Making Scents
Mickey isn't quite like his brothers and sisters. They're all stronger, faster, and have a much better sense of smell. That s because his "brothers and sisters" are dogs bloodhounds, to be exact. Mickey s mom and dad are crazy about canines. Their dogs are the loves of their lives and their livelihood. So, naturally, they re raising their son as if he was a dog, and Mickey wants nothing more than to make his parents proud.Just as Mickey is mastering the art of sniffing, a tragic accident forever changes his happy family. Mickey is sent to live with relatives he's never met, relatives who are not fond of kids . . . and who hate dogs!"

Making Scents Details

TitleMaking Scents
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 27th, 2017
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN159643452X
ISBN-139781596434523
Number of pages112 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Family, Childrens, Middle Grade, Animals

Making Scents Review

  • First Second Books
    June 27, 2017
    Dive your nose right into this heartfelt and beautifully drawn graphic novel for young readers about Mickey, a boy whose dog-loving parents raised him as if he were a dog. But when a tragic accident leaves Mickey an orphan, he must leave his dog family behind to live with an aunt and uncle he's never met before. What's worse of all, they hate dogs AND kids!
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  • Bookish
    May 19, 2017
    Middle grade graphic novels hold a special place in my heart. I never read them as a kid, and now I tend to pick ones up that I think a younger Kelly would’ve loved. In this book, a young boy who was raised alongside his parents’ dogs suddenly finds himself an orphan. He’s sent to live with his relatives, who dislike kids and hate animals, so he’s separated from his beloved bloodhounds. It’s a story about grief, loss, acceptance, and growth. Young readers who also feel a bit lost in the world ar Middle grade graphic novels hold a special place in my heart. I never read them as a kid, and now I tend to pick ones up that I think a younger Kelly would’ve loved. In this book, a young boy who was raised alongside his parents’ dogs suddenly finds himself an orphan. He’s sent to live with his relatives, who dislike kids and hate animals, so he’s separated from his beloved bloodhounds. It’s a story about grief, loss, acceptance, and growth. Young readers who also feel a bit lost in the world are sure to relate to Mickey and cheer for him as he begins to find happiness in his new home. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/frid...)
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  • Becky B
    June 17, 2017
    When a couple who raises bloodhounds has a son, they decide to raise him pretty much like one of their bloodhounds. He is taught to track things by scent, he calls the dogs his brothers and sisters, and he frequently does things the way they do. This isn’t much of a problem until he goes to school. His super sniffer and strange habits don’t win him many friends until his mom arranges for him to demonstrate to the entire school how cool his sniffer talents can be. Unfortunately, just as he was ma When a couple who raises bloodhounds has a son, they decide to raise him pretty much like one of their bloodhounds. He is taught to track things by scent, he calls the dogs his brothers and sisters, and he frequently does things the way they do. This isn’t much of a problem until he goes to school. His super sniffer and strange habits don’t win him many friends until his mom arranges for him to demonstrate to the entire school how cool his sniffer talents can be. Unfortunately, just as he was making headway at school tragedy strikes and Mickey must go live with his older aunt and uncle who don’t like dogs and never wanted kids. Is he doomed to a life of misery with a grouchy older couple?This had moments of cute and sweetness, and I liked the art style. Overall I ended up liking the story, but it was a little odd in places. Mickey might have been easier to swallow if he were actually raised by animals instead of two humans who pretty much treated him like he was one of their dogs. The fact that they raised him to call their dogs his brothers and sisters and such was just weird, bordering on abusive (he was treated like an animal much of the time). It didn’t go quite too far, but it was close. I did like watching how Mickey and his uncle and aunt worked things out, and the ending is a feel good closing. I’m not quite sure why the author/illustrators chose to set this in the 1950s. The scene where a woman threatens to sue the uncle for Mickey’s actions felt like something from today; it would never have happened in the 50s (considering corporal punishment was still practiced in schools, the mom probably would have been thankful for the kid getting punished physically for his wrongdoing). Since this is a preview version I’m hoping an editor catches that and changes it before the final print. Overall, this is a feel good story about an orphan who is an odd duck finding a place where he is loved and accepted.Notes on content: No language issues. No sexual content. One bite on page, some deaths mentioned but not shown.I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cierra
    July 12, 2017
    Summary: a 50s inspired comic following a boy named Mickey who is adopted into a brood of bloodhounds and two human parents. Tragedy strikes, and Mickey's world is turned upside down, though eventually he is able to prove the greatness of his sniffs (I mean gifts), to his not so animal loving aunt and uncle. Length: 112 pagesPublished: June 2017Pros:-I'm a dog person so I, of course, loved the focus on dogs in this story! My heart felt for Mickey following the tragedy that occurred within his fa Summary: a 50s inspired comic following a boy named Mickey who is adopted into a brood of bloodhounds and two human parents. Tragedy strikes, and Mickey's world is turned upside down, though eventually he is able to prove the greatness of his sniffs (I mean gifts), to his not so animal loving aunt and uncle. Length: 112 pagesPublished: June 2017Pros:-I'm a dog person so I, of course, loved the focus on dogs in this story! My heart felt for Mickey following the tragedy that occurred within his family. I didn't expect it to be so heavy for a middle grade graphic novel-Beautiful artistic design and detail -Enjoyed reading the extra "behind the scenes" pages following the story. The writers and artists explain the basics of how Making Scents was brought to life. Cons:- Mickey's brothers and sisters at the beginning of the story are bloodhounds and they are all very close, though once the sad events of the story unfold, he never sees them again. Since they were such a large part of one another's lives, I wish they could've connected or seen each other at some point in the remaining part of the story. Perhaps a sequel is planned and they will be reunited then. Recommend? Absolutely. This is a great story and gift for someone whose dog (or dogs) are their best friend(s). Final Rating: 4/5 *Published On Cierra's Heart Of Books*
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  • Anne
    May 12, 2017
    This is the case of a mismatched book and reader.I'm a dog lover, so I had hopes that I would strongly connect with the animals in the book. Unfortunately, I found that I didn't personally connect with Mickey or his story, and I felt parts of it came across as rushed.However, I'd still encourage any curious readers to pick this title up. It's a sweet story that explores themes of acceptance and praises a unique character for his talents. The use of color is really lovely in a subtle way, and you This is the case of a mismatched book and reader.I'm a dog lover, so I had hopes that I would strongly connect with the animals in the book. Unfortunately, I found that I didn't personally connect with Mickey or his story, and I felt parts of it came across as rushed.However, I'd still encourage any curious readers to pick this title up. It's a sweet story that explores themes of acceptance and praises a unique character for his talents. The use of color is really lovely in a subtle way, and young readers who love dogs or have experienced loss will likely relate to Mickey.
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  • Karen Arendt
    July 10, 2017
    I wasn't sure what this story was about. But it came with my Junior Library Guild order, and I try to read all of those books. This book has sad moments, like when Mickey's parents die in a car crash and his uncle does not like him very much. But there is also much to be said about dog traits here, since Mickey has an amazing sense of smell, trained by his parents who raised bloodhounds. I was particularly interested in the information about illustrating a graphic novel at the end of the book. V I wasn't sure what this story was about. But it came with my Junior Library Guild order, and I try to read all of those books. This book has sad moments, like when Mickey's parents die in a car crash and his uncle does not like him very much. But there is also much to be said about dog traits here, since Mickey has an amazing sense of smell, trained by his parents who raised bloodhounds. I was particularly interested in the information about illustrating a graphic novel at the end of the book. Very interesting and should not be missed.
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  • Katie Lawrence
    July 15, 2017
    A very quirky tale about a boy raised with dogs who is trained to have an exceptional sense of smell. I think this might have been just a bit too out there for me. Mickey was difficult to relate to and his uncle and aunt were hard to like. Maybe if it had been slightly longer I would have felt like it was more cohesive? I did not understand the uncles obsession with all kids being crooks either haha. I'd be curious to talk with a kid about this one and see what they think.
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  • Kathy
    July 3, 2017
    Grief and the love of dogs, with a touch of silliness.
  • Linnea
    June 29, 2017
    this had some much potential but it felt lacking, hopefully there will be a sequel to tie things up.
  • Jamie Holcomb
    July 14, 2017
    Goes from "weird but kinda funny I guess" to The Man Who Loved Clowns with uncomfortable speed. Meh.
  • 29Shift
    November 29, 2016
    Making Scents is interesting take on a graphic novel for young readers. When Mickey was just a baby, he was left in the nook of a tree. He was found by a talented group of hounds; the couple who owned them took in Mickey, no questions asked. However, Mickey was essentially raised as one of the dogs, not as a child. This starts to effect Mickey when he begins school and becomes a full-blown issue when his adoptive parents are killed in a car crash. Mickey is abruptly separated from his human and Making Scents is interesting take on a graphic novel for young readers. When Mickey was just a baby, he was left in the nook of a tree. He was found by a talented group of hounds; the couple who owned them took in Mickey, no questions asked. However, Mickey was essentially raised as one of the dogs, not as a child. This starts to effect Mickey when he begins school and becomes a full-blown issue when his adoptive parents are killed in a car crash. Mickey is abruptly separated from his human and canine family, forced to live with an adoptive Aunt and Uncle that do not understand Mickey, his talent for sniffing, and his grief. Making Scents is about making sense of the chaos that is life, accepting people for everything they are, fitting in, and being part of a family. The artwork is wonderful; each black and white panel is accented with one other hue, creating a monochromatic but still interesting composition. Scents always get their own color, which creates a nice effect. The only thing holding this graphic novel back are some abrupt transitions from section to section. (Note: this review is based on an advance reader copy, there may be transition pages planned for the final issue that are not seen here.) More than once there's a jump where readers may flip back to see if they've missed a page, but ultimately it doesn't prevent this book from being an effective tool for exploring its issues. Generally recommended for children feeling lost or grieving, dog lovers, and as a conversation starter.
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  • Ryan
    January 5, 2017
    When this book started I thought I would love it. Puppy Parents who normally raise bloodhounds have a child. They raise the child to act like a bloodhound. To use his nose to it’s best advantage. That got a little annoying by the time the kid was in school, but it was still interesting. Then when things finally settled into a decent pace, there is tragedy. And it just gets worse from there. I’m fine with the tragedy from nowhere scene. But then time starts skipping and his Uncle wants the boy to When this book started I thought I would love it. Puppy Parents who normally raise bloodhounds have a child. They raise the child to act like a bloodhound. To use his nose to it’s best advantage. That got a little annoying by the time the kid was in school, but it was still interesting. Then when things finally settled into a decent pace, there is tragedy. And it just gets worse from there. I’m fine with the tragedy from nowhere scene. But then time starts skipping and his Uncle wants the boy to act like a human, and not a dog. Plus all kids are crooks. I just lost interest and respect for the title. The story could have gone anywhere and been a great graphic novel for younger readers, but it was either not absurd enough, or two real that it makes fun of itself. I did like the art. They use simple three color illustrations and besides black and white, the third color changes frequently. I like the look and the format of the book, I just did not like the story.#Readharder 2017
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  • Laura Herold
    November 4, 2016
    This is a winner. I loved the vintage style artwork and use of color throughout this comic. As a dog lover, I really connected with Mickey's story. Sprinkled with valuable life lessons about growing up and being yourself.Enjoyable, funny and thoughtful! I received an ARC via NetGalley, but the opinions are my own.
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  • Andréa
    November 20, 2016
    Note: I received a digital galley of this book through NetGalley.
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