Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat
A visionary new master class in cooking that distills decades of professional experience into just four simple elements, from the woman declared “America’s next great cooking teacher” by Alice Waters.In the tradition of The Joy of Cooking and How to Cook Everything comes Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, an ambitious new approach to cooking by a major new culinary voice. Chef and writer Samin Nosrat has taught everyone from professional chefs to middle school kids to author Michael Pollan to cook using her revolutionary, yet simple, philosophy. Master the use of just four elements—Salt, which enhances flavor; Fat, which delivers flavor and generates texture; Acid, which balances flavor; and Heat, which ultimately determines the texture of food—and anything you cook will be delicious. By explaining the hows and whys of good cooking, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat will teach and inspire a new generation of cooks how to confidently make better decisions in the kitchen and cook delicious meals with any ingredients, anywhere, at any time. Echoing Samin’s own journey from culinary novice to award-winning chef, Salt, Fat Acid, Heat immediately bridges the gap between home and professional kitchens. With charming narrative, illustrated walkthroughs, and a lighthearted approach to kitchen science, Samin demystifies the four elements of good cooking for everyone. Refer to the canon of 100 essential recipes—and dozens of variations—to put the lessons into practice and make bright, balanced vinaigrettes, perfectly caramelized roast vegetables, tender braised meats, and light, flaky pastry doughs. Featuring 150 illustrations and infographics that reveal an atlas to the world of flavor by renowned illustrator Wendy MacNaughton, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat will be your compass in the kitchen. Destined to be a classic, it just might be the last cookbook you’ll ever need. With a foreword by Michael Pollan.

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat Details

TitleSalt, Fat, Acid, Heat
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 25th, 2017
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781476753836
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cookbooks, Food, Cooking, Nonfiction

Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat Review

  • Chessa
    January 1, 1970
    Full review at Leveled Up ReadingI love a good cookbook, but Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat goes beyond the normal boundaries of the genre. I would almost say that this book is like the kosher salt in your kitchen - it's going to enhance alllll the other recipes and cookbooks in your life. Personally, I have more confidence in my cooking than before reading this book, AND my food is more delicious. I couldn't' really ask for anything more!
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  • C
    January 1, 1970
    This book is flat-out genius and more than deserves all the praise it received. Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is far from a normal cookbook: Nosrat uses approachable, funny prose and helpful drawings to explain the basics of cooking and baking by considering the elements of salt, fat, acid, and heat. In this way the book really teaches you how to cook everything, not just the recipes clustered at the book's conclusion. This is a cookbook you actually READ vs flipping through a litany of recipes before g This book is flat-out genius and more than deserves all the praise it received. Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is far from a normal cookbook: Nosrat uses approachable, funny prose and helpful drawings to explain the basics of cooking and baking by considering the elements of salt, fat, acid, and heat. In this way the book really teaches you how to cook everything, not just the recipes clustered at the book's conclusion. This is a cookbook you actually READ vs flipping through a litany of recipes before giving up. I can't overemphasize how enjoyable I found this book.
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  • Bonny
    January 1, 1970
    Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat does offer an interesting way to think about the preparation of food, but I didn't find it “indispensable” or one that I “can't imagine living without” as Michael Pollan writes in the foreword. Author Samin Nosrat tells us that “there are only four basic factors that determine how good your food will taste: salt, which enhances flavor; fat, which amplifies flavor and makes appealing textures possible; acid, which brightens and balances; and heat, which ultimately determines Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat does offer an interesting way to think about the preparation of food, but I didn't find it “indispensable” or one that I “can't imagine living without” as Michael Pollan writes in the foreword. Author Samin Nosrat tells us that “there are only four basic factors that determine how good your food will taste: salt, which enhances flavor; fat, which amplifies flavor and makes appealing textures possible; acid, which brightens and balances; and heat, which ultimately determines the texture of food.” Those four are important and she conveys important information about how to use each of these to make better food. I personally wondered where sugar fit into this and why she left it out of the basic four. She does talk about sugar in each section, but mainly to say that salt will mask bitterness more effectively than sugar, and sugar is a good balance for acid. This first section in written in a chatty tone, telling the reader about mistakes she made along the way along with things she did that worked. It is a little imtimidating to the average reader/cook to read about Alice Waters and Chez Panisse, but Nosrat's writing conveys her passion without being overbearing.The second section has recipes, and while most of them sounded like they would be good, I didn't find any that I felt I simply had to make. The author might have a gift for making things far more complicated than I want to be in the kitchen. She has a recipe for Torn Croutons that has only bread and olive oil as ingredients, but goes on for four pages to obtain “even, yet rustic-looking” croutons. The Summer Tomato and Herb Salad lists tomatoes, salt, vinaigrette, and herbs for ingredients, and then continues for five pages of instructions. I think many of us have probably made this deliciously without a recipe at all. Chicken Pot Pie takes up seven pages and includes the sentence “Nestle the browned chicken into the vegetables.” (Nestle just made me laugh!) Making good food is both a science and an art, and something I enjoy trying to do most times I prepare food. For me, that also includes simplifying things when possible. I think Samin Nosrat is an exceptional cook who makes exceptional food, but I don't think that her methods (and urging cooks to season cooking water with “palmfuls of salt”) will become indispensable in my own kitchen. Book Bingo 2017 - About food
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  • Ariel ✨
    January 1, 1970
    If you order takeout for every meal or have a personal chef, feel free to ignore this book. Everyone else on the planet, do yourselves a favor and read her first four chapters! I consider myself a decent cook for an untrained young adult with mediocre cookware, but Samin Nosrat blew my mind with her simple and honest tips and lessons. Apparently, I've been using the wrong salt this whole time, bottled lime juice is the devil, you don't melt the butter for baked goods!!!, and acid is way underuti If you order takeout for every meal or have a personal chef, feel free to ignore this book. Everyone else on the planet, do yourselves a favor and read her first four chapters! I consider myself a decent cook for an untrained young adult with mediocre cookware, but Samin Nosrat blew my mind with her simple and honest tips and lessons. Apparently, I've been using the wrong salt this whole time, bottled lime juice is the devil, you don't melt the butter for baked goods!!!, and acid is way underutilized in all of my dishes.I will say that Nosrat's class privilege peeks through many times throughout the book. "Skip culinary school; spend a fraction of the cost of tuition traveling the world instead!" Okay, Samin...that's not realistic advice for most of us. It was nice to read about how she worked her way up from a busser at a fancy restaurant to where she is now, but as with most people who are immersed in the gourmet food world, some of her advice was out of touch with the audience I think she was hoping to reach.There's a lot of advice about cooking with meat and dairy, but vegetarians and vegans will also find this book useful. She covers non-dairy fats and writes at length about how different vegetables and non-meat proteins should be seasoned and cooked.I tweeted at her and asked if the beautifully illustrated charts throughout the book would ever be available for purchase, and she told me she was working on making that happen! I'm going to buy them all and hang them in my kitchen.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    What a great idea for a cookbook! I feel like this should be required reading for anyone even marginally interested in cooking. For one thing, it's fascinating, and very well written. But perhaps more importantly, Ms. Nosrat provides a non-intimidating guide to correcting the mistakes (over- or under-seasoning, not knowing which ingredients pair well together, not knowing how to cook a cut of meat, etc.) that scare folks out of the kitchen. Genius! The number one comment I hear when I talk about What a great idea for a cookbook! I feel like this should be required reading for anyone even marginally interested in cooking. For one thing, it's fascinating, and very well written. But perhaps more importantly, Ms. Nosrat provides a non-intimidating guide to correcting the mistakes (over- or under-seasoning, not knowing which ingredients pair well together, not knowing how to cook a cut of meat, etc.) that scare folks out of the kitchen. Genius! The number one comment I hear when I talk about tackling a challenging recipe: "I couldn't do that." Or, "I wouldn't dare try that." That makes me so sad, because cooking is definitely a skill perfected with trial and error. Here, Ms. Nosrat equips the reader with information that takes some of the guesswork out of the trial and error part of cooking. It's just wonderful.I received a review copy of this cookbook from NetGalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Juli Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I do not purchase cookbooks lightly, but I will be seeking out a copy of this one. I will also be enthusiastically recommending this book to everyone I know with a kitchen and tastebuds. This is the rare cookbook that transcends boundaries of cooking experience, background, and personal taste preferences. I would just as easily recommend this book to a picky eater who's just starting out cooking as to a voracious and kitchen-experienced foodie.Nosrat has created a solid system for teaching peopl I do not purchase cookbooks lightly, but I will be seeking out a copy of this one. I will also be enthusiastically recommending this book to everyone I know with a kitchen and tastebuds. This is the rare cookbook that transcends boundaries of cooking experience, background, and personal taste preferences. I would just as easily recommend this book to a picky eater who's just starting out cooking as to a voracious and kitchen-experienced foodie.Nosrat has created a solid system for teaching people how to really taste their food and use four simple elements to balance flavors and textures. While she gives solid scientific reasons for the lessons in this book, she is not dogmatic about recipes or precise directions, at least not in the way that The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science, for example, is. Instead, she encourages cooks to use their own senses as guides toward their own perfect cuisine. There are recipes here, but Nosrat is insistent that they are not to be followed by rote. I love how each basic recipe gives way to a myriad of variations, showing how they function as a part of a meal (adding acid or crunch or richness, for example), rather than simply showing off a combination of fancy ingredients. This book is much more of a textbook than a traditional cookbook: in fact, right off the bat, Nosrat suggests that her readers read cover-to-cover, rather than picking their way back and forth through the pages. Her recipes are purposefully classic (corn chowder, tuna confit, fried chicken, etc.) and invite personalization. I don't think there's single trendy ingredient in sight; the recipes require no such frills. Again, I cannot recommend this cookbook more strongly; it is an absolute gem.
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  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this after seeing her at an author talk. She's INCREDIBLY fun and lively and the book is wonderfully illustrated. She brings a lot of cooking experience, humor, and scientific knowledge to her explanation of how an understanding of the four basics of salt, fat, acid and heat can enable you to cook pretty much anything in the kitchen.Perversely, what I found was that this book actually made me feel more intimidated about cooking, not less, despite her funny stories about real-life kitche I bought this after seeing her at an author talk. She's INCREDIBLY fun and lively and the book is wonderfully illustrated. She brings a lot of cooking experience, humor, and scientific knowledge to her explanation of how an understanding of the four basics of salt, fat, acid and heat can enable you to cook pretty much anything in the kitchen.Perversely, what I found was that this book actually made me feel more intimidated about cooking, not less, despite her funny stories about real-life kitchen mistakes and her reminders that, e.g., it's just stew, if it doesn't work this time you can try it again. I got her basic message that you need to understand the four tools and then you can improvise. But there was a sort of subtext about "I made this polenta following the recipe at Chez Panisse and the gifted professional chef tasted it and made an adjustment I never would have expected, and as a result the dish went from bland to fantastic." I cook a lot and am basically happy if everything looks nice and is basically tasty. After reading this, I started to feel like every dish in a meal has to be ... perfected, and at a higher level of flavor than I am probably currently achieving. So ... a good cookbook, maybe best of all for a younger cook who can absorb the information without having a crisis of confidence. Lively, funny, informative but ... ultimately not the best cookbook, for me, that I've read this year. The recipes that make up the second half of the book are fine and appealing but, again, nothing that made me flag the page and think, "Wow, can't wait to try this one!"
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so interesting! I never read regular cook books because I just Google specific recipes when I need to. This book is a "how to cook book" or cooking theory. There are lots of things that seem obvious once I read them (like places that have meadows for grazing use lots of butter, but other places use other oils/fats. Duh, but I had never thought about it.) Or some things that I had read in recipes but didn't get the reasoning (like let ingredients come to room temperature before begin This book is so interesting! I never read regular cook books because I just Google specific recipes when I need to. This book is a "how to cook book" or cooking theory. There are lots of things that seem obvious once I read them (like places that have meadows for grazing use lots of butter, but other places use other oils/fats. Duh, but I had never thought about it.) Or some things that I had read in recipes but didn't get the reasoning (like let ingredients come to room temperature before beginning). There's a little bit of science in it, but not much. It's typical of what you'd hear chefs say on a cooking show. I'm writing this without trying any of the specific recipes at the end, so if they're all terrible I might change my mind.But I have already thought about and used some things during regular (Gobble delivery) cooking. Also, I like the prose and feel like the author is giving direction in a chatty way. Recommend to people who are interested in learning how to become more intuitive cooks and are interested in the science-ish foundations for cooking.
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  • Anita Pomerantz
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely learned some new tricks, but I thought the salt and fat and heat sections were stronger than the acid section, where I need the most help! I think the concept of balance still feels elusive and that is what I want to learn. But I definitely moved in the right direction and made a much improved roast chicken! The author has a great "voice", and I look forward to trying things she suggested.
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  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    I was frustrated by this book. But it was also fantastic. Why it's good: It's just an excellent explanation for cooking and a great way to view the whole enterprise. I love cooking and am pretty decent at making the stuff I like, but there was a lot in here that you get intuitively as a cook that is nice to see explained and spelled out. Like the acid part. I already love salt and I have intuitively used acid (lemon and vinegar) in most of my foods, but it was great to understand why. The frustr I was frustrated by this book. But it was also fantastic. Why it's good: It's just an excellent explanation for cooking and a great way to view the whole enterprise. I love cooking and am pretty decent at making the stuff I like, but there was a lot in here that you get intuitively as a cook that is nice to see explained and spelled out. Like the acid part. I already love salt and I have intuitively used acid (lemon and vinegar) in most of my foods, but it was great to understand why. The frustrating: Some it was very obvious and other parts were too complex without recipes (for example when she talks about bread dough, breads, and emulsion. My main beef with the book is that it's all about Alice Waters and what she likes. I already know about Alice Waters and frankly, didn't want to read another book about her. I was MUCH MUCH more interested to hear about Nosrat's grandparents and family in Iran and how they work salt, acid, fat, and heat in their food--developed over thousands of years. Or Indian or Italian. She gives hints about her family's cuisine, but keeps coming back to what Alice said and does. But Alice did not invent the tricks of cooking. I would bet her grandmother could teach her a lot more about the subtleties of flavor. I know because I have a grandma just like hers.
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  • Hesper
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of disappointing overall, but that's a relative opinion. I'm pretty sure the value of this rises in direct proportion to how little time the reader has spent cooking & learning about food prior to picking this up, and how much patience one has for the story part of recipe blogs. After a few pages the tone goes from breezy to grating fast. Yes, it has useful information even for experienced cooks, but it doesn't really feel "indispensable."Also, omitting garlic and adding ginger instead Kind of disappointing overall, but that's a relative opinion. I'm pretty sure the value of this rises in direct proportion to how little time the reader has spent cooking & learning about food prior to picking this up, and how much patience one has for the story part of recipe blogs. After a few pages the tone goes from breezy to grating fast. Yes, it has useful information even for experienced cooks, but it doesn't really feel "indispensable."Also, omitting garlic and adding ginger instead to the list of Eastern European spice pantry staples is laughable and criminal. Minus one star just for that.
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  • Callum McAllister
    January 1, 1970
    Yup, I read this cookbook from start to finish. And, yup: it's really really good. It has a lot about meat but is still great reference for the vegetarian, particularly in going through techniques and the various flavour charts throughout the book, which show which flavours you might want to pair together when cooking a particular meal from whichever part of the world. I learned quite a lot and am going to continue flipping back to reference parts of it for a long while.
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  • Adrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous! I saw Samin Nostrat on Netflix, loved her, loved all the wonderful information she offered to everyone who cooks. I just read and savored her book. I learned things I never even thought about. All exciting,useful and important information, for everyone who cooks! Wonderful book, I recommendit to everyone who has a stove and a pot.
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  • Isabelle Leo
    January 1, 1970
    Wow!! So clear and so straightforward, so well structured! I really feel like I'm going to retain the facts she taught me, the underlying principles, and the values - experimentation, practice, trusting my senses. I can't wait to start cooking the recipes in the back. I know I will refer to and reread most of the explanatory sections again and again. 2019 is the year of Samin
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  • Gigi
    January 1, 1970
    This book was exactly what I needed on my culinary journey. I've been teaching myself to cook over the last six years through books, cooking classes, and experimentation, but I've encountered gaps in my knowledge that I didn't know how to fill. This book showed me the light! I now understand the fundamentals of WHY something I'm attempting to cook is working or not working, and I also have so many new ideas.
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  • Gretchen Alice
    January 1, 1970
    This is really more of a textbook than a cookbook. Understanding the principles behind salt, fat, acid, and heat legit helped me level up as a cook. I think differently about cooking now and I'm very grateful to Samin Nosrat. Wendy MacNaughton's charming illustrations make this volume even more enjoyable to read. I can't wait to try out a few of these recipes and spend more time in the kitchen.
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  • Srujan
    January 1, 1970
    A bit of a disclaimer about my rating. It is purely for the first 45% or so of the book. Being a book on food the rest is filled with detailed recipes with very helpful detailing and a very science-ey, logical approach to cooking. Like simple things as when to salt things, salt tougher to cook beans an potatoes earlier and more generously. A lot of it is common cooking wisdom too but, here I speak for myself when I say that we overlook A LOT in our day to day cook. I found the recipes interestin A bit of a disclaimer about my rating. It is purely for the first 45% or so of the book. Being a book on food the rest is filled with detailed recipes with very helpful detailing and a very science-ey, logical approach to cooking. Like simple things as when to salt things, salt tougher to cook beans an potatoes earlier and more generously. A lot of it is common cooking wisdom too but, here I speak for myself when I say that we overlook A LOT in our day to day cook. I found the recipes interesting too but since I mostly cook Indian fare in my daily routine, I haven't tried any of them before. But, the first half of the book is really, really good and I cannot emphasis enough on who it teaches us to treat cooking ingredients with respect, whether they are expensive exotic ingredients or common, place everyday things. I loved the book and had been waiting to finish the book to watch the 4 part Netflix documentary based on the same. A big thumbs by for the illustrations by Wendy MacNaughton from me! 😊😊
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  • Alanna Why
    January 1, 1970
    I have only made the scrambled eggs recipe from this so far (lol) but this was a really fantastic and informative cookbook! The first half explains the four elements of good cooking and how to use them. I have always been looking for a cooking basics book that explains what makes things taste good and this was it. Mandatory reading for any aspiring home cook. When in doubt, ADD MORE SALT!
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    I can see why my friend enjoyed this book so much.....it taught more of the principles of cooking, not just recipes.
  • Bonnie Brandt
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this “cookbook”. It is not a book full of recipes. It is a book that teaches you how to cook. I like to cook and bake but always said I have more of an eye for a recipe than someone who can just throw things together and make them taste delicious.This book changed that. I realized I have a lot more knowledge than I knew. I’ve read a lot of recipe books and a lot of cooking books that assure me I can cook without a recipe. This is the first one that made me believe I can and what’s more i I loved this “cookbook”. It is not a book full of recipes. It is a book that teaches you how to cook. I like to cook and bake but always said I have more of an eye for a recipe than someone who can just throw things together and make them taste delicious.This book changed that. I realized I have a lot more knowledge than I knew. I’ve read a lot of recipe books and a lot of cooking books that assure me I can cook without a recipe. This is the first one that made me believe I can and what’s more it makes me want to!Read it if you have the slightest inclination to become a cook who doesn’t need to use a recipe. I know you’ll love it too. I mean just look at the other ratings and reviews. People seriously love this book.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I usually don't review cookbooks on Goodreads... but maybe I should? This cookbook had a "required reading" section before allowing readers to make any of the recipes. I kind of resented this, but I read it anyway. Nosrat writes relatably about her journey in understanding cooking intuitively. She shares her mistakes and her successes. She has a lot of stories about working at Chez Panisse, and is a disciple of Alice Waters, but she manages not to mix in too much food religion. Also I kind of lo I usually don't review cookbooks on Goodreads... but maybe I should? This cookbook had a "required reading" section before allowing readers to make any of the recipes. I kind of resented this, but I read it anyway. Nosrat writes relatably about her journey in understanding cooking intuitively. She shares her mistakes and her successes. She has a lot of stories about working at Chez Panisse, and is a disciple of Alice Waters, but she manages not to mix in too much food religion. Also I kind of loved the stories and it made my experience eating at Chez Panisse when I was on vacation even more enjoyable.The hand-lettering and illustrations are beautiful. Anyone who follows #bujo hashtags or is into hand lettering will love the artwork and infographics. It also matched well with the intuitive, flowing feel for cooking that Nosrat hopes to inspire. The instructional part of the book got me thinking about how I use salt, fat, and acid in my cooking and has helped me balance soups and curries. I made this one root vegetable salad from the book (before I finished reading the instructional section! forgive me!), and it was SOOOOO much work. It was a solid hour of cooking and I didn't even make the crispy sage leaves to go with. However it was also unforgettably delicious! The browned butter dressing left a lasting impression on me. It was so different from any other salad I've made. I hope to make some of the other recipes to increase my cooking proficiency.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This book deserved a better rating that what I'm giving it. It's a really informative yet accessible explanation of four of the essential elements of cooking. The author talks about how to use salt, fact, acid, and heat for all different kinds of cooking. The reason I didn't rate it higher is that I just couldn't get myself excited about reading it. It's interesting, just not the right thing for me to be reading in my current mood. This is a good book to buy and have on hand so that y 3.5 stars. This book deserved a better rating that what I'm giving it. It's a really informative yet accessible explanation of four of the essential elements of cooking. The author talks about how to use salt, fact, acid, and heat for all different kinds of cooking. The reason I didn't rate it higher is that I just couldn't get myself excited about reading it. It's interesting, just not the right thing for me to be reading in my current mood. This is a good book to buy and have on hand so that you can continue to reference back to the explanations as you learn.
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  • Kimberlee
    January 1, 1970
    I learned some things from this book, like how to properly salt food. But it was also very repetitive and I wasn't overly inspired by the recipe selection.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely a new classic!
  • Luca
    January 1, 1970
    Life changing. Absolutely must read, no matter how much of an experienced cook you are.
  • bronwyn
    January 1, 1970
    I have a friend who is a Samin Nosrat evangelist, and when I stayed with him over Christmas I picked up his copy of this book and within just a few pages was jabbing buttons on my phone to buy a copy of my own. I love her, I love her show, I love the way she thinks about food: as something that is both an art and skill that can and where possible should be refined to a high level, and as an accessible domestic endeavor. The book sometimes slips into thinking about food through the narrow lens of I have a friend who is a Samin Nosrat evangelist, and when I stayed with him over Christmas I picked up his copy of this book and within just a few pages was jabbing buttons on my phone to buy a copy of my own. I love her, I love her show, I love the way she thinks about food: as something that is both an art and skill that can and where possible should be refined to a high level, and as an accessible domestic endeavor. The book sometimes slips into thinking about food through the narrow lens of Franco-Italian haute cuisine, and also for that reason is very meat-focused, but by and large its scope is global, and most of its principles broadly applicable. I haven't tested or even really read any of the recipes yet, but I have learned a lot from the foundations of the book in exactly the way I most want someone to teach me about cooking: from principle, rather than from instructions for specific dishes. The chapters vary in coherence and usefulness--Salt was my favorite--but on the whole I found it very intuitive and easy to learn from. 'Samin says...' has become a frequent refrain in my kitchen and I imagine it's gonna be like that for a while. This won't work for everyone, but it was just what I needed. I should say that this is NOT an introductory book, though it sort of claims to be. I think its ideal audience is someone basically like me, a competent cook who is ready to up their game. A certain amount of knowledge is assumed (e.g. the verb "deglaze" is used with no gloss), and, most frustratingly, Nosrat never quite acknowledges the crucial difference between herself and her readers: she frequently reassures you that you will learn as she did, from experience--as though forgetting that you are presumably at home on your own or with other amateurs, whereas she learned by working in the kitchen of Chez Panisse. Not the same! With that reservation, though, I strongly recommend this and can't wait for whatever she does next.
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  • Kitty
    January 1, 1970
    ma muidu ei kiida heaks raamatute jagamist kaheks osaks, olgu ikka pigem üks ja korralik - aga selle puhul siin jõudsin küll korduvalt mõelda, et võiks olla kaks eraldi köidet. esimene osa, kus seletatakse, kuidas töötavad sool, rasv, hape ja kuumus söögitegemisel, õpetatakse erinevaid tehnikaid, vürtsitatakse seda kõike värvikate lugudega lapsepõlvest ja restoraniköökidest, lisatakse skeeme, mis on ühtlasi vaimukad illustratsioonid... selle raamatu ma ostaksin ja paneksin endale riiulisse. tein ma muidu ei kiida heaks raamatute jagamist kaheks osaks, olgu ikka pigem üks ja korralik - aga selle puhul siin jõudsin küll korduvalt mõelda, et võiks olla kaks eraldi köidet. esimene osa, kus seletatakse, kuidas töötavad sool, rasv, hape ja kuumus söögitegemisel, õpetatakse erinevaid tehnikaid, vürtsitatakse seda kõike värvikate lugudega lapsepõlvest ja restoraniköökidest, lisatakse skeeme, mis on ühtlasi vaimukad illustratsioonid... selle raamatu ma ostaksin ja paneksin endale riiulisse. teine osa on kokaraamat, kokaraamatuid ma parema meelega ei osta. korra loeksin kõik retseptid läbi, paari prooviks teha ka, ja siis viiksin raamatukokku tagasi.kuna see kõik ikkagi on antud välja ühesainsas köites, tuli mul minna kompromissile - lugesin esimese poole läbi ja kuna raamatukogu tähtaeg jõudis kätte (ja pikendada ei saanud, sellele oli järjekord), ostsin endale oma eksemplari ja lugesin retsepte ka.(kusjuures kui lemmikosaks peaks osutuma hoopis pildid, siis need on veel eraldi välja antud ja saakski osta endale koju seinale riputamiseks.)aga jah. see on see raamat, mis seletab ära suure osa sellest, kuidas maitsed kujunevad ja kombineeruvad. mitte liiga süvateaduslikult, aga piisavalt asjalikult, ja väga praktilisel moel. millele millal, kui palju ja millist soola panna (spoiler: enamasti varem ja rohkem, kui sa ise arvanud oleks; ja jämedat. muide, "kosher salt", millele ta seal kogu aeg viitab, on eesti keeles lihtsalt jäme sool ja juudi köögiga pole tal palju pistmist. pole tänu väärt). kuidas praadida liha ja kuidas teha majoneesi. millise maailma köögi juurde sobib mis tüüpi hape (itaalia toidu sisse pane punast veini, ida-euroopa söögile lisa hapukoort). keetmine-hautamine-praadimine-küpsetamine-röstimine-grillimine-misiganes.ja kas ma pilte mainisin?
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  • Jakub
    January 1, 1970
    https://www.heroine.cz/styl/603-tuk-z...Z finální verze článku vypadla moje medienwissenschaft masturbace, což je dobře. semka ji ale hodím, to je jasné. "Myšlení v síti je jednou z nejpodstatnějších lekcí, co Nosrat dává. Pro její rozvedení si musíme na chvilku odskočit od plotny k výzdobě kostela. Na obou místech nám jde o následující: šikovná síť či rozvrh dokážou být velmi užitečným nástrojem vedení a kontroly. Výjimečný umělec (nebo kuchař) totiž není pouze „génius“, vysvětluje teoretik méd https://www.heroine.cz/styl/603-tuk-z...Z finální verze článku vypadla moje medienwissenschaft masturbace, což je dobře. semka ji ale hodím, to je jasné. "Myšlení v síti je jednou z nejpodstatnějších lekcí, co Nosrat dává. Pro její rozvedení si musíme na chvilku odskočit od plotny k výzdobě kostela. Na obou místech nám jde o následující: šikovná síť či rozvrh dokážou být velmi užitečným nástrojem vedení a kontroly. Výjimečný umělec (nebo kuchař) totiž není pouze „génius“, vysvětluje teoretik médií Bernhard Siegert, on musí zároveň být pořádný řemeslník, co ovládá soudobé techniky a postupy. To rozhodně platí pro italského malíře Masaccia, který roku 1425 v kostele Santa Maria Novella ve Florencii začíná pracovat na své fresce Svatá trojice. Výjimečná věc. Masaccio totiž vyfikl první známou malbu podle pravidel centrální perspektivy.Dokázal to díky zapomenuté — a tehdy znovuobjevené — technice ptolemaiovského síťování map, které pracuje s délkovými a šířkovými stupni. Ty umožňují tvořit opticky konzistentní mapy nebo taky síť-rozvrh na zdi. Do uhlíky vyznačeného rozvrhu pak může Massacio i na dvourozměrném povrchu namalovat fresku přesně podle pravidel perspektivy. Nosrat ze svých čtyřech elementů vytváří síť, jejíž smysl je při troše představivosti podobný. Tedy vede nás a je díky ní možné „prokázat chyby a předepsat opravy,“ jak poznamenává Siegert. Chybí osvěžující kyselost, příliš pomalu smažené — tedy nekřupavé, opomenuté nasolení předem. Pohlídejme si tohle, říká Nosrat, a naše vaření bude chuťově vyvážené a konzistentní. Konzistentně výborné."
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  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    The Good:I saw the TV show and that made me want to pick the book. This book was enlightening and it was almost like taking a cooking class with a top chef. I realized I did so many things wrong while cooking/baking after reading this book. This book also taught me why certain ingredients were added at specific times while cooking. It taught me the science of cooking, which no other book did. I gained interest in cooking only after I had a kid. Just like all the other moms, I got obsessed with c The Good:I saw the TV show and that made me want to pick the book. This book was enlightening and it was almost like taking a cooking class with a top chef. I realized I did so many things wrong while cooking/baking after reading this book. This book also taught me why certain ingredients were added at specific times while cooking. It taught me the science of cooking, which no other book did. I gained interest in cooking only after I had a kid. Just like all the other moms, I got obsessed with cooking the most healthy and delicious food for him. In the process, I ended up liking cooking which I thought would never happen as I always hated cooking. Books like these will make anyone like cooking as it is all about the chemistry between the ingredients and as the author says it’s all about salt, fat, acid and heat. Must read for anyone interested in cooking.The Bad:I just wish the author had touched upon pressure cooking (she didn’t even mention it) since it is my most favorite and also a nutritious way of cooking. Also it was too tailored to American food. The sections under India were kinda wrong in the food wheels that she gave. I am not aware of a single Indian recipe which uses Beer as an acid. So I am skeptical about her research about cuisines from other countries. I am not sure why South Indian food never gets any recognition. It’s always North Indian meat curries that these westerners think Indian food is all about. Think beyond meat. There is so much more to Indian (and other cuisines) food than lamb curry or chicken curry. *rolling my eyes*
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  • Becki Iverson
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book I wish I had had when I first started learning to cook. I've seen some articles lately discussing how there are lots of cookbooks that give basic recipes but don't really tell you the why or how of what cooking is; after really thinking about this, I have to agree. This book fills most of that gap by giving you an explanation for integrating certain ingredients into each other, how to pick flavor profiles and complete seasoning, checking for doneness - think of it as being to basi This is a book I wish I had had when I first started learning to cook. I've seen some articles lately discussing how there are lots of cookbooks that give basic recipes but don't really tell you the why or how of what cooking is; after really thinking about this, I have to agree. This book fills most of that gap by giving you an explanation for integrating certain ingredients into each other, how to pick flavor profiles and complete seasoning, checking for doneness - think of it as being to basic cooking technique what Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything is to the standard recipe, or the textbook version of Alton Brown's Good Eats concept. I really liked Nosrat's voice here, and her connection to Michael Pollan is clear. I think this would make a great beginner cookbook as a housewarming gift or for people who are just starting out. Even experienced cooks can probably find some new gems of wisdom to enjoy as well, so don't count it out if you have some experience.
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