Limetown
From the creators of the #1 podcast Limetown, an explosive prequel about a teenager who learns of a mysterious research facility where over three hundred people have disappeared—including her uncle—with clues that become the key to discovering the secrets of this strange town.On a seemingly ordinary day, seventeen-year-old Lia Haddock hears news that will change her life forever: three hundred men, women, and children living at a research facility in Limetown, Tennessee, have disappeared without a trace. Among the missing is Emile Haddock, Lia’s uncle. What happened to the people of Limetown? It’s all anyone can talk about. Except Lia’s parents, who refuse to discuss what might have happened there. They refuse, even, to discuss anything to do with Emile.As a student journalist, Lia begins an investigation that will take her far from her home, discovering clues about Emile’s past that lead to a shocking secret—one with unimaginable implications not only for the people of Limetown, but for Lia and her family. The only problem is…she’s not the only one looking for answers. Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie are first-rate storytellers, in every medium. Critics called their podcast Limetown “creepy and otherworldly” (The New York Times) and “endlessly fun” (Vox), and their novel goes back to where it all began. Working with Cote Smith, a PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize Finalist, they’ve crafted an exhilarating mystery that asks big questions about what we owe to our families and what we owe to ourselves, about loss, discovery, and growth. Threaded throughout is Emile’s story—told in these pages for the first time ever.

Limetown Details

TitleLimetown
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 30th, 2018
PublisherSimon Schuster
Rating
GenreMystery, Science Fiction, Horror, Fiction

Limetown Review

  • Mariah
    January 1, 1970
    APR Investigative Journalist Lia Haddock delves into the mystery of what happened to the entire population of Limetown that disappeared without a clue. Season 1 was sooooo good! I hope there is a second season.
  • Matina
    January 1, 1970
    I am a podcast fan, and a fan of fiction, so it should come as no surprise that the moment I got access to Limetown’s prequel novel also titled Limetown I dug right in. Because it is a novel connected to a podcast I’ve chosen to break this into two parts: a book review, and a review of how they connect.I’m going to warn potential readers and listeners that the book does spoil major portions of the podcast. I've attempted to keep my review as spoiler free (for the book) as possible. The bookLimet I am a podcast fan, and a fan of fiction, so it should come as no surprise that the moment I got access to Limetown’s prequel novel also titled Limetown I dug right in. Because it is a novel connected to a podcast I’ve chosen to break this into two parts: a book review, and a review of how they connect.I’m going to warn potential readers and listeners that the book does spoil major portions of the podcast. I've attempted to keep my review as spoiler free (for the book) as possible. The bookLimetown is broken into two stories that alternate between chapters. Those stories are that of Lia, and her uncle Emile. Lia is a 17-year-old budding journalist who is searching for answers about her family and their possible connection to Limetown. Emile’s story starts 25 years before the panic at Limetown and revolves around his search for his family, and freedom.I found Emile’s story the more interesting of the two, he is different, special, and desperate. These were all factors that drove me to keep turning the pages of his story to see what kind of ending he got, did he find happiness? Did he find love? Did he find a place to belong? How would all that change to drive the next part of the story forward?Lia’s story was less engaging. The writing feels distant and worked so that her story lines up with the events in Emile’s life we gradually learn about. It is very structured to show us the after to Emile’s before. Much of the resolution to her story feels contrived and put together in an unbelievable way.As for the overall story, Limetown has a way of tying its characters together. It is not subtle about letting readers know just how parallel things are, and unfortunately this takes some of the surprise away from later ‘big reveals’. After one I actually put the book down and rolled my eyes. It relies on this again, at the end as the explanation for why many things happen. This makes the ending feel flat and unsatisfactory to a fan of the podcast searching for connecting threads.Limetown suffers from a problem that a lot of prequels deal with: It must tell its own story and feel special but also tie it into later narration. Because of this Emile’s story is very condensed, with huge time jumps and not enough breathing room, (which is surprising when you consider the fact that the book is 304 pages long), and Lia’s feels like filler that gets more and more confusing and coincidental as it goes.I would have liked this book more if it had been two books. Lia’s and Emile’s. If we were given more time to get to know the characters and walk with them as they grew and changed Lia might feel more approachable and Emile’s story could have been further expanded. As it stands it feels like we get highlights from their lives, leaving us little time to process major events or reveals.It doesn’t help that the writing often feels choppy itself. Lia’s chapters tend to have short sentences and odd tense choices. It can be said that this style was chosen specifically to emulate Lia’s distance or Emile’s oddness but it doesn’t hit home. I will add that the reading does get smoother as you progress through the book, but I can’t say if that was my brain accepting the style of writing or an actual improvement.The book and podcast togetherI did a re-listen of the podcast as soon as I finished the book in order to see just how connected the two are and determine how much a fan of the podcast might get out of the book.It was a rollercoaster of emotions as I listened to the podcast again, because this time my brain was trying its very best to connect all the new pieces I had to the old ones. There wasn’t a lot to put together with Emile, but his portion of the novel did actually make my listening experience better. I felt like I knew a lot of the characters better and knew his motivations deeper.Lia is where the trouble seems to be. For the sake of not spoiling anything I’m not going to name certain events in the book, but Lia knows much more than she lets on in the podcast. In the book she meets people who show up in it and she does things that I think should have at least been mentioned in the podcast. Her introductory episode could have easily been structured to have her mention these things, but it does not.This leads me to believe that the prequel was not planned. This book was not a part of the creators’ original story they wanted to tell, but is instead an afterthought or tool used to boost the podcast. Which isn’t a problem, I love the idea of mixed media storytelling. I think it’s incredible, but I think it needs to be done well. And having a character explicitly go out and look for a person in the book and then never mention that they had been looking for them when they’ve found them in the podcast does not work. I tried to come up with a reason Lia might not have said anything about her book adventure in the podcast, but the only thing I could imagine was her losing her memory of those events and not knowing it happened.The verdictThe book and podcast do not line up. I can hope that season two changes that, but for now anyone listening and reading will find themselves frustrated by the fact that things don’t seem to make sense. Limetown: The Prequel was trying hard to be its own thing, and would have benefited from simply being Emile’s story, no Lia at all. Her story left me confused and going “But didn’t?” the whole time I read, and again as I re-listened.I’m giving this book a 3 out of 5, mostly for Emile’s engaging story and my hope that season 2 will fix some of these issues I’m seeing. The book is actually scheduled to come out after season 2 airs, so I may be missing a lot. My recommendation is listen to the podcast, wait for season two listen to that, and then read the book if you want to know more about Emile’s history.As always I received an advanced copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest opinion which I have stated above.
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  • Anna Denney
    January 1, 1970
    Unrealistic, however I was still compelled to finish it
  • Calista Andrechek
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley, Cote Smith and Simon & Schuster Canada for the free e-book in exchange for an honest review.Seventeen-year old Lia’s life is rocked when she finds out that the entire populations of the small research facility in Limetown have disappeared without a trace. Among the missing is her uncle, Emile Haddock. It’s all everyone can talk about, except Lia’s family, the refuse to discuss anything that has to do with it. With Lia wanting to be a journalist, she delves into her own i Thank you NetGalley, Cote Smith and Simon & Schuster Canada for the free e-book in exchange for an honest review.Seventeen-year old Lia’s life is rocked when she finds out that the entire populations of the small research facility in Limetown have disappeared without a trace. Among the missing is her uncle, Emile Haddock. It’s all everyone can talk about, except Lia’s family, the refuse to discuss anything that has to do with it. With Lia wanting to be a journalist, she delves into her own investigation and discovers clues about Emile’s past that lead to a secret that you never imagined.I wasn’t sure what exactly to think as I have never heard the podcast, but the premise sounded interesting enough for me to want to give it a try. I found it interesting that the book was split up into chapters from Lia’s perspective now and Emile’s perspective from what was happening before Limetown. I was a bit surprised to find out that the book has “special” people in it that others want to study to find a way to open up the brains of the rest of us. I found Emile’s story line much more interesting to me because I liked seeing what was going on back then before Limetown started and the craziness he had to endure. Lia’s story is also interesting, but I found it more choppy and I didn’t enjoy the character very much overall. I found most of the timeline in the past a little far fetched for me, but it was still interesting and made me wonder what was going to happen in Lia’s timeline. This book to me was a bit of science fiction almost, but in a thriller way. I found that I had to continue to read on because it was getting intense and I needed to know what was going on and it was so cryptic that I didn’t even have a good guess about what was going to happen. I usually don’t like books that end with a cliffhanger, but it works for this book because now I just want to go and listen to the podcast and see what happens next. Pick it up November 13th!
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  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adore the Limetown podcast. In fact, after reading this, I'm going to give it a second listen, something I never do with podcasts. I jumped at the chance to read this prequel novel, told in alternating POVs of Lia and her uncle, Emile. I was enthralled with the plot and how it all set up the podcast so beautifully without really giving anything away. Some of the major reveals were actually helpful in connecting dots in the audio narrative. I think everyone would love this podcast, e I absolutely adore the Limetown podcast. In fact, after reading this, I'm going to give it a second listen, something I never do with podcasts. I jumped at the chance to read this prequel novel, told in alternating POVs of Lia and her uncle, Emile. I was enthralled with the plot and how it all set up the podcast so beautifully without really giving anything away. Some of the major reveals were actually helpful in connecting dots in the audio narrative. I think everyone would love this podcast, even people who don't traditionally like the medium. It is absolutely engrossing and leaves you itching for the next season. I did take one star off, however, because I truly liked the audio format much better. The podcast is like a puzzle you slowly piece together, whereas a novel just tells you the plot. I much prefer the puzzle. I wish some parts of the novel had been left to the imagination like in the podcast.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Limetown Tennessee has been put on the map when 300 people residing at the research facility vanished.Among them Lia Haddock's uncle Emile Haddock.Where have they gone? What is Limetown hiding?Lia leads the investigations into the mystery but she's not alone in her efforts as Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie have a story to tell.What's owed to family may find it's way to the forefront here.The story alternates between Lia and Emile with plenty of perspectives and finger pointing.The group was treated Limetown Tennessee has been put on the map when 300 people residing at the research facility vanished.Among them Lia Haddock's uncle Emile Haddock.Where have they gone? What is Limetown hiding?Lia leads the investigations into the mystery but she's not alone in her efforts as Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie have a story to tell.What's owed to family may find it's way to the forefront here.The story alternates between Lia and Emile with plenty of perspectives and finger pointing.The group was treated as experimental mice with dreams capturing the thoughts of many.Cote Smith has a great read that will linger on long after it's finished.Thank you to Cote, the publisher, NetGalley, and Aldiko for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    Oh.My.Goodness.This is incredible!!!
  • Kimberley
    January 1, 1970
    WOW! Talk about a wild ride. Limetown is the book prequel to a podcast that I’d never heard of. It is a head scratching, mind bending, amazing trip through the lives of Lia and Emile. Lia is Emile’s niece. Of course that’s probably the easiest thing I can explain about this book. You’ll have to read the book to get the rest.We start with Lia, in high school, writing for the school paper. We start with Emile, in high school, considered a weirdo and a loner. His only friend is his brother Jacob. J WOW! Talk about a wild ride. Limetown is the book prequel to a podcast that I’d never heard of. It is a head scratching, mind bending, amazing trip through the lives of Lia and Emile. Lia is Emile’s niece. Of course that’s probably the easiest thing I can explain about this book. You’ll have to read the book to get the rest.We start with Lia, in high school, writing for the school paper. We start with Emile, in high school, considered a weirdo and a loner. His only friend is his brother Jacob. Jacob and his wife Alison are Lia’s parents. There is your family tree. Along the way through Emile’s years, we meet lots of other shady and incredible characters. Emile is special. Special in a way that scares people. Special in a way that some people want to study and learn from. Special in that no one Emile’s age ever understands him.Jacob is your average teenager. Outstanding athlete, good student, caring big brother. Jacob & Emile live with their mom in Lawrence, Kansas. At least for a while they live with their mom. Eventually that relationship is broken and the boys run off to live with their aunt and uncle. Lia isn’t outstanding or special in any particular way. She does have a keen mind for investigation, however, and when she comes across her uncle’s belongings in the attic, it sends her on a mysterious tour of figuring out where he is or what happened to him. She finds out things along the way that both frighten and excite her. It’s Lia’s discoveries that cause this story to twist in ways you can’t imagine.I won’t give away much else, other than Limetown is a town that has vanished. Not the town itself, but it’s people and inhabitants. One day they are there, the next gone. Where they’ve gone is anyone’s guess. That’s one other little mystery to be uncovered.As I said, I’d never heard of the podcast, but you can bet I’m going to start listening now, just so I can uncover more secrets and surprises. Read this book. It’s fabulously written and the storytelling is simply unreal. Worth every minute.
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  • Paul Pessolano
    January 1, 1970
    “Limetown”created by Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie with Cote Smith, published by Simon and Schuster.Category - Mystery/Thriller Publication Date – November 13, 2018.I honestly don’t know what category this actually fits into, it could be considered horror or even supernatural. This is listed as, “The Prequel to the #1 Podcast”, which means absolutely nothing to me. I can only tell you that this book kept pulling me in and before I knew it, it ended.Lia Haddock’s life gets completely changed when s “Limetown”created by Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie with Cote Smith, published by Simon and Schuster.Category - Mystery/Thriller Publication Date – November 13, 2018.I honestly don’t know what category this actually fits into, it could be considered horror or even supernatural. This is listed as, “The Prequel to the #1 Podcast”, which means absolutely nothing to me. I can only tell you that this book kept pulling me in and before I knew it, it ended.Lia Haddock’s life gets completely changed when she hears about the town of Limetown. Limetown is a city, supposedly in Tennessee, where 300 people have disappeared without a trace. Lia’s uncle, Emile, seems to be at the center of this research facility.Lia’s mother has spent a lifetime trying to find out what happened to Emile, almost to the point of losing her marriage and family. Lia takes up the challenge or the hunt, and is sent to Australia on a student exchange program. It is here that she comes across another abandoned research facility that may have something to do with Limetown.She comes back to the United States and continues her search and finds more problems than answers, in fact, she discovers that she is not the only one looking for what happened to the people of Limetown.A totally engrossing book that is both scary and imaginary. It may not keep you up at night but will certainly give you plenty to think about.
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  • Deedi (DeediReads) Brown
    January 1, 1970
    All my reviews can be seen at https://deedireads.com/.Thank you to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and the authors for allowing me to read a copy of this book pre-publication.This book was a really fun read, especially for October. It's the perfect thriller mystery for a cozy night curled up on your couch with a nice drink.I first listened to season one of Limetown, a fiction podcast told in an investigative journalism format. It features reporter Lia Haddock as she attempts to figure out how o All my reviews can be seen at https://deedireads.com/.Thank you to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and the authors for allowing me to read a copy of this book pre-publication.
This book was a really fun read, especially for October. It's the perfect thriller mystery for a cozy night curled up on your couch with a nice drink.
I first listened to season one of Limetown, a fiction podcast told in an investigative journalism format. It features reporter Lia Haddock as she attempts to figure out how over 300 people living in Limetown disappeared into thin air — not a hair or fingerprint left over to prove they'd ever been there at all. Her uncle, Emile Haddock, was among them. It was very, very well done, and I highly recommend listening. It was creepy (but not in a horror way, which isn't my style) and exciting and leaves you wanting more immediately. It'll only take you three-ish hours, and season two will be out on Halloween.
The book (out November 13) is a prequel to the podcast and follows Lia as she first hears about Limetown, graduates high school, begins her interest in journalism, and starts to search for answers. The prequel unveils so many more connections and mysteries than I ever would have imagined. It also ended on a cliffhanger, which was very unexpected, because season one of the podcast offers no answers about how the prequel ended. I can't wait to listen to season two and hopefully get some answers!

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  • Ley
    January 1, 1970
    When I found out that Limetown was finally coming back after a three year hiatus with a new book, I was pretty excited. I started really getting into podcasts last year, and listened to season one earlier this year.I honestly had to go back and research the story to make sure it was fiction, and that I hadn't missed out on a major news story when I was thirteen. So, needless to say, Limetown had become important to me.I was pretty pumped to finally learn more about Emile, Lia's mysterious uncle When I found out that Limetown was finally coming back after a three year hiatus with a new book, I was pretty excited. I started really getting into podcasts last year, and listened to season one earlier this year.I honestly had to go back and research the story to make sure it was fiction, and that I hadn't missed out on a major news story when I was thirteen. So, needless to say, Limetown had become important to me.I was pretty pumped to finally learn more about Emile, Lia's mysterious uncle with psychic abilities (that's not really a spoiler, even if you haven't listened to the podcast). And honestly, his parts are the only reason I kept reading.There are a lot of issues with this book. Namely, there's a lot going on that doesn't match up with Lia's "current" timeline (current meaning the first season of the podcast). Like there are things she definitely does not know when she starts her investigation, but she already knows these things according to the book.Another major issue I have is there is a lot of queerbaiting in the story, for both Emile and Lia. It's perfectly fine for either or both of these characters to be gay or bi or somewhere in between. My issue lies in several scenes where it's very, very clear that Cote Smith was trying to set something up, but pulled back at the last minute.Some chapters dragged on and on, with nothing really happening, while others seemed far too short and left me wanting more of that particular time.With the second season of Limetown premiering today, I'd say if you're truly interested in the story, listen to just the podcast. If you want more about Emile's story, just...check the book out from your local library. I give it 2 out of 5 apples.
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  • Casey
    January 1, 1970
    On an ordinary day, over three hundred people disappear from a research facility and town in Limetown, Tennessee. One of the people who disappeared without a trace was Lia Haddock's uncle Emilie. Lia is captivated by the mystery of the missing people, spending all of her time looking for both answers and Emilie. Her parents refuse to talk about Limetown and Emilie, leading Lia further into her search for answers. 'Limetown' is a prequel to the hit podcast by the same name and builds quite a bit On an ordinary day, over three hundred people disappear from a research facility and town in Limetown, Tennessee. One of the people who disappeared without a trace was Lia Haddock's uncle Emilie. Lia is captivated by the mystery of the missing people, spending all of her time looking for both answers and Emilie. Her parents refuse to talk about Limetown and Emilie, leading Lia further into her search for answers. 'Limetown' is a prequel to the hit podcast by the same name and builds quite a bit of excitement for the new season coming sometime in 2018.Full disclosure: I adore the podcast Limetown. It has great pacing, great narration, and keeps listeners hooked. I thought the prequel to the podcast was a neat addition and it was interesting to read about Emilie's journey and how Lia found out about the events at Limetown. I would highly recommend this novel to anyone who loves the podcast or even someone who is interested in the podcast or the mystery surrounding a research facility, missing people, and a secret that people refuse to talk about. Pick this one up!Thanks to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for letting me read this one early!
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  • Elisa
    January 1, 1970
    This novel is a prequel to a podcast, a very famous podcast which I’d never heard of. In my opinion, the hallmark of a good book series is when any volume can be read as a stand-alone without any obvious gaps or repetitions; establishing the relationships amongst the characters, their history and personality with just a few strokes. This same principle would apply here. Limetown is not repetitive but I’m afraid that I had no idea what was going on. A teenage girl who wants to be a journalist fol This novel is a prequel to a podcast, a very famous podcast which I’d never heard of. In my opinion, the hallmark of a good book series is when any volume can be read as a stand-alone without any obvious gaps or repetitions; establishing the relationships amongst the characters, their history and personality with just a few strokes. This same principle would apply here. Limetown is not repetitive but I’m afraid that I had no idea what was going on. A teenage girl who wants to be a journalist follows the steps of her uncle, who disappeared from a research facility along with 300 other people. After that, maybe it’s me, but the plot was very confusing. Maybe the twists were great but they were lost on me because I’ve never listened to the podcast. In short, maybe fans of the podcast will rave about this novel but, as a regular reader I was lost. I chose to read this book and all opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased. Thank you, NetGalley/ Simon & Schuster!
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  • Tuna
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a satisfying, gorgeous read. I'm a fan of the podcast, and I went into this unsure of how it could top the mysteries established by the disappearance of Limetown. And I'll say upfront that it doesn't have the bombshell mystery of the podcast. But it does have other mysteries that are much more nuanced. We get to know Lia and how she became the dogged reporter at APR, we get to know Emile and how he became The Man They Were All There For, and we get answers about how Limetown even c This was such a satisfying, gorgeous read. I'm a fan of the podcast, and I went into this unsure of how it could top the mysteries established by the disappearance of Limetown. And I'll say upfront that it doesn't have the bombshell mystery of the podcast. But it does have other mysteries that are much more nuanced. We get to know Lia and how she became the dogged reporter at APR, we get to know Emile and how he became The Man They Were All There For, and we get answers about how Limetown even came to be. It's much more about human relationships than the podcast was. I thought there was some beautiful prose. I liked that there were lots of easter eggs hidden throughout the novel for podcast fans. Cote Smith did a lot of cool things with the structure of the book, too. He would set things up so that the reader could connect the dots and figure out the answer to a mystery themselves. It felt really rewarding.
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  • C. Purtill
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know anything about the podcast when I requested this book from Netgalley so I went into it with fresh eyes. It was a bit confusing so perhaps someone familiar with the story might have an easier time with it.Lia was a fascinating character: independent, intelligent, and curious but also a tad bit unlikeable and I appreciate that the author allowed her to be three-dimensional like that.There were a lot of unusual activities, unusual events that had no explanation. I don't require being I didn't know anything about the podcast when I requested this book from Netgalley so I went into it with fresh eyes. It was a bit confusing so perhaps someone familiar with the story might have an easier time with it.Lia was a fascinating character: independent, intelligent, and curious but also a tad bit unlikeable and I appreciate that the author allowed her to be three-dimensional like that.There were a lot of unusual activities, unusual events that had no explanation. I don't require being spoon fed answers but I did feel like I was constantly flipping back to earlier pages to refresh my memory or re-read. But I'm sure that must have been just my fault.Thanks to Netgalley for the book to review.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great pick if you love conspiracy theories, the Bermuda Triangle or are a fan of Stranger Things. Lia is a budding journalist who just wants a straight answer about what happened to the uncle she barely remembers and her parents won't talk about. Why did her uncle Emile and scores of others simply vanish one day from a strange nearby facility? Why won't her parents tell her anything?We alternate between present day and Lia's search for truth and what happened years before when Lia's da This is a great pick if you love conspiracy theories, the Bermuda Triangle or are a fan of Stranger Things. Lia is a budding journalist who just wants a straight answer about what happened to the uncle she barely remembers and her parents won't talk about. Why did her uncle Emile and scores of others simply vanish one day from a strange nearby facility? Why won't her parents tell her anything?We alternate between present day and Lia's search for truth and what happened years before when Lia's dad and his brother were young and Emile's story after. I haven't heard the podcast but the storyline here is promising, the tension ramps up and my curiosity is peaked. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • David V.
    January 1, 1970
    Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 10-11-18. Finished 10-14-18. All the members of a secret community of scientists and subjects disappear and for years the mystery continues. A young reporter begins to investigate; one of the missing is her uncle. I had the same feeling while reading this book as I had while watching the TV series "Lost" several years ago----that the writers were writing one episode (chapter) ahead of their viewers (readers), and that they were purposely stretching Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 10-11-18. Finished 10-14-18. All the members of a secret community of scientists and subjects disappear and for years the mystery continues. A young reporter begins to investigate; one of the missing is her uncle. I had the same feeling while reading this book as I had while watching the TV series "Lost" several years ago----that the writers were writing one episode (chapter) ahead of their viewers (readers), and that they were purposely stretching out the mystery by answering questions from the characters by giving vague, half-answers. I realize that there is a podcast follow-up to this book, and I intend to listen to those episodes. I also realize that there is an upcoming 2nd season of podcasts. I just hope the series comes to a satisfying conclusion---"Lost" did not. At the end of that series, I felt like I'd been "had."
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  • Lovely Loveday
    January 1, 1970
    Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast is a science fiction mystery that is sure to keep you up at night. The perfect scary podcast to listen to during October. I was intrigued after reading the synopsis and wanted to know more about this mystery, How could 300 people go missing and no one knows anything about it? Smith has written a remarkable read that draws you in and keeps you second guessing until the very end. A captivating read that is sure to leave you wanting to know more. Now I plan o Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast is a science fiction mystery that is sure to keep you up at night. The perfect scary podcast to listen to during October. I was intrigued after reading the synopsis and wanted to know more about this mystery, How could 300 people go missing and no one knows anything about it? Smith has written a remarkable read that draws you in and keeps you second guessing until the very end. A captivating read that is sure to leave you wanting to know more. Now I plan on listening to the podcast to find out more about this mysterious disappearance. I highly recommend Limetown to anyone who loves science fiction mystery.
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  • Lovely Loveday
    January 1, 1970
    Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast is a science fiction mystery that is sure to keep you up at night. The perfect scary podcast to listen to during October. I was intrigued after reading the synopsis and wanted to know more about this mystery, How could 300 people go missing and no one knows anything about it?  Smith has written a remarkable read that draws you in and keeps you second guessing until the very end. A captivating read that is sure to leave you wanting to know more. Now I plan Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast is a science fiction mystery that is sure to keep you up at night. The perfect scary podcast to listen to during October. I was intrigued after reading the synopsis and wanted to know more about this mystery, How could 300 people go missing and no one knows anything about it?  Smith has written a remarkable read that draws you in and keeps you second guessing until the very end. A captivating read that is sure to leave you wanting to know more. Now I plan on listening to the podcast to find out more about this mysterious disappearance. I highly recommend Limetown to anyone who loves science fiction mystery.
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  • Trevor
    January 1, 1970
    This was a surprising find that showed up in a list of top scary podcasts to listen to during October. Limetown is not necessarily voice acted at a high level of proficiency, but the story is compelling and the subtle creepy nature of how each chapter ends is worth the time. The nice thing is you will not spend a ton of time listening. The entire season 1 only goes about 5-6 hours in length. I especially enjoyed the format that lends itself to the nature of the story. This is a great Halloween l This was a surprising find that showed up in a list of top scary podcasts to listen to during October. Limetown is not necessarily voice acted at a high level of proficiency, but the story is compelling and the subtle creepy nature of how each chapter ends is worth the time. The nice thing is you will not spend a ton of time listening. The entire season 1 only goes about 5-6 hours in length. I especially enjoyed the format that lends itself to the nature of the story. This is a great Halloween listen if you are into something with a little science fiction tilt.
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  • Dakota Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    The voice acting was, by no means, great. It was okay--passable. Yet, despite this effect, the cliffhangers of each episode left me nervous. I sort of stumbled into this story, just to find myself crawling out of a blackened pit by the end. There is a lot here, but it's a shame there isn't any push towards the second season. Two years of no word gives me no hope, which is the largest tragedy of Limetown indeed.Overall, the story development was intense, and confusing, and cryptic. I wanted to kn The voice acting was, by no means, great. It was okay--passable. Yet, despite this effect, the cliffhangers of each episode left me nervous. I sort of stumbled into this story, just to find myself crawling out of a blackened pit by the end. There is a lot here, but it's a shame there isn't any push towards the second season. Two years of no word gives me no hope, which is the largest tragedy of Limetown indeed.Overall, the story development was intense, and confusing, and cryptic. I wanted to know more. I still do.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    In this prequel to a podcast, seventeen year old Lia, a journalism student, is drawn into the mystery of what happened to Limetown when she learns that her uncle Emile has vanished along with all of the residents of that town. The story tells about her uncle, father and mother's pasts and Lia's investigation into the mystery.
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  • Sarai Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    I've never listened to a pod cast, although, they sound like something I would enjoy. I picked up this book hoping to find a connection and explore a whole new opportunity for me. I have to say that this book started off really slow for me. There was a lot of back story and lead up that by the time the actual good stuff came around I was burnt out. The end of the story was good and kept me involved, but getting there was a chore. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Danielle (Starry-Eyed Librarian)
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free Digital Advance Reader Copy (ARC) of Limetown by Simon & Schuster Publishing through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Full review will be shared closer to publication date!Content Warnings for death, violence, stalking, references to untreated depression, and a violent homophobic incident.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Started off thinking it was pretty cheesy, but finished season 1 since it was short. By the end, I'm interested.
  • Sonya
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the book. I enjoyed learning about how Limetown came to be. I really enjoyed the mystery and writing. Now lets get season 2 of the podcast live!
  • Carol Dass
    January 1, 1970
    I found it rather confusing. I think I never knew where I was in the story. I felt that you had to have listened to the podcast first.
  • Deborah Caldwell
    January 1, 1970
    This is a review of the BOOK not the podcast, as most of these GR reviews seem to be. I’m going to come back to this later to add more once I’ve had time to process a bit more (and maybe listen again to the podcast to see how the prequel backstory changes that listening experience), but my initial thoughts are that the while the writing was often choppy and lacking in technical skill, the story was engrossing and adds as many questions to the Limetown mystery as it answers. The e-galley I read h This is a review of the BOOK not the podcast, as most of these GR reviews seem to be. I’m going to come back to this later to add more once I’ve had time to process a bit more (and maybe listen again to the podcast to see how the prequel backstory changes that listening experience), but my initial thoughts are that the while the writing was often choppy and lacking in technical skill, the story was engrossing and adds as many questions to the Limetown mystery as it answers. The e-galley I read had quite a number of errors; in addition to the usual smattering of punctuation errors, early on there are some strange grammatical choices (why so much resistance to past perfect tense??), paragraph breaks between character dialogues are inconsistent and confusing on several occasions, and one character apparently changed genders some time during the writing as their pronouns kept swapping back and forth. The writing starts off very choppy and staccato, and it was bad enough that I almost stopped reading. I wonder if it was intentionally meant to convey a sort of immaturity in the minds of the POV characters at the start, but if so I do not find it to have been done skillfully. For heavens sake, it’s okay to write longer sentences, and there are other ways to indicate a pause than full stops. The story was enough to keep me going despite these challenges. There are certain elements regarding Lia personally that I wish we’d gotten more of. The ending - bringing us from where Lia’s story ends in the prequel to the start of the podcast - feels unfinished. We don’t learn much about Lia’s personality outside of interviewing in the podcast, and what we learn from the book about younger Lia seems out of character at times. I would have liked to have seen how we get from the Lia in the book to the Lia in the show, but maybe there’s another book planned. Emile was not what I was expecting, and his role in creating Limetown also seemed rushed. I would have liked to have seen that in more detail as well.
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  • Regina
    January 1, 1970
    APR Investigative Journalist Lia Haddock delves into the mystery of what happened to the entire population of Limetown that disappeared without a clue. Season 1 had me enthralled. Looking forward to the next season.
  • Marcella
    January 1, 1970
    This review is for the podcast as I haven’t found the book yet: Spooky!
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