The Gifts of Reading
Elk boek is een cadeau voor de lezer, en een boek cadeau doen geeft een bijzonder gevoel. Tijdens het lezen voeren drie personen (de gever, de schrijver, de ontvanger) een gesprek dat elk van de hen rijker maakt. In 'Lezen als geschenk'vertelt Macfarlane dat hij op jonge leeftijd een boek kreeg dat belangrijk voor hem was, en dat hij die gunst uiteindelijk kon retourneren.

The Gifts of Reading Details

TitleThe Gifts of Reading
Author
ReleaseJun 16th, 2016
PublisherPENGUIN GROUP
ISBN-139780241257340
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Essays, Books About Books, Autobiography, Memoir

The Gifts of Reading Review

  • Roya
    January 1, 1970
    It’s taken me far too long to write a simple review for this short but enjoyable essay. It’s about the friendships we make through books and how books can transport us. It speaks about reading as a gift and there’s even a few good recommendations from the author. Did it really have to take me that long to write that? Of course not! I was just overthinking it as usual! Anyway, I’d highly recommend anyone who likes to read (aka, you) to give this a go.
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  • Haïfa
    January 1, 1970
    This story, like so many stories, begins with a gift. The gift, like so many gifts, was a book... I'm baffled at how quotable this tiny little book is!I don't usually read essays. They're as far from my normal reading tastes as you can get. But my friend TS fired straight and couldn't have chosen a better initiation! :) The act of giving encourages the onwards circulation of generosity. This book was very special in more than one way and deeply moved me. For one, I received it (thank you T This story, like so many stories, begins with a gift. The gift, like so many gifts, was a book... I'm baffled at how quotable this tiny little book is!I don't usually read essays. They're as far from my normal reading tastes as you can get. But my friend TS fired straight and couldn't have chosen a better initiation! :) The act of giving encourages the onwards circulation of generosity. This book was very special in more than one way and deeply moved me. For one, I received it (thank you TS!) at a time when I was struggling with reading and writing slumps and trying to find again the sparks of wonder and awe and pleasure I once found only between the pages of a book. This book talks about the impacts of book gifts, on both the giver and the receiver. For me, there are rarer pleasures than receiving books and than gifts freely given and the smile they put on the faces of those who receive them. You can say therefore that The Gifts of Reading was spot on!
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  • Marc
    January 1, 1970
    Very short essay. About the value of gifts, especially when it comes to books about walking. I did not know Robert Macfarlane, but when I noticed that he was a walking fanatic, I immediately put his other works on my To-read list. This book just is a charming, short read.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This brief essay was printed as a stand-alone pamphlet in aid of the Migrant Offshore Aid Station. Macfarlane begins by remembering Don, a fellow English teacher he met in China in 2000 who plied him with books by some of the authors who would later serve as models for his own lyrical nature/travel writing, including Annie Dillard and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Fermor’s A Time of Gifts is now one of the five books he gives most often as presents. Don’s friendship, the love of literature they shared, and This brief essay was printed as a stand-alone pamphlet in aid of the Migrant Offshore Aid Station. Macfarlane begins by remembering Don, a fellow English teacher he met in China in 2000 who plied him with books by some of the authors who would later serve as models for his own lyrical nature/travel writing, including Annie Dillard and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Fermor’s A Time of Gifts is now one of the five books he gives most often as presents. Don’s friendship, the love of literature they shared, and the books he passes on to students and the new generation of nature writers are the main themes of this compact and wholly pleasant piece of writing. Slip this in any reader’s Christmas stocking.
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  • Coffee&Quasars
    January 1, 1970
    A nice read, though low-impact. Mostly it's given me a few more suggestions to add to my TBR.
  • Negin
    January 1, 1970
    My daughter picked up this short and sweet essay when we visited the “Shakespeare and Company” bookstore in Paris. It’s a small booklet that was sold near the cashier, the sort of booklet that you pick up on a whim. The beautiful cover artwork caught our eye as well. This touching book is something that almost any book lover already knows: how lovely it is to give books as gifts and to receive them also.
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  • TS Chan
    January 1, 1970
    Short and sweet, this essay will resonate with book lovers who have made friends through books, and who love to give and receive them. It also made me add A Time of Gifts and The Living Mountain into my want-to-read list.
  • Thijs Joores
    January 1, 1970
    small but lovely gift <3
  • Daniela
    January 1, 1970
    "Reading kept him alive right till the end"
  • Austra
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a little great gift. And now I have to go and buy some 20 of these to give out to some great people who love books and gifts, and especially - book gifts.
  • Bilan M. Atayaah
    January 1, 1970
    "This is a beautiful double-proposition: that art enlarges our repertoire for being, and that it further enables a giving onwards of that enriched utterance, that broadened perception" Stunning lil pamphlet, made me feel so much! Reading is truly the most giving gift.
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful, heartfelt, and moving. Had this been an extended essay, and not such a short standalone piece, I probably would have given it 5 stars.
  • Callum McLaughlin
    January 1, 1970
    A simple but resonant anecdotal essay about the joy of books both given and received, and the power they have to inspire, transform, and perhaps even sustain lives.
  • Crazytourists_books
    January 1, 1970
    A small essay about the joy that giving and receiving books brings into our lives.
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This story, like so many stories, begins with a gift. That gift, like so many gifts, was a book…Most people love receiving presents, but for me the best present to receive is a book. A well-chosen book opens up a world of possibilities, it is something that can be treasured for ages and can have a resonance between giver and receiver. In this essay, Macfarlane extolls the deep significance of giving and receiving books as he recalls receiving The Time of Gifts by Patrick Leigh Fermor from Do This story, like so many stories, begins with a gift. That gift, like so many gifts, was a book…Most people love receiving presents, but for me the best present to receive is a book. A well-chosen book opens up a world of possibilities, it is something that can be treasured for ages and can have a resonance between giver and receiver. In this essay, Macfarlane extolls the deep significance of giving and receiving books as he recalls receiving The Time of Gifts by Patrick Leigh Fermor from Don, a close friend and past colleague. This simple gift of this book, was what drove him to walk the hills and mountains and in turn has given us, the reader, his own wonderful books.This short, intense, expresso like book is a little gem that will continue to provide insight and delight every time I give or receive a book. This is only available from Independent Bookshops, and monies go towards Migrant Offshore Aid Station.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely reflective read on reading. A homage to Patrick Leigh Fermor and in particular his book A Time of Gifts. An appreciation of the author's friend and mentor Don with whom he taught English Literature in Beijing, according to Mao. Thanks to Don, they survived to continue to enjoy reading and appreciate the gifts which books bring.
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  • Adeeb
    January 1, 1970
    You know how you have these stories about what it means to be human? About looking at the smallest things in your life? By taking those into consideration...you just feel so utterly alive and become a better person?This is such a story. This book isn't a work of fiction. It's a reflective essay about the meaning of gifts, specifically the gifts of reading.What is a gift? How can reading and books bundle up into a gift? Is it just the act of giving someone a book, or is it You know how you have these stories about what it means to be human? About looking at the smallest things in your life? By taking those into consideration...you just feel so utterly alive and become a better person?This is such a story. This book isn't a work of fiction. It's a reflective essay about the meaning of gifts, specifically the gifts of reading.What is a gift? How can reading and books bundle up into a gift? Is it just the act of giving someone a book, or is it that emotional connection that you offer?There's so much thought put into this book, yet they are delivered quite simply and concisely. I also felt so many emotions while reading this book. It is a book you read parts of, and the words just tingle underneath your skin. The last few pages made me stop in awe, filling me with goosebumps. I had to stop and appreciate the words.I recommend this book to everyone, especially if you're a book lover.
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  • nicky
    January 1, 1970
    3 / 5 starsI have been thinking about gift giving a lot lately, what with sustainability on the rise for a couple of years now, and the will to make conscious choices as well. Last christmas, before buying this essay (and actually gifting it to two of my closest friends, readers luckily), i made the decision to stop buying gifts simply for the sake of having something to give. i always try to give gifts with meaning and most often, to me, these gifts end up being books. there are so 3 / 5 starsI have been thinking about gift giving a lot lately, what with sustainability on the rise for a couple of years now, and the will to make conscious choices as well. Last christmas, before buying this essay (and actually gifting it to two of my closest friends, readers luckily), i made the decision to stop buying gifts simply for the sake of having something to give. i always try to give gifts with meaning and most often, to me, these gifts end up being books. there are so many people in my life however who do not really appreciate reading or literature which makes this a little bit hard. in the end though, these are the people i would want to read this book. it is not my friends or i who needed to read it - we already know what kind of an immense gift a book, a story, even just the line of a poem can be - but all the other people i know who might profit from knowing that books as gifts can change you and gift you with a piece of the gift giver itself.
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  • Sarah83 L
    January 1, 1970
    Such a cute story about reading and gifting books to others.
  • Myriam
    January 1, 1970
    '... the gift can be transformative and {that} the act of giving encourages the onwards circulation of generosity.'
  • Vivek Tejuja
    January 1, 1970
    Robert Macfarlane is a travel writer more than anything else. He writes about his adventures in walking, trekking, climbing and camping in the wilds above all else. This latest book of his however is different. It is about the joy of receiving and giving books as gifts. The book primarily centers on the relationship he shared with a long departed friend whom he worked and travelled with in China. This relationship was about book gifting. He recounts his love for Patrick Leigh Fermor’s books and Robert Macfarlane is a travel writer more than anything else. He writes about his adventures in walking, trekking, climbing and camping in the wilds above all else. This latest book of his however is different. It is about the joy of receiving and giving books as gifts. The book primarily centers on the relationship he shared with a long departed friend whom he worked and travelled with in China. This relationship was about book gifting. He recounts his love for Patrick Leigh Fermor’s books and also how he gives away the books he has loved to people he knows and doesn’t know. Macfarlane always has a stack of books ready (which he buys on the side) in his office which people can come and pick up. I loved the idea but I don’t know if I can do this. Maybe someday I will. Macfarlane has this wondrous style of explaining things so simply – he doesn’t need to exaggerate life and that’s why you need to soak in whatever he offers. All his experiences with reading are one of a kind and while you may relate to them at some point, you wish you’d live them. If a book manages to do that to you, then it is a pretty good book, according to me. “The Gifts of Reading” is full of anecdotes about books, reading and the lives that perhaps we should be living compared to what we are. I wish the book were longer. I wish it didn’t end so soon. I would love to read more of Macfarlane’s books for sure after this essay.
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  • Wahyu Novian
    January 1, 1970
    This brief essay makes me rethink the acts of giving. I do think so hard when I want to give someone a book for (I hope) they’ll like it and stay forever with them. Such a lovely tiny book(let).
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    This short essay -- just 34 pages of text in A6 format -- is a paean or hymn to reading, giving, and books. In fact, one book in particular which he was given as a present, Patrick Leigh Fermor's A Time of Gifts. Macfarlane then uses this as a springboard to discourse on what moves him: teaching, talking and travelling, companionship, landscape and nature.I can't begin to grasp or comprehend all that the author has read, visited or achieved but there is no doubting that the writer of last This short essay -- just 34 pages of text in A6 format -- is a paean or hymn to reading, giving, and books. In fact, one book in particular which he was given as a present, Patrick Leigh Fermor's A Time of Gifts. Macfarlane then uses this as a springboard to discourse on what moves him: teaching, talking and travelling, companionship, landscape and nature.I can't begin to grasp or comprehend all that the author has read, visited or achieved but there is no doubting that the writer of last year's unexpected bestseller The Lost Words (illustrated by Jackie Morris) is someone who lives life to the full and exults in all he puts his mind to. In describing Leigh Fermor's book he describes it thus:I felt it in my feet. It spoke to my soles. It rang with what in German is called Sehnsucht: a yearning or wistful longing for the unknown and the mysterious. It made me want to stand up and march out -- to walk into adventure.It's clear that he finds so much of what he comes across in his reading as inspiring. He's not without humour; he declares that "not all books received as gifts are transformative, of course. Sometimes the only thing a book gives its reader is a paper cut." But from being given books that expand both his mind and his horizons he makes it his habit to do the same, in the hopes that recipients will likewise find inspiration.The back cover of this slim booklet tells us that all proceeds from its sale are donated to Migrant Offshore Aid Station. The charity's mission is designed to provide desperately-needed search and rescue services to people attempting dangerous sea crossings while fleeing violence, poverty and persecution. Such migrants are travellers who don't have the liberty to journey for leisure or pleasure. The purchase of this publication may therefore in some small way help a few of those who are in most desperate need of aid, one of the many ways in which reading can prove to be a gift.
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  • Kobi Jade
    January 1, 1970
    "The outcome of a gift is uncertain at the time of giving, but the fact that it has been given charges it with great potential to act upon the recipient for the good."This was brilliant. Utterly brilliant. I picked this up completely on a whim and I don't think I've ever felt so much emotion within the pages of an essay this short. I'll admit freely, that when I finished these 34 pages, I cried. I don't think I've ever read something that has impacted me so much. I felt as though I was taken on agiven "The outcome of a gift is uncertain at the time of giving, but the fact that it has been given charges it with great potential to act upon the recipient for the good."This was brilliant. Utterly brilliant. I picked this up completely on a whim and I don't think I've ever felt so much emotion within the pages of an essay this short. I'll admit freely, that when I finished these 34 pages, I cried. I don't think I've ever read something that has impacted me so much. I felt as though I was taken on a journey by Macfarlane. Both emotionally, and metaphorically speaking. I from now on, will buy this book whenever I come across it and willingly hand it out to the people important in my life, and to the people who I believe can change the world. God. Please pick this up. Please take 10 minutes out of your day to sit down and read this. This essay is why I read. It will change your life. It sure as hell changed mine. Thank you Robert Macfarlane, thank you.
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  • Tamsien West (Babbling Books)
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful meditation on the power and value of gifts, especially when those gifts are stories. It's a tiny little essay, so small the spine has no writing on it, but it was the perfect length to read just before I drifted off to sleep. I had tears in my eyes by the final page, there was so much love and generosity in the pages. A vivid reminder to continue to give books I loved away and share them with those I love. I've made a pile already to share, and I think I will reread this little volum A beautiful meditation on the power and value of gifts, especially when those gifts are stories. It's a tiny little essay, so small the spine has no writing on it, but it was the perfect length to read just before I drifted off to sleep. I had tears in my eyes by the final page, there was so much love and generosity in the pages. A vivid reminder to continue to give books I loved away and share them with those I love. I've made a pile already to share, and I think I will reread this little volume regularly.
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  • julia
    January 1, 1970
    3.0 Stars.This essay makes me want to gift people books again, even though it’s mostly a waste because I’m surrounded by non-readers. Apart from that, I don’t feel this essay was offering an abundance of depth, but I guess that wasn’t the aim anyway. I’d say its focus lay on the simple, magical, sometimes life-changing pleasure of a bookish gift.
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  • J Name
    January 1, 1970
    Inspiration for anyone which is inexcusable to ignoreThis short book I hope finds its way to many people's lives. It moved me so much. I read this the same day I rewatched The Color of Pomegranates for the first time (its power still held up!). This small book really floored me with it's messages on gift giving, reading, writing, human spirit, life and loss. Some of the best nonfiction I've read.
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  • Michael Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really nice long essay that explains the wonders of gifts (especially those that are books) and taught me that giving a gift can have a bigger impact than you could imagine.
  • Ian Clary
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable little book. Appropriately, given to me by a friend. Thankful he did.
  • BookishDubai
    January 1, 1970
    What a perfect book to start the year with! I'm definitely going to share and gift more books this year.
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