The Library at the Edge of the World
A warm, feel-good novel about the importance of finding a place where you belong - perfect for fans of Maeve Binchy.Local librarian Hanna Casey is wondering where it all went wrong ... Driving her mobile library van through Finfarran's farms and villages, she tries not to think of the sophisticated London life she abandoned when she left her cheating husband. Or that she's now stuck in her crotchety mum's spare bedroom.With her daughter Jazz travelling the world and her relationship with her mother growing increasingly fraught, Hanna decides to reclaim her independence. Then, when the threatened closure of her library puts her plans in jeopardy, she finds herself leading a battle to restore the heart and soul of the fragmented community. Will she also find the new life she's been searching for?

The Library at the Edge of the World Details

TitleThe Library at the Edge of the World
Author
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
Rating
GenreFiction, Cultural, Ireland, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Contemporary

The Library at the Edge of the World Review

  • Dale Harcombe
    January 1, 1970
    Who could resist a book with the title of a library at the edge of the world? Not me. The story revolves around Hanna Casey. After separating from her cheating husband, Hanna, in her early fifties, ends up living with her mother on the outskirts of a town in Ireland where she grew up. Her daughter Jazz has a job with an airline company and spends her time flying around the world, coming back every now and then to visit her mother and grandmother or at other times visiting her father in London. H Who could resist a book with the title of a library at the edge of the world? Not me. The story revolves around Hanna Casey. After separating from her cheating husband, Hanna, in her early fifties, ends up living with her mother on the outskirts of a town in Ireland where she grew up. Her daughter Jazz has a job with an airline company and spends her time flying around the world, coming back every now and then to visit her mother and grandmother or at other times visiting her father in London. Hanna has a job as librarian in the Finfarran Peninsula community. This is a far cry from the lifestyle she lived while married to Malcolm. But given the shortage of jobs in the area, she knows she is lucky to have a job at all. As she drives her mobile library van around the area, Hanna tries to keep herself aloof from the people and even those she works with at the library, like Conor. But then events conspire to change her way of looking at life and of the people around her.This is a charming, feel good story. The setting was stunning and the characters were interesting. Even though she can be prickly, I felt sorry for Hanna. Her mother Mary Casey is an aggravating character. No wonder Hanna could not contemplate continuing to live with her and decides to renovate the old house left to her by her great aunt Maggie. Some of Hanna’s interactions with Fury, the builder, are classic. There is a hint of romance in the novel, but it is not the main focus. Basically this is a book about relationships, community and working together. I enjoyed this charming read that leaves the reader feeling in a good place.
    more
  • Desiree
    January 1, 1970
    It sure is a feel good book and I especially enjoyed the setting in a small town Ireland. It sounds like a lovely community. The ending is okay as all goes well, but I feel like there are some few loose ends that need to be tied. I guess there will be a sequel to this. I can’t seem to connect to Hanna most of the time and I don’t think it’s because of the age. There are also a lot of characters that it got so confusing to follow who is who. It started painfully slow for my liking that I find mys It sure is a feel good book and I especially enjoyed the setting in a small town Ireland. It sounds like a lovely community. The ending is okay as all goes well, but I feel like there are some few loose ends that need to be tied. I guess there will be a sequel to this. I can’t seem to connect to Hanna most of the time and I don’t think it’s because of the age. There are also a lot of characters that it got so confusing to follow who is who. It started painfully slow for my liking that I find myself skimming some pages because it fails to catch my interest. The conflict came later on in which I feel like a good quarter of the book can be shed off.It is well-written, though, and the main reason that I keep reading. That and the second half of the book is so much better that I managed to get through it until the end. From the numerous characters, there are some whom I enjoyed reading than the others. Sister Michael, a nun in the convent, and Fury, the carpenter who’s fixing Hanna’s cottage, both of them helped Hanna save the library and the community. There’s a hint of romance, too, which is not really the focus of the story, which I like. I also love how everyone banded together to save not only the library but the whole community. With all that, I’d say it is still a good read overall. It just needs the kind of reader who will enjoy not only the writing style but also the lovely setting in Ireland.
    more
  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, what an absolutely wonderful book for every book lover on earth! I adored this story of a public library, a woman starting over, family, friends and community set in rural Ireland. The setting is fabulous, the people make my heart happy and the storyline of a librarian saving a library makes this school librarian jump for joy. Thanks a million to the publisher for sending me a complimentary review copy of this title! Now, if all of that makes me so happy, just IMAGINE how excited I was to fi Oh, what an absolutely wonderful book for every book lover on earth! I adored this story of a public library, a woman starting over, family, friends and community set in rural Ireland. The setting is fabulous, the people make my heart happy and the storyline of a librarian saving a library makes this school librarian jump for joy. Thanks a million to the publisher for sending me a complimentary review copy of this title! Now, if all of that makes me so happy, just IMAGINE how excited I was to find out that this is actually the first book in a series that was originally published in Ireland and is just now coming to the US from Harper Perennial! AND, the next 2 books in the series are available to buy in the US through Book Depository, so of course I ordered them immediately and can now binge read them the moment they arrive! YAY! The US cover is VERY different from the Irish covers ~ the Irish covers are very much in the "English cozy" style with illustrations and curly cutesy font. Both are great, but I do think this photographic cover will do amazingly well here in the states!
    more
  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsWhen I was a student 20 years ago I went to Ireland and subsequently became obsessed with All Things Irish. As an avid reader my reading choices were also influenced, and I read everything I could find by Marian Keyes and Maeve Binchy (20 years ago chick lit was HUGE).Fast forward to 2017. I received an ARC of The Library at the Edge of the World (thanks Netgalley) and hoped it would bring back some of that old Irish magic. It did.I found the descriptions of the house on the hill so evo 4.5 starsWhen I was a student 20 years ago I went to Ireland and subsequently became obsessed with All Things Irish. As an avid reader my reading choices were also influenced, and I read everything I could find by Marian Keyes and Maeve Binchy (20 years ago chick lit was HUGE).Fast forward to 2017. I received an ARC of The Library at the Edge of the World (thanks Netgalley) and hoped it would bring back some of that old Irish magic. It did.I found the descriptions of the house on the hill so evocative. I actually had a dream while reading the book about having a little cabin of my own somewhere. The characters in the book were outspoken and kind, and life in and around the village seemed charming, despite the challenges. Sometimes I felt that there were too many details about the council's workings but I realize that they were integral to the plot.I thought this was an excellent feel good story of contemporary life in a small Irish village which is threatened by high level government decisions. This book is perfect for readers who want the same slice of Irish life feeling as Maeve Binchy and Marian Keyes but with less of a romance angle and more of a generic where is my life going angle.
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Such an enjoyable read. I really loved meeting all of the characters in this book and wish the author would write more about the inhabitants of this lovely Irish town (and surrounding area). My favorite was Fury O'Shea what a name! All in all a great relaxing book that would make a perfect lazy day read. Lose yourself in this lovely Irish town.
    more
  • Alva
    January 1, 1970
    This is a gorgeous Irish story about Hanna, Mary, Jazz, Fury and their supporting cast in fictional Finfarran. A sparkling tale of determination and goodness with a real sense of family and home. Wonderful storytelling by Felicity Hayes-McCoy who's working on a sequel and I for one can't wait!
    more
  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    Some twenty-odd years earlier, Hanna Casey fled the oppressing and limiting Finfarran peninsula heading for London and dreams to work with art, maintaining library collections. But, a whirlwind romance and subsequent pregnancy led to a marriage. With the loss of that pregnancy and a decade-later birth of her daughter, she thought her life complete. But, when the realization came that her now ex-husband had a long-standing affair with a family friend, she packed up herself and her daughter and ra Some twenty-odd years earlier, Hanna Casey fled the oppressing and limiting Finfarran peninsula heading for London and dreams to work with art, maintaining library collections. But, a whirlwind romance and subsequent pregnancy led to a marriage. With the loss of that pregnancy and a decade-later birth of her daughter, she thought her life complete. But, when the realization came that her now ex-husband had a long-standing affair with a family friend, she packed up herself and her daughter and ran home. Refusing even a penny from her ex, she’s reinvented herself as a prim, proper and perhaps even coldly efficient librarian in the little town of Lissbeg, rebuffing opportunities for friendship and closeness with everyone. What emerges here is the slow unraveling and unburdening of Hanna’s grief, as she learns to see just who her ex-husband is, her own vulnerability and willingness to take a backseat to everyone else’s ideas, her own discontent with her mother and the gradual definition of her own life, made in her own making. Sure there are huge and small missteps, some impulsive decisions and outbursts on her part and a little piece of land with an overgrown garden, leaky roof and field full of abandoned appliances, she starts to find a path. Never easy or solely gentle, the self-interest that spurred Hanna’s growth was gradual, she often could be found kicking and screaming (metaphorically) with her ‘face like the backside of a chicken’ being her go-to expression through much of the story. But, what is most striking is the changes in Hanna – it isn’t that we get to know her better, for she is almost wholly unlikable in her pity-party prickles out persona early on, but the changes, the flashes of optimism and determination that arise through each moment she sees something new, or takes a moment to really listen. The strength from the elderly nun, the desperation of her assistant Conor, the brightness and optimism of the girls at HaberDashery, her mum, her daughter and so many others, the story reads simply with plenty of moments, characters and conflicts that brighten and enliven the read. The growth and changes in Hanna were contrasted with the rehab of her little cottage and the stalwart, strange and always bartering Fury and the Divil, you’ll want to head to this little peninsula, see the gardens and seal-cove and visit the new illuminated text in the Lissbeg Library. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via Edelweiss for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
    more
  • MsArdychan
    January 1, 1970
    Please note: I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way.I recently did a writing exercise in preparation for NaNoWriMo where we listed things we like to see in books. Mine included a small town setting, strong female characters, a central meeting place, and an underdog. All those wonderful aspects are part of The Library At The Edge Of The World, by Felicity Hayes-McCoy. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and Please note: I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way.I recently did a writing exercise in preparation for NaNoWriMo where we listed things we like to see in books. Mine included a small town setting, strong female characters, a central meeting place, and an underdog. All those wonderful aspects are part of The Library At The Edge Of The World, by Felicity Hayes-McCoy. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and left me with a massive desire to visit Ireland in the future.What I Liked:Strong Female Character:Hanna Casey once had dreams of being an art librarian in London. But after her marriage and high-flying lifestyle crumbles, she must return home to Ireland and live with her shrew of a mother. She finds employment at the local library, a big step down, but she is somewhat content there.I love how Hanna regained her self-worth by renovating an old home. Through her builder, she learns to compromise and to realize that accepting help from others doesn't make you weak.Once she realizes the county plans to consolidate services (and close the library), she spearheads an effort to mobilize the whole village to act.Small Town Setting:While the little peninsula of Finfarran is fictional, the book's vivid descriptions and colorful characters created a living place. There are beautiful beaches with stunning coastlines. Quaint farms, and family-run bed and breakfast inns, all struggling in an economy that is fading. They see their economy, which is mostly tourism, slowly slipping away as wealthy businessmen guide lucrative government contracts towards larger towns. If they don't do something soon, younger people will be forced to leave, in order to find work.A Central Meeting Place:At the heart of the story is the library. As an avid reader, I loved how the library went from a rigid, sterile place to an active community center. It really became the heart of the town.And in the library, there were wonderful secondary characters that enriched the novel. From the chatty moms with strollers, to the man who comes to the library, systematically looking at each book, this feels like a real place.An Underdog:The whole town is the underdog as they fight to keep the county from consolidating vital services. The county's plan may seem like a smart way to save money, but it doesn't take into account the impact it will have on the smaller communities.As the town bands together to develop an alternate plan, they all realize how much they have to gain by helping and supporting each other. They know that if their plan succeeds, younger people will have a chance to stay in the community. But if they fail, it will mean the slow death of the village.What I Didn't Like:While I enjoyed the ending, there was a plot device that was used to move certain characters into place which I thought was unnecessary. I don't like to include spoilers, but this small event felt totally thrown in and artificial. I wished that the author could have made a different choice.
    more
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a bit hard to get into and rather slow-going at times; a lot of characters to keep track of and not all of them were fun to spend time with. I was especially annoyed that the main character, a trained librarian, was opposed to providing her community with the most basic of library programming and services -- she was against book clubs, for heaven's sake. No wonder her library was threatened with closing. Maybe libraries are different in Ireland than they are here in the U.S., but her at This was a bit hard to get into and rather slow-going at times; a lot of characters to keep track of and not all of them were fun to spend time with. I was especially annoyed that the main character, a trained librarian, was opposed to providing her community with the most basic of library programming and services -- she was against book clubs, for heaven's sake. No wonder her library was threatened with closing. Maybe libraries are different in Ireland than they are here in the U.S., but her attitude was baffling to me as a librarian. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing an e-galley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • BJ
    January 1, 1970
    First book by this author and thoroughly enjoyed it. Story about a woman whose marriage ends after 20 years and who returns to her hometown in Ireland with her teenage daughter. She takes a job as the town librarian and lives with her Mom who is a bit high-maintenance and drives her to need some solitude. Over the years, she holds herself apart from the locals, who think she is a bit stuck-up. This is the story of how she becomes a part of the community trying to save her library and her job. It First book by this author and thoroughly enjoyed it. Story about a woman whose marriage ends after 20 years and who returns to her hometown in Ireland with her teenage daughter. She takes a job as the town librarian and lives with her Mom who is a bit high-maintenance and drives her to need some solitude. Over the years, she holds herself apart from the locals, who think she is a bit stuck-up. This is the story of how she becomes a part of the community trying to save her library and her job. It sounds like the author intends this to be the first in a series and I certainly hope so. Loved this small town and its eccentric characters.Note: Read as part of MMD 2017 Reading Challenge #1-Reading for Fun - #6, A book about books or reading.
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    After separating from her husband, Hanna Casey returns to her mother's home in Ireland and soon finds herself in the middle of a battle to save her rural hometown. A pleasant story about a town coming together and the ragtag locals who stand up to 'city hall'. Unfortunately none of the characters really grew on me and the main character, Hanna, was borderline unlikable. However, it does offer a compelling view of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and its cozy small town setting should appeal to many rea After separating from her husband, Hanna Casey returns to her mother's home in Ireland and soon finds herself in the middle of a battle to save her rural hometown. A pleasant story about a town coming together and the ragtag locals who stand up to 'city hall'. Unfortunately none of the characters really grew on me and the main character, Hanna, was borderline unlikable. However, it does offer a compelling view of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and its cozy small town setting should appeal to many readers.
    more
  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    I have bought this book while on a training in Ireland and decided that i wanted to look for a book written by an Irish author and The Library at The Edge of The World caught my eye, because I liked the title and the cover is very pittoresque. So I went into it not knowing what to expect. The Library at The Edge of the World is about a community finding it's unity and coming together for a common cause. The book is about a woman in her 40s trying to reconstruct her life after a divorce. It is ab I have bought this book while on a training in Ireland and decided that i wanted to look for a book written by an Irish author and The Library at The Edge of The World caught my eye, because I liked the title and the cover is very pittoresque. So I went into it not knowing what to expect. The Library at The Edge of the World is about a community finding it's unity and coming together for a common cause. The book is about a woman in her 40s trying to reconstruct her life after a divorce. It is about the power that lies withing us to change our lives and about asking for help. I liked the writing style and the dialogue reminded me of the time I've spent in Cork because it felt so real and authentic. The only issues I had was with one of the characters, Jazz, because no one is so "romantic" or innocent to not understand what is going on with their parents. Also I've had a bit of an issue with the idea of Irish people struggling to find proper jobs. Overall an enjoyable read.
    more
  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved every moment of this book. It is a gorgeous book from its front cover to the very last page. Full of love, happiness, discovering oneself and happily every afters. Such a delight. I loved it. Thank you for the opportunity to read this book for an honest review. I voluntarily reviewed an Advance reader copy of this book. You can find my review on both Goodreads and Amazon. On goodreads.com/karenwhittard on Amazon under k.e.whittard from publication date. And on instagram.com/bo I absolutely loved every moment of this book. It is a gorgeous book from its front cover to the very last page. Full of love, happiness, discovering oneself and happily every afters. Such a delight. I loved it. Thank you for the opportunity to read this book for an honest review. I voluntarily reviewed an Advance reader copy of this book. You can find my review on both Goodreads and Amazon. On goodreads.com/karenwhittard on Amazon under k.e.whittard from publication date. And on instagram.com/bookfairyuk
    more
  • Alison Smith
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Librarian Hana Casey's return to her home in rural Ireland, after a divorce. The tension of living with her mother who is difficult and temperamental; the complications of trying to have an old cottage renovated and being at the mercy of an uncontrollable local Irish builder, who turns out to be the hero of the tale, in more ways than one. Life in modern day rural Irelands - the challenges and the characters. An easy relaxing read. Recommended.
    more
  • Lorna Sixsmith
    January 1, 1970
    A good holiday read which shows the importance of community. I thought it was going to turn out to be a romantic novel but it was much more interesting than that. Great characters, Fury was definitely my favourite. If you're looking for a good novel about Ireland, make it this one.
    more
  • Sworster1
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! Thoroughly enjoyable read. Makes you want travel to Ireland!
  • Beata Dobrogoszcz
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book from Net Galley & Hachette Books Ireland in exchange for a fair review.A simply story about Hannah, 50 plus divorced woman who tries to put her life together. That means, among others, to move from London back to her family town in Ireland, somewhere far away, in a forgotten place. That also means leaving again with her mother (not very agreeable person) and doing the job, which she would have never picked up if not the circumstances. I really feel for Hannah. Being her age i I got this book from Net Galley & Hachette Books Ireland in exchange for a fair review.A simply story about Hannah, 50 plus divorced woman who tries to put her life together. That means, among others, to move from London back to her family town in Ireland, somewhere far away, in a forgotten place. That also means leaving again with her mother (not very agreeable person) and doing the job, which she would have never picked up if not the circumstances. I really feel for Hannah. Being her age is never easy to pull the life up again. In additional one day she gets to know that she may loose this job and everything what she worked so hard for, would go down. One day she accidentally steps out and she is no longer “one of the invisible locals”.I liked the scenery where story is located. Leaving for several years in Ireland gave me a pretty good idea the place might look, who are the people, how is their life going on. I loved all the Irish characters. I liked this some sort of a little bit slow motion the books is developing at the beginning. But also at the same beginning, at some point I was lost with who is who. That cleared later but the feeling that some characters should be introduced better, remained. Altogether: brilliant, charming read written beautiful language.
    more
  • The Library Lady
    January 1, 1970
    This is being touted as being for fans of Maeve Binchy (in fact, there's a Maeve Binchy reference in the story) and yes, it does have some of the hallmarks of that much missed Irish novelist. I don't think it's quite as good--Hayes-McCoy needs to let her characters tell the story more, with less omniscient narration for one thing, and there are a heck of a lot of stock characters. I also hate the fact that Hanna starts off as a stereotypical shushing librarian, but at least it's due to her perso This is being touted as being for fans of Maeve Binchy (in fact, there's a Maeve Binchy reference in the story) and yes, it does have some of the hallmarks of that much missed Irish novelist. I don't think it's quite as good--Hayes-McCoy needs to let her characters tell the story more, with less omniscient narration for one thing, and there are a heck of a lot of stock characters. I also hate the fact that Hanna starts off as a stereotypical shushing librarian, but at least it's due to her personal life mostly. I might have given it 3 stars, feeling it was a 3 1/2, but the scene where Hanna goes nuclear at the sort of mother of a toddler that I have put up with for decades gave it the extra 1/2 star!All in all, a fun read, and it appears that Hayes-McCoy is planning more of the same. I'll read them.
    more
  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    SO happy that this is being reissued in the US (thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the ARC.). Hanna is a woman who is at loose ends and in a difficult spot. She's in her 50s, her husband is gone, her daughter is off on her own adventures, and she's dealing with her mother, who is crotchety to say the least. She opts to move home to Western Ireland, where she finds work on a mobile library (I have wonderful memories of the bookmobile that came to our neighborhood). Financial issues intrude SO happy that this is being reissued in the US (thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the ARC.). Hanna is a woman who is at loose ends and in a difficult spot. She's in her 50s, her husband is gone, her daughter is off on her own adventures, and she's dealing with her mother, who is crotchety to say the least. She opts to move home to Western Ireland, where she finds work on a mobile library (I have wonderful memories of the bookmobile that came to our neighborhood). Financial issues intrude here again but Hanna finds a way to make things work. Read this for the entertaining village interactions but most of all to watch a woman come into her own. Nicely written, this is a relaxing and cheerful read.
    more
  • BrocheAroe
    January 1, 1970
    This book, while set in a charming Irish village, with a charming plot about a mobile library van, was difficult to love at first. Though I wanted to be sympathetic towards librarian Hanna (middle-aged, divorced, living with her mother), at first she is determined to make irritating decisions and have a thoroughly unlikeable attitude, which is only slightly better than the meddlesome and overbearing personality of her mother. But over time as the plot rolls along, behind-the-scene machinations m This book, while set in a charming Irish village, with a charming plot about a mobile library van, was difficult to love at first. Though I wanted to be sympathetic towards librarian Hanna (middle-aged, divorced, living with her mother), at first she is determined to make irritating decisions and have a thoroughly unlikeable attitude, which is only slightly better than the meddlesome and overbearing personality of her mother. But over time as the plot rolls along, behind-the-scene machinations make themselves clear, unexpected community members come together, and Hanna learns to open up, to let go, and to find peace, making this worth the read in the end.
    more
  • Fi
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful tale of going home after a divorce and trying to find your place in the community again. Too old to be living with her mother Hanna struggles to make sense of what's happened in her life. With her adult daughter living in another country and a fiercely independent mother she's not sure where she belongs. Deciding to renovate a dilapidated cottage on the edge of the cliff and leading the fight to save Lissbeg library where Hanna works give her something to focus on. Things don't alway A wonderful tale of going home after a divorce and trying to find your place in the community again. Too old to be living with her mother Hanna struggles to make sense of what's happened in her life. With her adult daughter living in another country and a fiercely independent mother she's not sure where she belongs. Deciding to renovate a dilapidated cottage on the edge of the cliff and leading the fight to save Lissbeg library where Hanna works give her something to focus on. Things don't always go to plan though and her life starts to take turns in directions she couldn't have imagined.
    more
  • Marge
    January 1, 1970
    I got this copy free as an advance read. (The book is not coming out till November 2017.) When I saw on the cover that it was for fans of Maeve Binchy I thought I had made a mistake. But it turned out to be a fun, light read.After she finds her wealthy lawyer husband has been cheating on her in their London home, Hanna Casey goes back to a small village on Ireland's west coach where she grew up. Because she had angrily told her ex-husband she wanted nothing from him, she is left to take care of I got this copy free as an advance read. (The book is not coming out till November 2017.) When I saw on the cover that it was for fans of Maeve Binchy I thought I had made a mistake. But it turned out to be a fun, light read.After she finds her wealthy lawyer husband has been cheating on her in their London home, Hanna Casey goes back to a small village on Ireland's west coach where she grew up. Because she had angrily told her ex-husband she wanted nothing from him, she is left to take care of herself and their teenage daughter herself. She finds a place in the small village library and slowly thaws to the people around her. As she helps them, they help her make a new life for herself.
    more
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Hanna is the local librarian in a small town in an out of the way part of Ireland. After her husband cheated on her, she returned to the small town from London, living with her mother, Mary Casey, a force of her own. Defending the library and the locals from a development scheme enriching a few, Hanna begins to get the town working together. Great sense of place and characters I hope we get to revisit.
    more
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Did not finish.I’m three days into this book and have only made it in less than 150 pages. It’s so slow. The characters are barely likable. The main character somehow manages to come off as a victim yet a lot of people think she’s snooty.If you add in her cranky mother and her awful ex husband, I’m not sure what I like here beyond the potential of the storyline.I kept thinking something was going to happen to get the story going but after reading some other reviews, I think it might continue on Did not finish.I’m three days into this book and have only made it in less than 150 pages. It’s so slow. The characters are barely likable. The main character somehow manages to come off as a victim yet a lot of people think she’s snooty.If you add in her cranky mother and her awful ex husband, I’m not sure what I like here beyond the potential of the storyline.I kept thinking something was going to happen to get the story going but after reading some other reviews, I think it might continue on at this leisurely pace.I hate to leave a book unfinished but I’ve invested enough time in this one to know it’s not my personal taste.
    more
  • Linda Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Centering around Hannah, a woman who has left her cushy London life and cheating husband to return home to Ireland and her mother's house. This started a little slowly but definitely worth finishing. Really, what's not to like? It's set in a small Irish village on a small peninsula and centers on a librarian trying to save a dying town and a library due for extinction. Quirky characters throughout.
    more
  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I was very eager to read this book because of the beautiful cover and creative title. The contents of the book definitely lived up to the cover and title.The blurb on the book description describes it perfectly "feel good". This was such a delightful book that I enjoyed from beginning to end. I cannot wait to read more by this author.
    more
  • Caitríona Shanahan
    January 1, 1970
    Based on publisher's description, this book could be taken as a light summer trifle - a wronged woman rediscovering her independence through circumstance beyond her control. In fact, this book is so much more. Yes, it does centre on Hanna Casey's story - the story of a middle-aged woman renegotiating the terms of her life after the shock of betrayal has finally passed. But it is also the story of community, and in particular how rural communities adapt and survive when they are given the opportu Based on publisher's description, this book could be taken as a light summer trifle - a wronged woman rediscovering her independence through circumstance beyond her control. In fact, this book is so much more. Yes, it does centre on Hanna Casey's story - the story of a middle-aged woman renegotiating the terms of her life after the shock of betrayal has finally passed. But it is also the story of community, and in particular how rural communities adapt and survive when they are given the opportunity.I loved this book. It is filled with living, breathing characters. And while some are more venal than others (Hanna's ex being particularly unpleasant) most people in this book are, in the main, good people, doing the best they can. I liked the reality faced by the people of the peninsula: their economic existence is being threatened by bureaucrats looking to make things neater, looking to improve their performance against centrally specified standards, and by those with influence looking to increase their influence. As one of the characters in the book said, there was no need for brown envelopes (an Irish expression referring to corruption) - all that was needed was for the system to be allowed to continue unchallenged. And that is an honest reflection of life in rural Ireland.I was dreading the moment when Jazz discovered her father's infidelity, and the destruction of her trust in her mother. I felt it would be overwrought, and out of keeping with the tone of the rest of the book. But Felicity Hayes-McCoy had the good sense to handle it in an entirely different manner. I was so satisfied when Jazz worked out on her own how manipulative her father was; and it was a fitting final development of Hanna's character that she put an end to any illusions she had left about the father of her child, and she, at last, felt free to be honest about everything.I was also thrilled that this did not become a romance novel. Yes, Brian the architect will probably be Hanna's paramour at some future date. But this was a story of Hanna becoming whole and independent again, and she needed to remain independent to achieve that.Yes, the psalter was a bit of a deus ex machina, but in truth, the story and the community deserved the bit of good luck. It was earned by Fury through years of honesty and hard work, and it was earned by Felicity by building the elements of the story carefully and lovingly, drawing an honest picture of life in Corca Duibhne today.Ironically, I picked up this book from the mobile library that serves Corca Dhuibhne, where Felicity lives, and the book is a tribute to the importance of our library service, and those that support the villages and small towns around here.
    more
  • Kate Stringer
    January 1, 1970
    If you feel the way I do about sheep and green cliffs and finding a fixer-upper-of-one's own, this is a darling book about community and words and gumption. Warning: best read with tea and knee-high wool socks.
  • Lisa Houston
    January 1, 1970
    Review will follow when I get home from holiday
  • Jane Gregg
    January 1, 1970
    Sure, but it was quite a fine bit of craic.
Write a review