interior is a stirring novella that is difficult to label. While there is a certainly element of horror and the paranormal occurring within its absorbing pages, there is something more magical happening.Mapping the Interior is the story of a 15 yr old boy who is unexpectedly reacquainted with his father after leaving the reservation. However, there is a small complication with the encounter. His father lost his life under unexplained circumstances. What ensues is a poignant tale of l Mapping the Interior is a stirring novella that is difficult to label. While there is a certainly element of horror and the paranormal occurring within its absorbing pages, there is something more magical happening.Mapping the Interior is the story of a 15 yr old boy who is unexpectedly reacquainted with his father after leaving the reservation. However, there is a small complication with the encounter. His father lost his life under unexplained circumstances. What ensues is a poignant tale of life, loss and family and that is beautifully saturated with culture and wonder.We are supplied with a young protagonist who is facing adversity on multiple levels. Young Junior is mourning the loss of a father that he cannot fully comprehend. He is living off of the reservation and adjusting to a new life that is not without challenges. He holds an adherent obligation to protect his younger brother Dino who is suffering what can best be described as seizures and cognitive impairment. His single mother is at the disadvantage of struggling to provide full financial support for the family, while also attending to Dino’s healthcare needs. We are thrust into a dismal environment that quickly plays on the emotions, creating an intense experience that will obscure the lines between reality and fantasy.This is a ghost story brilliantly utilized to fashion a tale of discovery and realization. Haunting components are manipulated in order to carry Junior through a journey that will dare him to confront a difficult past and the reality of the present. Sometimes things are not as they seem. Sometimes we must look deep within ourselves to find the answers and closure we seek.Mapping the Interior is as refreshing as it is transfixing. Culture, grief and family dynamics merge to construct an unforgettable story that evokes multiple emotions and resonates with powerful meaning. This is likely to be a very personalized experience with each encounter. I am resolutely giving Mapping the Exterior the highest recommendation.* I would like to thank Tor for providing me with this copy. The review above is my own unbiased opinion.You may also find this review on Books, Vertigo and Tea.
    more
  • Matthew Galloway
    June 12, 2017
    I sometimes found the writing a tad confusing, but this one was definitely a creepy, yet moving, read. I'll definitely be reading more of the author's work.
  • Gary
    May 22, 2017
    An unusual novella that I got to read in galley form. It is a disturbing and somewhat genre and convention defying ghost story, but such a description does not do it justice. Steeped in Native American lore and knowledge (the author is a Native American) it's only real drawback is that the only two sympathetic characters are supporting characters. An interesting and quick read nonetheless.
    more
  • Edward Rathke
    June 27, 2017
    Reminds me of the best of Stephen's writing, but, for me, it never hit those real high notes.It's a great little novella about a boy, his dead dad, his brother, and his mother, that has a ton of heart, some laughs, and some scares. It reminds me a lot of The Long Trial of Nolan Dugatti, but it's more straightforward and less playful. No one writes teenagers as well as Stephen, and this really captures that feel of being young and not knowing the world, not fitting into the world the way you thin Reminds me of the best of Stephen's writing, but, for me, it never hit those real high notes.It's a great little novella about a boy, his dead dad, his brother, and his mother, that has a ton of heart, some laughs, and some scares. It reminds me a lot of The Long Trial of Nolan Dugatti, but it's more straightforward and less playful. No one writes teenagers as well as Stephen, and this really captures that feel of being young and not knowing the world, not fitting into the world the way you think you should. And because this is about a boy's dead dad, it's also about how we grow up knowing and not knowing certain things.But, yeah, it's solid, and the rating is maybe influenced by having read 20 of Stephen's books, making it less of an objective figure and more of a comparison to his other work. Either way, it's awesome.With this and Mongrels, I feel like Stephen's peeling off a lot of the tricks that obfuscate so much of the heart of his stories and characters. These just bleed on the page and we feel every drop.
    more
  • Silvana [The Book Voyagers]
    May 29, 2017
    Sometimes the writing confused me and the timeline seemed weird, but to be honest this seems to happen lots for Tor novellas so I'm okay with it, but otherwise this book was really something. It had its spooky moments and how Stephen Graham Jones draws the story and makes me be there with Junior and Dino and their mom. If you're looking for a book about Native Americans written by a NA author, you should check this out when it's out! It's a novella so you'll fly by, but never doubt so MANY THING Sometimes the writing confused me and the timeline seemed weird, but to be honest this seems to happen lots for Tor novellas so I'm okay with it, but otherwise this book was really something. It had its spooky moments and how Stephen Graham Jones draws the story and makes me be there with Junior and Dino and their mom. If you're looking for a book about Native Americans written by a NA author, you should check this out when it's out! It's a novella so you'll fly by, but never doubt so MANY THINGS HAPPEN and they're so intense and great. I really enjoyed the plot, like I said it was a bit confusing at first, but it really picks up and shows us amazing things in the pages of this book. I do love Tor's books so much, especially their fantasy/sci-fi stuff. Plus look at this cover it's gorgeous.
    more
  • Cassandra
    April 21, 2017
    Bruise-dark like all of Jones' writing, there's an ache in its pages that is hard to refute. It is a compact read, one that'd have fellow claustrophobes cringing, and also one that evokes the restlessness of a difficult childhood. Born and raised in Malaysia, I don't think I have the background to comment on how well the book deals with Native American identity, but I can say this: it is brilliant at calling up the hurt of a dead parent, the hurt of being an outsider, the hurt of always having t Bruise-dark like all of Jones' writing, there's an ache in its pages that is hard to refute. It is a compact read, one that'd have fellow claustrophobes cringing, and also one that evokes the restlessness of a difficult childhood. Born and raised in Malaysia, I don't think I have the background to comment on how well the book deals with Native American identity, but I can say this: it is brilliant at calling up the hurt of a dead parent, the hurt of being an outsider, the hurt of always having to be watchful. I'll be thinking of this one for a while.
    more
  • Jon Shank
    June 24, 2017
    I'm fairly new to Jones, though I have enjoyed his work. He writes horror with a deep emotional core. I have only read this and his collection The Ones That Got Away, so I have a limited perspective of his body of work. Still, he seems less concerned with the easy scare, the gross out factor, and death (in the way that most horror writer's deal with death), and more about the horror of living trying to live a good life and often failing. This novella tells the story of Junior, who is looking bac I'm fairly new to Jones, though I have enjoyed his work. He writes horror with a deep emotional core. I have only read this and his collection The Ones That Got Away, so I have a limited perspective of his body of work. Still, he seems less concerned with the easy scare, the gross out factor, and death (in the way that most horror writer's deal with death), and more about the horror of living trying to live a good life and often failing. This novella tells the story of Junior, who is looking back on his 12th year of life when his father, briefly, came back to life about spending eight years dead. At first Junior welcomes his father's return, but comes to regret it later. At its heart, its a story about a young boy trying to become a man for his mother and his mentally challenged brother, and, at the end, when the story moves into the present, for his own son. The end, though somewhat ambiguous, is frustrating and sad/ My only problem with this story is the transition from Junior seeing his father's return in a positive light to seeing him as a threat. Junior develops certain beliefs and rules around ghosts and the dead that return. Beliefs that he doesn't support and never really questions. Junior struggles with guilt over having to dispel his father's ghost, but never questions that he's doing the right thing. I couldn't buy into Junior's thinking, couldn't help be think he was doing his dad an injustice. What he does at the end, for me, only added to this feeling. Jones likes ambiguity (as do I). However, I think a little more clarity would have made the story work better for me overall. Still, enjoyed it. Jones's first person narratives always feel authentic to me. I also enjoyed the depths he chose to explore in this work. I look forward to reading more from him (and as he seems super prolific, I'm sure he'll keep me reading for a long time).
    more
  • Maria
    June 27, 2017
    I feel that this would have worked better as a full-length novel because we would have gotten the chance to get a bit more backstory, and it would have added more depth to the characters. That said, there is some beautiful imagery throughout the story. The hero's struggle with his inner demons and his effort to stand up to his father's ghost, or maybe said ghost is actually a manifestation of his demons which is an aspect that I found very interesting, comes across adequately enough for the most I feel that this would have worked better as a full-length novel because we would have gotten the chance to get a bit more backstory, and it would have added more depth to the characters. That said, there is some beautiful imagery throughout the story. The hero's struggle with his inner demons and his effort to stand up to his father's ghost, or maybe said ghost is actually a manifestation of his demons which is an aspect that I found very interesting, comes across adequately enough for the most part but maybe gets a bit too confusing towards the end. Since this is a story very rich in symbolism, I understand that some things are meant to remain hidden to the reader, or better said, are meant to be not easily discernible, so I feel the need to acknowledge the fact the confusion may have been deliberate. Overall, I think it succeeds in accomplishing its purpose but the reading experience left me feeling kind of unsatisfied.I want to thank the publisher for kindly providing me with a copy of this book via NetGalley.
    more
  • Hayden
    June 21, 2017
    If Hollywood had any guts, someone would pick this novella up and make it work on the big screen. There's a dark Spielberg thing in here. Set not in E.T.'s suburban cookie cutter sprawl, but out on the fringes. Out where you might have an old truck tire half-buried in the yard of the house you're renting, and you have to work the antenna to get a picture on the TV. You have two boys, living with a single mom. The oldest, the narrator, he's thinking about his departed dad more and more. The young If Hollywood had any guts, someone would pick this novella up and make it work on the big screen. There's a dark Spielberg thing in here. Set not in E.T.'s suburban cookie cutter sprawl, but out on the fringes. Out where you might have an old truck tire half-buried in the yard of the house you're renting, and you have to work the antenna to get a picture on the TV. You have two boys, living with a single mom. The oldest, the narrator, he's thinking about his departed dad more and more. The younger...well, he has his brother to look out for him. Mom's trying. Moved her family away from the reservation because she thought things would be better here. The story is about family. About the things you can believe when you want, or need, them enough. Things that might come crawling, for better or worse.Mapping the Interior has teeth (like most all of Stephen Graham Jones's stuff), and it has shadows, but there's a heart in there, too. Mongrels was like that, and it was my favorite thing by SGJ up to that point. I don't know that I like Mapping... more, but I genuinely loved this novella.
    more
  • Dave
    June 26, 2017
    My first encounter with this author was in his werewolf novel Mongrels which I thoroughly enjoyed. Mapping the Interior is another story about family dynamics and history with the terror ratcheted up. We are introduced by way of a horror story to twelve-year-old Junior who carries the stories of his culture and long dead father. He also sleepwalks and he sees ghosts. But this story isn’t really about ghosts is it, just like Mongrels wasn’t about lycanthropy? Read the rest of the review:http://th My first encounter with this author was in his werewolf novel Mongrels which I thoroughly enjoyed. Mapping the Interior is another story about family dynamics and history with the terror ratcheted up. We are introduced by way of a horror story to twelve-year-old Junior who carries the stories of his culture and long dead father. He also sleepwalks and he sees ghosts. But this story isn’t really about ghosts is it, just like Mongrels wasn’t about lycanthropy? Read the rest of the review:http://thebrazenbull.com/books/mappin...
    more
  • Dorothy O'Connell
    June 22, 2017
    I'm not going to sleep tonightThis novella is Stephen Graham Jones at his deepest interior. Full of love, grace, tragedy, and pain. All of them carried in the blood from generation to generation, through the broken hearts and lives of a family. Ah, dammit. I'm tearing up again. The deepest horror in Jones' stories is that you know them and you know they're true. They're true.
    more
  • Areanna Garcia
    May 22, 2017
    Areanna
  • Danya
    June 12, 2017
    This is a very well written, very dark and disturbing novella. While I'm impressed by it and was captivated by the story, I can't exactly say that I liked it. A tough read by a talented author.Full review to come!
  • Sarah
    June 30, 2017
    This is a weird one. It was very creepy, and had it's moments of thoughtfulness and beauty but there was something that dragged for me that didn't fully pull me in. I think it was the writing. Choppy and inconsistent, it attempted to make everything fill heavier and maybe meatier but ended up making it confusing. Perhaps I didn't quite get it or maybe it was that the writing just didn't work, but that was the one big thing that bothered me. Otherwise I enjoyed it the creepy, rawness of it. The This is a weird one. It was very creepy, and had it's moments of thoughtfulness and beauty but there was something that dragged for me that didn't fully pull me in. I think it was the writing. Choppy and inconsistent, it attempted to make everything fill heavier and maybe meatier but ended up making it confusing. Perhaps I didn't quite get it or maybe it was that the writing just didn't work, but that was the one big thing that bothered me. Otherwise I enjoyed it the creepy, rawness of it. The idea and the emotion that did come through was great. There was just something in the sentence structure and writing, it didn't quite succeed for me.
    more
  • Cadence
    June 28, 2017
    Wow. The voice of 'Junior', the narrator in this story is the same sort of tight lipped realist that typifies Jones' writing style. The book is short but compelling - I had to know what happened in the end. I have to say, as a reader who can usually guess the surprise ending a mile away, it's really nice to read a book where I'm caught SO off guard.
    more
  • Elisa
    June 27, 2017
    Not my cup of tea. I couldn't get past the gratuitous animal cruelty. It's scary and creepy, I just didn't like it.
Write a review