Ink, Iron, and Glass (Ink, Iron, and Glass, #1)
Can she write a world gone wrong?A certain pen, a certain book, and a certain person can craft entirely new worlds through a branch of science called scriptology. Elsa comes from one such world that was written into creation by her mother—a noted scriptologist.But when her home is attacked and her mother abducted, Elsa must cross into the real world and use her own scriptology gifts to find her. In an alternative 19th-century Italy, Elsa finds a secret society of pazzerellones—young people with a gift for mechanics, alchemy or scriptology—and meets Leo, a gorgeous mechanist with a smart mouth and a tragic past. She recruits the help of these fellow geniuses just as an assassin arrives on their doorstep.In this thrilling debut, worlds collide as Elsa unveils a deep political conspiracy seeking to unlock the most dangerous weapon ever created—and only she can stop it.

Ink, Iron, and Glass (Ink, Iron, and Glass, #1) Details

TitleInk, Iron, and Glass (Ink, Iron, and Glass, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2018
PublisherMacmillan/Imprint
ISBN-139781250112750
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Historical, Historical Fiction

Ink, Iron, and Glass (Ink, Iron, and Glass, #1) Review

  • Lior
    January 1, 1970
    This book sounds AMAZING
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    ETA: So glad I picked this up. The action picked up immediately, and I saw new depth with the characters. Plus, wow, some surprises that I'm still reeling from!
  • mith
    January 1, 1970
    BLESSED BE THE POWERS THAT DECIDED THAT THE OXFORD COMMA STAYS IN THE TITLE.i don't know who you are, but i love u.
  • Lydia
    January 1, 1970
    NO NO NO, HOLY MOTHER OF PLOT TWISTS.MY POOR HEART.I'm writing this review STRAIGHT AWAY after completing 'Ink, Iron and Glass' by Gwendolyn Clare, and I'm in complete utter agony.This book was gripping, delicious and delightfully entertaining - it pulled me in from the very first page and demanded that I rarely put it down (oops, sorry University work - you'll have to wait!). It was engaging in a way that most of the books I've read recently haven't been in a long time, and I can feel myself br NO NO NO, HOLY MOTHER OF PLOT TWISTS.MY POOR HEART.I'm writing this review STRAIGHT AWAY after completing 'Ink, Iron and Glass' by Gwendolyn Clare, and I'm in complete utter agony.This book was gripping, delicious and delightfully entertaining - it pulled me in from the very first page and demanded that I rarely put it down (oops, sorry University work - you'll have to wait!). It was engaging in a way that most of the books I've read recently haven't been in a long time, and I can feel myself breaking out of an almost self-indulged reading slump.This book follows Elsa, a person who was written into the world by what can best be described as "magical ink" as she gets ripped away from her home and the life she knew after her mother gets kidnapped.Drama ensues. Elsa develops a crush (BUT THIS IS IN NO WAY AT ALL A MAIN FEATURE OF THE BOOK. IT'S MORE LIKE A CONVENIENT FEATURE THAT ALLOWS CLARE TO RIP. YOUR. HEART. OUT), and she has to develop her knowledge and battle a series of difficult trials in order to get her mum back.This book was kick-ass from cover to finish, and it's writing style was very much luck that of Cassandra Clare's. The world involves some sort of steam-punky elements (or that's the vibe I got from it), and there's plenty of mysterious 'types of humans', much like in our beloved Mortal Instruments books.Sadly, though, Ink and Iron Glass just wasn't quite hooking enough to make it a five star read. The plot felt slow at points, and some parts of the book felt like I was reading someone's attempt of trying to increase their word count in a particularly creative English essay. Meaning, some scenes were just not needed.Elsa herself was definitely redeemed near the end, but, admittedly, she was arrogant, haughty and a little bit up-her-own-ass. Whilst annoying for the reader, her characterisation was perfect for the picture Gwendolyn Clare was trying to paint - a teenage girl who wasn't used to having friends and wasn't used to compromising, making her selfish and unbearable at times. All the characters were believably written, and Leo (my baby *-*) deserves a special shout out for being a new book crush.If only I was in a world where I could write HIM into existence. Overall, I loved jumping (quite literally) into the world of Ink, Iron & Glass and would definitely recommend it as a must-buy for fans of our Queen Cassandra Clare, and of course any fantasy lovers who wish they could write a fictional world into existence. (WHO WOULDN'T WANT DREAMY BOOK CRUSHES TO BECOME REAL PEOPLE??)That is my honest opinion, so I'm signing out.-SilverWolfReads, howling her opinions online xx
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  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    Ooo pretty cover! I like it =D---Again, how in the world does this book already have a negative review? It is not even close to being out! So misleading...
  • TJ Burns
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Yes! This is my kind of book! Intelligent, clever, creative, and action-packed story line; intriguing and diverse characters, who experience personal growth; interesting, clever, and at times witty dialogue; surprises and unexpected twists - everything I look for in a YA fantasy!I received a copy of this book from Macmillan Children's Publishing Group via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    One of my least favorite things in the world is when I read a book that I self-hyped so much in my mind and then the actual product monumentally disappoints. And Ink, Iron, and Glass is the PERFECT example, so I guess it's good for something after all :')What makes it worse is that this book has the kind of concept that could work on pretty much any medium. A steampunk novel where the main character is a character in a world that became sentient?? And she creates worlds but then her world gets d One of my least favorite things in the world is when I read a book that I self-hyped so much in my mind and then the actual product monumentally disappoints. And Ink, Iron, and Glass is the PERFECT example, so I guess it's good for something after all :')What makes it worse is that this book has the kind of concept that could work on pretty much any medium. A steampunk novel where the main character is a character in a world that became sentient?? And she creates worlds but then her world gets destroyed and she’s stuck in 19th Century Europe and has to try and find her way back?? I would read this book, go see this movie, binge-watch this TV show, and play this video game Every. Single. Time. But, alas. This book is just. Bad. First off, these Victorian Europe characters were born sounding like they were born in the 90s. The 1990s. Honestly, I probably wouldn’t have noticed if they hadn’t switched from sounding modern to sounding like actual legitimate characters from a historical fiction novel back to modern so many times. It was sooo choppily written and extremely jarring and I feel like my mind and my ears have to sleep for a thousand years to get the sound of this dialogue out of my brain. Also this book has highkey one of the most annoying cases of instalove I have ever read in a novel and ohhh my goshhh I want to die just thinking about it. I’m talking full on ”The boy looked up, and for a second their gazes locked,” and I mean honestly I’m just so sick of this crap loll. ”He gave her an annoyed look, which did nothing to lessen the perfect angle of his features.” I can’t wait for deathThis book also did a whole lot of telling and not showing. It made the exposition almost as choppy as the dialogue. Okay – and here’s the thing. I feel weird and reluctant calling out a steampunk/alt-history novel for historical inaccuracies, but listen. Usually in steampunk, the technology that is incorporated is some new invention, or it’s modern-day technologies with some sort of anachronistic twist, but this book just took random, plain ol’ modern day inventions without any twist and shoves them into the story (e.g. radial saws and flamethrowers). And sure, there’s some pretty basic and two-dimensional robots and a sentient household, but instead of invoking the wonder and fangirling that steampunk novels usually do in me, I was just bored. The world-building and technological aspects are just weak. Another thing about the historical inaccuracies – a lot of this book (or, at least, a lot of the part that I read), takes place in Sardinia, and there is absolutely no mention of Sardo, the Sardinian Language. Though many citizens spoke Italian at the time, Sardo was still a main language and the idea that there is absolutely no mention of it when de Vries and Elsa arrive in Sardinia and Elsa is learning Italian seems less like a minor alternate-history decision and more like weak writing. Literally all you have to do is google “what language do they speak in Sardinia.” It’s not that hard to avoid linguistic errors like this.Also, and by no means is this a Frozen knockoff, but I Legitimately Cannot Physically Read the name Elsa without thinking of Idina Menzel hiding out in an ice castle.Plus, and this definitely isn’t a Rick Riordan knockoff, but when I hear of a character named Leo who has curly hair and is a mechanic I am incapable of picturing anyone else besides Leo Valdez. The Leo in this book is Leo Valdez now.So, bottom line is I would probably skip this one unless you are REALLY into steampunk and will read even the super crappy ones. This was not a good novel and it did not fill my fantasy craving. I’m disappointed. Pre-Review: idk if it's just because I'm tired but this book is kind of pissing me off and it's past midnight and I have finals to study for and I just don't have the energy so./ this may be back on my currently reading shelf tomorrow morning who knows?? I certainly don't
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  • Camile Souza
    January 1, 1970
    ohhh I like this cover, I want it.Yep, that's how I roll. *sees aesthetically pleasing cover, wants book*feel free to judge ;)
  • Elsa ➰
    January 1, 1970
    gUYS. OMG. FINALLY. MY NAME IS ELSA. THE MC’S NAME IS ELSA. Okay, uhhhhh I’d never seen a character whose name was Elsa in a book, it’s going to be weird reading about a girl whose name is the same as mine.IM ALREADY EXCITED. PLUS, THE STORY LOOKS AWESOME!!!
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  • Deborah Schaumberg
    January 1, 1970
    I just had a chance to read an ARC of this book. It is completely unique! I loved the steampunky elements and the world-building is amazing. The characters are well-developed and the ending is a total surprise! You will not be disappointed!
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