A Stranger at Fellsworth (Treasures of Surrey, #3)
Could losing everything be the best thing to happen to Annabelle Thorley? In the fallout of her deceased father’s financial ruin, Annabelle’s prospects are looking bleak. Her fiancé has called off their betrothal, and now she remains at the mercy of her controlling and often cruel brother. Annabelle soon faces the fact that her only hope for a better life is to do the unthinkable and run away to Fellsworth, the home of her long-estranged aunt and uncle, where a teaching position awaits her. Working for a wage for the first time in her life forces Annabelle to adapt to often unpleasant situations as friendships and roles she’s taken for granted are called into question. Owen Locke is unswerving in his commitments. As a widower and father, he is fiercely protective of his only daughter. As an industrious gamekeeper, he is intent on keeping poachers at bay even though his ambition has always been to eventually purchase land that he can call his own. When a chance encounter introduces him to the lovely Annabelle Thorley, his steady life is shaken. For the first time since his wife’s tragic death, Owen begins to dream of a second chance at love. As Owen and Annabelle grow closer, ominous forces threaten the peace they thought they’d found. Poachers, mysterious strangers, and murderers converge at Fellsworth, forcing Annabelle and Owen to a test of fortitude and bravery to stop the shadow of the past from ruining their hopes for the future.

A Stranger at Fellsworth (Treasures of Surrey, #3) Details

TitleA Stranger at Fellsworth (Treasures of Surrey, #3)
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherThomas Nelson
ISBN0718011856
ISBN-139780718011857
Number of pages336 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Romance, Historical, Regency, Christian

A Stranger at Fellsworth (Treasures of Surrey, #3) Review

  • Katie
    February 10, 2017
    I liked this book, but I wasn't wowed by it. There was the traditional regency setting, boarding school, lady/servent relationship, mysterious woods, etc. Parts of it I really liked, but it was really easy for me to put down. Thanks to Netgalley and publishers for a copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Elodie (Readable Mélange)
    February 25, 2017
    I greatly enjoyed this fresh Regency romance. Owen and Annabelle were sympathetic main characters, especially Annabelle - she wasn't over-weak like a lot of historical heroines, but her strength wasn't exaggerated either. Although I can't relate to her relationship with her brother (I love all my many brothers and all my brothers love me ;) ), I felt for everything that happened to her.Which brings me to my next point, which is that even though some of the incidents in the book were farfetched, I greatly enjoyed this fresh Regency romance. Owen and Annabelle were sympathetic main characters, especially Annabelle - she wasn't over-weak like a lot of historical heroines, but her strength wasn't exaggerated either. Although I can't relate to her relationship with her brother (I love all my many brothers and all my brothers love me ;) ), I felt for everything that happened to her.Which brings me to my next point, which is that even though some of the incidents in the book were farfetched, it was written well enough that I never felt like it was stupid or melodramatic or whatevs. Instead, I found myself on the edge of my seat (not literally, because I was curled up in bed pretending it wasn't 1 am) excited to see what would happen.The thing I didn't like about Stranger was the character of Mr Bartrell. Why does there always have to be a lustful numbskull in every historical romance? It was an interesting enough storyline for maybe the first couple novels but after fifty consecutive books containing this plotline (may or may not be hyperbole) it's getting a little old.This was a small price to pay, however, for such an enjoyable read! I recommend it to all Christian Regency fans.Recommended for ages 15+.I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Karen
    March 3, 2017
    Wow, for a Regency era tale, this had a faster pace with more action and the romance was quite believable. It wasn't all balls, gowns and tea cups like some tend to be, although there was a little. Well, it wouldn't be Regency without it, right? It is probably one of my favorite books from this time period, ever! Several characters were like something from a Dicken's or Bronte sisters' tale, sinister, corrupt, with societal prejudices, and others full of goodness and hope. An intricate plot kept Wow, for a Regency era tale, this had a faster pace with more action and the romance was quite believable. It wasn't all balls, gowns and tea cups like some tend to be, although there was a little. Well, it wouldn't be Regency without it, right? It is probably one of my favorite books from this time period, ever! Several characters were like something from a Dicken's or Bronte sisters' tale, sinister, corrupt, with societal prejudices, and others full of goodness and hope. An intricate plot kept it going, plus a tender romance for some sigh-worthy moments. Owen Locke is my new book crush. Highly recommend to readers who enjoy a good Regency era story with some action. 5 stars!(An e-copy was provided by NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Olivia
    February 10, 2017
    {3.75 stars}While the first few chapters took me a bit to get into the storyline and characters, I found overall this book enjoyable to read. The setting reminded me of a Jane Austen book or movie, especially the social aspects, the scandals, and descriptions of England. I especially loved Owens work as a gameskeeper; it added a different aspect compared to many regency reads.The storyline ended up being more intense than I expected, especially at the end, but it was a pleasant surprise. I didn' {3.75 stars}While the first few chapters took me a bit to get into the storyline and characters, I found overall this book enjoyable to read. The setting reminded me of a Jane Austen book or movie, especially the social aspects, the scandals, and descriptions of England. I especially loved Owens work as a gameskeeper; it added a different aspect compared to many regency reads.The storyline ended up being more intense than I expected, especially at the end, but it was a pleasant surprise. I didn't quite see how everything would tie together until close to the end, and I found that bit interesting. Crosley's character probably shocked me the most, considering how she seemed toward the beginning. The romance is quite minimal compared to some romance novels, although at the end there are a few kisses. There wasn't a lot of spiritual content, although a few mentions of faith and prayer. I would have liked if there was a bit more focus on salvation through Jesus Christ, rather than just having faith. All in all a book I enjoyed. I will definitely be looking into more of this author's books!*I received this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Amy
    March 3, 2017
    A new favourite from Sarah Ladd! I loved to recommend Sarah's series 'Whisphers on the Moors'. In fact everyone that came into the book store looking for a historical fiction, I placed one of those books into their hands. She was a little known author to our customers, but there is something about Sarah's writing that draws you deep into the period, the story. However, I have felt a little disconnected to the more recent books by Sarah Ladd, and I have missed the ability her earlier work had to A new favourite from Sarah Ladd! I loved to recommend Sarah's series 'Whisphers on the Moors'. In fact everyone that came into the book store looking for a historical fiction, I placed one of those books into their hands. She was a little known author to our customers, but there is something about Sarah's writing that draws you deep into the period, the story. However, I have felt a little disconnected to the more recent books by Sarah Ladd, and I have missed the ability her earlier work had to pull me in to a well developed plot. If you ever could literally feel like a fly on the wall, this is it. You feel like you are right there, living, breathing with the early 1800s going on its daily life around you. That's what I love about this book. I was there in London, while Annabelle was receiving the shut down by the society that had been her friends. I was there as she fled in fear for her future. I was there as she looked about in resigned acknowledgement of her new attic room that she was to share with 3 other servants of Fellsworth School. Life would never be the same for Annabelle Thorley. Attempting to escape and hide from her brother and his attempts to marry her to Mr Bartrell, she comes to accept that her new life may not be what she had dreamed and hoped for. She is free, and with that she starts to reconnect with the memories her mother left behind - of that of her faith. Remembering her mothers prayers, she steps into an unfamiliar path of hope. With her reuniting with her Uncle & Aunt there is the chance to feel what family should represent. Of course, the new acquaintance of Mr Owen Locke, gamekeeper at the nearby Bancroft Park - develops at a natural pace. Owen has suffered a loss of his own, and knows only too well the cost of scandal that can come to a person. Unhurried and well descriptive, I enjoyed every page of this book. The minor characters are such a compliment to those who feature more widely, and there was nothing predictable in the plot. I was touched by this line, a discussion between Annabelle & Owen. (Paraphrased) 'Peace is not determined by your circumstances... Peace is dependent upon where you place your faith.' I truly believe that no matter how we long for our environment or situation to be 'just right' it's false thinking that those things will bring you a measure of true peace in life. Where we place our faith, that is what will carry us through life. Through the darkness as well as the light.Thank you to Thomas Nelson & Netgalley for the complimentary copy. This is my honest review.
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  • Alannie Marshall
    March 26, 2017
    I recently finished reading A Stranger at Fellsworth by Sarah E. Ladd. Unfortunately, I was not blown away by this novel. If you have spent any significant length of time reading inspirational romance, you will know what I mean when I say this book was a little too cliche, and not in an endearing way. The story itself starts out interestingly enough, but the mystery element was underwhelming. Now, I am not Nancy Drew by any means, but with a little deductive reasoning and practically from the mo I recently finished reading A Stranger at Fellsworth by Sarah E. Ladd. Unfortunately, I was not blown away by this novel. If you have spent any significant length of time reading inspirational romance, you will know what I mean when I say this book was a little too cliche, and not in an endearing way. The story itself starts out interestingly enough, but the mystery element was underwhelming. Now, I am not Nancy Drew by any means, but with a little deductive reasoning and practically from the moment the mystery arc was introduced I guessed the ending and the culprits. There was potential there, granted, but it ultimately fell flat.My other issue was with the characters and their dynamic. They all seemed one-dimensional to me and didn't possess any of the life and passion I have felt from even some of Ladd's other works. Annabelle seemed nice enough, but she ultimately felt artificial. There wasn't anything I found to be relatable about her, and none of her thoughts or feelings felt genuine. She seemed to me merely a paper doll--lifeless and boring after a few minutes. Owen, I feel like I barely got to know (perhaps that is the issue with all these characters, who knows?). Every time I interacted with him, he was too busy worrying about poachers to reveal anything deeper than surface level issues with his late wife. That backstory could have used more explanation as well, as it was teased a little, but I ultimately wasn't made to care very much for the situation at all. I don't know that I would call this a romance novel. The two main characters hardly interact with one another in any significant ways, and their relationship felt too convenient. Yes, he helps her out. But do they necessarily fall in love? I read the entire book, but I wouldn't have been able to tell you they did if they hadn't said so at the end. Why should they love one another? It didn't make sense to me, and it felt too tropey. There was no spark, and for me, I feel like this is more a story about the dangers of poaching than anything else. Perhaps, if you are into that, you will enjoy this book, but I feel like I wasted my time. As far as the faith element, I'm not sure there was much of one. Prayers are mentioned by a few of the characters, but it didn't seem like it was much of a priority. It was more like an afterthought. Annabelle's journey to faith (I say journey very loosely) seemed more like a driveway that cut off too soon. I honestly cannot say that she even had a faith journey, frankly. Now granted, I don't necessarily expect every character to have a miraculous faith experience by the end of one novel, but if your genre is faith-based fiction, you should use faith as more of a foundation than an addendum. The main point I keep coming back to is that I did not connect with this book at all--not the story, the characters, or the writing. The long and the short of it is that it didn't possess that je ne sais quoi. It was lifeless, flat, one-dimensional, and ultimately a let down. This may seem harsh considering it is "just a romance novel", but to me, there is no such thing. Every piece of literature, no matter the target audience or genre, can build up a person, teach a lesson, and provide an escape to another world if only for a few hours. A Stranger at Fellsworth failed in this respect for me, and because of that, I'm afraid I cannot recommend it. I received this book from the author, and I was in no way required to leave a positive review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Martha
    March 6, 2017
    The lovely cover will make you pick up this book, but the story will not let you put it down. This book does not come out until May, so I generally try to read them closer to the time of publishing. However, this one was irresistible Once I started it, I could not put it down. The story where the heroine found herself facing forced marriage because of money was very common in those times, and escape was not always something that was possible. The hero and heroine both, faced abuse, and yet perse The lovely cover will make you pick up this book, but the story will not let you put it down. This book does not come out until May, so I generally try to read them closer to the time of publishing. However, this one was irresistible Once I started it, I could not put it down. The story where the heroine found herself facing forced marriage because of money was very common in those times, and escape was not always something that was possible. The hero and heroine both, faced abuse, and yet persevered.The spiritual elements in this book were quite open and keen, where this is not a book you might pick up and wonder if it was a Christian book. If you are not looking for one, don’t pick this one up. I found the message to be heart warming and encouraging.I completely enjoyed this book!
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  • Debbie
    March 22, 2017
    "A Stranger at Fellsworth" is a Christian historical romance set in 1819 in England. It's the third book in a series, but it's essentially a stand alone. Annabelle finds the courage to leave a bad situation even though it means working for a living and potentially never marrying. She and her uncle agreed that she shouldn't tell people who she was, so I found it odd that they made no real efforts to hide her identity (and she even admits to it when asked).Owen's wife was murdered, so he feels pro "A Stranger at Fellsworth" is a Christian historical romance set in 1819 in England. It's the third book in a series, but it's essentially a stand alone. Annabelle finds the courage to leave a bad situation even though it means working for a living and potentially never marrying. She and her uncle agreed that she shouldn't tell people who she was, so I found it odd that they made no real efforts to hide her identity (and she even admits to it when asked).Owen's wife was murdered, so he feels protective of women who are in dangerous situations. It made sense that he'd help a woman he barely knew, and her kindness toward others and efforts to help his daughter were understandably attractive to him. Potentially dangerous poachers were causing problems, and it's Owen's job to catch them and stop the person running the poaching operation. This created some suspenseful situations.The time period was more of a backdrop than a detailed part of the story. The Christian element was mainly the concern shown for others and a character accepting Christ. There was no sex or bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable romance novel.I received an ARC review copy of this book from the publisher through Amazon Vine.
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  • Hannah
    March 27, 2017
    Review coming closer to publication.
  • Tim-melissa Williamson
    February 24, 2017
    Sarah E. Ladd is one of my favorite authors! I was only introduced to her writing in the last year, but since discovering the grace with which she weaves story I eagerly anticipate her newest release. A Stranger at Fellsworth is her newest release in the Treasures of Surrey series. In this story Annabelle, a young lady who has lost virtually all prospects due to her father and brother's inability to protect the family fortune, seeks help from an essentially unknown uncle, her mother's brother. H Sarah E. Ladd is one of my favorite authors! I was only introduced to her writing in the last year, but since discovering the grace with which she weaves story I eagerly anticipate her newest release. A Stranger at Fellsworth is her newest release in the Treasures of Surrey series. In this story Annabelle, a young lady who has lost virtually all prospects due to her father and brother's inability to protect the family fortune, seeks help from an essentially unknown uncle, her mother's brother. He willingly helps her escape a dangerous situation and create a new life for herself. While settling into her new way of life she frequently runs into the gameskeeper, Owen, a man who was integral in helping Annabelle escape her old life. It does not take long for Annabelle to realize she is not as safe at Fellsworth as she assumed she would be.As with the first two titles in this series (The Curiosity Keeper and Dawn at Emberwilde) I could not put this book down! The characters are delightful and believable. I love how the ideas of faith and following God are seamlessly woven into the story. The characters grow and develop naturally as the story unfolds. I appreciate how effortlessly Ladd changes from the perspective of the heroine to the hero. She has a gift for conveying emotion without directly stating it. I hated to see this novel end! I highly recommend this series as well as all other written by Sarah Ladd. You will be delighted by her ability to craft an intriguing story often filled with mystery and danger. She easily weaves her faith throughout her stories without it sounding forced. I'm so happy to have found her books and I think you will be to!
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  • Lisa
    February 6, 2017
    This is another unique Regency from Sarah Ladd. At times I think every possible plot has already been written out. However, SL comes up with some new twists that keeps things new. Fleshing out the relationship between a mistress and her lady's maid, the responsibilities of a gamekeeper, and the ramifications of poaching are not usual Regency faire. But, with those details and some endearing characters this book easily captures your attention.
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  • Sarah
    March 10, 2017
    I'd give A Stranger at Fellsworth 3.5/5 stars. It's interesting and well worth reading, but I was disappointed to find that I had no problem putting it down for a couple days. If you're looking for a Regency-era inspy romance to enjoy and need it to fit into a busy schedule, try this one!
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  • Anne Rightler
    March 1, 2017
    A Stranger at Fellsworth is an intriguing Regency romance by Sarah E. Ladd. Annabelle is a young woman who is used to having fancy clothes, going to balls and being served by a lady's maid. But she is miserable, knowing her brother was throwing her to the wolves or more specifically to the wolf known as Mr. Barton. She must make a choice and she bravely does just that. After a chance meeting with Owen, a direct and self-assured gameskeeper in an area where her estranged uncle lives, she trades t A Stranger at Fellsworth is an intriguing Regency romance by Sarah E. Ladd. Annabelle is a young woman who is used to having fancy clothes, going to balls and being served by a lady's maid. But she is miserable, knowing her brother was throwing her to the wolves or more specifically to the wolf known as Mr. Barton. She must make a choice and she bravely does just that. After a chance meeting with Owen, a direct and self-assured gameskeeper in an area where her estranged uncle lives, she trades the life she knew for another one yet unknown. With a plot full of dark motives, poaching, kidnapping, murder, and a strong thread of faith in a God of second chances, the author definitely keeps the reader's interest. The characters, the good ones and the bad ones as well, are believable, flawed yet vibrant and evocative. The Stranger at Fellsworth is a great concoction of a fascinating setting, compelling conflict, and a sweet romance reminding readers they each have a purpose and life is about finding that purpose and following it.I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley.com. A favorable review was not required and the opinions are my own.
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  • Susan
    March 2, 2017
    This wasn't quite as polished as most of Sarah Ladd's books, but I still give it 3 1/2 stars. Parts of the story were VERY predictable. I appreciated the effort into more dangerous topics (abuse, family forcing women marry against their will, poaching,) but it had some unlikely parts. Perhaps the most blatant was that Owen Locke would fall for ANOTHER society girl without a bit more concern. She knows nothing about preparing food, doing laundry, etc., etc, and she'll be expecting to take that on This wasn't quite as polished as most of Sarah Ladd's books, but I still give it 3 1/2 stars. Parts of the story were VERY predictable. I appreciated the effort into more dangerous topics (abuse, family forcing women marry against their will, poaching,) but it had some unlikely parts. Perhaps the most blatant was that Owen Locke would fall for ANOTHER society girl without a bit more concern. She knows nothing about preparing food, doing laundry, etc., etc, and she'll be expecting to take that on if she marries him. It seemed too easily accepted. It could have been a question dealt with as part of the dilemma, part of the story, but it seemed ignored. That part bothered me a bit.I appreciated the Christian aspects of learning to accept God's will and of forgiveness; they are an integral part of the story.I received this digital ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Becky
    February 25, 2017
    For some authors, the writing seems to flow naturally from their pens. The era, the characters, the settings, and the plot movement seem like an organic function of their craft. Such is the case for Sarah E Ladd. I've read several of her books and her plot devices never seem to grow old. I must say, though, that with A Stranger at Fellsworth, she was a bit predictable. We have a heroine who is being bartered to a slimy man in repayment for a debt. We have a hero who helps her escape such a terri For some authors, the writing seems to flow naturally from their pens. The era, the characters, the settings, and the plot movement seem like an organic function of their craft. Such is the case for Sarah E Ladd. I've read several of her books and her plot devices never seem to grow old. I must say, though, that with A Stranger at Fellsworth, she was a bit predictable. We have a heroine who is being bartered to a slimy man in repayment for a debt. We have a hero who helps her escape such a terrible fate and falls in love with her. We also have skulduggery, terrible accidents, and feats of derring-do. There were some surprises in the book, though. Annabelle has a few significant trinkets from her mother that are quite valuable, and she has to share a room with three other women and her things don't get stolen. There are suspicious characters whose interactions with Annabelle don't really have a bearing on the movement on the plot. Those are extremely minor criticisms on the book, it's still a very enjoyable book and quite an easy read. Definitely worth four stars! My thanks to Thomas Nelson for allowing me to read and review this book.
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  • Mj
    February 13, 2017
    “Every person is on a journey. You. Me. Mr. Thorley. Miss Stillworth. Every single one of us.” …. “Some of us will learn and grow, and some will struggle and fail. I know I certainly could not judge another. All we can do is be there for the ones who have been put into our lives.” -CrosleySuspense, romance and a bit of faith deliver a great story in this latest novel by Sarah E. Ladd. Readers of Regency novels will definitely engage with this story. Intriguing characters, dark plots, and subtle “Every person is on a journey. You. Me. Mr. Thorley. Miss Stillworth. Every single one of us.” …. “Some of us will learn and grow, and some will struggle and fail. I know I certainly could not judge another. All we can do is be there for the ones who have been put into our lives.” -CrosleySuspense, romance and a bit of faith deliver a great story in this latest novel by Sarah E. Ladd. Readers of Regency novels will definitely engage with this story. Intriguing characters, dark plots, and subtle romance tie the story together quite well! Annabelle Thorley, a young gentile woman, finds her life changing drastically as her family goods are carted from their pleasant home and sold by her brother who has inherited the family estate. Bills to settle, debts to be paid, and unsavory friends add to Annabelle’s brother Thomas’s problems. Thomas decides to use Annabelle as a means of getting himself out of debt and out of trouble. Desperation drives Annabelle to seek shelter at Fellsworth School run by her Uncle Edmund, whom she has not seen in ten years. Owen Locke, a groundskeeper from the neighboring estate, steps in and provides safe transportation to Fellsworth for Annabelle and her ladies maid, Crosley. Uncle Edmund is quite willing to provide the two women with jobs and a safe place to live. Thus begins a changed life for Annabelle and Crosley both. One will use the change to her advantage and one will use it unwisely. Once again Sarah Ladd examines in depth the significance of family, morals, and the true meaning of home. Annabelle and Owen have both suffered loss and difficulties. Annabelle’s upbringing left her ill suited to the life with which she winds up, but she makes an effort to adapt and do the best she can with the skills she has. Owen learns that he is capable of a great deal of patience and that his patience and hard work do pay off in the end. Annabelle and Owen learn that home is where you make it and family is sometimes what we choose, not what we are born to. This ARC copy was received from Thomas Nelson and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.****
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  • Kelly Tyree
    February 5, 2017
    A Stranger At Fellsworth was a fantastic book. It keeps you completely engaged in the story. The characters are easy to love (and to despise). Annabelle Thorley lives with her brother and his wife after the death of their parents. Due to unwise financial decisions that their father made and that her brother, Thomas, continue to make, they are in financial want. Thomas is pushing Annabelle to marry a man named, Mr. Barton so that they can have financial security. But Annabelle finds Mr. Barton to A Stranger At Fellsworth was a fantastic book. It keeps you completely engaged in the story. The characters are easy to love (and to despise). Annabelle Thorley lives with her brother and his wife after the death of their parents. Due to unwise financial decisions that their father made and that her brother, Thomas, continue to make, they are in financial want. Thomas is pushing Annabelle to marry a man named, Mr. Barton so that they can have financial security. But Annabelle finds Mr. Barton to be cruel and she has no desire to marry him. When she refuses, her brother is mean to her and she feel physically threatened. As that threat to her safety increases, she decides her only option is to run away. She approaches a game keeper that is there when his employer is visiting Thomas. The game keeper, Owen Locke, agrees to help her escape. She travels to Owen's home in Fellsworth where she goes to visit an uncle she has not seen in ten years. She is wearing a large bruise at the hands of her brother. Annabelle's uncle takes Annabelle and her Lady's Maid in. He runs a private school and gets both Annabelle and her Lady's Maid a job there. Annabelle finally feels she has peace for the first time. Owen Locke is dealing with his own set of issues. He is caring for his daughter after the violent death of his wife. He feels drawn to Annabelle and has a need to protect her. He also finds the property he works at has become the victim of poachers. He works to uncover that scheme. As Annabelle works at the school, she becomes a friend to Owen's daughter. As Owen and Annabelle begin to realize they have feeling for each other things get complicated at the school and Annabelle's peace is in jeopardy when her location is discovered. The book is incredibly well written. It features a beautiful combination of action, suspense and romance. I cannot say enough good things about A Stranger at Fellsworth.
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  • Regina
    February 7, 2017
    A Stranger at Fellsworth is a tremendous book full of suspense, romance, adventure, and characters that will sweep you away! I was completely enthralled with this book. Sarah Ladd had me hooked with this one!Annabelle Thorley lives with her abusive and controlling brother, Thomas, along with his wife. Thomas pushes Annabelle into a marriage proposal for financial security, but she isn’t wanting to marry Mr. Barton. She finds Mr. Barton to be possessive, domineering, and controlling. Annabelle en A Stranger at Fellsworth is a tremendous book full of suspense, romance, adventure, and characters that will sweep you away! I was completely enthralled with this book. Sarah Ladd had me hooked with this one!Annabelle Thorley lives with her abusive and controlling brother, Thomas, along with his wife. Thomas pushes Annabelle into a marriage proposal for financial security, but she isn’t wanting to marry Mr. Barton. She finds Mr. Barton to be possessive, domineering, and controlling. Annabelle encounters Owen Locke, a game keeper in Fellsworth, while out shopping with her lady’s maid. After an incident at her home, Owen helps her flee to her uncle’s home in Fellsworth. Annabelle finds peace for the first time while living under her uncle’s care.Owen Locke has his own issues, he has a young daughter living at the school, and there are poachers among the land. Owen has his hands full in discovering who is behind the poaching. Annabelle and Owen’s lives are in danger when things happen. And romance blossoms between them. Disclosure statement I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Julie
    February 14, 2017
    I really enjoyed this book. I liked Annabelle's strength and fortitude among so many trials and Owen's gentlemanly ways and kindness. This book is a clean romance with a bit of mystery. I would recommend it.
  • Terressa
    February 10, 2017
    Mystery mixed a romance and discovering ones self. Ladd did it again! Pulled the reader in from the first page and kept me entranced throughout the entire story. Fantastic read!
  • Rachelle Sperling
    March 24, 2017
    Sarah Ladd writes a different kind of regency novel. She delves under the surface and looks at issues of the day while adding a bit of mystery, intrigue and faith to her romance.A Stranger at Fellsworth is the third book in the Treasures of Surrey series, but can easily be read as a stand alone novel.In this novel we see a glimpse of both the privilege and vulnerability of women in this era. Annabelle has been raised to a life of luxury and expectation. When all of that promise goes away she fin Sarah Ladd writes a different kind of regency novel. She delves under the surface and looks at issues of the day while adding a bit of mystery, intrigue and faith to her romance.A Stranger at Fellsworth is the third book in the Treasures of Surrey series, but can easily be read as a stand alone novel.In this novel we see a glimpse of both the privilege and vulnerability of women in this era. Annabelle has been raised to a life of luxury and expectation. When all of that promise goes away she finds herself at the mercy of a brother who would use her as a bargaining chip and an abusive man. Annabelle’s story is one of choosing courage and the struggle to adapt to an entirely new life rather than submit to a life as a pawn to be mistreated. It’s a story of naivety, reality and growing in discernment.Owen’s story is one of redeeming past regrets and finding new hope.In this novel Ladd presents a layered, captivating and dramatic regency tale.I received a free galley of this novel in exchange for my honest opinion.
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