You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone
Eighteen-year-old twins Adina and Tovah have little in common besides their ambitious nature. Viola prodigy Adina yearns to become a soloist—and to convince her music teacher he wants her the way she wants him. Overachiever Tovah awaits her acceptance to Johns Hopkins, the first step on her path toward med school and a career as a surgeon. But one thing could wreck their carefully planned futures: a genetic test for Huntington’s, a rare degenerative disease that slowly steals control of the body and mind. It’s turned their Israeli mother into a near stranger and fractured the sisters’ own bond in ways they’ll never admit. While Tovah finds comfort in their Jewish religion, Adina rebels against its rules.When the results come in, one twin tests negative for Huntington’s. The other tests positive.These opposite outcomes push them farther apart as they wrestle with guilt, betrayal, and the unexpected thrill of first love. How can they repair their relationship, and is it even worth saving?From debut author Rachel Lynn Solomon comes a luminous, heartbreaking tale of life, death, and the fragile bond between sisters.

You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone Details

TitleYou'll Miss Me When I'm Gone
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherSimon Pulse
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult

You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone Review

  • Rachel Solomon
    January 1, 1970
    Update on 11/14/17: Now that advance copies are out in the world, I want to note that this book deals with heavy issues that aren't evident from the description. Adding a TW here for self-harm and suicidal ideation. If you would like specific pages numbers or further information, please let me know, and I'm happy to provide that. You can contact me through my website: http://www.rachelsolomonbooks.com/con.... Update: YOU'LL MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE will officially be out in the world on January 2, Update on 11/14/17: Now that advance copies are out in the world, I want to note that this book deals with heavy issues that aren't evident from the description. Adding a TW here for self-harm and suicidal ideation. If you would like specific pages numbers or further information, please let me know, and I'm happy to provide that. You can contact me through my website: http://www.rachelsolomonbooks.com/con.... Update: YOU'LL MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE will officially be out in the world on January 2, 2018! I am so beyond excited to share this book! It is dual POV, narrated by both sisters, and contains a lot of things that are dear to my heart: ambitious, sometimes unlikable girls, complex sibling relationships, awkward and all-consuming first love, moral gray areas, and protagonists who are practicing Jews. I can't wait for you to read it!
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    ***Actual rating: 5/5 Tov Stars*** The thin ivory candles in the middle of the table are a third their original height. Jews are not to extinguish them; we are supposed to let them burn on their own instead. That’s what I have been taught.Tonight I lean over and blow them out. It’s official! You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone just drew my reading year of 2017 to a close perfectly. Wow, I don’t even know where to begin with this splendid piece of writing by the lovely Rachel. This book is highly ed ***Actual rating: 5/5 Tov Stars*** The thin ivory candles in the middle of the table are a third their original height. Jews are not to extinguish them; we are supposed to let them burn on their own instead. That’s what I have been taught.Tonight I lean over and blow them out. It’s official! You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone just drew my reading year of 2017 to a close perfectly. Wow, I don’t even know where to begin with this splendid piece of writing by the lovely Rachel. This book is highly educational (in my opinion) and slightly entertaining. I learn a lot about the mysterious Hebrew language, Jewish people and their traditions; I also learn a lot about both physical and mental health issues. You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone starts with a pair of 18-year-old, half-American, half-Israeli, Jewish twins, Tovah and Adina Siegel, hating each other’s guts from the very beginning to the end. They never stop feeling jealous toward the other’s achievements in life and they also have trouble communicating with each other since they all have so much to complain about and find fault with. Tovah is the academic genius who never fails a test and participates in a variety of extracurricular activities so that she can be fully prepared for the early application to the one and only Johns Hopkins. She aces in all her works and has an ambition to become a great surgeon in the future. She’s a well-disciplined and extremely obedient daughter who always follows the Jewish rules such as keeping kosher or wearing the evil eye bracelet all the time.On the contrary, Adina is the treacherous, rebellious one who never quite listens to her Aba and Ima (that’s how Tovah and Adina call their papa and mama), who’s not afraid to go on an adventure just to see what life has to offer. Just because she doesn’t study as hard as Tovah doesn’t mean she’s not talented. In fact, Adina is a viola prodigy. She spends days and nights practicing viola; she even takes private lessons with Arjun, her 25-year-old Indian music teacher. I don’t know why but Tovah and Adina seem to fight/compete against each other on literally everything; one gets envious when the other achieves something great. They never stop arguing about trivial matters all the time, and I get that it’s probably the sibling thingy (honestly, sometimes twins are even worse because they’re the same age, they look identical and they have to share their parents’ love) but what I find hard to believe is how opposite, how different Tovah and Adina are. It’s already dreadful enough that both sisters keep comparing themselves with each other and constantly make the other’s life miserable; to make matters worse, the story truly begins when they get their genetic test results for early diagnosis of Huntington’s disease, the one that slowly eats their Ima away day after day. Huntington’s disease is an inherited disorder that results in death of brain cells; some of the earliest symptoms include memory loss, mood swings, unsteady gaits, lack of coordination, hallucinations…etc. With the completely opposite test results, the twins are no longer twins. In order not to spoil anything about the story, I’d leave this part out for you to discover by yourselves. *wink* What I’d like to talk about is Adina’s characteristics. It never comes across my mind that such a talented viola player can be someone so dangerous—both physically and mentally—because she always seems so passionate and confident about her life. Little do I know how mentally unstable Adina actually is and the more her story unfolds, the more shocking I become. Tovah will bring me zero relief. If she and I grow close again, she will be a constant reminder of everything I am missing out on. It’s because we are twins that it will hurt so much, seeing her experience things that I cannot, knowing I am so close to them but unable to grasp them. I will watch her graduate college and become a surgeon and fix people and get married and maybe have children. I will watch her plan an entire fucking future without worrying about an impending death. I will watch her mull over choice after choice after choice.Maybe life is better without her. She’s so determined to destroy Tovah’s life by accomplishing everything Tovah can’t or fails to accomplish, and then she’s so sure about sleeping with older guys. She never truly experiences puppy love because she always deems herself as a young girl with mature mind who deserves to have sex be with older men. Yep, Adina is this kind of double-life girl who seems to perform excellently in front of prominent musical influencers while seeks a way to satisfy her sexual desire at nights. It is a mystery to me when lust turns to love, when sex turns into a relationship. If a relationship means playing duets and cooking together and teaching each other words in other languages, then maybe that is exactly what Arjun and I have. Maybe love is what comes next. In the meanwhile, since the lovely-teacher’s pet-Tovah is so wrapped up in her studies and extracurricular activities, having a boyfriend is never on her to-do list in the near future. But who knows? Thanks to the adorable guy with a gap between his front teeth named Zack, Tovah finally manages to see the world through an artist’s eyes. *heart eyes & pink bubbles* Zack reaches across the table and touches my evil-eye bracelet, his index finger spinning one of the beads. Jewelry’s always itched and scratched me, but this is a link to a family member I know so little about, so when Ima gave it to me for Chanukah, I vowed to wear it as much as possible.“That’s new,” he says. A statement, not a question. This close, I can smell his ocean-salt cologne.“So is your cologne.”His cheeks flush. “You got me there.”“This was my Israeli grandmother’s, on my mother’s side.”“Can’t say the same about my cologne.” Tovah and Zack’s transformation from friends to lovers is both cheesy and awkward but I love it! I mean, they have some serious, real talks about love, life and even sex instead of the cliché sorts of sweet nothing.I also appreciate how Tovah can look past Zack’s unexperienced self in romantic relationship/sex and she can also put aside the stereotypical thinking that artists are poor. Seriously, it’s really rare for an ambitious, successful genius to see beneath the ordinarily beautiful. ”There are a lot of ways to be smart,” I say, though I probably wouldn’t have considered Zack’s art intelligent before this year. “It’s not all about grammar or tests. Your art, for example, that’s smart. I can tell how much thought you put into it, even when you claim it doesn’t mean anything.”“What I’m trying to say is, you never make me feel that way. Like I’m not smart enough to be with you, even though you’re a genius too. And I really appreciate it.” Undoubtedly, the main focus of this book is on the Siegel twins because whoa, you won’t believe how much they’ve improved throughout the story. When it comes to character development in a story, I always think it means the little steps those protagonists take or the subtle progress they make because those are pretty much what I’ve read so far. Thus, color me shock when I finished reading this book. *deadpan* Adina is the ticking bomb in the Siegel family and Tovah is the most motivated one in life; in the last few chapters of the book, both of them somehow realize the essence of life and the knowhow to live life to the fullest all of a sudden. No kidding, the twins suddenly find their unique way of compromise and for once, I finally feel relieved to see them stick together like a family does. Our relationship probably won’t ever be what it was before we started growing into our own skin. Before we hurt each other. Before the world hurt us. Maybe we’ll never fully understand each other or know all of each other’s secrets, and surely we’ll never recapture our childhood innocence. But we can have something new. Something messy and real and imperfect, because that’s what both of us are. All in all, I have a good time reading You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone since the plot twists are so intense and the huge difference between Tovah and Adina’s personalities is pretty intriguing. Though I admit that this book at some point makes me feel really, really down because there are some serious issues addressed and Rachel’s writing is so good that it’s hard not to feel what the characters are struggling with. In my opinion, trigger warnings for Huntington’s disease, depression, anxiety, suicide, and strong sexual desire are necessary before reading/recommending this book to someone else. Besides, I would totally suggest teenagers (especially senior high school students) read You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone since most of the main characters are facing a lot of indecisions about their college majors, future careers, meanings of life and such but most importantly, their lessons of life are what you truly don’t want to miss! Anyway, You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone is a brilliant debut work of Rachel and I HIGHLY RECOMMEND it to everyone (*please note the TW)! It’s one of my most anticipated reads for 2018 and I’m pleased to say that it doesn’t disappoint. Lastly, I just want to say that Rachel, you’re officially one of my top favorite authors from now on!***Thanks to FFBC for providing me with an e-copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.***
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  • Navessa
    January 1, 1970
    “Sonatas and concertos tell stories. They make you feel every possible emotion, sometimes all within a single piece…they are joy and tragedy and fear and hate and love. They are everything I never say out loud.” There are a lot of truly lovely and meaningful quotes I could have used from this book to start my review of it, but the above best sums up this reading experience. Adina and Tovah’s story is full of joy and tragedy and fear and hate and love.I have two sisters, and Adina and Tovah’s si “Sonatas and concertos tell stories. They make you feel every possible emotion, sometimes all within a single piece…they are joy and tragedy and fear and hate and love. They are everything I never say out loud.” There are a lot of truly lovely and meaningful quotes I could have used from this book to start my review of it, but the above best sums up this reading experience. Adina and Tovah’s story is full of joy and tragedy and fear and hate and love.I have two sisters, and Adina and Tovah’s sisterly relationship just rang so true to me. It reflected a lot of my own experiences. The petty jealousy, the competitiveness, the sometimes blinding dislike, it was all there, and then some.You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone is told through dual first person PoV, and while I’ve read a lot of books that use this method of storytelling, this was hands down one of the best executed.Adina is a musician, and her narrative reads much like a symphony. Her chapters are filled with highs and lows, poetical metaphor, and lyrical, beautiful storytelling. Her twin, Tovah, dreams of becoming a doctor, and her chapters are written in a clean, concise, sometimes surgical voice that reflects that. From the very beginning, you’re given a clear understanding of who each girl is, and how they differ. And yet they’re twins, so the similarities are also there, subtly woven into each PoV in such a way that you can’t help but hope that they resolve their conflict and realize they’re more alike than they think.And there is a LOT of conflict within this book.Imagine that your mother has a fatal disease. One that manifests much like rapidly progressive dementia, only with the addition of more apparent physical symptoms along with the memory loss. Now imagine finding out that you’ve inherited it. Every time your mother forgets a name, or stumbles, or has a facial tic, or slurs her speech, you’re forced to watch your own fate. A thousand times a week, you bear witness to the inescapable reality of your future. Now imagine having a twin who has escaped this fate.Talk about a firestorm of emotions.The fact that Adina and Tovah’s relationship was fraught with betrayal and animosity before one is diagnosed with Huntington’s only makes the resulting emotional turmoil that much more intense. The dual PoVs add an interesting dimension to this for the reader, because you find yourself sympathetic to both, angry at each in turn for what they do to the other, and yet also empathetic.I loved it. I loved that I couldn’t figure out who I was meant to root for. Now that I’ve finished the book, I’m pretty sure it was both.This is a more mature YA, complete with swearing and sex and mental health issues. There are some stronger themes in here than a lot of the contemporary YA that I’ve read, and I’m happy to say that they were very well portrayed, and handled with the depth they deserve. There’s also some great representation of diversity in this, and I love that I’m seeing more and more of it in YA.The sisters – well, Tovah, at least – would identify as conservative Jewish. Their faith is an integral part of the story. Not only do they speak Hebrew at home, but there are a hundred smaller references to their beliefs and practices throughout this. It was superbly executed. As a non-Jewish reader, I never felt overwhelmed or confused about the details. I never felt as if I was being lectured or preached to, like I sometimes have with other books including a strong religious aspect. It was just who they were.Was this an easy read? No. And you should know that going in. You are probably going to feel ALL the emotions. You are probably going to get really angry with these sisters. But know that it’s all worth it. Because the ending, while not a perfectly tied up little bow of peace and happiness and resolution (which would be BS if it was), at least leaves you feeling like these two have learned and grown, and will continue to do so off the page.I can’t recommend this enough for YA readers. I enjoyed it so much that Rachel Lynn Solomon is going on my one-click list. She’s truly an author to watch.This review is also available on The Alliterates.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a haunting read.I can’t give this anything less than 5 stars because I devoured it. I read it in one day, and by the end of it I was emotionally drained. This story broke my heart over and over again. I had to take little breaks between chapters to just catch up on my thoughts. This follows two estranged sisters, who are complete opposites. One artistic and outgoing, and the other academic and an introvert. After their 18th birthday, they are tested for Huntington’s, which runs in This was such a haunting read.I can’t give this anything less than 5 stars because I devoured it. I read it in one day, and by the end of it I was emotionally drained. This story broke my heart over and over again. I had to take little breaks between chapters to just catch up on my thoughts. This follows two estranged sisters, who are complete opposites. One artistic and outgoing, and the other academic and an introvert. After their 18th birthday, they are tested for Huntington’s, which runs in the family. One of them tests positive, the other negative. Now one sister must rethink her future plans and factor in Huntington’s, while the other has to wrestle with the guilt of testing negative while her sister tested positive. There were times that both Adina and Tovah were unlikable, but that just made me like them even more. They were flawed, sometimes selfish, but very complex and real. Their relationship was so far from perfect, with jealousy and guilt between them. And there were times when you were siding with Adina in their arguments, and then the next chapter you were rooting for Tovah. But the end of day, you just couldn’t help but sympathize with both of them. They both made their mistakes, but they both were so well-developed and you just wanted them to reconcile and try to fix their relationship.Every single relationship in this book was so fragile. Adina and Tovah’s relationship, their relationship with their parents, with their love interests, their friends. I recommend this to anyone who likes reading about complex characters. This story also has a heavy focus on the sisters’ religions: Judaism. They talk a lot about their faiths, traditions, and practices. One sister is very religious while the other has her doubts. This book was heartbreaking but also hopeful. It was one of my most anticipated books of 2018 and I’m so glad it didn’t disappoint me. Thank you to Netgalley for this ARC.
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, this was really, really good. And yeah, I'm excited to see more Jewish rep in YA that isn't Holocaust-related, but as a sister book, as a coming-of-age, as a book about teens looking to the future, as a book about examining your own worth through other's eyes, as a book about familial relationships on the whole...yeah, this is good.
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  • Ava
    January 1, 1970
    I'm speechless. Preorder this beautiful, haunting book, please.
  • Jennifer Hawkins
    January 1, 1970
    I read an early draft of this beautiful, haunting book as a sensitivity reader. As the member of a family battered by Huntington's Disease, I believe with all my heart that this is an important book that everyone should read. It's conversely beautiful and tragic, and not in the ways you might think. The author paints the nuances of this disease with a deft and empathetic hand. Devastating realities are balanced by the complicated (but redeeming) love of sisters. The Jewish culture presented is l I read an early draft of this beautiful, haunting book as a sensitivity reader. As the member of a family battered by Huntington's Disease, I believe with all my heart that this is an important book that everyone should read. It's conversely beautiful and tragic, and not in the ways you might think. The author paints the nuances of this disease with a deft and empathetic hand. Devastating realities are balanced by the complicated (but redeeming) love of sisters. The Jewish culture presented is lovely and natural, the ancillary characters are fully-realized and add depth and emotion, and the dual POV is superb. These sisters--Adina and Tovah--are so different and lovely in their own ways. The writing itself reminds me of Jandy Nelson's style. Without question, this is one of the best books I've ever read. I can't wait to have a hardcover copy in my hands.
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  • Marty :} (thecursedbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Before I start reviewing this book, I want to tell you that You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon is probably my favourite book of the year. It's one of the most powerful reads of mine, it was raw, it made me feel things. It was absolutely perfect and when it comes out in January, please make sure you read it because you have no idea what you're losing on. "I thought I could force him to love me. Relationships are not about control, though, and perhaps that is why I have never had Before I start reviewing this book, I want to tell you that You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone by Rachel Lynn Solomon is probably my favourite book of the year. It's one of the most powerful reads of mine, it was raw, it made me feel things. It was absolutely perfect and when it comes out in January, please make sure you read it because you have no idea what you're losing on. "I thought I could force him to love me. Relationships are not about control, though, and perhaps that is why I have never had a real one. I want to always feel strong when I am with guys. That isn’t going to change. I am always going to wear my dresses and red lipstick because I like them. I am always going to have people watch me when I am onstage, but my looks are not the only things that make me Adina."I'm not sure how to make a structure for this book review as I usually tell you first about the things I've enjoyed and then about the ones I didn't. But this book is different because I've enjoyed absolutely everything. Like literary, there's nothing I didn't enjoy. So, buckle up because we're going on a fangirling trip, my dear.Things that I absolutely loved about You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone : How the books makes it pretty clear that women can be everything and don't have to be limited to only on trait (like smart, beautiful or talented).The characters are absolutely unique, Rachel Lynn Solomon did a great job at creating complex and three-dimensional characters. They felt so real, that for the first time, I had absolutely no problem imagining them, imagining what they would like, what they might do in a situation. I absolutely love how Adina and Tovah, the main characters, are very different. Adina is a music prodigy, she is very cofident, she loves make-up and dresses, she's experienced in relationships. And then, Tovah is the smart girl, the one that never gets comments on how she looks, but is always complimented on her brain, she's not that experienced in relationships. You get the idea. What I absolutely loved about Solomon's book is how she fought these cliches. She showed us this sister rivalry that was pretty much rooted in people's expectations and how society sees girls. I've always been annoyed with how girls can only be smart or can only be beautiful and there's never both of them. And if you're beautiful, then you're expected to have a boyfriend, if you don't, then there's something wrong with you. If you're smart, you're expected to focus on your studies and forget about the boys. So, society wants us to be one dimensional, pretty much. And Rachel Lynn Solomon slammed it all.2. Sisters and a very complex take on their relationshipTovah and Adina don't have a good relationship at the beginning of this book, they are arguing all the time, they don't spend time together and so on. The thing is they have very valid reasons and it's not that simple. You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone is, in my opinion, a love letter to sisters, in the end, you realize how beautiful and touching it is to have a sister, how that bond is beyond everything else. To me, as an only child, it really touched me and made me envious of everybody who has a sister.3. Family over relationships, alwaysSolomon did a great job of focusing on family rather than on romantic relationships. I think you've seen pretty often on my blog commenting on how YA does pretty badly in incorporating family interactions in the stories a.k.a the missing parents. This one again destroyed everything you could expect from YA, it was mainly focused on family, relationships were there, but only to show us more facets of Adina and Tovah. It was amazing how every relationship from their family was explored by the end of the book, you get Adina and Tovah together, Adina and her mom, Tovah and her dad, Adina and her dad, Tovah and her mom. And they are all very unique. They feel so real because they are normal relationships. For example, Adina is very much connected with her mom, but she has a colder relationship with her dad, not because of issues, but because they don't connect as much. With Tovah, it's the other way around. And I think it's highly relatable because even in a family, we are all people and there are some persons with whom we can identify and get along with better than with others (even if they are our parents).4. Incredible representation of Huntington'sAs a psychology major, I'm highly interested in mentally ill people being represented in a good way. I'm fed up with books that demonize them, make them seem violent and aggressive and like they don't matter. I know better than that. We should all know better than that. Because we can do so much better for them by starting with trying to understand and be there, listen.I got into this book not knowing much about Huntington's besides the fact that it is genetical. The premise of the book is that Adina and Tovah are going to take a DNA test to see whether they're going to have the disease like their mother or not. I think Solomon did such a great job at representing this illness as it is, not romanticized, not distorsioned in any way. It just felt very real to me and I understood many facets of it.What I highly appreciated was the outcome of the DNA tests and how the sisters progressed from there. I don't want to say much because I want you to find out for yourself. But at some point, I was very worried about one character's potential decision. It's a very difficult matter and I don't think there's a white or a black in here, it's about decision and perspective. But the author managed to show that there are choices and I loved that, showing alternatives is amazing.5. Religion being very important in this bookI think religion is becoming somewhat of a taboo for our society, I rarely ever see it talked about in books anymore and I dislike this trend because I feel like it's not that people aren't religious anymore, as much as they don't feel the subject will be interesting to people. And it's pretty wrong. It was so refreshing to see both perspectives in the book. The characters are Jewish, Tovah identifies with Judaism a lot, while Adina doesn't because for her there's impossible for God to exist and let her mother be as sick as she is. I think it was refreshing to see both of these perspectives in one book because it was impossible not to relate to any of them. And while I'm a religious person, Adina's thoughts were relatable, at times, as she does, I've always questions what's the reason for all the suffering. You know, it's highly relatable. And it's great, we should talk about these things instead of letting silence divide us.6. Not very nice charactersThis one is a favourite of mine. In my opinion, Adina was one of those characters that aren't nice (at all), but you can't help, but feel for them. I rooted for her all the time, even though I wasn't okay with her actions. You just realize that she's flawed and that's totally okay. Women don't have to always be agreeable, nice in order for us to like them. We all have different personalities and we should accept that in female characters as we do with male characters. Adina challenged everything, she liked to play games, she wanted to be liked and appreciated, she owned her body. I loved seeing such a confident character in a YA book.7. Sex representation in YAThanks. Thanks. Thanks. Thanks. A million times thanks.We have to understand that teenagers have sex. (WOW!) And they should be informed and those healthy representations of sex in YA are absolutely necessary if we want them to be informed.8. Amazing plotlinesWhat I enjoyed the most was how Adina came to realize that her relationships weren't what she wanted. She realized that most of her past relationships had been about her body and not about who she was. And I loved how she came to this realization. Solomon presented us her relationship with Arjun and Tovah's relationship with Zack and they were contrasting each other. Tovah and Zack made Adina aware of some of the issues she had when it came to relationships and life, in general. I really loved it.9. Making your dreams come trueBoth of these characters are very dedicated to what they want and I loved how hard-working they both were. I loved how their objectives were very high and they wanted everything, at once. And I adored how the book showed us that sometimes you might not get what you want because it's not meant for you or because you're not prepared for it. It showed us that it's okay to take a break from something you've worked a lot on, to just wonder if it's what you want. It's okay to try to get to know yourself better, any time. It's never too late to understand who you are and what you want.All in all, this book challenged a lot of cliches, a lot of unhealthy tropes, it is a dreamy book and it is an important book and I hope you all find yourself in it.Also, I'm so happy for Rachel Lynn Solomon who got to write the book she probably always wanted to read. "I wrote this book partially because the only Jewish stories I read growing up were Holocaust narratives. We cannot stop telling those stories, but they are not the only stories we as Jewish people have to tell."(this line is from the acknowledgments and it stayed with me a lot.)
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  • Rachel WritesThings
    January 1, 1970
    Edit: Dec 2 2016: This book just keeps getting better. OMG <3.***THIS IS MY CRIT PARTNER'S AMAZING DEBUT!!!!!!!!!I have read many many drafts of this beautiful, important book. YOU'LL MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE is about two sisters, Adina (Adi) and Tovah (#TEAMTOVAH!!!), as they deal with their mother's Huntington's disease, college applications, romance/sex/love, being Jewish and what the heck that means (and if G-d even hears us when we're praying/upset/etc.), and what living - truly living - me Edit: Dec 2 2016: This book just keeps getting better. OMG <3.***THIS IS MY CRIT PARTNER'S AMAZING DEBUT!!!!!!!!!I have read many many drafts of this beautiful, important book. YOU'LL MISS ME WHEN I'M GONE is about two sisters, Adina (Adi) and Tovah (#TEAMTOVAH!!!), as they deal with their mother's Huntington's disease, college applications, romance/sex/love, being Jewish and what the heck that means (and if G-d even hears us when we're praying/upset/etc.), and what living - truly living - means. It is dual points of view, which means you get to hear from both Adi and Tovah, and their relationships - with each other, with their parents, with their friends, and boyfriends. It is a love letter to Seattle and sisters, something Rachel knows only too well :). I'm so excited you all get to read it!
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  • Julie Zantopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book that I've read that had a heavy focus on the Jewish faith, practices, traditions, and language and it was wonderful! It was diverse not just in religious and cultural ways but also in the racial differences of love interests and physical illness rep (Huntington) as well. I was impressed by how well all the different topics merged into a well-told, cohesive, and touching story. Tovah and Adina were complex and complete characters and I loved their interaction with their pee This is the first book that I've read that had a heavy focus on the Jewish faith, practices, traditions, and language and it was wonderful! It was diverse not just in religious and cultural ways but also in the racial differences of love interests and physical illness rep (Huntington) as well. I was impressed by how well all the different topics merged into a well-told, cohesive, and touching story. Tovah and Adina were complex and complete characters and I loved their interaction with their peers, parents, love interests, and one another. I truly enjoyed this debut novel and cannot wait for more from Solomon.
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