Six Seasons
The debut cookbook from Joshua McFadden, a chef with the soul of a farmer and the palate of a visionaryJoshua McFadden, chef and owner of renowned trattoria Ava Gene’s in Portland, Oregon, is a vegetable whisperer. After years racking up culinary cred at New York City restaurants like Lupa, Momofuku, and Blue Hill, he managed the trailblazing Four Season Farm in coastal Maine, where he developed an appreciation for every part of the plant and learned to coax the best from vegetables at each stage of their lives.In Six Seasons, McFadden channels both farmer and chef, highlighting the evolving attributes of vegetables throughout their growing seasons—an arc from spring to early summer to midsummer to the bursting harvest of late summer, then ebbing into autumn and, finally, the earthy, mellow sweetness of winter. Each chapter begins with recipes featuring raw vegetables at the start of their season. As weeks progress, McFadden turns up the heat—grilling and steaming, then moving on to sautés, pan roasts, braises, and stews. His ingenuity is on display in 225 revelatory recipes that celebrate flavor at its peak.

Six Seasons Details

TitleSix Seasons
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 2nd, 2017
PublisherArtisan
ISBN-139781579656317
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cookbooks, Food, Cooking, Nonfiction

Six Seasons Review

  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I am SO impressed! It takes something pretty extraordinary to catch my attention and catapult a cookbook to both a 5-star rating and an immediate place on my must-own list. I am picky with cookbooks; I just don't have the space to own many, so I carefully evaluate whether a new book will be consulted often and cooked from, and whether it offers something new that my other books don't provide. Only a scant handful of cookbooks jump from the "read it once" category to "I need this now!" This one I am SO impressed! It takes something pretty extraordinary to catch my attention and catapult a cookbook to both a 5-star rating and an immediate place on my must-own list. I am picky with cookbooks; I just don't have the space to own many, so I carefully evaluate whether a new book will be consulted often and cooked from, and whether it offers something new that my other books don't provide. Only a scant handful of cookbooks jump from the "read it once" category to "I need this now!" This one does. I took so many notes. I am inspired to cook, frantic to get to a farmers' market, and just plain excited to try these recipes. The author has a daunting, impressive resume and his recipes don't disappoint. Get thee to a bookstore!I received a review copy from NetGalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I try to eat lots of vegetables though I don't naturally love them so I appreciate any cookbook with an imaginative approach to plant-focused cooking. But really, the five stars may have come from from this sentence alone:"And please, eat salads with your hands."Clearly, Joshua McFadden and I are kindred spirits.
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    Made two recipes so far, and this book is just a pleasure to read and cook from.
  • DelAnne Frazee
    January 1, 1970
    Title: Six Season A New Way With VegetablesAuthors: Joshua McFadden & Martha HolmbergPublisher: Artisan BooksPublished: 5-2-2017Pages: 284Genre: Cooking, Food & WineSub-Genre: Special Occasions; Vegetables; MealsISBN: 9781579656317ASIN: B01L83TSVEReviewed for: NetGalley and PublisherRating: 4.75 StarsAlthough I do eat meat I have always had a preference to vegetables. Six Season - A New Way with Vegetables offers a variety of new to me recipes to revive some of my old favorites. There Title: Six Season A New Way With VegetablesAuthors: Joshua McFadden & Martha HolmbergPublisher: Artisan BooksPublished: 5-2-2017Pages: 284Genre: Cooking, Food & WineSub-Genre: Special Occasions; Vegetables; MealsISBN: 9781579656317ASIN: B01L83TSVEReviewed for: NetGalley and PublisherRating: 4.75 StarsAlthough I do eat meat I have always had a preference to vegetables. Six Season - A New Way with Vegetables offers a variety of new to me recipes to revive some of my old favorites. There are a number of butters in addition to a few salads and dips and sauces. Jump next to side dishes such as salad, mixed vegetables, raw vegetables, Vegetarian dishes and a few vegetable dishes with meat. Everything tasted great and was filling. There was no recipe I prepared that was not a huge success with my family. All were easy to follow. From beginning to end Six Season is a desirable cookbook for any one looking for a few new ways to use those excess summer vegetables. My rating is 4.75 out of 5 stars.Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01L83TSVE/...Barnnes & Noble Link: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/six-s...Goodreads link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...The Reading Room: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.ph...Twitter: https://twitter.com/DelAnne531/status...
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  • Phyllis
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Checked it out of the library because I'd read a few favorable reviews, and liked it so much I've bought a copy. The full-page color photos are mouthwatering, the recipes are easy to follow yet different enough to warrant another cookbook on my shelves, and the chef/author's enthusiasm and knowledge make this more than a collection of recipes. The concept is to cook using the freshest produce available, hence cooking seasonally (and he's divided it into 6 instead of 4 I loved this book. Checked it out of the library because I'd read a few favorable reviews, and liked it so much I've bought a copy. The full-page color photos are mouthwatering, the recipes are easy to follow yet different enough to warrant another cookbook on my shelves, and the chef/author's enthusiasm and knowledge make this more than a collection of recipes. The concept is to cook using the freshest produce available, hence cooking seasonally (and he's divided it into 6 instead of 4 seasons). This is not a vegetarian cookbook (lamb, chicken, beef & fish are all included) but the majority of the recipes are vegetarian or can be easily adapted.
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  • Juli Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Now this is a book that is liable to become a classic. Fresh, veggie-forward recipes that are kicky enough for a restaurant but simple enough for a home cook. Nearly all the ingredients are easily procured and inventively prepared. I love the frequent mixing of fresh produce and everyday pantry items like olives, raisins, and canned tuna. I also love that meat and dairy are not taboo here, but merely not the stars of the show. Overall, this book deserves the hype it has gotten, and I would even Now this is a book that is liable to become a classic. Fresh, veggie-forward recipes that are kicky enough for a restaurant but simple enough for a home cook. Nearly all the ingredients are easily procured and inventively prepared. I love the frequent mixing of fresh produce and everyday pantry items like olives, raisins, and canned tuna. I also love that meat and dairy are not taboo here, but merely not the stars of the show. Overall, this book deserves the hype it has gotten, and I would even consider purchasing this one later on down the road.
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  • Debbi
    January 1, 1970
    I discovered this book through my CSA newsletter. The recipes are straightforward and very interesting. It is the go-to book when you can not think of one more thing to do with cabbage or brussels sprouts or...With great photos and a relaxed engaging writing style, I like the book. Its an idea book for me. I probably won't be grilling any radishes in the near future and I'm not big on pickled vegetables but the food is fresh, modern and appealing.
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  • Wdmoor
    January 1, 1970
    I hate vegetables with a passion IMO one day scientists are going to discover the cure to cancer is a daily Big Mac and french fries. But I have to admit, Mr McFadden's book has almost changed my mind. It's well-written with a beautiful layout, great pictures and interesting writing. I checked it out of the library, brought it back and ordered a copy from Amazon. This is a book you want around the house.
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  • Aniesa
    January 1, 1970
    This is the kind of food I like to eat. I have many books on vegetables, but this one is a stand-out. Thus far everything I've made has been delicious and fairly easy. These dishes are full of flavor and healthful farmers market bounty. Definitely a new fave.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I want to make everything in this book. But that will take a year and a slightly older kid in the family. Putting it on the cookbook wishlist for 2019.
  • Nelly Santanna
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the kindle version of the book. Expand my vegetables vision a lot ! I think I'm gonna buy the paper version !
  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    This is a phenomenal cookbook that has changed the way we eat, from a starch and protein-heavy diet to a more produce-centric one. Once a week we check the local Sprouts flyer, see what's in season, and turn to the corresponding sections in this book to pick out a few recipes. The recipes are versatile and after learning a handful of new techniques and dressings, we can break down whatever the Farmer's Market throws at us. Overall, I've gained a much better fluency with vegetables that goes This is a phenomenal cookbook that has changed the way we eat, from a starch and protein-heavy diet to a more produce-centric one. Once a week we check the local Sprouts flyer, see what's in season, and turn to the corresponding sections in this book to pick out a few recipes. The recipes are versatile and after learning a handful of new techniques and dressings, we can break down whatever the Farmer's Market throws at us. Overall, I've gained a much better fluency with vegetables that goes beyond recipes. And it's good eats.
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    This is a lovely book about ways to add vegetables to your diet, but this is not a vegetarian cookbook. There is a wide variety of recipes based on a deeper conception of the seasons, which includes early summer and early fall. The recipes are seasonal, and are ordered based on that order and organized by vegetable. Many recipes have photos, but not all. There is encouragement to adapt recipes, and the introductions to some recipes provide ideas of different ways to prepare them. McFadden also This is a lovely book about ways to add vegetables to your diet, but this is not a vegetarian cookbook. There is a wide variety of recipes based on a deeper conception of the seasons, which includes early summer and early fall. The recipes are seasonal, and are ordered based on that order and organized by vegetable. Many recipes have photos, but not all. There is encouragement to adapt recipes, and the introductions to some recipes provide ideas of different ways to prepare them. McFadden also values essential supporting ingredients and wants the reader to pay close attention to his section on his larder, and the ingredients that should be available. He also includes information on sourcing from his preferred vendors.I made three recipes from the book. The Steamed cabbage with lemon, butter, and thyme was simple and full of bright flavor. As someone who loves simply prepared cabbage, I found it delicious. The Rutabaga with maple syrup, black pepper, and rosemary was also simple. The rosemary added a richer and more savory element to the flavor profile. I found the rutabaga to be a bit more crunchy and bitter than I like, but that is often the case with rutabagas and me. The Preserved eggplant was also a simple recipe and will be a lovely addition as a side, to salads, or in sandwiches.As I mentioned earlier, this is not a vegetarian cookbook. Some recipes include meat, including bacon and sausage. It is really for omnivores, though it also has many recipes that are suitable for vegetarians. Overall, the range of recipes and the many unexpected flavor combinations (like roasted cauliflower, plums, sesame seeds, and yogurt), meant that even though I got a digital copy for review, I have decided to purchase the book as well.
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  • Critterbee❇
    January 1, 1970
    Six Seasons is full of recipes showcasing the beauty of fresh produce, mainly vegetables. Joshua McFadden has such respect for the ingredients that every recipe seems well thought out, and directions are thorough and very well written. This is not a vegetarian cookbook, although the recipes focus on vegetables, they often include meat.The skill level required ranges from simple (one ingredient sauces and twists on basic classics like Carbonara and Frittata) to more challenging (yet not Six Seasons is full of recipes showcasing the beauty of fresh produce, mainly vegetables. Joshua McFadden has such respect for the ingredients that every recipe seems well thought out, and directions are thorough and very well written. This is not a vegetarian cookbook, although the recipes focus on vegetables, they often include meat.The skill level required ranges from simple (one ingredient sauces and twists on basic classics like Carbonara and Frittata) to more challenging (yet not discouragingly so) recipes with more ingredients and steps. The flavors in the recipes make sense, and many are classic combinations amplified with some added extra zing.The book is divided into six seasons, per the title, and further divided into vegetables in each season. First, how to choose, care for, and prepare the vegetables is explained, and then a few recipes are provided for each vegetable. The seasons included are Spring, Early Summer, Midsummer, Late Summer, Fall and Winter. I loved the care with which the vegetables were treated. And the strong fresh from the garden vibe. And I want to try about half of the recipes in the book. This is definitely worth checking out. Highly recommended for home chefs who love fresh produce.**eARC Netgalley**
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Mcfadden wrote this book to focus on seasonal cooking, hardly earth shaking today but unlike many other seasonal cooking cookbooks, McFadden emphasizes also how to use the foods in different ways through the season from raw to cooked with an emphasis on complexity in flavor and texture. This is not blue hill farms carrot on a nail (even though McFadden did work at Blue Hill). And it’s clear from the title that McFadden means more than winter, spring summer and fall. Because summer is such a big Mcfadden wrote this book to focus on seasonal cooking, hardly earth shaking today but unlike many other seasonal cooking cookbooks, McFadden emphasizes also how to use the foods in different ways through the season from raw to cooked with an emphasis on complexity in flavor and texture. This is not blue hill farms carrot on a nail (even though McFadden did work at Blue Hill). And it’s clear from the title that McFadden means more than winter, spring summer and fall. Because summer is such a big produce time, he actually divides summer into three seasons. McFadden emphasizes a fairly flexible approach to cooking where substitutes are allowed and even encouraged, and he does provide a larder section to give cooks an idea of what’s essential to these recipes. In the larder he explains how to store, which brands he prefers and how he uses the ingredient. After the pantry section, he provides basic recipes from spicy butters to pickles to brined olives. I particularly like the whipped ricotta, I can’t believe I haven’t run across that idea before.Then he starts with his seasons. Within each season, he focuses on a specific ingredient, explains how to prep and use it and its different seasons, then he shares several recipes with bright, colorful full-page pics but also pictures showing techniques. Almost every recipe has green onions in it, and he also loves celery. One of the greatest strength of the book is that the recipes tend to be unusual, that is you won’t find them in other veggie cookbooks, but also he provides fun and unusual suggestions of what you might do with a recipe. For example, he includes a recipe for Asparagus, nettle and green garlic frittata and then suggests turning it into an appetizer by slicing into squares and serving on whipped ricotta.Another real strength is the details he provides to improve a dish. These are details that can be used for beyond the cookbook. For example, he explains why and how you salt cucumbers or when you can use your cauliflower leaves. You can certainly make recipes without knowing this, but why would you want to when these small changes makes better food. He also does this thing where he flavors things with garlic and then throws out the garlic which provides a subtle garlic flavor to dishes.This is a great seasonal veggie cookbook—but I think there are only two desserts in the whole book!
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  • Wendi
    January 1, 1970
    I was very excited to get this one when it was released and have made a few recipes from it since. Another reviewer has already written how I feel about it (unfortunately)... it's okay. We have a back-to-baseline easy weeknight meal, which is basically jarred spaghetti sauce, sometimes augmented with a couple garlic cloves and 1/2 a pound of meat, spaghetti, and steamed broccoli. I was excited for his recipe of rigatoni with broccoli and sausage, which I was imagining to be an elevated version I was very excited to get this one when it was released and have made a few recipes from it since. Another reviewer has already written how I feel about it (unfortunately)... it's okay. We have a back-to-baseline easy weeknight meal, which is basically jarred spaghetti sauce, sometimes augmented with a couple garlic cloves and 1/2 a pound of meat, spaghetti, and steamed broccoli. I was excited for his recipe of rigatoni with broccoli and sausage, which I was imagining to be an elevated version of our go-to. And it is... kind of. I mean, sure, ricotta is always going to elevate a dish (one of those guaranteed improvements, like frying something or sprinkling some raw sugar on muffins before baking, etc), but honestly, all the recipe taught me was that I could spoon some ricotta on our regular, easier meal and be happier. His meal was good, but I won't make it again - wasn't worth all the extra effort for a slight improvement. I use this as a specific example, but I've made 4-5 other recipes with the exact same response afterwards - this was quite a bit of work and great (+$) ingredients, but it was just okay.Just, I suppose, disappointed, ultimately. Not what I expected from my original perusal of the book and recipes.
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  • Esther
    January 1, 1970
    Ever since reading Dan Barber's book The Third Plate I have been passionately exploring the world beyond merely eating organic. Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden is absolutely perfect for Pacific Northwest readers who want to take the next step beyond eating organically to consuming food that is geographically and seasonally based. Did I mention that Joshua McFadden actually worked for Dan Barber's Blue Hill restaurant prior to moving to Ava Gene's in Portland? No wonder I loved this book so much!I Ever since reading Dan Barber's book The Third Plate I have been passionately exploring the world beyond merely eating organic. Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden is absolutely perfect for Pacific Northwest readers who want to take the next step beyond eating organically to consuming food that is geographically and seasonally based. Did I mention that Joshua McFadden actually worked for Dan Barber's Blue Hill restaurant prior to moving to Ava Gene's in Portland? No wonder I loved this book so much!I have tested out several of the recipes from the book and my family and friends thoroughly enjoyed them. While I initially received a galley in order to review the book,  I just purchased it because I am planning to cook from it tonight. Tonight I will either be making the Pan-Roasted Carrots with Carrot Top Salsa Verde, Avocado, and Seared Squid or the Cream of Celery Soup. The ultimate sign of a great cookbook to me is one that you know you will keep returning to season after season. Also, if you feel like you might need a little inspiration before delving into a cookbook like this, I would highly recommend the movie Haute Cuisine about a feisty Chef who prepares geographically based meals for a French President.
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  • Ginna
    January 1, 1970
    Got from library, and the general information was good. I certainly like the idea of this book, and as my gardening ventures out into more obscure vegetables I want recipes to cook and enjoy them. This...was not that kind of book. There are very, very few recipes that one could just cook from ingredients in the pantry. I tried a few that were simpler, and they were ok. Not amazing, just OK. I tried Celery Puntarelle-Style (146), although I had to buy anchovies. It tasted like savory celery Got from library, and the general information was good. I certainly like the idea of this book, and as my gardening ventures out into more obscure vegetables I want recipes to cook and enjoy them. This...was not that kind of book. There are very, very few recipes that one could just cook from ingredients in the pantry. I tried a few that were simpler, and they were ok. Not amazing, just OK. I tried Celery Puntarelle-Style (146), although I had to buy anchovies. It tasted like savory celery salad. With anchovies. I tried Rigatoni with Broccoli and Sausage (although I used store-bought Ricotta instead of making my own from scratch), and again, it was fine. It was pasta with sausage, veg, and white sauce. The whole book was a strange combination of mundane recipes with precious descriptions (I mean, beans on toast? You need a recipe for that? I guess it has "Perfect Shell Beans".) and overly convoluted recipes that I can't imagine cooking. I meant to try the Beet Slaw with pistachios and raisins, but you are meant to make pistachio butter, then not to mix it into the dressing, but coat the bowl or plate with it. Why? He doesn't explain. Back to the library, and not planning on buying it.
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  • Maryalene
    January 1, 1970
    I love cookbooks that are broken down by season, and this book takes that concept even further by turning summer into three seasons. What's more, I appreciated the author's approachable tone and realistic recipes. I made the Butter Lettuce with New Potatoes, Eggs and Pancetta Vinaigrette as well as the Pasta Carbonara with English Peas. Both employed some cooking techniques that were unfamiliar to me, but Joshua McFadden's instructions were so clear and simple that both meals ended up being I love cookbooks that are broken down by season, and this book takes that concept even further by turning summer into three seasons. What's more, I appreciated the author's approachable tone and realistic recipes. I made the Butter Lettuce with New Potatoes, Eggs and Pancetta Vinaigrette as well as the Pasta Carbonara with English Peas. Both employed some cooking techniques that were unfamiliar to me, but Joshua McFadden's instructions were so clear and simple that both meals ended up being relatively easy to make. In addition to the recipes, McFadden provides details on what he keeps in this larder -- including brand recommendations and storage tips. There are also short introductions to various vegetables with tips for buying and using them. I found these to be helpful as well.Like almost all the books I read nowadays, this one came from the library. However, I liked Six Seasons so much that I might have to buy it for my personal collection. Highly recommended for anyone looking to add more seasonal vegetables to their diet.
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  • Kae Davis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is absolutely amazing and kind of a vegetable workhorse. It compiles seasons and the veggies that are in that season, then it gives you recipes that contain that veggie (as a main feature). This is a great book to refer to when you might have gone to the store and picked up a vegetable because it looked cool or because it's what you have left in your fridge or on your counter. The photography in this book is amazing! Each season has a color, which makes it easy to just page to that This book is absolutely amazing and kind of a vegetable workhorse. It compiles seasons and the veggies that are in that season, then it gives you recipes that contain that veggie (as a main feature). This is a great book to refer to when you might have gone to the store and picked up a vegetable because it looked cool or because it's what you have left in your fridge or on your counter. The photography in this book is amazing! Each season has a color, which makes it easy to just page to that season and find what you are looking for. The recipes are interesting and add a bit of flare for some tried and true vegetables that you just expect to have eaten the same way. If you are looking for a new way to eat old vegetables, amazing photography, interesting backstory, anecdotes and information about vegetables, and a nice sleek but not overwhelming feel. I definitely suggest this book.Right now this book is my most favorite on my shelf, right next to Half Baked Harvest. If you were looking for a great plantbased cookbook, I say, definitely buy this!
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  • Kate Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I fell in love with this book when I read the P.S. at the end of the book. "Don't buy tomatoes in the winter. Love, Joshua". This more than a book full of recipes. It is a book of life style and life philosophy. It's about eating the local vegetables of the season. Instead of eating the strip mined tomatoes in January--wait and eat the real thing in August. It's about cherishing food when it's in season and therefore becoming more in tune with Earth's natural seasons and cycles. It's a great I fell in love with this book when I read the P.S. at the end of the book. "Don't buy tomatoes in the winter. Love, Joshua". This more than a book full of recipes. It is a book of life style and life philosophy. It's about eating the local vegetables of the season. Instead of eating the strip mined tomatoes in January--wait and eat the real thing in August. It's about cherishing food when it's in season and therefore becoming more in tune with Earth's natural seasons and cycles. It's a great approach to slowing down and appreciating the wonders of each season. And I'm sure you like me were taught there are only 4 seasons, but in this wonderful book there are six: Spring, Early Summer, Midsummer, Late Summer, Fall, and Winter. And he does things with vegetables that I have never, ever thought of--like grilling radishes! Will I try and like all of these recipes? I'm sure I won't--but I will certainly try some of them. And I won't buy tomatoes in the winter any more.
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Even before I started a Cookbook Book Club at my library in October 2016 (after hearing a great presentation about them at the RI Library Association conference in 2016), I had a category on here for cookbooks because I have made it a point over the past 7 years or so, to really look at the entire book not just a few recipes and stick it back on the shelf. I'm very choosy about which books I'll buy and put on my shelf. This book I may own someday but for now I borrowed it and spend a good amount Even before I started a Cookbook Book Club at my library in October 2016 (after hearing a great presentation about them at the RI Library Association conference in 2016), I had a category on here for cookbooks because I have made it a point over the past 7 years or so, to really look at the entire book not just a few recipes and stick it back on the shelf. I'm very choosy about which books I'll buy and put on my shelf. This book I may own someday but for now I borrowed it and spend a good amount of time assessing it. One of the nicest features of this book is that there are drawings of the vegetables. This helps out a lot when you get a Veggie Box like we do from Farm Fresh RI. They email a list of the vegetables contained in the box but I don't waste paper printing it out so I having this book would be a nice help when we are trying to tell the difference between kohlrabi and a very large beet!
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  • Catherine Woodman
    January 1, 1970
    This cookbook is flat out fantastic. I can't wait to go to Portland and eat at his restaurant, and I can only hope it will be like eating a Nopi in London. I have made six things from this, the best of which is a kind of variation on a salad nicoise, where you make the Italian tuna sauce, spread it on the plate first, and then put the vegetables, both pickled and not, fresh and steamed, on top, and then serve. It is elegant and beautiful and unusual and delicious. And easy. I have made five This cookbook is flat out fantastic. I can't wait to go to Portland and eat at his restaurant, and I can only hope it will be like eating a Nopi in London. I have made six things from this, the best of which is a kind of variation on a salad nicoise, where you make the Italian tuna sauce, spread it on the plate first, and then put the vegetables, both pickled and not, fresh and steamed, on top, and then serve. It is elegant and beautiful and unusual and delicious. And easy. I have made five other dishes from it, and when I had to return it to the library and would have had to wait to get it back again, I decided that I couldn't do without it. So great. I cannot say enough great things about it--and the organization is fantastic too,
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  • Dominika
    January 1, 1970
    This is somewhat reminiscent of a Food52 post where the recipes look so exquisite but can I find this stuff in Pittsburgh or do I have to make a trip to New York City just to get some of these ingredients (ok, it's not that bad). I do really love the concept of this book, taking the "cook what's in season" advice to its logical level. Food is art and it only makes sense to use the appropriate paints. You have a lot of great sides and mains here, but this is far from a vegan cookbook. This is somewhat reminiscent of a Food52 post where the recipes look so exquisite but can I find this stuff in Pittsburgh or do I have to make a trip to New York City just to get some of these ingredients (ok, it's not that bad). I do really love the concept of this book, taking the "cook what's in season" advice to its logical level. Food is art and it only makes sense to use the appropriate paints. You have a lot of great sides and mains here, but this is far from a vegan cookbook. Vegetable-centered, but incorporating a lot of dairy and animal products (which honestly, is a style I'd like to do more of). I guess it is rather inspirational. Plus the cover is honestly gorgeous (I love me some textured-hardback books).
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    I have been perusing this cookbook for quite a while. The concept of six seasons (added are early summer and late summer) is useful and practical. The author is an experienced chef and the collaborating author is an experienced cookbook author. This book would be for someone who knows their way around a kitchen because recipes call for a drizzle of this and a glug of that but nothing critical is left to vagueness. Foods, especially the vegetables, are used completely when possible. Six Seasons I have been perusing this cookbook for quite a while. The concept of six seasons (added are early summer and late summer) is useful and practical. The author is an experienced chef and the collaborating author is an experienced cookbook author. This book would be for someone who knows their way around a kitchen because recipes call for a drizzle of this and a glug of that but nothing critical is left to vagueness. Foods, especially the vegetables, are used completely when possible. Six Seasons is veggie centered but not veggie exclusive since ingredients like sardines and sausages make occasional appearances. Missing one star because it is a bit chef-ish for me (that’s me not necessarily you).
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Many seasonal cookbooks divide the year into 4 seasons - spring, summer, fall, and winter. But in Six Seasons Joshua McFadden divides the year into 6 - spring, early summer, mid-summer, late summer, fall, and winter and I think this really works especially if you garden. There is a big difference in what is coming out of the garden in early summer versus late summer. Each season has 3-5 recipes featuring an ingredient that is available during that season. This is a great way to focus on seasonal Many seasonal cookbooks divide the year into 4 seasons - spring, summer, fall, and winter. But in Six Seasons Joshua McFadden divides the year into 6 - spring, early summer, mid-summer, late summer, fall, and winter and I think this really works especially if you garden. There is a big difference in what is coming out of the garden in early summer versus late summer. Each season has 3-5 recipes featuring an ingredient that is available during that season. This is a great way to focus on seasonal eating/cooking and make the most of whatever produce is available and at peak freshness. Definitely a few recipes I want to try in here!
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  • Joan Harper
    January 1, 1970
    I like the way this cookbook is set up by seasons, including the shoulder seasons of late Spring and late summer. It is not strictly a vegetarian cookbook as there are many recipes with meat, chicken and fish. But the focus is vegetables and using them only when they are in season. I think we are all trying to cook this way but it can be challenging to keep the meals varied when you are faced with mountains of zucchini or hoards of gourds. That's where this book comes in handy.The recipes I have I like the way this cookbook is set up by seasons, including the shoulder seasons of late Spring and late summer. It is not strictly a vegetarian cookbook as there are many recipes with meat, chicken and fish. But the focus is vegetables and using them only when they are in season. I think we are all trying to cook this way but it can be challenging to keep the meals varied when you are faced with mountains of zucchini or hoards of gourds. That's where this book comes in handy.The recipes I have tried have been very flexible about ingredients which I always appreciate. Substitution is not only allowed but encouraged. I will be cooking from this book regularly.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous cookbook with seasonally-arranged recipes focusing on in-season produce. McFadden loves fresh spices, vinegars, homemade pickles, and raves about the importance of good olive oil. Some of his cooking rules are militant and pretentious (the horror of store bought ground black pepper, oh no!) but there's enough yummy stuff in here to overlook some of the obnoxious descriptions. If you're vegetarian, you can expect your parents to buy this book for you for Christmas (although many of the Gorgeous cookbook with seasonally-arranged recipes focusing on in-season produce. McFadden loves fresh spices, vinegars, homemade pickles, and raves about the importance of good olive oil. Some of his cooking rules are militant and pretentious (the horror of store bought ground black pepper, oh no!) but there's enough yummy stuff in here to overlook some of the obnoxious descriptions. If you're vegetarian, you can expect your parents to buy this book for you for Christmas (although many of the dishes include meat, most are vegetarian; you will find lots of greens-with-cheese-and-an-egg-on-top variations).
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  • Jessica Marquis
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely, visually-stunning book that teaches you everything you need to know about vegetables. A basic premise is that it’s essential to cook seasonally (duh), as in no tomatoes in winter. McFadden splits the summer season up into three parts to make better use of abundant warm-weather crops. “Six Seasons” is organized by season and then by vegetable. In addition to innovative ways to prepare every vegetable (how to salt them, cut them roast them: basics), the book contains McFadden’s essential A lovely, visually-stunning book that teaches you everything you need to know about vegetables. A basic premise is that it’s essential to cook seasonally (duh), as in no tomatoes in winter. McFadden splits the summer season up into three parts to make better use of abundant warm-weather crops. “Six Seasons” is organized by season and then by vegetable. In addition to innovative ways to prepare every vegetable (how to salt them, cut them roast them: basics), the book contains McFadden’s essential recipes–homemade croutons, tonnato, whipped ricotta–easy things to learn, memorize, and add to your repertoire.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Vegetables, with a little meat or preserved fish for seasoning thrown in here and there, are the star of this show. My son shakes his head when he sees me reading a cookbook like a ‘real book’, but the stories behind the recipes are what make a book compelling. Why this cookbook and not another? In this case, the author’s back story as a chef turned farmer brings a special dimension to the dishes. There are a few variations on dishes that I already cook which made me wonder why I’d never tried Vegetables, with a little meat or preserved fish for seasoning thrown in here and there, are the star of this show. My son shakes his head when he sees me reading a cookbook like a ‘real book’, but the stories behind the recipes are what make a book compelling. Why this cookbook and not another? In this case, the author’s back story as a chef turned farmer brings a special dimension to the dishes. There are a few variations on dishes that I already cook which made me wonder why I’d never tried doing it his way. Everything I tried was fantastic. After borrowing it from the library, I’m compelled to buy a copy.
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