R.I.P. Eliza Hart
When Eliza Hart, the most popular girl at Ventana Ranch boarding school, is found dead on the cliffs outside her dormitory, Ellie Sokoloff is determined to figure out what happened to her. After all, Eliza was Ellie’s childhood best friend. Never mind that ever since Ellie arrived at school Eliza has spread terrible rumors about her, calling her a liar and a stalker, when all Ellie wanted to do was rekindle their old friendship. Or that Ellie’s claustrophobia limits where she can go and what she can do. Or that Ellie’s suitemate, Sam, is the only one who will help her . . . because to everyone else, Ellie looks like the top suspect. Can Ellie clear her name and solve the mystery behind Eliza’s death? Her hunt for the truth will uncover secrets she never imagined, sending her deep into her own memories of her childhood with Eliza Hart. New York Times bestselling author Alyssa Sheinmel delivers a gripping mystery and a sensitive and moving examination of the secrets that can hold us back—and even destroy us.

R.I.P. Eliza Hart Details

TitleR.I.P. Eliza Hart
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 28th, 2017
PublisherScholastic Press
ISBN-139781338087628
Rating
GenreMystery, Young Adult, Contemporary, Mental Health, Mental Illness

R.I.P. Eliza Hart Review

  • Mike Stack
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything I expected and more. I expected a good mystery story. I got that, and an amazing book that deals with mental health. I picked this up at bookcon when they were handing them out, so thank you to the publisher for handing these out for review. This book is about a girl with mental issues she conceals, which isn't helped by the fact that she has many social issues too. Then there is Eliza Hart, the girl who hides everything, makes Ellie feel like crap throughout high school This book was everything I expected and more. I expected a good mystery story. I got that, and an amazing book that deals with mental health. I picked this up at bookcon when they were handing them out, so thank you to the publisher for handing these out for review. This book is about a girl with mental issues she conceals, which isn't helped by the fact that she has many social issues too. Then there is Eliza Hart, the girl who hides everything, makes Ellie feel like crap throughout high school, and is very emotionally unstable, for reasons revealed bit by bit throughout the book, constantly leaving you awestruck.This book dives into family backgrounds and how mental diseases can be hereditary, which many people do not realize. One major thing I think needs to be taken away from this book is to never be afraid to get help. The author is very respectful to people with mental illness in this book, and handles suicide much better than some other young adult books about suicide. The author mentions the suicide hotline at the end of the book.The characters themselves are very complex, all mental illnesses aside. The supporting cast of characters add to the story greatly, and make this book even more captivating. The author definitely knows how to write amazingly interesting characters, (and their relationships) which is proven by Ellie and Eliza. I highly suggest this book if you like stories that have very well developed characters you start to relate to. The writing is also just simply amazing. The author entices you with amazing story lines and exciting "twists" that make you want more. Twist might not be the right word for it. Sheinmel creates a complex story that, when something is revealed about the past (or present) it leaves you breathless. Can we also just mention how beautiful the cover is? It is so simple yet so deep, and the image reflects the story so well.This book is an emotional ride and I will be glad to buy the finished version of on its release in November. Highly emotional, R.I.P. Eliza Hart is a must-read in my opinion.Edit: Owning the hardcover makes me so happy!
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  • glimpses_of_me
    January 1, 1970
    This is no shadow of doubt my favorite contemporary read for 2017 this far! For the book blurb click Here (GoodReads)I am so in awe that it is almost hard to write the review. I feel like I won't give it justice.R.I.P Eliza Hart is about (mainly) two girls with mental issues. Ellie, who suffers from claustrophobia due to a traumatic experience we don't figure out till the end of the book. And Eliza, who was emotionally unstable for reasons revealed slowly throughout the book. It impressed me how This is no shadow of doubt my favorite contemporary read for 2017 this far! For the book blurb click Here (GoodReads)I am so in awe that it is almost hard to write the review. I feel like I won't give it justice.R.I.P Eliza Hart is about (mainly) two girls with mental issues. Ellie, who suffers from claustrophobia due to a traumatic experience we don't figure out till the end of the book. And Eliza, who was emotionally unstable for reasons revealed slowly throughout the book. It impressed me how much background story is given to both main characters in just a few hundred pages. I felt Ellie's pain thorough the pages and I was always curious to know what would happen next. She was a wonderful and easy character to relate to. As was Sam, her roommate, friend, and eventually love interest. The romance story happening on the side between those two is adorable. I was gushing and blushing while reading their interactions. Utterly cute! Eliza was just as well written. Her character is a little darker. A little more disturbed. A little harder to understand. But as we find out more about her and about her family we began to understand it all better. We began to understand her better...I found Alyssa Sheinmel's description of both girls issues profoundly touching and respectful. There aren't many young adult authors out there that can write on such subjects in a realistic and yet light hearted way, she does that perfectly. I also loved that she dives into Eliza's family's background in order to explain Eliza's issues. I don't think many people realize that certain mental problems are/can be hereditary.It is my belief that the main message in the book was to never be afraid or ashamed to ask for help. And that was done beautifully!Everyone that has suffered from depression has difficulties talking about it. Both because it is not an easy subject and because of the bad rep it receives. So to have this done so well was fantastic! I will be recommending this to everyone I know who enjoys contemporaries and/or realisticsbooks! Go Read! For more reviews from me visit glimpsesofmybooks.blogspot.com
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  • jv poore
    January 1, 1970
    The appeal of the convenient, all-access “…narrow streets on the narrow island of Manhattan” is almost irrelevant for someone uncomfortable (at best) in enclosed spaces. Hopeful that her home state would help her open doors that claustrophobia kept firmly closed, Ellie accepts a scholarship to attend a tiny boarding school buffered by redwoods, opening wide above the Pacific Ocean. Alone, Ellie explores the other dorms. A parental accompaniment would have been cool, but her issues have taken up The appeal of the convenient, all-access “…narrow streets on the narrow island of Manhattan” is almost irrelevant for someone uncomfortable (at best) in enclosed spaces. Hopeful that her home state would help her open doors that claustrophobia kept firmly closed, Ellie accepts a scholarship to attend a tiny boarding school buffered by redwoods, opening wide above the Pacific Ocean. Alone, Ellie explores the other dorms. A parental accompaniment would have been cool, but her issues have taken up too much of their time anyway. She will make friends here, none of these students know of her problems. Actually, she even sees a name she knows and suddenly, Ellie has something to look forward to: reconnecting with Eliza Hart. Awkwardness should be the worse-case-scenario. Eliza may not have fond memories of her former childhood friend, she may not even remember Ellie at all. Appearing angry and almost personally offended that Ellie dare approach her, Eliza obviously loathes Ellie. In fact, she’s already told everyone on campus that Ellie is a vicious, pathological liar and students should simply steer clear. Stunned, shattered, struggling with her sanity, Ellie has to know why. Even as Eliza’s body is recovered from the cliffside and speculations swirl around campus, Ellie cannot stop searching for answers. As she uncovers Eliza’s best kept secret, Ellie’s own repression is revealed, changing her perspective on absolutely everything. R.I.P. Eliza Hart is an outstanding YA novel because, as narrators of their own stories, Eliza and Ellie explain actualities of mental illness in a way that everyone can understand and empathize with. Misconceptions, such as medicine plus therapy equal a cure, are corrected…without sounding like a somber after-school-special. And the awesome element of something decidedly different, redwood burl poachers.This review was written for Buried Under Books by jv poore.
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  • Sam Kozbial
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't what I was expecting, but I think it was even better than what I thought I was in store for. This book was a sort of mystery, I guess, but mostly it was an honest look at mental health issues. It was forthright and showed its affects from multiple sides, which I thought was well done. Full review to follow. *I would like to thank the publisher for the advanced copy of this book. BLOG | INSTAGRAM | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    This will be a short review, because I don’t want to give anything away, and this is a slowly-unfolding mystery that is best experienced through reading it. I don’t want to spoil anything! So… I requested to join this blog tour because (1) I’d read Second Star by Alyssa a few years ago and really enjoyed it, and (2) I love mysteries and boarding school stories, and since this one had both I figured I couldn’t go wrong. I hadn’t expected the book to be so heavily focused on mental health issues, This will be a short review, because I don’t want to give anything away, and this is a slowly-unfolding mystery that is best experienced through reading it. I don’t want to spoil anything! So… I requested to join this blog tour because (1) I’d read Second Star by Alyssa a few years ago and really enjoyed it, and (2) I love mysteries and boarding school stories, and since this one had both I figured I couldn’t go wrong. I hadn’t expected the book to be so heavily focused on mental health issues, but I’m so glad I was able to have this reading experience. Although I say it is “heavily focused” on mental illness, I don’t mean to imply that it’s a heavy or super sad book, because amazingly enough it’s not. It’s a very well done portrait of mental illness in several forms, while also giving us a mystery you’re eager to see solved, a struggling-at-boarding-school experience, and even budding romance!For several reasons, I really connected with the characters in this book, both Ellie and Eliza. I am claustrophobic myself, though I’ve never had such a severe form as Ellie does. I have, however, had a few panic attacks in small spaces, especially times when I’ve had to have MRIs (ugh I hate those). So I understood what Ellie was going through, even though my issue is not as severe as hers. I have also had experience with someone very similar to Eliza’s father (my brother-in-law), and I can say without a doubt that Alyssa’s portrayal of him and the effect on those around him was spot on. I was writing in the margins of my ARC very early on when he was on the page as to what I thought the issue was, and I turned out to be right. I know that’s very vague, but I really don’t want to give anything away.Overall, I just want to get across that Alyssa’s portrayal of people struggling with, surviving with, and living fully with mental health issues is carefully drawn, sympathetic, and never maudlin. I’d recommend reading the author’s note at the end, in which Alyssa explains her thinking behind the book and some of the work she did to ensure accurate portrayals of various mental health issues. She also does a wonderful job showing how mental illness affects not only the person afflicted but also those around them, be they family or friends, co-workers or classmates. I highly recommend reading this book, even if you’re not one who normally enjoys “issue books.” It’s really not maudlin or overly heavy, nor is it preachy when dealing with a tough subject. The balancing act Alyssa strikes in this book with Eliza’s story is darn near perfect; I truly don’t think I’ve seen such a straightforward, unflinching, and sympathetic look at this issue in any book I’ve read before.Again, I know this is rather vague, but I don’t want to give anything away and ruin the reading experience. I would just encourage you to check it out for yourself. It’s a relatively short, easy read, and I think you’ll find yourself quickly turning the pages just as I did. If you read R.I.P. Eliza Hart, I’d love to know what you think of it!Rating: 4 stars!Thank you to Scholastic Press for the ARC copy of this book for purposes of review. This is my honest and voluntary rating and review. Thanks also to Rockstar Book Tours for including me on the blog tour!
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  • Sabrina Fox
    January 1, 1970
    I am so glad I read this book. It's set in a boarding school, which is always a setting that intrigues me since I went to public school all my life. I'll be the first to admit the two girls, Ellie and Eliza confused me at first because their names were so similar, but after I figured out what was going on the reading was smooth sailing from there.I had quite a bit in common with Ellie, I believe. Which immediately made me like her. She's claustrophobic, as am I. I'm not as bad as her, but I'm sk I am so glad I read this book. It's set in a boarding school, which is always a setting that intrigues me since I went to public school all my life. I'll be the first to admit the two girls, Ellie and Eliza confused me at first because their names were so similar, but after I figured out what was going on the reading was smooth sailing from there.I had quite a bit in common with Ellie, I believe. Which immediately made me like her. She's claustrophobic, as am I. I'm not as bad as her, but I'm skittish about getting into an elevator, or being hugged too hard, and enclosed water slides make me panic to no end. Connecting with a book character through such a unique thing is wonderful, because I can understand exactly where she's coming from and just how tiresome it can be to be worried about whether you'll be put in a situation that triggers you.R.I.P. Eliza Hart follows the story of two young girls named Ellie and Eliza. Eliza seems at first to be Ella's bully, but further on in the story your opinion will drastically change after the story begins to unfold.I believe this to have one-upped 13 Reasons Why in every way imaginable. I've never seen a write be so spot on with mental health issues than Sheinmel has been. She approached it in a way that has class, and still leaves her characters with dignity and tact, all the while showing how mental illness not only affects the one who has it, but permeates the lives of others bearing witness the slow decline of their loved ones. One thing that stood out to me, was that Sheinmel included the suicide hotline number at the end of the book. I strongly recommend this book to every YA and up out there, in place of 13 Reasons Why.Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions herein are of my own and are not swayed by any outside factors.
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  • Kira
    January 1, 1970
    GoodReads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.This book I think did a really good job with a very difficult subject matter. Eliza Hart was Ellie's best friend in first grade before she moved to New York. Ellie has never really gotten over the loss of her friend, especially since she is unable to make new friends since she is labeled class freak due to her claustrophobia that started after she left California. Ellie gets the chance to move back to California on scholarship and hopes that be GoodReads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.This book I think did a really good job with a very difficult subject matter. Eliza Hart was Ellie's best friend in first grade before she moved to New York. Ellie has never really gotten over the loss of her friend, especially since she is unable to make new friends since she is labeled class freak due to her claustrophobia that started after she left California. Ellie gets the chance to move back to California on scholarship and hopes that being back will help her overcome her disability. A fresh start. Eliza though has made sure that wont happen though. Even after Eliza is found dead, the small elite school hates Ellie and blames her for the death of the most beloved and popular student. Only Ellie's roommate seems to be on her side. This book dives deep into mental disorders. There are triggers for depression, suicide and bullying. It was written so a younger audience could enjoy it with out sacrificing the depth of the message. I think how depression was conveyed was very well done. It send a powerful message about peoples hidden journeys and how we don't always understand how people cope around us. There were some things that were overdone that I didn't understand in the story, like the extent of the claustrophobia that Ellie experiences. I get that is what drives her to move back to California and really keeps the plot moving in the right direction but it wasn't something I could fully understand.
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  • Kayla (booksandbloomies)
    January 1, 1970
    When Eliza Hart, the most popular girl at Ventana Ranch boarding school, is found dead on the cliffs outside her dormitory, Ellie Sokoloff is determined to figure out what happened to her. After all, Eliza was Ellie’s childhood best friend.Never mind that ever since Ellie arrived at school Eliza has spread terrible rumors about her, calling her a liar and a stalker, when all Ellie wanted to do was rekindle their old friendship. Or that Ellie’s claustrophobia limits where she can go and what she When Eliza Hart, the most popular girl at Ventana Ranch boarding school, is found dead on the cliffs outside her dormitory, Ellie Sokoloff is determined to figure out what happened to her. After all, Eliza was Ellie’s childhood best friend.Never mind that ever since Ellie arrived at school Eliza has spread terrible rumors about her, calling her a liar and a stalker, when all Ellie wanted to do was rekindle their old friendship. Or that Ellie’s claustrophobia limits where she can go and what she can do. Or that Ellie’s suitemate, Sam, is the only one who will help her . . . because to everyone else, Ellie looks like the top suspect.Can Ellie clear her name and solve the mystery behind Eliza’s death? Her hunt for the truth will uncover secrets she never imagined, sending her deep into her own memories of her childhood with Eliza Hart.New York Times bestselling author Alyssa Sheinmel delivers a gripping mystery and a sensitive and moving examination of the secrets that can hold us back—and even destroy us.TRIGGER WARNING: This book and review does mention suicide. Before I dive into the review, I want to thank Alyssa Sheinmel for sending me a copy of this book to review! This is the first time an author has contacted me for a review and I am so happy I can do this for her!This is not a book I would have picked up on my own. I don't usually read thrillers or books that touch upon suicide. I dont like thrillers usually because I get scared easily and when I was eighteen my brothers best friend took his own life. But when I was contacted by the author and I read what the book was about, I decided I was going to give it a chance. And I am really happy I did. Ellie has spent her high school career being bullied by a girl who was once her best friend. She has spent four years trying to combat her own metal illness while trying to convince herself that she's not crazy and that she doesn't need other friends. Eliza's death really shakes Ellie up and causes her to discover parts of herself she didnt even know existed.The story is written with different POV's, switching between Ellie's as she's telling over what happened between the time Eliza dies and until a few days after and Eliza as she's narrating her death and what went through her mind during the whole time.The cover is perfect for this story in many different ways. It relates alot to both Eliza and Ellie. I like how simple it while being able to convey alot of meaning. I will say that this book was hard to read at points, it made me cry and it made me think differently. I think the characters are well developed and play well off of each other. There are alot of topics touched up: claustrophobia, depression, racism, bullying and many other topics. I think this is a very important read. It doesn't romanticize any of the above topics and is a relatable story.  Again, thank you so much Ms. Sheinmel for sending me an ARC of this book! I really appreciate it. 
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    If you loved FACELESS, you'll love Alyssa's latest!
  • Sandie, Teen Lit Rocks
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this so much more than I thought I would. Fascinating exploration of mental illness: anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsion, etc. Two young women with nearly identical names were once best friends before one of them moved away. Upon becoming reacquainted, it's clear one has become a "mean girl," and the other an easy target. The mean girl is found dead on a boarding school campus, and authorities can't figure out whether it was suicide, an accident, or foul play. Dual POV between dead Enjoyed this so much more than I thought I would. Fascinating exploration of mental illness: anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsion, etc. Two young women with nearly identical names were once best friends before one of them moved away. Upon becoming reacquainted, it's clear one has become a "mean girl," and the other an easy target. The mean girl is found dead on a boarding school campus, and authorities can't figure out whether it was suicide, an accident, or foul play. Dual POV between dead Eliza and barely living Ellie is incredibly well done, and Ellie is such an empathetic character. The subtle romance in it (view spoiler)[(between claustrophobic Ellie and her biracial suite-mate) is compelling too! (hide spoiler)]
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  • Forever Young Adult
    January 1, 1970
    Graded By: RosemaryCover Story: All Wet BFF Charm: MehSwoonworthy Scale: 4Talky Talk: She Said, She Said…From the GraveBonus Factor: Big SurFactor: Battling Mental IllnessRelationship Status: Friends From My Old SchoolRead the full book report here.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so good. Could relate with the main character since she stuffing alone with mental health. It may be hard for people to understand what’s going on inside someone head. You got to be supportive and understanding and not judge the person who dealing with there own issues. Never be afraid to ask for help when you think you need. In honor of the book coming out soon doing an giveaway on my blog, https://abellafairytale.wordpress.com...
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  • Clary
    January 1, 1970
    Very good read about mental illness and how complex this disease is. The story is based on the perspective of two characters who struggle with mental illness. It even discusses how it affects their families.
  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that it feels difficult to review fairly. It had its good points but there is nothing terribly fascinating about it. While you are reading, you keep waiting for a twist: something to make it worth all the talk of trees and claustrophobia. Basically, two girls who were best friends until 2nd grade when one of them moved away meet again at a boarding school in California. Our narrator wants to reconnect with her friend immediately, only to be completely rebuffed and then This is one of those books that it feels difficult to review fairly. It had its good points but there is nothing terribly fascinating about it. While you are reading, you keep waiting for a twist: something to make it worth all the talk of trees and claustrophobia. Basically, two girls who were best friends until 2nd grade when one of them moved away meet again at a boarding school in California. Our narrator wants to reconnect with her friend immediately, only to be completely rebuffed and then humiliated by her obviously troubled former friend. The story opens with the discovery that Eliza, the girl our narrator is obsessed with (she tries to convince you over and over that she isn't obsessed but come on. I can barely remember the names of most kids I went to Kindergarten with, let alone having this painful need to reconnect with any of them) has died, somehow tumbling off a cliff that the dorms overlook (poor planning on the part of those pesky architects). Immediately, Eliza's friends are convinced that Ellie, our narrator has killed her simply because Eliza told these friends that Ellie was stalking her. So, on the journey of self-discovery (aka who killed Eliza and why does Ellie care so damn much), Ellie begins to remember the flaws in their friendship (because that's what you remember when you think back on your friends from ages 5-7?) and starts recovering lost memories from that time period that still affect her at 16. You figure our pretty early on what really happened to Eliza but the book tries (poorly) to throw you off course with mentions of sweaty palms and pained facial expressions. I don't know... I finished it, which means it had something about it that held my interest, but this was not a book in the bullying subgenre that really stands out to me. I didn't feel emotionally connected with any of the characters and really didn't feel terribly sympathetic. It's not so much a mystery (because little is actually 'solved'), not a thriller (because nothing really happens). In the end, it is an examination of mental illness and how well some suffering hide their pain. For kids who are suffering but don't want to talk about it, it might not be a bad read for them.
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  • Amber James
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. There are definitely trigger warnings for suicide, depression, etc so be cautious as you go into this book. Fast paced, interesting and moving contemporary. I was beyond lucky to have received an ARC from the lovely author. This book comes out at the end of November, make sure to pick it up if the synopsis intrigues you like it did me!
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  • Rosa Elena Burgos
    January 1, 1970
    A story that touches on the topics of depression, suicide, anxiety, and claustrophobia. There is no real mystery on what happened to Eliza. It's not the WHO that matters in this novel, but the WHY.
  • Cate
    January 1, 1970
    I got the ARC copy of this novel.
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