The Van Gogh Deception
When a young boy is discovered in Washington DC’s National Gallery without any recollection of who he is, so begins a high-stakes race to unravel the greatest mystery of all: his identity. As the stakes continue to rise, the boy must piece together the disjointed clues of his origins while using his limited knowledge to stop one of the greatest art frauds ever attempted. Digitally interactive, this museum mystery offers QR codes woven throughout the book that bring renowned paintings to readers’ fingertips.

The Van Gogh Deception Details

TitleThe Van Gogh Deception
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 29th, 2017
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780544759275
Rating
GenreMystery, Childrens, Middle Grade, Art

The Van Gogh Deception Review

  • Miranda
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like a mini Jason Bourne movie for middle schoolers! It's like a mix of Home Alone and Catch That Thief and basically every great story where the kids are the ones who have to try and outsmart the bad guys. It was super fast-paced and played out exactly like a movie.
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  • Suzanne Maley
    January 1, 1970
    Very clever use of QR codes. I enjoyed this book so much that I will be checking out other books by Deron Hicks.
  • TJ Burns
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children's Book Group via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineA boy is found in the National Gallery, staring into space. He can't tell the police his name, although there is a tag on his shirt that says "Arthur". The diagnosis-- traumatic amnesia. He is placed with an emergency foster mother, Mary Sullivan, who has a daughter Art's age, Camille. The two get along well, and during an outing to the museums, Art starts to pick up on some clues about who he is. Unfortunately, these get him followed and result in some hig E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineA boy is found in the National Gallery, staring into space. He can't tell the police his name, although there is a tag on his shirt that says "Arthur". The diagnosis-- traumatic amnesia. He is placed with an emergency foster mother, Mary Sullivan, who has a daughter Art's age, Camille. The two get along well, and during an outing to the museums, Art starts to pick up on some clues about who he is. Unfortunately, these get him followed and result in some high speed chases, fire alarms being pulled, and violence to Christmas trees. Art and Camille end up at one of the places from Art's past, and he starts to remember why he was traumatized. There's a much bigger issue at stake dealing with some Van Gogh paintings. Can the two children stay safe and shed some light on international art forgery?Strengths: I really liked Mary and Camille, and thought that most of the police were very sympathetic and helpful while observing protocol. When one neglected protocol, it wasn't a good idea! The descriptions of D.C. and the museums were very interesting, especially since I was just there. Art's amnesia made sense, and the mystery worked out well. Lots of details about art. Weaknesses: There's pretty much zero interest in art related mysteries in my library. Blue Balliet? Gathering dust. Malone's The Sixty-Eight Rooms? Not going out, even though I love it. The one exception is Ponti's Framed, but that had a lot more action, adventure and humor. Plus, it was shorter. What I really thought: If Under the Egg is a hot commodity in your library, definitely take a look at this one. There's not a lot of art in my school, and I have little interest in it, so I will pass, since I don't see it circulating well on its own.
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  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss; I received an ARC from the publisher at ALA Midwinter 2017.
  • Liz Friend
    January 1, 1970
    The story: A boy is found, sitting in the National Museum of Art, with no memory of how he got there, no memory of who he is. Taken in by Mary Sullivan and her daughter, "Art" and Camille go on the trail, tracking down the very few clues they have--only to turn up a fraudulent painting by Vincent Van Gogh--and Art is the only thing standing between the mastermind and a hundred and eighty-three million dollars. How can two kids possibly stand up against a team of professionals?June Cleaver's rati The story: A boy is found, sitting in the National Museum of Art, with no memory of how he got there, no memory of who he is. Taken in by Mary Sullivan and her daughter, "Art" and Camille go on the trail, tracking down the very few clues they have--only to turn up a fraudulent painting by Vincent Van Gogh--and Art is the only thing standing between the mastermind and a hundred and eighty-three million dollars. How can two kids possibly stand up against a team of professionals?June Cleaver's ratings: Language G; Violence PG; Sexual content G; Nudity G; Substance abuse G; Magic& the occult G; GLBT content G; adult themes (amnesia due to violence; fraud) PG; overall rating PG.Liz's comments: I'm always a fan of a good mystery, and not only was this one good, but it included QR codes that led the reader to pictures of the art being discussed. Very cool! Great for young artists and mystery buffs alike.
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  • Pamela Barrett
    January 1, 1970
    This is a roller coaster of an adventure. It starts with a boy sitting in the National Gallery in Washington D.C., he is staring at a Degas sculpture for hours. As closing time draws near a security guard asks him to leave, but then he finds out that the boy doesn’t know where his parents are, how he got there, or even his own name. The guard takes him to the police who open a case and get him into a temporary foster home. As the days go by the boy starts remembering all kinds of things about ar This is a roller coaster of an adventure. It starts with a boy sitting in the National Gallery in Washington D.C., he is staring at a Degas sculpture for hours. As closing time draws near a security guard asks him to leave, but then he finds out that the boy doesn’t know where his parents are, how he got there, or even his own name. The guard takes him to the police who open a case and get him into a temporary foster home. As the days go by the boy starts remembering all kinds of things about art and artists in bits and pieces, but as he gets closer to finding out who he is, he realizes that someone is after him and he is in danger. All around him are clues and he must figure it out before it’s too late. Fun, clever and with QR codes embedded in its pages, it is a great way to introduce kids to art. This mystery would make a great movie. 4 stars
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    The Van Gogh Deception by Deron R. Hicks is a wonderful fictional novel packed with true information. Perfect for an art, mystery, or action-loving readers. My favorite part of this book was the ending which in a way was also my least favorite part. I loved the ingenuity of the end but hated the fact that it ended. The Christmas tree falling on the bad guy was just so funny. And the recovered memory made me want to cry. However those scenes just added to the "can't put it down" feeling of the bo The Van Gogh Deception by Deron R. Hicks is a wonderful fictional novel packed with true information. Perfect for an art, mystery, or action-loving readers. My favorite part of this book was the ending which in a way was also my least favorite part. I loved the ingenuity of the end but hated the fact that it ended. The Christmas tree falling on the bad guy was just so funny. And the recovered memory made me want to cry. However those scenes just added to the "can't put it down" feeling of the book.
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  • Engel Dreizehn
    January 1, 1970
    ARC copy...It was very much an action packed ride and mystery all revovling around a boy with no memory, sinister figures and a very "art-ful" heist in progress. Reading the entire built up as very exciting plus being an art lover it was enjoy to read all the art history related tidbits (nice touch on the QR codes despite me having no means of reading it) and the actual deception itself proves to be very cleaver indeed. Good suggestion for an artful read.
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  • Basya
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC from the publisher. What a great mystery and quick read - suspenseful and informative. I got hooked by the main character immediately and loved the surprise and clever ending. Everything came together perfectly. The QR codes are a genius way to entice the tech savvy generation. Well done!
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic!! Loved the mystery and the characters. QR codes in the text take you to images of the works of art in the book. Terrific!I received an electronic arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    A solid 4.5! In my opinion, Hicks is one of the best children's authors. The books are interesting, engaging, and educational. This one is even interactive with QR codes.
  • Abbie
    January 1, 1970
    Read my review at Bookish Adventures.
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Great for mystery and art lovers -- fast paced fun set in DC and at the National Gallery of Art.
  • Maywoodbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!! Jason Bourne for juvenile readers- quick, exciting, and fit together as an adult novel would!!
  • Sharon Lawler
    January 1, 1970
    Fast paced art museum mystery which takes place over a four day period in Washington Dc. Perfect for middle graders, who will love the access to the museum pieces via QR codes.
  • Trshava
    January 1, 1970
    *ebook given through Netgalley which doesn't affect my opinion*
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