Fetch
From an award-winning artist, a memoir of life with a difficult, beloved dog that will resonate with anybody who has ever had a less than perfectly behaved pet When Nicole Georges was sixteen she adopted Beija, a dysfunctional shar-pei/corgi mix—a troublesome combination of tiny and attack, just like teenaged Nicole herself. For the next fifteen years, Beija would be the one constant in her life. Through depression, relationships gone awry, and an unmoored young adulthood played out against the backdrop of the Portland punk scene, Beija was there, wearing her “Don’t Pet Me” bandana.   Georges’s gorgeous graphic novel Fetch chronicles their symbiotic, codependent relationship and probes what it means to care for and be responsible to another living thing—a living thing that occasionally lunges at toddlers. Nicole turns to vets, dog whisperers, and even a pet psychic for help, but it is the moments of accommodation, adaption, and compassion that sustain them. Nicole never successfully taught Beija “sit,” but in the end, Beija taught Nicole how to stay.

Fetch Details

TitleFetch
Author
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherMariner Books
ISBN-139780544577831
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Autobiography, Memoir, Comics, Nonfiction, Animals, Dogs

Fetch Review

  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    I have been saying for years that I want to adopt a dog but I haven't yet. This is a love story about a woman and the little dog who meant so much to her. It's a touching book with great illustrations. I really enjoyed it. I'm even more determined to find a dog of my own now!
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this book as much as I liked "Calling Dr. Laura," and I also didn't like Georges in it as much as I did in her earlier graphic memoir. I felt throughout a lot of it that small anger I get at bad dog parents. It's kind of annoying to me that Georges "gets" Beija enough to write her dog manifesto and to get frustrated with people who won't leave her be, but this is the same person who rented an apartment specifically because she needed to live somewhere else with her dog and then got I didn't like this book as much as I liked "Calling Dr. Laura," and I also didn't like Georges in it as much as I did in her earlier graphic memoir. I felt throughout a lot of it that small anger I get at bad dog parents. It's kind of annoying to me that Georges "gets" Beija enough to write her dog manifesto and to get frustrated with people who won't leave her be, but this is the same person who rented an apartment specifically because she needed to live somewhere else with her dog and then got an apartment where her dog could explicitly not live, and who knows that the dog can't tolerate strangers but then makes her live in a party house with lots of squatters staying there. Eventually, she does learn that she hasn't been doing right by Beija, but... come on. And I'm not really sure if the recounting of George's childhood experiences capturing wild animals to keep as pets (thereby killing them) was supposed to illustrate her lifelong love of animals or to inform her adult desire to save animals as a way of making amends... or something else.I also had some problems reading the book. The captions are set off in a way that makes it unclear if they go to the panel above or below them, and it switches often, so it's hard to get in a rhythm with it. This all sounds like I didn't like the book, but I still did. And, of course, I cried at the end.
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  • Raina
    January 1, 1970
    Of course it made me cry.Georges' work always hits home for me. Here, she tackles the issue of problematic pets you love (sometimes, BECAUSE they're problematic). I, too, lived with a dog with issues for years. Callie (maybe unlike Beija, Georges' dog) was fluffy and blonde, and looked super friendly - until another dog came along or you put your face too close to hers, or otherwise made her feel unsafe. Then, a Jekyll/Hyde transformation took place and her snarl was legitimately terrifying. She Of course it made me cry.Georges' work always hits home for me. Here, she tackles the issue of problematic pets you love (sometimes, BECAUSE they're problematic). I, too, lived with a dog with issues for years. Callie (maybe unlike Beija, Georges' dog) was fluffy and blonde, and looked super friendly - until another dog came along or you put your face too close to hers, or otherwise made her feel unsafe. Then, a Jekyll/Hyde transformation took place and her snarl was legitimately terrifying. She bit other dogs more than once.She died a few years ago. I loved her very much. Partially because we had an intimate connection that was special to us. But it was difficult managing her behavior in public. Having to warn every new person not to assume too much or worry every time another dog approached when I walked her. Memories of that time makes me hesitate to get another dog now.Georges tells her story, which is in a lot of ways similar to mine.I've always been sensitive to stories centering around dogs, or any animal suffering, really. Stories like these hit so close to home, I usually avoid them like the plague. Friends know not to recommend movies with any animal pain in them.But I HAD to read Georges book, knowing her work. I enjoyed guessing where the story overlapped with Calling Dr. Laura.And I'm glad I did read it. Even though it made me cry.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Nicole and Beija co-star in this sweet and funny graphic novel/memoir. The story, weaving youthful memories and adult follies, is heartfelt and accountable. The panels/artwork is the best I've seen from Georges, one of my favorite comic storytellers today.
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful, often hilarious portrait of an unpredictable childhood and a complicated yet magical queer punk coming-of-age in Portland in the early millennium, all through the author's relationships to animals--most significantly her difficult, damaged, beloved soulmate dog Beija. The drawing is wonderful, the storytelling captivating, and the ending is somehow both heartbreaking and heart-repairing. (I wept.) Captures a time and a scene and a personal experience so beautifully, both visually an A beautiful, often hilarious portrait of an unpredictable childhood and a complicated yet magical queer punk coming-of-age in Portland in the early millennium, all through the author's relationships to animals--most significantly her difficult, damaged, beloved soulmate dog Beija. The drawing is wonderful, the storytelling captivating, and the ending is somehow both heartbreaking and heart-repairing. (I wept.) Captures a time and a scene and a personal experience so beautifully, both visually and textually.
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  • Peacegal
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars -- Graphic memoir enthusiasts and pet lovers alike will plow through this unique and affecting comic, and will be happy they did. Nicole Georges chronicles her 15 years with Beija, a small mixed-breed dog whose personality might charitably be called "eccentric." But this isn't "just" a dog story. It's also the story of a young woman's struggles for growth and independence with a personal background that is marred by chaos and irresponsible parenting. A young girl's struggles to create 4.5 stars -- Graphic memoir enthusiasts and pet lovers alike will plow through this unique and affecting comic, and will be happy they did. Nicole Georges chronicles her 15 years with Beija, a small mixed-breed dog whose personality might charitably be called "eccentric." But this isn't "just" a dog story. It's also the story of a young woman's struggles for growth and independence with a personal background that is marred by chaos and irresponsible parenting. A young girl's struggles to create a sense of stability for herself and her menagerie of small pets will touch anyone who reads FETCH. (Judging by the pop cultural references, the author and I are right around the same age.)There's another element of FETCH that pleasantly surprised me. If you're familiar with my other reviews, I have frequently written with disappointment about authors who are willing to go to the moon and back for their special companion animal, but are completely blind to taking even the smallest step toward compassion for those other than cats and dogs. We learn that Georges is an animal protection advocate and vegan. She even spent a while volunteering at Farm Sanctuary, one of the first rescue shelters for farmed animals. Readers aren't bombarded with this information--rather, it's skillfully woven into the storyline itself. Therefore, FETCH will--and has been--embraced by mainstream readers who will hopefully absorb some compassion for animals beyond those they share their homes with. But just as mainstream pet culture has a lot of flaws, so does the vegan and animal advocacy side. I'll admit that when I saw the subtitle, identifying the book's subject as a "bad" dog, I felt a bit of trepidation. Unlike most of our movement at the moment, I care about dog attack victims, both human and animal, as much as I care about dogs. What made this book's subject a bad dog? Did she maul people or pets? Was this the author's way of making excuses for dangerous behavior, as we see depressingly often? Well...yes and no.Beija barks, growls, snaps, and very occasionally bites when other people try to pet her. Her behavior is motivated out of fear, rather than predatory aggression. It's probably a product of neurology as much as it is her history--as even a terrifying background doesn't always guarantee a mean dog--just ask an ex-laboratory beagle. That said, Beija does bite a child and a big dog, the latter drawing blood, within these pages. She is a little dog, so can't do much damage, but I do wish someone would have taken steps to prevent these things from happening. In hindsight, I am sure the author does too. Beija is, sadly, most often attacked by other dogs. In keeping with the current party line of our movement, the author has to add a little "not all pit bulls" caveat, even though one gives Beija her worst injury, removing a large chunk of her face. Guys, it's not hateful or prejudiced or whatever to acknowledge that people created dog breedsfor different purposes, including inhumane ones like baiting and fighting "sports," and the owners of said dogs need to acknowledge this and be extra vigilant to avoid tripping that genetic switch and creating a tragedy. In all, however, FETCH is a fantastic and captivating memoir and tribute to a loved canine, and don't be surprised if you find your eyes watering a little bit as you close its back cover!
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  • CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! Be prepared to laugh and cry. Check out this review/interview with the author I did for Autostraddle
  • Denver Public Library
    January 1, 1970
    Famed zinester and graphic memoirist Nicole Georges ripped my heart from my chest. It has been a bit since I have been actively sobbing over a book, but the recipe is clearly a coming-of-age story with a surly and ill trained dog. Georges is known largely for her graphic memoir Calling Dr. Laura, detailing her reliance on radio host Dr. Laura Schlessinger to process an onslaught of life altering moments: discovering her family lying to her about her father being dead her entire life, only discov Famed zinester and graphic memoirist Nicole Georges ripped my heart from my chest. It has been a bit since I have been actively sobbing over a book, but the recipe is clearly a coming-of-age story with a surly and ill trained dog. Georges is known largely for her graphic memoir Calling Dr. Laura, detailing her reliance on radio host Dr. Laura Schlessinger to process an onslaught of life altering moments: discovering her family lying to her about her father being dead her entire life, only discovering, at twenty-three, that he is alive, while also coming-out as a lesbian. In her newest, and deceptively innocuous, memoir Georges focuses on her adult life and her connection to her dog Beija. Adopting Beija when she was a teenager, Beija seemed to mirror Georges’ anxieties, afraid of strangers, unwilling to be touched. Georges grows and adapts with her companion, referring to Beija as both her horcrux and her familiar, and the incredibly relatable experience of living your life so connected to another short-lived and flawed being radiates through these pages. I have never felt more connected to another person's story in print, down to eerily similar black cat-eye glasses I wear most days, having to take several reading breaks to digest my kinship with this story and my journey with my own pup. In addition to graphic memoirs, Geroges’ zine series has been compiled in the collection Invincible Summer. Get Fetch from the Denver Public Library- Hana
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  • Emily Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    💖✨Beija✨💖
  • Sassafras Lowrey
    January 1, 1970
    i have been waiting for this book to come out. i pre-ordered as soon as i could, and when it arrived i started reading immediately. i ended up reading the whole book in less than a day because i just couldn't stop myself. this book is heartbreaking and beautiful and brilliant and i loved everything about it. if you love dogs (especially difficult ones), zines, queers and coming of age memoir you really have to read this book.i've been reading Nicole J Georges zines for years and years and have a i have been waiting for this book to come out. i pre-ordered as soon as i could, and when it arrived i started reading immediately. i ended up reading the whole book in less than a day because i just couldn't stop myself. this book is heartbreaking and beautiful and brilliant and i loved everything about it. if you love dogs (especially difficult ones), zines, queers and coming of age memoir you really have to read this book.i've been reading Nicole J Georges zines for years and years and have always loved her dog stories best of all. so thrilled to have this book on my shelf
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  • MariNaomi
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorites from 2017! I laughed, I cried, I bought it for a bunch of my friends.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    oh h*ck.(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review. Trigger warning for allusions to rape, child abuse, domestic violence, animal abuse, alcoholism, self-harm, and suicidal ideation.)I first discovered Nicole Georges's artwork nestled within the pages of Bitch Magazine . Instantaneously smitten, my adoration only grew when I learned that Georges was a vegan who referred to her furry sidekick Beija as her "canine life partner." Her 2010 Invincible Summer Queer Animal Odysse oh h*ck.(Full disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for review. Trigger warning for allusions to rape, child abuse, domestic violence, animal abuse, alcoholism, self-harm, and suicidal ideation.)I first discovered Nicole Georges's artwork nestled within the pages of Bitch Magazine . Instantaneously smitten, my adoration only grew when I learned that Georges was a vegan who referred to her furry sidekick Beija as her "canine life partner." Her 2010 Invincible Summer Queer Animal Odyssey calendar still rests in the plastic protective covering it arrived in. (Don't worry, I take it out every once in awhile for much-deserved admiration.) I enjoyed her debut graphic novel, Invincible Summer: An Anthology , well enough, though haven't quite gotten around to reading Calling Dr. Laura . Even so, I can say with 99.9% certainty that Fetch: How a Bad Dog Brought Me Home is her best work yet. For my Noodle, Mags.------------------------------ At the tender age of sixteen, Georges adopted a dog as a gift for her then-boyfriend and first love, Tom. The ensuing back-and-forth demonstrates why you should never give a dog as a gift: despite clearing it ahead of time with Tom's mother, Tom's stepfather did not sign off on the deal. Nicole's mom reluctantly allowed her to keep the dog, but Beija's many behavioral problems quickly wore her patience thin. Beija harbored an intense dislike/fear of men, children, and veterinarians; did not enjoy being picked up or touched on her sides; did not suffer invasions of space lightly; and frequently antagonized/was victimized by other dogs. She was temperamental and required patience, compassion, and understanding - much like her new human. And so, in a situation so weird and improbable that it seems like the plot of a bad Fox sitcom, you have both sets of parents conspiring to push their teenagers out of the nest and into a seedy apartment, just so they could have a Beija-free home: "Starting now, this gift would change the course of both our lives. [...] All of this in order to keep the dog. As if we'd had a teen pregnancy." While Nicole's relationship with Tom would soon implode, her partnership with Bejia proved to be for keeps. Through unhealthy relationships, annoying roommates, professional upheavals, and the trials and tribulations of growing up and discovering oneself, there was one constant in Nicole life. And if she just so happened to have four legs, a soft tummy, and spoke in a series of barks, whimpers, and tail wags, so what? Family is what you make of it. Fetch is Rennie-approved. ------------------------------ Most of the blurbs I've read so far focus on the coming-of-age aspect of Fetch (e.g., it's not "just" a book about a dog). And while it is indeed that - after all, at the time of her death, Beija had lived with Nicole for almost exactly half of Nicole's life - to me Fetch is, above all else, a love letter to and everlasting celebration of a best friend. A soul mate. A patronus, to quote Georges. (A daemon, in my vocab.) The dogs, they will always come first. PRIORITIES.There's this one Mutts comic I love: It's a lovely day, and Ozzie is walking Earl on a long leash. A little heart bobs in a thought bubble above the human's head. To the right is a quote by one W.R. Purche: "Everyone thinks they have the best dog. And none of them are wrong." To borrow a phrase from an online friend (Marji Beach, who works at another awesome animal sanctuary called Animal Place), it's clear that Nicole considers Beija the best worst dog ever. Their love for one another shines through every panel and page, making the inevitable goodbye that much more heartbreaking. It took me a full week to read the book, just because I couldn't bear to face the last forty pages. I think it's safe to say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, especially when it comes to Fetch, and animal lovers will take something a little extra special away from their experience. When I say "animal lovers," I mean both in the conventional sense - i.e., those who care for culturally appropriate animals, such as dogs, cats, horses, and rabbits - as well as those of use who extend that circle of compassion to all nonhumans. There are precious few comic books that I could call overtly vegan - only two come to mind, namely Matt Miner's Liberator and The Animal Man by Grant Morrison - and I'm happy to add Fetch to the list. While Georges only drops the v*-word (vegetarian or vegan) a handful of times, she does introduce readers to animal rights issues in a gentle, subtle way. If you're not on the lookout (and I always am!), you might just miss it. Though all the better to sneak into your subconscious, worming and niggling and prodding you to think about the face on your plate or the skin on your back ... to see them as someones rather than somethings, more alike than different from the dog snuggled up next to you or fast asleep at your feet. Full disclosure: In between bites of spider trappings, Rennie assisted me in writing this review. ------------------------------ I especially loved Bejia's manifesto, "I am not a stuffed animal," which surreptitiously introduces readers to the idea of intersectionality: "It's kind of like feminism, but for dogs." That line (along with countless others) literally had me squealing for joy. Little Beija-Boo - is she a shar pei-doxy mix? corgi and beagle? who knows! - is adorable and tubby, even as she's telling you to back the fuck off. I could go on and on - about the many weird parallels between Georges's life and mine; about how I see pieces of Bejia in my own dogs; about the many ways, both large and small, that my loved ones and I have adapted our everyday routines and very existences to better accommodate our four-legged family members - but suffice it to say that Fetch is a must-read for anyone who's ever loved (and lost) a dog (though you may want to wait until the loss isn't quite so fresh - the ending is freaking brutal). Ditto: anyone who just likes good storytelling or quirky artwork. I know I've focused on the nonhumans for most of my review - hey, that's how I do - but even those rare scenes sans doggos are beautifully rendered and engaging. In summary: Fetch is easily my favorite book of 2017 thus far, graphic novel or no.Aaaaand just in case the previous 1,000 words didn't convince you, here are a few of my favorite panels to help seal the deal. (That last one? So charming that it displaced foster doggy as the background on my desktop. Temporarily, but still.) http://www.easyvegan.info/2017/07/18/...
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  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Content warning for mentions of (unintentional, maybe?) pet violence in review:I dunno, this will have a lot to offer many readers but I don't think I'm one of them. I was already not enjoying myself, and then I reached a page where she admits to kicking her dog so hard in the head she literally thought the dog was dead (it wasn't), with a footnote saying, "I'm not saying I recommend kicking your dog in the head, but Beija never gave me any trouble after that day" or something to that extent. Th Content warning for mentions of (unintentional, maybe?) pet violence in review:I dunno, this will have a lot to offer many readers but I don't think I'm one of them. I was already not enjoying myself, and then I reached a page where she admits to kicking her dog so hard in the head she literally thought the dog was dead (it wasn't), with a footnote saying, "I'm not saying I recommend kicking your dog in the head, but Beija never gave me any trouble after that day" or something to that extent. That was a pretty freaking solid NOPE moment for me and made me realize this probably isn't the story I hoped it would be, so I'll put it down now.
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  • Hannah Garden
    January 1, 1970
    Ahhh I really want to tell you how magical and special this book is but I can't even think of high enough praise, tbpf. It is a jewel, so full of love it will crack you.I remember reading Georges' first book and being like oh holy frijoles I can't WAIT till she writes a new one. Please go buy copies of this for all your animal companions, it is legitimately a celestial body.
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  • Kelly Dashiell
    January 1, 1970
    This was particularly painful to read, since I just lost my cat Levi to cancer as well. We were mates for 17 years, and the similarities between our relationship and the author's relationship with her dog were pretty spot on. If you ever had a pet that you felt was your "external heart", as Georges put it, you should probably read this.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I knew this book was going to emotionally wreck me. This is the story of Nicole J. Georges and her dog, Beija. Beija is a shar-pei/corgi mix with some behavioral troubles. She's not comfortable with people petting her, she's somewhat aggressive when people emit different kinds of energy levels. She is constantly told by people that she is a horrible, no good, bad dog. However, reading this graphic memoir you can see through Nicole George's perspective tha Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I knew this book was going to emotionally wreck me. This is the story of Nicole J. Georges and her dog, Beija. Beija is a shar-pei/corgi mix with some behavioral troubles. She's not comfortable with people petting her, she's somewhat aggressive when people emit different kinds of energy levels. She is constantly told by people that she is a horrible, no good, bad dog. However, reading this graphic memoir you can see through Nicole George's perspective that Beija is also a misunderstood dog.As someone who owns a bulldog, I actually found myself understanding where the author was coming from. It's hard because in some circumstances you understand why people see and say what they do when they think something is wrong with a dog's behavior, but the fault in that is that often people don't give certain breeds of dog a chance to become better. It's very evident in this story how much the author loved her dog and how much her dog helped me with a dark period of her life. Animals have magic powers in this regard, they know when their companion needs them and will do anything to try and make things better. I also loved the artwork in this graphic memoir. It's got great visual appeal and the author does an amazing job of illustrating the story that she wanted to tell. I really loved this story, and I definitely want to check out more of Nicole J Georges graphic memoirs. Fetch is both funny as it is heartbreaking, and if you are an animal lover and owner it will probably make you cry. I know I did.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    The first time I picked this book up, I sat it back down. The first few pages reminded me uncomfortably of the passing of our dog, Katie, last November. Like Beija, this book's dog heroine, Katie was a eccentric who was wary of strangers and had her own particular ways. She was not an easy dog. She was 15 when she left us.I picked up the book this morning and read the entire thing in one sitting. Toward the end, tears were flowing. Nicole adopts Beija initially as a gift for her boyfriend, but i The first time I picked this book up, I sat it back down. The first few pages reminded me uncomfortably of the passing of our dog, Katie, last November. Like Beija, this book's dog heroine, Katie was a eccentric who was wary of strangers and had her own particular ways. She was not an easy dog. She was 15 when she left us.I picked up the book this morning and read the entire thing in one sitting. Toward the end, tears were flowing. Nicole adopts Beija initially as a gift for her boyfriend, but it soon becomes apparent that Beija is the one rock-solid force in Nicole's life. She's there as Nicole deals with the psychological fall-out of having a narcissistic parent, coming to grips with her sexuality, and more.By the end of the book, I was just as much in love with the odd little dog as Nicole clearly was ... and wept uncontrollably at the end. Beija was Nicole's companion for 16 years ... the subject of her art, and a stabilizing friend. Highly recommended for dog lovers.
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  • Megan (ReadingRover)
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel was amazing. It’s like Nicole created it personally for me. I know what it is to live with a let’s just say “quirky” dog. This book was funny, warm and heartbreaking all at once. I adored it. I work with dogs and I have a certain soft spot for difficult ones. The anxious, fearful and aggressive ones are always the ones I bond with. Beija and Nicole were a wonderful pair. Their bond was something most people would never understand. That’s what made it so special. Everything abo This graphic novel was amazing. It’s like Nicole created it personally for me. I know what it is to live with a let’s just say “quirky” dog. This book was funny, warm and heartbreaking all at once. I adored it. I work with dogs and I have a certain soft spot for difficult ones. The anxious, fearful and aggressive ones are always the ones I bond with. Beija and Nicole were a wonderful pair. Their bond was something most people would never understand. That’s what made it so special. Everything about this book was great. The story, the illustrations and most of all Beija. Thank you Nicole for sharing your story. I can’t wait to read more of your stuff.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    A standout graphic novel about the 15 years Nicole Georges spent with her lovable but problematic pooch Beija. Highly recommended for dog fans, however, with the caveat that Georges is not without her own flaws especially when it comes to pet care. In fact, I’d wager some of Beija’s problems stemmed from the unstable environment and individuals she was around for much of her life. That being said, for her faults, Georges undeniably loved Beija and the two had a special bond that dog people know A standout graphic novel about the 15 years Nicole Georges spent with her lovable but problematic pooch Beija. Highly recommended for dog fans, however, with the caveat that Georges is not without her own flaws especially when it comes to pet care. In fact, I’d wager some of Beija’s problems stemmed from the unstable environment and individuals she was around for much of her life. That being said, for her faults, Georges undeniably loved Beija and the two had a special bond that dog people know well. In addition to the canine draw, readers will also learn about the challenges of Georges’s own upbringing along with a glimpse into Portland life. Be prepared for some emotional moments.
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  • Waverly Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    I have this problem with graphic novels. I start reading and I can't stop turning pages. I got this book from the library and read it within the next hour. It's an enchanting story about a "bad dog" (a dog that doesn't like most people) and how the author's devotion to this creature transformed her life. She shaped her life around her dog's needs and that resulted in certain choices which ultimately were to her benefit.
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  • Monica Washenberger
    January 1, 1970
    This simultaneously heart warming & heart wrenching read chronicles the years that follow adopting a shy dog with all of her quirks.
  • Rebekah
    January 1, 1970
    I fell hard for this book. Having had the unique joy of living with “the best bad dog” for a while, this book’s bad dog Beija spoke to me very loudly.
  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    That was so good, and now I’m crying and sweet puppy Skye is licking my face like the good girl she is.
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Cute book I stumbled across at the library. Being extremely close to a dog for 13 years that hated most other people, this resonated with me in a lot of ways. Very good artwork.
  • Emelie Gaughan
    January 1, 1970
    Good coming of age graphic memoir. Definitely enjoyed this and could draw many parallels to my first dog while reading this.
  • Megan Kirby
    January 1, 1970
    I've been into Invincible Summer since I got into zines 100 years ago, so I try my best to keep up with Nicole's latest releases. Fetch traces 16 years of her life through the life of her dog, which is a really smart narrative framework. It's about Beija, but it's also about relationships and living in punk houses and learning to express yourself and growing up. Pretty quick read--couple train rides--and definitely enjoyable.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I was expecting to enjoy Fetch, but it's so much more than an enjoyable read. I dunno, there's connection and layers of figuring shit out and acceptance and love and joy and heartache and pain. Georges' art style took me a hot second to get used to, but once I did, I really liked it. I liked the flashbacks to her childhood and her use of music, zines, and punk culture to set the stage for her life with Beija.
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  • Rachel C.
    January 1, 1970
    An object lesson in why not everyone who loves dogs should own one.
  • Matthew Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Nicole Georges since her first graphic memoir, “Calling Dr. Laura.” While I was not bothered by the more haphazard narrative style of that first book (at some points I even enjoyed it), I still recognize that it was not the most coherent narrative. While touching and personal, it still seemed a bit at a distance. Georges latest, “Fetch”, however, is incredibly tight narratively. There is a coherent movement of events from when and why she adopted her dog Beija through all th I have been a fan of Nicole Georges since her first graphic memoir, “Calling Dr. Laura.” While I was not bothered by the more haphazard narrative style of that first book (at some points I even enjoyed it), I still recognize that it was not the most coherent narrative. While touching and personal, it still seemed a bit at a distance. Georges latest, “Fetch”, however, is incredibly tight narratively. There is a coherent movement of events from when and why she adopted her dog Beija through all the (mis)adventures she went on with her. Furthermore, this task was accomplished in an incredibly personal and intimate way.If you read “Calling Dr. Laura”, you have some sense of the difficulties Georges has faced in her life, but you don’t get a true sense of how they affected her. “Fetch” digs into these things: her childhood, the confusion around her own sexuality, her struggle with both romantic and platonic relationships, etc. So, while the star of the book is definitely Beija, the story is just as much about Georges’ ability to overcome the problematic relationship styles that were modeled to her as a child and grow into a more emotionally intelligent person.The book shows an incredible amount of reflection and honesty on Georges’ part, while simultaneously being an enjoyable read. She continues to be one of the best comic artists at utilizing the form of the comic to serve the narrative (something she does incredibly well in “Calling Dr. Laura” as well). The images are beautiful and—when they need to be—powerful.Overall, the book is incredibly positive, beautiful, and gives lots to think about regarding how we emotionally involve ourselves interpersonally with others: human and dog alike.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Not the story for me. I did not connect with the writer or the story and was appalled at some of the choices made regarding the dog. Moving into an apartment where dogs aren’t allowed, not containing the dog when in public, either with a muzzle or short leash, etc. I struggled to finish this book.
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