I Believe in a Thing Called Love
Desi Lee knows how carburetors work. She learned CPR at the age of five. As a high school senior, she has never missed a day of school and has never had a B in her entire life. She's for sure going to Stanford. But—she’s never had a boyfriend. In fact, she’s a disaster in romance, a clumsy, stammering humiliation-magnet whose botched attempts at flirting have become legendary with her friends. So when the hottest human specimen to have ever lived walks into her life one day, Desi decides to tackle her flirting failures with the same zest she’s applied to everything else in her life. She finds her answer in the Korean dramas her father has been obsessively watching for years—where the hapless heroine always seems to end up in the arms of her true love by episode ten. It's a simple formula, and Desi is a quick study. Armed with her “K Drama Rules for True Love,” Desi goes after the moody, elusive artist Luca Drakos—and boat rescues, love triangles, and fake car crashes ensue. But when the fun and games turn to true feels, Desi finds out that real love is about way more than just drama.

I Believe in a Thing Called Love Details

TitleI Believe in a Thing Called Love
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 30th, 2017
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN0374304041
ISBN-139780374304041
Number of pages336 pages
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Romance, Fiction, Young Adult Contemporary, Young Adult Romance, Academic, School, Realistic Fiction

I Believe in a Thing Called Love Review

  • Cait • A Page with a View
    March 2, 2017
    Easily one of the best YA contemporaries I've ever read. Absolutely hilarious & endearing. Review to come!Thank you to the publisher for sending me an ARC!
  • Bentley ★ Bookbastion.net
    March 31, 2017
    Full disclaimer, I've never seen a K-Drama before (although this book definitely peaked my interest in them) so I can't definitively judge how well this book actually aligns with the execution of the televised dramas. However, Maurene Goo does a spectacular job of explaining them to readers who have never seen them before, and based on her explanation, I think I have a handle on how they work. Plus, I had my wonderful reading buddy, Josh (Forever Bookish Josh) reading along with me and he helped Full disclaimer, I've never seen a K-Drama before (although this book definitely peaked my interest in them) so I can't definitively judge how well this book actually aligns with the execution of the televised dramas. However, Maurene Goo does a spectacular job of explaining them to readers who have never seen them before, and based on her explanation, I think I have a handle on how they work. Plus, I had my wonderful reading buddy, Josh (Forever Bookish Josh) reading along with me and he helped fill me in too. I want to be clear: rating this book was difficult! I kept going back and forth between 3 and 4 stars for a number of reasons. There's some super cute and endearing aspects of this book, and it's quite well written, but I can't just overlook some of the more problematic elements either. One thing I loved about this story was the diverse and widely varied characters. There's so much positive representation and visibility here, which is always a plus in my book. Desi's parents emigrated to America before she was born, so her Korean heritage is still a large part of her life and factors heavily into the story. One of my favorite aspects had to be the quieter moments, between Desi and her father. Maurene Goo incorporates a lot of information about Korean culture: television, language, food, etc., in their conversations and left me feeling like this is one book where I'm coming away from it feeling like I learned a few things. Also, can I just say how refreshing it is to see a healthy parent/teenage protagonist relationship in a YA novel? I feel like so often the parents are absent from the story, or enemies of the main character and that's certainly not the case here. However, despite how cute and fun I may have found those smaller, more intimate moments, I was really dismayed by the main character, Desi, and found her behavior extremely problematic. Despite being the Valedictorian of her graduating class, Desi has extreme self-esteem issues and can't talk to boys without embarrassing herself, so she comes up with a plan to land herself Luca Drakos, the hottest boy in school. Utilizing steps meticulously taken from the K-Dramas she watches with her dad, Desi sets out to seduce herself a boyfriend. There's just one problem: she becomes totally complicit in lying, and hurting other people in order to do it. Which I just can't get behind. I'm not even going to beat around the bush here. Desi's actions reach a point where the only way I could enjoy the story any further was to pretend that I was reading a psychological thriller. Seriously, that's how absurd some of the choices she makes are. The poor girl was in need of a therapist by the end of the book, not a boyfriend. One question I like to ask myself as I read, is "if the genders were reversed, would we still support this character's choices," and in all honesty, I don't think we would. I don't mean to imply that I disliked this book. On the contrary, I really enjoyed most of it. It's fast-paced, and the conversations between characters are really cute. I just wanted more accountability for Desi's actions in the end than we ended up getting. ★★★✯✩ = 3.5 stars!See this review and more like it on my bookblog: Book ★ Bastion___________________________________Buddy Reading this with my good friend Josh (Forever Bookish Josh). I've realized recently I'm woefully under-read in YA contemporaries, so this book seems like a perfect starting point to rectify that!
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  • Maggie
    September 8, 2016
    20+ YEARS OF WATCHING KOREAN DRAMAS WITH MY MOM HAVE COME DOWN TO THIS MOMENT.
  • Joshua Gabriel (Forever Bookish Josh)
    March 31, 2017
    Thank you, Macmillan, for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Unexpected things happen, but it's how we react to them, how we learn and evolve from these things that shapes us into who we are. —DesiThe moment I saw the blurb of this book, I was overwhelmed by the desire to get my hands on it. With the exception of Jenny Han's To All the Boys I've Loved Before, I hardly own YA novels that feature Korean/Asian protagonists, let alone characters who love K dramas. Being Thank you, Macmillan, for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Unexpected things happen, but it's how we react to them, how we learn and evolve from these things that shapes us into who we are. —DesiThe moment I saw the blurb of this book, I was overwhelmed by the desire to get my hands on it. With the exception of Jenny Han's To All the Boys I've Loved Before, I hardly own YA novels that feature Korean/Asian protagonists, let alone characters who love K dramas. Being a fellow Asian and K drama fan, you can only imagine the happiness I felt when I was given the opportunity to read this book early.I Believe in a Thing Called Love has a unique and engrossing premise. Desi, an admirable nerd, is used to setting goals and getting what she wants. She excels at everything academic, but she strangely sucks at love. Inspired by her favorite K dramas (and their formulaic happy endings), she devices a supposedly perfect plan to make Luca, her crush, fall for her.This book had me hooked from the start. It was so funny, relatable, and downright entertaining. Desi's romantic bloopers, aka "flailures," were especially giggle-worthy. I felt sorry for her, but I had a hunch that her choleric (and adorably nerdy) personality would eventually pay off. I had fun analyzing her nearly "sociopathic" behavior; she was somehow similar to Amazing Amy of Gone Girl. Desi's relationship with her father was another thing that I enjoyed. They were practically best friends, but it was still apparent that she acknowledged his authority over her. It is also important (and funny) to note that Desi's father was the original K drama fan in their family. Without his influence, Desi wouldn't have come up with a flawless plan to get herself a man.The diversity in this book also deserved my applause. Both Desi and Luca were people of color, and Fiona, Desi's bff, was lesbian. Wes, Desi's second bff, exhibited behavior that made me suspect that he was gay, too. I apologize in advance if I was simply influenced by stereotypes while I analyzed his characterization. Nonetheless, this novel got an A+ from me in terms of racial and sexual diversity.In retrospect, Desi's "talent" for manipulation was the primary catalyst behind my 3-star rating. Desi was irrevocably an empowered female in light of her agency, but I found it hard to support her every time she intentionally toyed with Luca's feelings. In totality, Desi was goal-oriented to a fault. Until now, I cannot decide if her story deserves a happy ending because I do not appreciate the objectification of any sex.This book's affirmation of the Bad Father stereotype also hampered my enjoyment. I generally liked Luca because of his sweet and artistic personality, but I was annoyed that he predictably had daddy issues. I can hardly wait for YA lit to overcome this dreadful trope! :lOverall, I Believe in a Thing Called Love is exactly like your typical Korean drama. It will give you a lot of happy feels, but it is mostly predictable. Yes, I did not enjoy it to the fullest. Still, I would recommend it to readers who are looking for a cute and refreshingly diverse book.
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  • Giselle (Book Nerd Canada)
    September 7, 2016
    Doth my eyes deceive me? Is that an Asian model on this cover?! :O
  • Amanda Pearl
    September 13, 2016
    To say that I'm excited for this is a severe understatement.ALMOST PPAAAAAARRRAAADIIIIIIIISSEE!
  • Amber
    September 16, 2016
    A book about a girl who uses k-dramas as a guide to flirting and romance????I NEED.
  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    October 1, 2016
    Okay so I am usually not one for cover models, like ever, though it sometimes works for contemporary or modern setting book I guess. However, I must say it is pretty nice to see an Asian cover model on this. Basically it's just nice to be included. I've really been looking forward to this because I have a pretty strong feeling I can relate, and I love K-dramas so this should be fun lol
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  • Anya
    September 15, 2016
    YES, A THOUSAND TIMES YES. The universe needs this book.
  • Ava
    February 16, 2017
    This was so so cute. Why you should read it:•Korean mc•lots of k drama references!•an amazing father/daughter relationship•excellent friendships•super cute romance 3.5 or 4 stars, I'm not sure yet.
  • Kristin Hackett (SuperSpaceChick)
    April 27, 2017
    3.5 stars - Really cute and fun!
  • Alexa
    April 8, 2017
    If you've ever enjoyed a Korean drama, you'll likely enjoy I BELIEVE IN A THING CALLED LOVE as much as I did! As a girl who used to watch Korean dramas (it's a family pastime, actually), I was eager to get my hands on a copy of this book. It was as adorable, and funny, and quirky as I expected, a total romantic comedy in book form, and I had a lot of fun reading it.
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  • Kelly
    December 25, 2016
    I think this book ruined me for all other books. SWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN FOREVERRRRRRRRRRR
  • Muggleboooks
    April 22, 2017
    Being an Asian and a K-Drama fan, being approved of having to review this book brought me a-100% joy! Reading the blurb, I immediately knew that I'd love the MC, a Korean-American teenage girl with a cool father who loves watching K-Dramas... Or would I?Meet Desi Lee, an outstanding student, a goal-setter, a complete control freak, she excels at anything except love. Then she met the artist, Luca Drakos (what a cool name right?) and she'd do anything to make the boy fall in love with her. Of cou Being an Asian and a K-Drama fan, being approved of having to review this book brought me a-100% joy! Reading the blurb, I immediately knew that I'd love the MC, a Korean-American teenage girl with a cool father who loves watching K-Dramas... Or would I?Meet Desi Lee, an outstanding student, a goal-setter, a complete control freak, she excels at anything except love. Then she met the artist, Luca Drakos (what a cool name right?) and she'd do anything to make the boy fall in love with her. Of course, with the help of her listed steps or Rules on How to Achieve True Love. A round of applause for the well-made diversity. Racial and sexual diversity are present in this book. Stating the fact that the two MCs are people of colors and that Desi's best friend is a lesbian.Desi Lee has such a strong voice, with her being all nerdy, wanting to be in-control, setting goals, having directions in life, and planning her future. But I hated how she thought that she can manipulate EVERYTHING, I mean, who would want their feelings to be manipulated? I hated how she purposely played with Luca's feelings, like Luca's just another science experiment (which he was) and another trophy to put on her collection.I also want to mention the difference between Desi and Luca's father. Desi being really close to hers supporting her, her dad being all vocal and witty around her. While Luca has a father who always have him arrested, grounds him, and all. Makes the readers realize that parents do have different ways on raising their children.This is my first time reading a book written by Maurene Goo. Her exceptional and brilliant writing made me want to read more of her works. I highly recommend this book to everyone who loved Jenny Han's To All The Boys I've Love Before.
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  • Sue (Hollywood News Source)
    September 8, 2016
    Yes. I am dying to read it, I have this mighty need.
  • Claire (not Danvers)
    April 3, 2017
    PRE-REVIEW:I'VE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS BOOK ALL MY LIFE. I HOPE IT DOESN'T DISAPPOINT.I've been watching Korean dramas since I was young. First gif: Princess Hours started it all. No, that was a lie.Second pic (below): Endless Love: Autumn in my Heart started it all. It was a very painful drama to watch.Eventually, you know... there were other dramas that came after that.Third gif: The HeirsMy favorite would always be Scholar Who Walks the Night but that show is paranormal romance, therefore not PRE-REVIEW:I'VE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS BOOK ALL MY LIFE. I HOPE IT DOESN'T DISAPPOINT.I've been watching Korean dramas since I was young. First gif: Princess Hours started it all. No, that was a lie.Second pic (below): Endless Love: Autumn in my Heart started it all. It was a very painful drama to watch.Eventually, you know... there were other dramas that came after that.Third gif: The HeirsMy favorite would always be Scholar Who Walks the Night but that show is paranormal romance, therefore not relevant in this pre-review. But whatever, who cares?!But let's face it, the book is probably going to be something like this,Anyway, if you haven't seen any korean dramas, I would suggest the first Endless Love to be your first one. If you want something funny, choose Full House (not pictured) or Princess Hours. **warning: be aware of the poor girl, rich guy trope**
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  • Rachel (APCB Reviews)
    March 9, 2017
    "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" is undoubtedly one of the cutest and fun contemporary books I've ever read! Hilarious, swoony, and diverse, this book has basically everything I want in a summer read. This book stood out to me mainly because of the k drama aspect. I've never actually seen a k drama before, but I know that there is a huge fanbase and culture surrounding them. Now because of this book I can't wait to watch my first k drama! I think k drama fans will love all of the references dr "I Believe in a Thing Called Love" is undoubtedly one of the cutest and fun contemporary books I've ever read! Hilarious, swoony, and diverse, this book has basically everything I want in a summer read. This book stood out to me mainly because of the k drama aspect. I've never actually seen a k drama before, but I know that there is a huge fanbase and culture surrounding them. Now because of this book I can't wait to watch my first k drama! I think k drama fans will love all of the references dropped in this story along with Desi's step-by-step guide to making a guy fall in love with you as seen on k dramas. Desi is a protagonist who has - so far - been unlucky in love. She's one of those people that has embarrassing things happen all the time, and you can't help but good-naturedly groan and chuckle when you hear her past stories. She's also such a hard worker, and I love her nerdiness. I love that Desi embraces who she is and flawlessly owns her brains and drive. She doesn't come off as a snooty know-it-all, but it's so cute that she knows so much random knowledge about everything! Desi has so many great relationships in this book. Her relationship with her father is the cutest thing ever! I love their support for one another. Desi also has such great friends too. Fiona and Wes back her up for all of her crazy ideas and build her up whenever her confidence is low and keep her in check when she spins out of control.The romance in this book is the sweetest, most swoon-worthy thing I've read in awhile. I love the idea of first love, and to watch Desi recreate k drama elements to attract her love interest is equal parts hilarious and sweet. There are so many light-heated, fun scenes mixed with some deeper, more intense moments. Desi are Luca are so adorable together! I haven't read Maurene Goo's other book, but the writing in this book was exceptional. The writing is nuanced and quick to devour. I love that Maurene explores the themes of things being beyond your control and that unexpected things happen in life, both good and bad. This book has its moments of triumphs and fails, but overall I loved everything about this book. The pacing was good, the plot engaging. I loved this book so so much and I think you all should read this book.
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  • Aneta Bak
    April 10, 2017
    I Believe in a Thing Called Love was absolutely adorable. It has a intelligent main character, funny storyline and a swoon worthy romance. Any fans of K-dramas and high-school romance books will love this one.Desi Lee is the closest thing to perfect. She's intelligent, popular, athletic, involved in multiple extracurricular activities, and is well on her way to her dream University of Stanford. The only thing Desi Lee isn't perfect in, is talking to boys. When the handsome Luca Drakos joins Desi I Believe in a Thing Called Love was absolutely adorable. It has a intelligent main character, funny storyline and a swoon worthy romance. Any fans of K-dramas and high-school romance books will love this one.Desi Lee is the closest thing to perfect. She's intelligent, popular, athletic, involved in multiple extracurricular activities, and is well on her way to her dream University of Stanford. The only thing Desi Lee isn't perfect in, is talking to boys. When the handsome Luca Drakos joins Desi Lee's school, Desi makes it her mission to get this boy to like her, so she can finally experience whats its like to have a boyfriend. The plan, follow the steps Korean Dramas use to make Luca fall in love with her.The first thing I said about this book, only a few chapters in, was that I seriously wish that my future children are exactly like Desi Lee. I fell in love with this character right from chapter one. Not only is she an amazing main character, but she's also extremely relatable. I especially loved her relationship with her father, it is so adorable to read about, I haven't read many book where a parent figure is in the book so much, and is depicted in a positive way like her dad was. Desi Lee will go down as one of my all time favourite main characters.The romance in this book was really cute. While it wasn't my all time favourite romance, I did ship the main characters. Desi Lee and Luca make a perfect pair, and it was wonderful to watch them fall in love. The only thing I didn't like, was the predictability. It is so easy to tell what will happen to the story, and there weren't any crazy twists to make it interesting.The main problem I had with this book was the ending. Fair warning, SOME SPOILERS AHEAD. One of the main reasons that I loved Desi Lee was because of her intelligence. I could relate to that, and I really admired it. Watching Desi Lee throw away her future, for the university she's always dreamed about going to, all because of a boy... that honestly broke my heart. Desi Lee had such a bright future ahead of her, and she literally threw away her chances of attending the university because of Luca. I think I would have taken this a different way, if it wasn't for the fact that the main reason Desi and Luca ended up together at the end was because Luca found out she did that for him. I am all for relationships where your partner helps you become a better person and achieve your goals, but this relationship was the opposite. This book was so close to being perfect for me. Minor changes and I would have given it 5 stars. I still highly recommend it, especially to fans of Korean Dramas and anyone who loves YA Contemporaries. Desi Lee will rock your world.Happy Reading,Aneta
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  • Sam Kozbial
    April 22, 2017
    The K-Drama guide to getting a boyfriend. This was super cute!Review to follow.BLOG|INSTAGRAM|BLOGLOVIN| FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
  • Lexie
    January 7, 2017
    OH MY GOD LOVE LOVE LOVE(thank you to my wonderful Sestra Samantha for lending me her copy)I'll go a bit more into this closer to the date, but guys I think I needed to be best friends Desi in High school because honestly she's my kind of cool.
  • Aila
    April 18, 2017
    3.5 starsCheck out this review at One Way Or An Author!I started this book with the goofiest smile on my face, and ended it with that same goofy smile intact. I Believe In A Thing Called Love follows Desi Lee, a Korean-American on her way to medical school and Stanford who gets captured by the grasps of first love. Known for her flailures in flirting, however, Desi composes a plan derived from the beloved K dramas her and her father watch to snag the crush, an artist struggling to reconnect with 3.5 starsCheck out this review at One Way Or An Author!I started this book with the goofiest smile on my face, and ended it with that same goofy smile intact. I Believe In A Thing Called Love follows Desi Lee, a Korean-American on her way to medical school and Stanford who gets captured by the grasps of first love. Known for her flailures in flirting, however, Desi composes a plan derived from the beloved K dramas her and her father watch to snag the crush, an artist struggling to reconnect with his father. Gripping, off-the-charts hilarity, and ultimately triumphant, readers will fall in love with Desi as she navigates her way through love and life. We begin with Desi talking about building dreams, which is further reinforced in the story as we see her tackle all her activities and academics with passion and precision. She’s on her way to valedictorian, is a member of many clubs (and on the cabinet of just as many), and plays in two varsity sports. This is your A+, all-around, fun girl friend who… unfortunately cannot get a boyfriend. Cue her brilliant idea: use K drama tropes to form a formula where the new guy in school, Luca, is bound to fall for her.“I believed, and still believe, that you can build your dreams brick by brick. That you can accomplish anything with persistence. Even falling in love.”Desi is utterly relatable, hilarious, and lovable. Her relationship with her single father, who is a mechanic, is wonderful to see. They’re very close, and his absolute support of where she goes and what she does was so heartwarming to see. We also see her interactions with best friends Wes and Fiona, as well as a friend found again, Violet. Her character was a shining star in the story, and truth be told, quite reminiscent of the clumsy but good-intentioned K drama heroines out there. (Seriously, the storyline follows these plot devices pretty well.) She has the wits and hilarity (as well as embarrassing moments) to match any K drama lead out there.“K dramas bottled up swoony true love in addictive ten-to-twenty hour packages. My reactions to chaste first kisses were akin to heart attacks.”I loved seeing snippets of Korean culture on the page, as this was written by an Own Voices author. Goo weaves ramen + kimchi and other delightful dishes easily into the script, as well as a lovely backstory to how Desi’s parents ended up immigrating from Korea to America. My favorite were the K drama references and all the familiar titles. I was internally screaming “YESS!!” at references to dramas like King 2 Hearts, Protect the Boss, Boys Over Flowers, and more. <3Despite her K drama formula, however, Desi soon realizes that some things in life… can’t be controlled. Including love. This happens as she gets more feelings for Luca and learns more about him. While Desi was absolutely relatable and hilarious, I had more minor feelings for Luca. His character captures the morose artist vibe, although he can be quite silly at times. I think what ultimately stands out is that all these diverse characters are perfectly imperfect, with all the flaws and idiosyncrasies of people we see in real life. And that’s the kind of characterization I adore in contemporaries. “Real love: It was all about risk and having faith. There were no guarantees.” So, silly antics, embarrassing real life K drama scenarios, and down-to-earth characters that you will utterly fall in love with completes I Believe In A Thing Called Love. Desi is a girl after my own heart, and I enjoyed following her journey from beginning to end as she explores the possibilities of love that resounds with a triumphant conclusion.
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  • Sarah (Books Before Bandaids)
    April 16, 2017
    I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo is a hilarious look at finding love despite the unexpected. Desi is an overachiever who excels at everything she puts her mind to, except romance. When it comes to romance, she has humiliated herself over and over. Her best friends, Fiona and Wes, call her attempts at flirting “flailure” flirting+failure. When artist, Luca, starts attending her school Desi is determined to turn her luck around. Using the same obsessive studying that has helped her I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo is a hilarious look at finding love despite the unexpected. Desi is an overachiever who excels at everything she puts her mind to, except romance. When it comes to romance, she has humiliated herself over and over. Her best friends, Fiona and Wes, call her attempts at flirting “flailure” flirting+failure. When artist, Luca, starts attending her school Desi is determined to turn her luck around. Using the same obsessive studying that has helped her succeed at academics and athletics, Desi turns to the Korean dramas that her father has been watching for years. Studying the formulaic K dramas for patterns about how to achieve a happy ending, Desi creates her 24 steps K drama steps to true love. While some of these steps achieved predictable results like “have a secret dream that brings you closer to the guy,” other steps like “life-threatening event makes him/you realize how real your love is” resulted in consequences that surprised even Desi. The K drama steps led Desi and Luca through a series of rom-com style adventures that were often hilarious, always cringe worthy and brilliantly diverse. Goo gracefully honors and deconstructs typical romantic tropes throughout her writing. The plot driven narrative exudes authenticity with fully realized, complex characters and positive parental relationships. Goo’s engaging coming of age story is a must read. Note: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Gaby
    March 25, 2017
    Cute, fun, fluffy. Reads a little young and has a lot of those deeply embarrassing moments that can sometimes be hard (for me) to read, but definitely an enjoyable contemporary romp. I also really enjoyed all of the diversity and K Drama (although I couldn't tell you how accurate everything is since I have no prior knowledge).
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  • Mary H
    January 1, 2017
    I believe in a thing called love da dada dada da dadada I believe in a thing ca-ulled LO-OOOOOOOVE! That song was totally stuck in my head for the last 50 or so pages. It took me a little while to totally get behind this books (I loved the premise, but the execution didn't draw me in initially), but I really enjoyed it. IBIATCL is sweet and fluffy and exactly what I'd like more of in ya, especially considering how inclusive it is. This is the kind of cast that feels real, and I will smack anyone I believe in a thing called love da dada dada da dadada I believe in a thing ca-ulled LO-OOOOOOOVE! That song was totally stuck in my head for the last 50 or so pages. It took me a little while to totally get behind this books (I loved the premise, but the execution didn't draw me in initially), but I really enjoyed it. IBIATCL is sweet and fluffy and exactly what I'd like more of in ya, especially considering how inclusive it is. This is the kind of cast that feels real, and I will smack anyone who dares to call it a checklist of diversity or some such nonsense.This book is adorable and will have you sighing dreamily as you imagine your own K drama esque romance. Full review to come.
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  • Angel
    January 10, 2017
    TOO CUTE FOR LIFE.Desi is such a fun heroine, a perfect star for this rom-com delight of a novel. Maureen Go works in the kdrama tropes expertly, with a healthy sense of humour and honesty. I cannot wait for teens to have this book in the spring!
  • The Bookavid
    September 28, 2016
    this cover makes me so so happyspecifically that there is an asian girl on it. bless everyone involvedim gonna throw me my money at this book once its released
  • Michelle
    October 13, 2016
    NEEEEEEED.
  • Kirsten Hubbard
    September 23, 2016
    lucky enough to read this book early, and there were actual, literal LOLs. it is IMPOSSIBLY adorable -- and super romantic, too.
  • Manisha
    September 16, 2016
    WHAT? Coming out May 2017? Dramabeans y u introduce this so early, now I'm gonna die waiting. (ノಠдಠ)ノ︵┻━┻
  • Inês
    September 8, 2016
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