The Choice
A powerful, moving memoir—and a practical guide to healing—written by Dr. Edith Eva Eger, an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor help her treat patients and allow them to escape the prisons of their own minds.Edith Eger was sixteen years old when the Nazis came to her hometown in Hungary and took her Jewish family to an interment center and then to Auschwitz. Her parents were sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Mengele soon after they arrived at the camp. Hours later Mengele demanded that Edie dance a waltz to “The Blue Danube” and rewarded her with a loaf of bread that she shared with her fellow prisoners. These women later helped save Edie’s life. Edie and her sister survived Auschwitz, were transferred to the Mauthausen and Gunskirchen camps in Austria, and managed to live until the American troops liberated the camps in 1945 and found Edie in a pile of dying bodies. One of the few living Holocaust survivors to remember the horrors of the camps, Edie has chosen to forgive her captors and find joy in her life every day. Years after she was liberated from the concentration camps Edie went back to college to study psychology. She combines her clinical knowledge and her own experiences with trauma to help others who have experienced painful events large and small. Dr. Eger has counselled veterans suffering from PTSD, women who were abused, and many others who learned that they too, can choose to forgive, find resilience, and move forward. She lectures frequently on the power of love and healing.The Choice weaves Eger’s personal story with case studies from her work as a psychologist. Her patients and their stories illustrate different phases of healing and show how people can choose to escape the prisons they construct in their minds and find freedom, regardless of circumstance. Eger’s story is an inspiration for everyone. And her message is powerful and important: “Your pain matters and is worth healing: you can choose to be joyful and free.” She is eighty-nine years old and still dancing.

The Choice Details

TitleThe Choice
Author
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherScribner
ISBN-139781501130786
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, World War II, Holocaust, History, Biography, Psychology, War

The Choice Review

  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch-perfect memoir by Dr. Edith Eger. I was not familiar with Dr. Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story. The book is organized into four sections: Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing. I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy. It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr. Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime. But she is not satisfied to make this book onl This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch-perfect memoir by Dr. Edith Eger. I was not familiar with Dr. Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story. The book is organized into four sections: Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing. I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy. It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr. Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime. But she is not satisfied to make this book only about her experience. She is clearly a committed therapist who understands pain and forgiveness uniquely, and has a very powerful message that to truly live a full life, we need to make the choice not only to forgive, but to forgive ourselves.I describe the book as pitch-perfect because from the introduction, Dr. Eger explains that there is no heirarchy when it comes to suffering. She does not tell her story so that the reader will minimize their own suffering in comparison, that would just be another way of judging ourselves. As a therapist, she understands that someone whose suffering may seem superficial to others, is generally attributed to something much more deeply rooted, and representative of a much larger pain. I find it extraordinary that she is capable of empathizing with others to this extent. When you read her story, and I hope you do, you will understand the extent of her personal suffering. Not only what she endured in her youth, but as an adult coming to terms with everything she lost, and finding a way to let it be her strength, instead of imagining what her life would have been had it not been interrupted by the cruelty and injustice of the Holocaust. I can not find the words to describe the depth of her compassion. Life is about choices, and I am guilty of the destructive thinking that Dr. Eger drescribes in the book. In my Midewestern upbringing, I was raised to take responsibility for my choices. I pride myself in this responsibility. What this book has made me realize that often in my experience, this has been a punishing idea - there are choices, and there are consequences. But life is not that simple, there are choices and more choices. Often we choose to punish ourselves. In doing so, we are imprisoning ourselves with our own beliefs - of not feeling worthy, a fear of making a bad choice... The author is open about choices she made in her own life, and that they may not have been the best ones. Everyone suffers. Everyone has endured the consequences of their own poor choices. But to live our best life, we must continue to make choices, instead of allowing ourselves to be imprisoned by our past. Thank you, Dr. Edith Eva Eger for sharing your story and your wisdom. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advance copy of The Choice for review.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I will admit that I did not expect to enjoy this book. I thought it was going to be another holocaust memoir with a hint of psychological analysis. But man, was I wrong.This book was beautifully written, and was a struggle to put down every night. This book was a small exercise in self-help, disguised as a gorgeous memoir. The Choice has genuinely made me change how I think about life. I would highly recommend this book.
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  • Ruth O'hagan
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of the most beautiful and inspiring books I have ever read. Edith tells the story her extraordinary. The main premise of the book is how she highlights her extraordinary experience as a Holocaust survivor and the how she learned to heal herself. Edith gently takes the reader by the hand vividly guides the reader on a journey of her past and present through this book. The most compelling section of the book is when she retells her experience in the concentration camps. She explains i This was one of the most beautiful and inspiring books I have ever read. Edith tells the story her extraordinary. The main premise of the book is how she highlights her extraordinary experience as a Holocaust survivor and the how she learned to heal herself. Edith gently takes the reader by the hand vividly guides the reader on a journey of her past and present through this book. The most compelling section of the book is when she retells her experience in the concentration camps. She explains it with such bravery and strength. It was heartbreaking to hear what she went through. The strength that she showed is otherworldly. Also, compassion that she shows throughout the book is truly inspiring. She doesn't just show compassion for the Nazi's but also the compassion she shows for herself. I recommend this book for so many reasons. It's a coming of age story and how our family can affect our self esteem and how we view ourselves. Edith demonstrates that family is where we learn how to value our self-worth and the personal expectations we set for ourself's. Edith does explain the holocaust but that is not what the book is mainly about. The book is about healing and how we can love to learn to love ourselves through our challenges. Similar to Viktor Frank's, Man's search for meaning, Edith explains how love and a hunger for learning/purpose helped her survive her the holocaust.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    An uplifting and powerful lifetime memoir documenting not only the authors experience in Auschwitz but also the longer term recovery, both physically and psychologically. This was an unexpected read in the sense that I anticipated much of the book to be focused on wartime; when in actual fact, only the first third was. The latter parts of the book focus on the authors personal life as she nurtured a family and works as a psychologist. This was different to many books of a similar genre but I enj An uplifting and powerful lifetime memoir documenting not only the authors experience in Auschwitz but also the longer term recovery, both physically and psychologically. This was an unexpected read in the sense that I anticipated much of the book to be focused on wartime; when in actual fact, only the first third was. The latter parts of the book focus on the authors personal life as she nurtured a family and works as a psychologist. This was different to many books of a similar genre but I enjoyed it all the same. The authors account of returning to Auschwitz as a middle aged woman are particularly moving, as is her descriptions of speeches and workshops she gave to future generations. A must read for those interested in World War Two history.
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  • Maria João Trindade
    January 1, 1970
    No words to describe this. It's life-changing and I will never forget what I read here. Thank you so much for sharing your story, Dr. Eger. It truly was one of the most inspiring books I've ever read.
  • Maria Sol
    January 1, 1970
    Terriblemente real..... sigo leyendo y leyendo relatos que vienen de la locura de la segunda guerra mundial y sigo sin poder entender como todo esto fue posible. Tremendo!
  • Jaike
    January 1, 1970
    Ik heb zo veel emoties gevoeld tijdens het lezen. Niet te beschrijven. Recensie volgt snel.
  • Lola Et La Vie
    January 1, 1970
    I knew from the start this book would touch me. I generally avoid books about WWII and concentrations camps, their horrors too much for me to contemplate. Yet, I felt compelled to read this book. The reason being that from the description I gathered this was about a woman who had survived and gone on to use her strength to help others with their trauma.No, this was not an easy read. When she takes us into Auschwitz and tells us about the horrors she had seen and experienced there, my heart shran I knew from the start this book would touch me. I generally avoid books about WWII and concentrations camps, their horrors too much for me to contemplate. Yet, I felt compelled to read this book. The reason being that from the description I gathered this was about a woman who had survived and gone on to use her strength to help others with their trauma.No, this was not an easy read. When she takes us into Auschwitz and tells us about the horrors she had seen and experienced there, my heart shrank in compassion and shame that humanity can be so cruel. But I also felt her courage and that of her sister, of the hardships and mental strength they must have had to survive when it may have been easier to give up.I realised that being liberated from a prison does not mean the prison is gone. It can live on inside us. Dr Eger’s story of finally recognising and battling the prison in her mind is incredibly brave. I greatly respect and admire her for using her strength and harrowing experiences to help others deal with the prisons they had created for themselves, whatever the reason. She helps without judging.Yes, this books tells of a survivor’s story, but it tells so much more about the strength and power that lives inside all of us and that we can help ourselves with the right guidance.I would thoroughly recommend this book to everyone, whether you are struggling with your own demons or not.
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  • Claudia S. (Dream Memories)
    January 1, 1970
    "No existe una jerarquía del sufrimiento. No hay nada que haga que mi dolor sea mejor o peor que el tuyo, no existe ninguna gráfica en la que podamos plasmar la importancia relativa de un pesar respecto a otro." Reseña completa en el blog: http://mdmemories.blogspot.com/2018/0...No suelo leer libros de no ficción, pero siempre estoy dispuesta a leer historias profundas e importantes que me hagan cambiar la perspectiva de las cosas. Agradezco a la vida y a la editorial por poner este libro en mi "No existe una jerarquía del sufrimiento. No hay nada que haga que mi dolor sea mejor o peor que el tuyo, no existe ninguna gráfica en la que podamos plasmar la importancia relativa de un pesar respecto a otro." Reseña completa en el blog: http://mdmemories.blogspot.com/2018/0...No suelo leer libros de no ficción, pero siempre estoy dispuesta a leer historias profundas e importantes que me hagan cambiar la perspectiva de las cosas. Agradezco a la vida y a la editorial por poner este libro en mi camino. Ha sido retador, sorpresivo y duro, pero vale muchísimo la pena el viaje lector emprendido. Su historia cambia vidas y de ahora en adelante será uno de mis libros favoritos que recomendaré a todo quien desee conocer el testimonio de una sobreviviente al Holocausto, quien con su historia quiere ayudar a quienes hayan sufrido pérdidas en sus vidas y deseen superar el pasado.Edith Eger fue una sobreviviente de una de las peores tragedias de la humanidad. A los dieciséis años fue enviada al campo de exterminio de Auschwitz por ser judía, y donde fue testigo de la muerte de sus padres en las cámaras de gas. Ella y su hermana no murieron, pero sabían que cada día la muerte era una posibilidad. Edith era una gimnasta y bailarina, y fue eso lo que le dio la oportunidad de seguir con vida y que el doctor Josef Mengele, el nazi que las encerró, no las matara. Pero de ahí en adelante su existencia estuvo marcada por el hambre, la enfermedad, la explotación laboral, el agotamiento, el maltrato y el odio. Logró sobrevivir a duras penas. Este libro es su testimonio y a la vez, un regalo para la humanidad.Actualmente es una psicóloga muy reconocida que se dedica a ayudar a pacientes que sufren de victimización o que no han podido superar pérdidas pasadas. Personas que fueron como ella. Su dolor no terminó en Auschwitz. La acompañó durante mucho tiempo, los flashbacks siguen ahí, tiene crisis de vez en cuando y sabe que es algo con lo que tendrá que vivir para siempre. Pero dedica su vida a ayudar a otros, y eso es de admirar.En este libro inicia contándole al lector cómo era su vida durante la guerra y cómo fue su vida cautiva en Auschwitz siendo sólo una adolescente. No es fácil leer lo que nos narra. Pensar que todo ocurrió en la realidad y lo estamos leyendo de primera mano por alguien que estuvo físicamente en el lugar, es bastante fuerte y difícil. Puedes sentir el hambre, la injusticia, el odio, el olor de las montañas de cadáveres y el cansancio de tanto caminar. Nos explica detalladamente todas las atrocidades que vivió, las veces que estuvo a punto de morir y el esqueleto en el que se convirtió a falta de comida. Está escrito maravillosamente, pero narrando los actos más crueles que ha vivido el hombre. "Aquí el asesinato es eficiente. Sistemático." Luego de su liberación por los soldados estadounidenses, la autora nos cuenta cómo trata de recuperar su vida, a pesar de no darse cuenta que retener sus sentimientos y no hablar de ello, no es la mejor forma de avanzar. De ahí en adelante empieza su proceso de curación, de liberación ya no física, pero sí espiritual. Al ser psicóloga nos narra acerca de los testimonios y sesiones de terapia con muchos de sus pacientes, en quienes ella se ve reflejada, y nos explica el origen de la angustia y el dolor de todos ellos siendo una experta en el tema. Es muy interesante y educativo conocer las consecuencias de la pérdida en diversas circunstancias. Además relaciona su historia con la historia de sus pacientes, acompañándola en su auto-descubrimiento y curación. Ella aprendió con ellos a superar sus traumas. El lector podrá encontrar en el libro la mejor manera para dejar, si es su caso, el dolor del pasado atrás, superar las pérdidas de todo tipo y adoptar la mejor forma de su ser en el presente. "Ojalá hubiera sabido que no era una persona dañada, sino que estaba sufriendo las secuelas de una vida interrumpida." Este libro es un aprendizaje emocionante y profundo acerca de los sentimientos humanos y lo que es capaz de hacer a partir del dolor. Edith Eger es una mujer ejemplar, inspiradora, y no me cabe duda de que es bastante fuerte. Lo que vivió pudo destruirla toda su vida, le arrebataron la oportunidad de ser bailarina, pero ella decidió no dejar que Hitler dominara su presente ni su futuro. Es un análisis del alma humana, del proceso que se necesita para superar las crisis emocionales, de lo que significa ser feliz y perdonar, de la necesidad de ser libres en cuerpo y alma. Un viaje emocional que me llevó a pensar en mis propias pérdidas y en si de verdad he logrado superarlas. Nos recuerda que el ser humano puede sufrir muchos golpes en su vida, pero nadie puede quitarle lo que pone en su mente. Me alegra saber que Edith, a sus noventa años, dejó un testimonio para toda la vida que podrá ser leído por las generaciones futuras. Les ayudará a ser valientes, a vencer la adversidad y a reconocer en él la verdadera esencia del ser humano que no tiene que ver con el odio, si no con la comprensión de los sentimientos y la elección de ser feliz. Soy alguien mejor luego de haber leído su historia.
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  • Angela Smith
    January 1, 1970
    This is truly an inspirational story of how the author went to Auschwitz and unlike so many others, she survived to share her story. Her story is not just about the terrible things she saw and suffered there but also how she managed to go on living after it happened and turned it in to something positive to help others going through struggles in their lives, be it PTSD, addiction, loss. The things that happened were truly horrendous but she chose to live, to survive and face her fears, even retu This is truly an inspirational story of how the author went to Auschwitz and unlike so many others, she survived to share her story. Her story is not just about the terrible things she saw and suffered there but also how she managed to go on living after it happened and turned it in to something positive to help others going through struggles in their lives, be it PTSD, addiction, loss. The things that happened were truly horrendous but she chose to live, to survive and face her fears, even returning to Auschwitz years later to sort of lay some ghosts of her life there.The book is also about how we can deal with the hardships that life throws at us and try to make sense of them and perhaps even find peace, which only we can find from within. There is no golden promise from the author that things will necessarily be fixed, but all anyone can do is try. An aspiring account of the human spirit overcoming great evil and not letting Hitler win. Edith comes full circle when she talks to a regiment from the same division as the US soldiers that pulled her out of a pile of corpses when she was finally freed at the liberation.
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  • Pamela Fernandez
    January 1, 1970
    4.5
  • Rita
    January 1, 1970
    Muy buen comienzo pero acaba en autoayuda pura y dura y aburre
  • Milly Cohen
    January 1, 1970
    Me maravilla el ser humano. Su potencial. Su fuerza. Su fe. Su transformación.Esta mujer me maravilla aun más. Por su humor. Por su vitalidad. Por su historia (para mi no existe eso de "una historia más del mismo tema"). No creo haber leído a ningún sobreviviente del Holocausto, aun vivo, con tanta preparación y sabiduría. Y dulzura.No lo entiendo. No entiendo cómo se puede lograr tanto luego de lo otro, y muchos no logramos nada, sin haber pasado por lo otro.Una joya de libro y de mujer.Con cad Me maravilla el ser humano. Su potencial. Su fuerza. Su fe. Su transformación.Esta mujer me maravilla aun más. Por su humor. Por su vitalidad. Por su historia (para mi no existe eso de "una historia más del mismo tema"). No creo haber leído a ningún sobreviviente del Holocausto, aun vivo, con tanta preparación y sabiduría. Y dulzura.No lo entiendo. No entiendo cómo se puede lograr tanto luego de lo otro, y muchos no logramos nada, sin haber pasado por lo otro.Una joya de libro y de mujer.Con cada generación nueva de nuestros descendientes, le ganamos a Hitler. Me encanta esto!!!!!(y ya está en español para quién así lo prefiera)
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    I finished this book last month but finally adding it on here after the holidays. Profound and unbelievable. Gathering my thoughts and will post review soon. I will note now that this is hands down the best audio narration I’ve ever listened to. Actress Tovah Feldshuh was superb.
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  • Anne-Marie
    January 1, 1970
    While reading this book, the tears sometimes just flowed quietly from my eyes. What one human being can do to another out of hate is just far beyond my comprehension, no matter how hard I try to find even a tiny sliver of understanding. Dr Edith Eger and her sister survived the horrors of Auschwitz and so much more, but it took her years to make peace with her stolen youth. Like her sister, Magda, once said to her; "Hitler fucked us up for sure." Edith tells her story with a feisty attitude, but While reading this book, the tears sometimes just flowed quietly from my eyes. What one human being can do to another out of hate is just far beyond my comprehension, no matter how hard I try to find even a tiny sliver of understanding. Dr Edith Eger and her sister survived the horrors of Auschwitz and so much more, but it took her years to make peace with her stolen youth. Like her sister, Magda, once said to her; "Hitler fucked us up for sure." Edith tells her story with a feisty attitude, but the sadness is always somewhere not too far from the surface. Physically she was broken by the horrors she had to endure, but she guarded her mental and spiritual freedom with fierceness. The book is not only about her survival, but also about the people she helped in her later years as psychologist. Edie is one of the few survivors still alive that can tell firsthand about the atrocities of the concentration camps.The message that run through this book like a golden thread, is that only we can free ourselves, whether we are in the prison of a bad marriage, a destructive family, a job we hate or our self-hate. We cannot always choose our destiny, but we can choose how to react to it.Edie learned that trauma is a nearly constant feeling in your gut that something is wrong or that something terrible is going to happen. She was 16 when she was sent to Auschwitz and even to this day, at 90 years old, there are still some smells, some sounds, that transport her back to Auschwitz in seconds. Men in uniform, sirens in the street. It took her a long time and a bumpy road to realise that what happened can never be forgotten and can never be changed, but that she can choose how to respond to the past. And that is also what she helped her patients to work through. Things happen in our lives that is not always our fault or we are not able to stop it or change it, but if we force these traumas, these stories or secrets of our lives, into hiding, we create our own prison. We deny ourselves the opportunity to grieve our losses, wounds and disappointments. And in denying this, we are doomed to keep on reliving them. Freedom lies in learning to cope with the memories and to gather the courage to break down the prison we created, brick by brick. If you are a survivor, of any kind, you should not ask, "Why me?" The only relevant question is, "What now?" Like Edie said, memory is sacred ground, but we must be careful that our memory does not become the place where our rage and guilt keep circling like vultures, scavenging the same old bones. For many years Edie did exactly that. She was a gymnast and ballet dancer on her way to the Olympics, when Hitler happened. She tells how the women, while at Auschwitz and constantly hungry, would cook in their heads. They would describe recipes to each other and debate about the amount of spices to put into a certain dish. Their food fantasies sustained them. This broke my heart. Edie said they were barracks artists, always creating, providing their minds with sustenance that kept them alive, kept them hopeful. Sometimes they had beauty pageants, modeling in their grey, shapeless dresses and dingy underwear. Edie's mantra became "if I survive today, tomorrow I will be free". And she did survive, but it took her many more years to become truly free. The physical trauma heals, but it will be many years before she begins to understand the psychological trauma she carrries with her. When she and Magda return to their hometown after the war, they are among only seventy out of fifteen thousand, from their town, that survived Auschwitz. The Nazi's didn't just murder millions of people, they murdered whole families. Edie and Magda was an anomaly, two sisters that survived together. But they lost both their parents. Hitler stole their life as it was supposed to be, from them. This is one of the biggest parts of her realiy that Edie had to make peace with. How it could have been if there was no Hitler and how it was after Hitler. Theri was a constant scream inside her; "Hitler and Mengele chose for me! I didn't get to choose!"It takes Edie years to realise that she did have a choice. She could choose her attitude in any given set of circumstances. That became the big turning point in her life. She realised that if we are stuck in the past with "If only..." we are living in a prison we created ourselves. The only place we can exercise our freedom of choice is in the present. The secret of self-acceptance is... YOU can only do what YOU can do the way YOU can do it. After almost forty years, Edie returns to Germany for the first time since the war. She almost doesn't go, but decides that if she doesn't, then Hitler won. And during this trip she decides to visit Auschwitz. This trip is another part of her own healing. I will leave it at that, so you can read for yourselves.I take these quotes with me:"When we grieve, it's not just over what happened - we grieve also for what didn't happen.""Don't inhale your anger to your chest.""Times are changing and we are changing with them. We are always in the process of becoming.""Time doesn't heal. It's what you do with the time. Healing is possible when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief.""It is too easy to make a prison out of our pain, out of the past. At best, revenge is useless. It can't alter what was done to us, it can't erase the wrongs we've suffered, it can't bring back the dead. At worst, revenge perpetuates the cycle of hate. It keeps the hate circling on and on. When we seek revenge, even non-violent revenge, we are revolving, not evolving. Each of us has the capacity to hate and the capacity to love. Which one we reach for, is up to us."And finally: "You can't change what happened, you can't change what you did or what was done to you in the past. But you can choose how you live NOW."
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  • Christine Fay
    January 1, 1970
    Dr. Eger writes succinctly and passionately about enduring the horrors of the Holocaust and interweaving the stories of others who endured similar traumas and tragedies. Think of Elie Wiesel’s Night, and then multiply that by ten, and you’ve got this book. It’s a story of hope when all seems hopeless. It’s a story of triumph when all around her is tragedy. It’s a story that when read, makes us a little more human, a little more intelligent, and a little more empathetic toward the human condition Dr. Eger writes succinctly and passionately about enduring the horrors of the Holocaust and interweaving the stories of others who endured similar traumas and tragedies. Think of Elie Wiesel’s Night, and then multiply that by ten, and you’ve got this book. It’s a story of hope when all seems hopeless. It’s a story of triumph when all around her is tragedy. It’s a story that when read, makes us a little more human, a little more intelligent, and a little more empathetic toward the human condition.“Often, the little upsets in our lives are emblematic of the larger losses; the seemingly insignificant worries are representative of greater pain” (9).“It took me many decades to discover that I could come at my life with a different question: Not: Why did I live? But: What is min to do with the life I’ve been given?” (19).“If I had to name my therapy I’d probably call it Choice Therapy, as freedom is about CHOICE – about choosing compassion, humor, optimism, intuition, curiosity, and self-expression. And to be free is to live in the present. If we are stuck in the past, saying, “If only I had gone there instead of here . . .” or “If only I had married someone else . . . ,” we are living in a prison of our own making. Likewise, if we spend our time in the future, saying, “I won’t be happy until I graduate . . . ,” of “I won’t be happy until I find the right person.” The only place where we can exercise our freedom173) of choice is in the present” (173).“In other words, I began to formulate a new relationship with my own trauma. It wasn’t something to silence, suppress, avoid, negate. It was a well I could draw on, a deep source of understanding and intuition about my patients, their pain and their path to healing” (219).“Work has set me free. I survived so that I could do my work. Not the work the Nazis meant – the hard labor of sacrifice and hunger, of exhaustion and enslavement. It was the inner work. Of learning to survive and thrive, of learning to forgive myself, of helping others to do the same. And when I do this work, then I am no longer the hostage or the prisoner of anything. I am free” (233).“Carlos had embraced his power to stand up and speak his truth at the risk of being excluded and criticized. He had chosen not to be a victim. And he had taken a moral stand. He had acted in alignment with a higher purpose: to combat racism, to protect human dignity. In defending his own humanity, he protected everyone’s. He paved a way for all of us to live in keeping with our moral truth and ideals. Doing what is right is rarely the same as doing what is safe” (255).“Do you know all that time you spent alone as a child, feeling so sad and isolated, you were building a huge store of strength and resilience?” (261).“I reminded myself that I was there to share the most important truth I know, that the biggest prison is in your own mind, and in your pocket you already hold the key: the willingness to take absolute responsibility for your life; the willingness to risk; the willingness to release yourself from judgment and reclaim your innocence, accepting and loving yourself for who you really are – human, imperfect and whole” (271).This book should be required reading for the ENTIRE HUMAN RACE!
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  • Nuria Llop
    January 1, 1970
    Creo que merece las 5 estrellas tanto por el contenido como por la valentía y la generosidad de la autora al ofrecer sus experiencias para ayudar a otros, y también porque creo que es realmente un libro de autoayuda muy útil.Confieso que no lo habría leído de no ser porque me eligieron para narrar el audiolibro, y ha sido un placer y un honor poner voz a este impresionante testimonio de una superviviente de Auschwitz. La mayoría sabemos ya de los horrores que se vivieron en los campos de extermi Creo que merece las 5 estrellas tanto por el contenido como por la valentía y la generosidad de la autora al ofrecer sus experiencias para ayudar a otros, y también porque creo que es realmente un libro de autoayuda muy útil.Confieso que no lo habría leído de no ser porque me eligieron para narrar el audiolibro, y ha sido un placer y un honor poner voz a este impresionante testimonio de una superviviente de Auschwitz. La mayoría sabemos ya de los horrores que se vivieron en los campos de exterminio durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, pero Edith Eger nos cuenta más. Esta mujer excepcional nos transmite sus vivencias de un tiempo anterior a la guerra y lo que siguió a su liberación, que tampoco fue un camino de rosas. Una liberación, sin embargo, que fue solo física, pues su mente y sus emociones siguieron apresadas durante años hasta que, gracias a su trabajo de psicóloga y a su afán por ayudar a los demás, logró descubrir qué la mantenía presa y enfrentarse a ello. El libro se divide en tres partes, y es la última la que constituye la auténtica “autoayuda”, pero en las otras dos, las testimoniales, mezcla a veces el relato de su pasado con lo que aprendió después, regalándonos perlas de sabiduría propia y otras de pura psicología, como la diferencia entre “victimismo” y “victimización”, por ejemplo, así que recomiendo leer (o escuchar) la obra de principio a fin. Además, nos cuenta esa parte de su vida enfocándola siempre desde la esperanza y desde su espíritu constante de superación, como un canto a la vida que conmueve y agita las emociones. A mí, al menos, me ha removido mucho.La parte de autoayuda propiamente dicha se basa también en su experiencia personal, en este caso con algunos de sus pacientes, y nos muestra por medio de ellos cómo muchos de los problemas que sufrimos están en nosotros mismos, en nuestra mente, y que solamente en nosotros podremos encontrar la solución. Hace tiempo que no leía autoayuda, pero hubo una época en que me empapé de mucha, y una de las cosas que más me ha gustado de este libro es que está escrito desde la humildad, que no pretende sentar cátedra con sus conclusiones, sino ayudar de verdad, y que todo lo fundamenta en casos reales que podrían ser el tuyo o el mío. Lo recomiendo encarecidamente a cualquiera que le interese la historia contemporánea y a todo aquel que cree que no encuentra su felicidad porque las circunstancias le son desfavorables.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    “Only I can do what I do the way I do it”. This and many more quotes make this book an unique way to describe what Edith and many other survivors of Holocaust lived. But what makes this book special is that it mostly talks about the recovery and healing process. How to continue living after all the losses. How to follow your dreams and make a life of value. “Each moment is a choice” and we have the power to choose how we react and act in every situation. Very inspiring.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I could say a lot about this completely enthralling memoir but I am going to leave that for you to self discover on your own journey...for this book is life changing.
  • Yai Pergamino Infinito
    January 1, 1970
    Una historia de dolor, horror y tristeza, pero también es una historia de superación. Me ha gustado bastante, porque la autora transmite muy bien sus sentimientos, para que tú también lo sientas.
  • Esther
    January 1, 1970
    Descubrí esta novela mientras paseaba entre las novedades de la editorial y como el título captó mi atención (yo y mi obsesión por Auschwitz), decidí leer la sinopsis. Seguramente ya sabréis lo mucho que me gusta la novela histórica, más aún las que se ambientan en la Segunda Guerra Mundial, pero si a todo eso le añadimos que esta está basada en hechos reales tened por seguro que la voy a leer. Et voilà! La editorial me cedió un ejemplar y hoy vengo a contaros mis impresiones, aunque os adelanto Descubrí esta novela mientras paseaba entre las novedades de la editorial y como el título captó mi atención (yo y mi obsesión por Auschwitz), decidí leer la sinopsis. Seguramente ya sabréis lo mucho que me gusta la novela histórica, más aún las que se ambientan en la Segunda Guerra Mundial, pero si a todo eso le añadimos que esta está basada en hechos reales tened por seguro que la voy a leer. Et voilà! La editorial me cedió un ejemplar y hoy vengo a contaros mis impresiones, aunque os adelanto que las frases que aparecen en la portada son totalmente ciertas y no están ahí por rellenar hueco ;) La novela se nos presenta narrada en primera persona desde el punto de vista de Edith, protagonista y autora de esta historia. Historia que arranca con el vivo recuerdo de una fotografía: la propia Edith, su hermana Magda y su madre Ilonka cogidas del brazo, desoladas y haciendo cola en una larga fila sin saber qué les espera y sin saber si esa será la última vez que se vean. Desde el mismo momento en el que Magda y Edith se enteran de la muerte de sus padres en la cámara de gas junto a otros cientos —y miles— de judíos, entrarán en una continua lucha por la supervivencia. «Si sobrevivo hoy, mañana seré libre», piensan. Y sí, sobreviven, pero siempre quedarán traumas, heridas y cicatrices que nunca se curarán ni desaparecerán. Historias y recuerdos que permanecerán en su memoria y en la de todos los supervivientes hasta el fin de sus días.Sería prácticamente imposible mencionar a todos los personajes, tanto principales como secundarios, que aparecen en esta historia porque son muchísimos, pero sí me gustaría destacar y recordar a los más importantes: los padres de Edith, sus hermanas Magda y Clara, Béla (el que, tras terminar la guerra y reconstruir un poco su vida, se convertirá en su marido y en su bote salvavidas), Lester e Imre (dos hermanos que también sobreviven a la guerra) y Laci (otro superviviente al que Magda conocerá con el tiempo).Como el propio título indica, Edith quería ser bailarina profesional, pero poco antes de estallar la guerra fue expulsada del equipo olímpico por el simple hecho de ser judía, así que vio su sueño truncado cuando aún era muy joven aunque nunca dejó a un lado su amor por la danza. Y jamás hubiese pensado que eso mismo sería lo que la salvaría de la muerte, pues llegó a oídos del doctor Josef Mengele —el ángel de la muerte— que era una muy buena bailarina, así que un día la obligó a que bailase para él por mero entretenimiento.Y bueno... podría estar horas y horas contándoos cosas sobre Edith, tanto de periodos anteriores a la guerra como posteriores, pero se haría muy larga y aburrida la reseña y esa no es mi intención. Normalmente acostumbro a hablaros un poco de los personajes, pero al ser esta una novela basada en hechos reales, los personajes traspasan el papel y se convierten en personas de carne y hueso, personas que han vivido y sobrevivido a una de las épocas más convulsas de nuestra historia, aunque también se da voz y visibilidad a los que, por desgracia, no lo lograron =/Es por eso mismo por lo que esta vez no puedo hablar de personajes bien construidos y trabajados o de personajes cercanos y humanos; pero sí puedo hablaros de personas valientes, de personas que dieron su vida y hasta su último aliento luchando por algo que les pertenecía: su dignidad. Y es que se cuentan tantas y tan crueles historias y experiencias que ponen los pelos de punta, entristecen y enfurecen, pero también nos regalan un sinfín de lecciones que ayudan a los personajes a ver un puntito de luz al final del túnel.La novela no cuenta con una trama propiamente dicha, sino que está dividida en cuatro partes: la prisión, la huida, la libertad y la curación. En cada una de ellas, el lector seguirá los pasos de la mano de la propia Edith y se meterá en su piel de tal manera que sentirá lo mismo que ella.A pesar de esas cuatro divisiones, yo he sentido que la novela estaba dividida en dos grandes bloques. Por un lado tendríamos la parte personal, donde Edith nos cuenta su experiencia antes, durante y después de la guerra y de Auschwitz. Y por otro lado tendríamos la parte psicológica, donde nos cuenta las experiencias personales que vivió con los pacientes a los que ayudó (que por si no lo sabíais, Edith Eger se licenció en en Psicología Clínica décadas después de terminar la guerra) y la forma en que esas experiencias la ayudaron a ella misma para salir adelante.Esta novela, que se mueve entre la biografía y autoayuda, no pretende ser una mera descripción de hechos y acontecimientos que sucedieron durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, sino un cúmulo de experiencias personales tanto de gente que sufrió la guerra como de gente que no estuvo relacionada con ella pero aun así necesitaban la ayuda de Edith para guiarles hacia su propia libertad.Como es obvio, leer esta novela supone enfrentarte a historias muy duras y crueles, pero también supone aprender muchísimas cosas al lado de Edith Eger, así que no puedo sino recomendaros su lectura si os gustan este tipo de novelas, pues como reza en la propia portada: «Este libro es un regalo para la humanidad. Una de esas historias que nunca quieres terminar de leer y que te cambian la vida para siempre». Y sí, no podría describir de otra manera lo que «La bailarina de Auschwitz» ha supuesto para mí.He sentido rabia e impotencia en muchísimas ocasiones, aunque también pena, mucha pena. A medida que iba descubriendo la historia de Edith y la de todos los que pasaron por lo mismo que ella, me fui dando cuenta de que por culpa de la ambición política de unos pocos entraron en guerra países enteros y fueron muchos los inocentes que sufrieron las consecuencias. Y ya ni hablemos de los prejuicios hacia los judíos sin un motivo aparente y las barbaridades que sufrieron por el simple hecho de ser judíos. Claro que también tuve momentos de alegría y felicidad aunque, por desgracia, no hubo tantos como me hubiese gustado :')Y si he podido sentir todo eso y más ha sido gracias a la pluma de la autora, pues escribe de una forma tan cercana y directa que es imposible no empatizar con ella y con todas las historias y experiencias que nos regala. Se sirve de frases breves y concisas que de igual modo llegan al lector de forma directa y a mí no ha podido gustarme más su forma de escribir.A pesar de que muchos de los capítulos no eran precisamente cortos (algunos incluso superaban las veinte páginas), en ningún momento se me hizo pesada ni aburrida, por lo que el ritmo de lectura es bastante ágil y os aseguro que a mí me tenía completamente sumergida y enganchada porque, entre otras cosas, el tema o temas que trata me interesan muchísimo y nunca es suficiente. El final de la novela vino cargado de emociones y sentimientos, de ilusiones y agradecimientos. Después de lo mucho que cambió la vida de Edith después de la guerra y de grabarse a fuego en mi mente que, tal y como recoge la novela, Auschwitz y cualquier campo de concentración eran fábricas de muerte creadas por el hombre, las palabras de esta gran mujer han logrado calarme hondo y su historia quedará siempre conmigo. Y termino la reseña diciendo que el mundo necesita más personas como Edith Eger :')Podéis leer la reseña completa en el blog: http://papillons-dans-le-ciel-bleu.bl...
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    The ballerina that got away and helped others in troubles to have a second or third choice in life. Some sentences shock, potent prose of hauntingly retelling in the memoir part, and then her forbearingness, compassion, and great advising in the helping others part of this work.She tells, the author Dr. Edith Eva Eger, of her days vividly, from her darkest days of captivity from Factory to factory, loaded from Train to train and then Shower of one kind cleansing to another of dread, a shower of The ballerina that got away and helped others in troubles to have a second or third choice in life. Some sentences shock, potent prose of hauntingly retelling in the memoir part, and then her forbearingness, compassion, and great advising in the helping others part of this work.She tells, the author Dr. Edith Eva Eger, of her days vividly, from her darkest days of captivity from Factory to factory, loaded from Train to train and then Shower of one kind cleansing to another of dread, a shower of killing, ultimately from Captivity to survival and living on with resilience, hope and forwardness, and choices to be bigger, greater than her parents could ever want, in helping others in their captivity of all kinds of pains and darkness, to breathing and walking out of their domain into some light, some chance for choice of a better kind, a pursuit of a happiness, a betterment.The authors writing has a melody to telling something so terrible, her voice potent and visceral has you hanging with heartbeat in her place, in her terror of those days past, all evoked before the reader. These brutal facts heard of before, seen on screen, but for me not read in a book before with such great vivid telling and craft in writing coupled with a voice compelling and compassionate.A work of accountabilities and choices, and freeing yourself from captivity within, whatsoever the pain, whatsoever the darkness passeth, and continue on.A must read that will be in best and highly recommended reads lists of 2017.In the foreword Philip Zimbardo PhD writes a fitting account of this work: "The Choice is an extraordinary chronicle of heroism and healing, resiliency and compassion, survival with dignity, mental toughness, and moral courage. All of us can learn from Dr. Eger’s inspiring cases and riveting personal story to heal our own lives." Excerpts from introduction:What happened can never be forgotten and can never be changed. But over time I learned that I can choose how to respond to the past. I can be miserable, or I can be hopeful, I can be depressed or I can be happy. We always have that choice, that opportunity for control.Freedom lies in learning to embrace what happened. Freedom means we muster the courage to dismantle the prison, brick by brick.Bad things, I am afraid, happen to everyone. This we can’t change. If you look at your birth certificate, does it say life will be easy? It does not. But so many of us remain stuck in a trauma or grief, unable to experience our lives fully. This we can change.My own search for freedom and my years of experience as a licensed clinical psychologist have taught me that suffering is universal. But victimhood is optional. There is a difference between victimization and victimhood. We are all likely to be victimized in some way in the course of our lives. At some point we will suffer some kind of affliction or calamity or abuse, caused by circumstances or people or institutions over which we have little or no control. This is life. And this is victimization. It comes from the outside. It’s the neighborhood bully, the boss who rages, the spouse who hits, the lover who cheats, the discriminatory law, the accident that lands you in the hospital. In contrast, victimhood comes from the inside. No one can make you a victim but you. We become victims not because of what happens to us but when we choose to hold on to our victimization. We develop a victim’s mind—a way of thinking and being that is rigid, blaming, pessimistic, stuck in the past, unforgiving, punitive, and without healthy limits or boundaries. We become our own jailors when we choose the confines of the victim’s mind.Whether you’re in the dawn or noon or late evening of your life, whether you’ve seen deep suffering or are only just beginning to encounter struggle, whether you’re falling in love for the first time or losing your life partner to old age, whether you’re healing from a life-altering event or in search of some little adjustments that could bring more joy to your life, I would love to help you discover how to escape the concentration camp of your own mind and become the person you were meant to be. I would love to help you experience freedom from the past, freedom from failures and fears, freedom from anger and mistakes, freedom from regret and unresolved grief—and the freedom to enjoy the full, rich feast of life.What follows is the story of the choices, big and small, that can lead us from trauma to triumph, from darkness to light, from imprisonment to freedom.Excerpts:Memory is sacred ground. But it’s haunted too. It’s the place where my rage and guilt and grief go circling like hungry birds scavenging the same old bones. It’s the place where I go searching for the answer to the unanswerable question: Why did I survive?First the high kick. Then the pirouette and turn. The splits. And up. As I step and bend and twirl, I can hear Mengele talking to his assistant. He never takes his eyes off me, but he attends to his duties as he watches. I can hear his voice over the music. He discusses with the other officer which ones of the hundred girls present will be killed next. If I miss a step, if I do anything to displease him, it could be me. I dance. I dance. I am dancing in hell. I can’t bear to see the executioner as he decides our fates. I close my eyes.We were sent to the showers every day at Auschwitz, and every shower was fraught with uncertainty. We never knew whether water or gas would stream out of the tap.Our skin hardly covers our bones. We are an anatomy lesson. Elbows, knees, ankles, cheeks, knuckles, ribs jut out like questions. What are we now? Our bones look obscene, our eyes are caverns, blank, dark, empty. Hollow faces. Blue-black fingernails. We are trauma in motion. We are a slow-moving parade of ghouls. We stagger as we walk, our carts roll over the cobblestones. Row on row, we fill the square in Wels, Austria. Townspeople stare at us from windows. We are frightening. No one speaks. We choke the square with our silence. Townspeople run into their homes. Children cover their eyes. We have lived through hell only to become someone else’s nightmare.All of the survivors I met had one thing in common with me and with each other: We had no control over the most consuming facts of our lives, but we had the power to determine how we experienced life after trauma. Survivors could continue to be victims long after the oppression had ended, or they could learn to thrive. In my dissertation research, I discovered and articulated my personal conviction and my clinical touchstone: We can choose to be our own jailors, or we can choose to be free.“My mama told me something I will never forget,” I began. “She said, ‘We don’t know where we’re going, we don’t know what’s going to happen, but no one can take away from you what you put in your own mind.’ ” I have said these words countless times, to Navy SEALs and crisis first responders, to POWs and their advocates at the Department of Veterans Affairs, to oncologists and people living with cancer, to Righteous Gentiles, to parents and children, to Christians and Muslims and Buddhists and Jews, to law students and at-risk youth, to people grieving the loss of a loved one, to people preparing to die, and sometimes I spin when I say them, with gratitude, with sorrow.https://more2read.com/review/choice-edith-eva-eger/
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  • Theut
    January 1, 1970
    Mi aspettavo un libro diverso (ma non per questo sono rimasta delusa): non pensavo che la vita dell'autrice avesse tanta parte all'interno dell'economia del libro. Mi ha colpita non solo la descrizione della sua vita ad Auschwitz, ma anche (e forse soprattutto) il dopo: il dolore, la negazione e l'essere "interrotti" come essere umani dopo una simile esperienza, e come lei ha fatto (e ha aiutato molti) ad andare oltre e riprendersi la propria vita.Perché non si può cambiare il passato ma possiam Mi aspettavo un libro diverso (ma non per questo sono rimasta delusa): non pensavo che la vita dell'autrice avesse tanta parte all'interno dell'economia del libro. Mi ha colpita non solo la descrizione della sua vita ad Auschwitz, ma anche (e forse soprattutto) il dopo: il dolore, la negazione e l'essere "interrotti" come essere umani dopo una simile esperienza, e come lei ha fatto (e ha aiutato molti) ad andare oltre e riprendersi la propria vita.Perché non si può cambiare il passato ma possiamo cambiare noi il nostro atteggiamento verso di esso (che non vuol dire perdonare chi ha commesso atrocità, ma cercare di non farsi schiacciare per sempre e rimanere in balia dei demoni).Le domande che mi hanno più incuriosita (e che si riferiscono a qualunque situazione della nostra vita):- Che cosa vuoi?- Chi lo vuole?- Che cosa hai intenzione di fare a questo scopo?- Quando?Forniscono ottimi spunti di riflessione.
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  • Paola E.
    January 1, 1970
    Una historia de supervivencia pero sobre todo de superación personal.Es tan impactante como "Después de Auschwitz", una historia tan real como cruel, que nunca deja de sorprenderme.
  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    When Dr. Edith Eger was sixteen years old, she was rounded up from her home in Hungary and sent to Auschwitz concentration camp. Separated from her mother and father, who were sent straight to their deaths, she and her sister were forced into horrible circumstances where every choice made for them could have life-ending consequences. Through the years, as she went on with her life, immigrated to America and became a clinical Psychiatrist, she has discovered how every person has the choice on how When Dr. Edith Eger was sixteen years old, she was rounded up from her home in Hungary and sent to Auschwitz concentration camp. Separated from her mother and father, who were sent straight to their deaths, she and her sister were forced into horrible circumstances where every choice made for them could have life-ending consequences. Through the years, as she went on with her life, immigrated to America and became a clinical Psychiatrist, she has discovered how every person has the choice on how to internally deal with the circumstances they are presented. There is no way to accurately sum up this book, or how it deeply it effected me. As we come closer to the point in time when there are no longer any Holocaust survivors, we need more of these stories, more of these reminders of what the human race is capable of, both of evil and of strength. The first two-thirds of this book is memoir while the last is more about her practice of Psychiatry and her clients. I really think everyone should give this a read and I'm already wondering if it is on Oprah's radar. I'm not a big "self-help" reader, but this was one of the most honest, heart-wrenching and inspirational reads that I have come across. I received a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Latkins
    January 1, 1970
    It's hard to find words to describe this book. On the one hand, it's a memoir of Edith Eger's life, not just how she survived being sent to Auschwitz at the age of 16 with her parents and sister Magda, but also how she coped with her life afterwards, and the guilt of surviving when her parents and so many others were murdered. On the other, it's a book that the reader can find inspiration in for their own lives. After emigrating to America, Edith Eger became a psychologist and went on to help ot It's hard to find words to describe this book. On the one hand, it's a memoir of Edith Eger's life, not just how she survived being sent to Auschwitz at the age of 16 with her parents and sister Magda, but also how she coped with her life afterwards, and the guilt of surviving when her parents and so many others were murdered. On the other, it's a book that the reader can find inspiration in for their own lives. After emigrating to America, Edith Eger became a psychologist and went on to help other people with their traumas and emotional problems, whilst still trying to understand her own.What is truly different about this book is that, despite the fact that the author went through such unimaginable horror, she still remains so positive and optimistic about life. She learns from her patients as well as helping them. At times this isn't an easy story to read - but it doesn't wallow in the macabre, and ultimately it is life-affirming. I think it's going to be a big bestseller in the future, and it deserves to be - I must confess that I cried my eyes out several times when reading it.
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  • Kirsti
    January 1, 1970
    I first saw an article about this book on my Facebook wall (Daily mail maybe?) and popped it on my to-read list, knowing I'd keep my eye out for a copy. I was lucky enough to be selected on Netgalley to read this a few days later (thank you!) but I wasn't in the right mind space to read it. I knew I would have to be open to this story and not let the sadness of it overwhelm me, because it was about a truly horrific event and would be deeply personal. It was both those things.But it was also Edit I first saw an article about this book on my Facebook wall (Daily mail maybe?) and popped it on my to-read list, knowing I'd keep my eye out for a copy. I was lucky enough to be selected on Netgalley to read this a few days later (thank you!) but I wasn't in the right mind space to read it. I knew I would have to be open to this story and not let the sadness of it overwhelm me, because it was about a truly horrific event and would be deeply personal. It was both those things.But it was also Edith journey towards healing, and forgiveness for herself and decisions she made in life. We follow her life through Auschwitz and beyond, to her eventual marriage, family life and career. But it is late in life that Edith begins using the tools she has learned through experience to help herself, and fully help others.A story that needs to be told. Five stars.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite the must-read I'd been led to believe it would be given the rave reviews this has had but an interesting and moving read, especially during the first 2/3s of the book which focuses on Eger's own life experience rather than case studies from her professional life. Seems rather a small thing to focus on but her repeated use of "Honey", to address clients grated (it seemed uncharacteristically unprofessional, but maybe this is a UK/US thing).
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  • Julia Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    The Choice by Edith Eger is the true story of a concentration camp survivor who uses her experiences to help others. It is a painful read but one that also gives hope. We cannot stop the bad things from happening but "I can choose how to respond to the past." Our outlook to our circumstances will determine whether we survive or perish. "No one can make you a victim but you." In the camps Edith Eger chose to focus on the good times. Her mind took her to places her body could not go. "We can't cho The Choice by Edith Eger is the true story of a concentration camp survivor who uses her experiences to help others. It is a painful read but one that also gives hope. We cannot stop the bad things from happening but "I can choose how to respond to the past." Our outlook to our circumstances will determine whether we survive or perish. "No one can make you a victim but you." In the camps Edith Eger chose to focus on the good times. Her mind took her to places her body could not go. "We can't choose to vanish the dark, but we can choose to kindle the light."Edith Eger survived because she held on to the positive. Her mindset was to survive today because tomorrow she would be free. Edith Eger survived Auschwitz, death marches and more camps. She clung on to hope.Freedom did not come with liberation. Freedom came with facing her past and talking about it. For years Edith Eger locked her memories away and imprisoned herself. Only when she spoke out about the horrors did she begin to heal.Returning to Auschwitz years later, Edith Eger laid her ghosts to rest. She released her guilt. Earlier, staying at Hitler's Berghof, she forgave him. This did not mean forgetting or letting Hitler off the hook but it did bring freedom for Edith Eger. "I lived to see freedom because I learned to forgive."Edith Eger quotes Corrie ten Boom forgiving the concentration camp guard in God's strength. She believes we can choose to live out our Hitler side or our ten Boom side.The Choice is powerful and heart wrenching. There are lessons for us all to learn. The main one being that forgiveness is freeing. Holding a grudge and seeking revenge imprisons us and weighs us down. Choose to forgive and live free. Survival and freedom have much to do with our state of mind as well as our external circumstances. Edith Eger is a brave woman.May we never forget the six million innocents who perished in the Holocaust.I received this book for free from Net Galley. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own.
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  • Merrilee Gibson
    January 1, 1970
    As a psychotherapist, I was looking at this book from at least two perspectives: the first, my response to a truly amazing and moving life story; the second, how Dr. Eger’s book might be used to help patients facing traumatic memories.I am in awe of Dr. Eger--she demonstrates an extraordinary degree of resilience combined with an equally rare gift for forgiveness. Some have said that, when life hands you a lemon, make lemonade. But Dr. Eger has made a lemon soufflé. I work with patients who have As a psychotherapist, I was looking at this book from at least two perspectives: the first, my response to a truly amazing and moving life story; the second, how Dr. Eger’s book might be used to help patients facing traumatic memories.I am in awe of Dr. Eger--she demonstrates an extraordinary degree of resilience combined with an equally rare gift for forgiveness. Some have said that, when life hands you a lemon, make lemonade. But Dr. Eger has made a lemon soufflé. I work with patients who have traumatic histories, and find that often they are so enmeshed in their past pain that they cannot move past it, nor are they able to put it out of their memory by accepting that it is past, cannot be changed, and the only direction to move is forward. But that is a message that many cannot process. I have found also that for some patients, hearing an inspiring story does not give them more courage, but rather they feel discounted or take it as a personal failure that they cannot move forward as this other very brave person has done. It is abundantly evident that Dr. Eger is an extraordinarily gifted individual, and for those fortunate enough to work with her toward their own healing, they are blessed. So, I would tell patients about this book, and suggest they might find inspiration in it; those who can accept this exceptional story and choose to follow the lessons it offers might be very much helped by it.My thanks to author, publisher, and NetGalley for providing a copy of this book to read and review.
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