Pigeon P.I.
Pigeon private investigator Murray just wants to take things easy, but when kind-hearted Vee starts to sing like a canary (after all, she is a canary) he can't hold out. Murray agrees to find the feather thief who has kidnapped her friends, but his change of heart comes too late: now Vee herself has gone missing. Can Murray find the mysterious feather thief and save his new friend, or is her goose cooked?

Pigeon P.I. Details

TitlePigeon P.I.
Author
ReleaseMar 2nd, 2017
PublisherAndersen
ISBN-139781783444830
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Mystery, Animals, Birds, Humor

Pigeon P.I. Review

  • Helen White
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant. I'm fond of bird pun books. Pigeon private investigator tries to find missing birds. The big reveal page for the culprit is amazing. Clever, nice illustrations, well worth reading.
  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    Murray MacMurray Pigeon P.I. is feeling down after his partner Stanley has skipped town. He doesn't feel like taking a case, but a little canary is insistent he must help her find her missing friends and then she herself goes missing. Pigeon is on the case and no one will keep him from solving it.The tone of this is like classic black and white film mysteries. Murray should obviously be read with a Sam Spade voice. Of course kids have no clue about black and white films or Sam Spade, so I'm not Murray MacMurray Pigeon P.I. is feeling down after his partner Stanley has skipped town. He doesn't feel like taking a case, but a little canary is insistent he must help her find her missing friends and then she herself goes missing. Pigeon is on the case and no one will keep him from solving it.The tone of this is like classic black and white film mysteries. Murray should obviously be read with a Sam Spade voice. Of course kids have no clue about black and white films or Sam Spade, so I'm not entirely sure how this will go over with them. They should like the mystery part and how the bad guy is brought down, but a lot of the tone and such may only come through if adults help bring it across in read aloud voices. Picture book mysteries are few and far between, so this is a welcome addition.
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  • LH Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    When it comes to picture books, I always, always have to talk about the complexity of them. They are hard beasts to get right, they are even harder beasts to do well. Pigeon P.I is something quite oddly wonderful, a sort of mashup of gumshoe detective drama with a lot of bird puns and something quite delightful in the process. Forgive me for simply reciting the blurb in whole but I think it does the business better than anything I can CASE No. 621 - Feathered friends are going missing all over t When it comes to picture books, I always, always have to talk about the complexity of them. They are hard beasts to get right, they are even harder beasts to do well. Pigeon P.I is something quite oddly wonderful, a sort of mashup of gumshoe detective drama with a lot of bird puns and something quite delightful in the process. Forgive me for simply reciting the blurb in whole but I think it does the business better than anything I can CASE No. 621 - Feathered friends are going missing all over town, but private investigator Murray likes the quiet life ... until a little bird tells him a story the famous Pigeon P.I cannot ignore. There's such a lot to enjoy in this book from the wry beginning of "Business was slow / just the way I liked it" through to the exuberant flurry of detail that dots nearly every page and in substantial amounts. Some of the more specific puns may require explaining ("Privet Eye - Gardening Solutions") but it's a delight to pick them out and this is a book that will sing with repeated reading ("Two beaks are better than one"). As Murray starts to work his way through the case, he comes into contact with a range of individuals - plucky canaries, furtive pigeons, and the reveal of the eventual kingpin is a delight. It's a soaring, intense, bold double spread and one that stamps the book with such a moment that you can't help but stop and drink it in.I'd definitely place this a little towards the older edge of picture books, somewhere around Elys Dolan and Sarah Bee because of the dense detail and puns. It's such a smart and witty book, and it's one that gives different endpapers! Endpapers are so important! The reader gets a guide to investigation at the start of the book - take quiet snacks, and not 'quiet but impractical' snacks such as jelly; whilst the end of the book has tips on advanced detection featuring Duck Tracy and Sherstork Holmes. A delight. A bold, mad, glorious delight. My thanks to the publisher for a review copy.
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  • Debbie Tanner
    January 1, 1970
    This will be a great one for our mystery unit. Excellent example the noir genre.
  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    Pigeon P.I. on the case! Birds are disappearing left and right, what is going on? Is anyone safe? I just adore detective/mystery books, and I was delighted to try this one out as it brought a bit of a new spin on the genre. A pigeon doing all sorts of detective work. Or well, he is kind of not doing anything, but he is still a detective deep down. And a detective can't let a case (or a friend) alone like this. And so it begins. The search for his tiny new friend, Vee. Who came to him for help, b Pigeon P.I. on the case! Birds are disappearing left and right, what is going on? Is anyone safe? I just adore detective/mystery books, and I was delighted to try this one out as it brought a bit of a new spin on the genre. A pigeon doing all sorts of detective work. Or well, he is kind of not doing anything, but he is still a detective deep down. And a detective can't let a case (or a friend) alone like this. And so it begins. The search for his tiny new friend, Vee. Who came to him for help, but got kidnapped. I loved that Murray didn't let this one go. He didn't know Vee that well, so he could have easily just not gone searching for her, but he did. And I was cheering for him along the way. Until the end I didn't know what was going on, well, OK, I had a mild suspicion, especially since the birds stolen were all colourful. But the twist? The bad guy? I didn't expect that one. I also love that while we don't see any humans around, we do know they are around (given the food, the milk cartons, the fact the missing birds have owners). Oftentimes even with animal books you will see the humans. But in this one.. nothing! I had a laugh that those police gulls eating doughnuts bigger than they are. Those sure are some King Ring Doughnuts. (Now I am hungry for doughnuts, argggh.)The art is a delight, there are just so many details. Even after reading the text, there is so much to explore. Pieces of newspaper or tiny newspapers, lists, posters, bird stores/shops, and much more. You will keep on looking. Plus I love how the book was formatted. Not like a lot of picture books (with big pictures (either on one page or covering both) or some tiny ones on one page, instead it is a combo of big illustrations, small illustrations, and comics. I love it!Oh and bonus points to those pages at the very front and the very back. The first double page is a Beginner's Guide to Private Investigation, with anything from tips to equipment. The last double pages are about Advanced Detection. Like that you should be light on your feet, or that one should carry a book or newspaper to hide behind. But there are also famous detectives (of course all birds), and even a fun little exam (which makes you re-read the book, or if you are a budding detective, makes you check your notes :P). So yes, I would highly recommend this one, and I will be putting this one on my list to buy, as I want this book in my collection. I will also be keeping an eye on this author. :)Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Ina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a cute book about a Pigeon named Murray who runs a detective agency. The text reads like a classic detective book/movie - I could almost hear Humphrey Bogart's voice as I read the book the first time. There are puns and stereotypes (like when the police birds all are eating donuts at the crime scene) and some great hats. The illustrations are fun and our hero - and side kick - do get the bad guys in the end and there is a happy ending.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Like another reviewer, I could hear the voice of Sam Spade as I read, but that's not what will attract young readers. Trying to figure out the mystery will! Lots of details in the variety of images, and activities in the endpapers will keep youngsters rereading.Be sure to look under the dust jacket!
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    A little all over the place, so definitely better for one-on-one or small groups instead of a storytime or whole class. A good choice for elementary aged kids into detectives and crime solving, but I'd skip it for younger kids.I also need the "cops like donuts" stereotype to die, but that's a battle with the world in general and not specific to this story.
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  • Jess Verzello
    January 1, 1970
    What a hoot! I love the characterization and witty use of puns throughout this picture book. There is always more to discover in the illustrations, and readers will love the twist at the end. Absolute delight!
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    A punny noir, fun and witty.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Fans of old police movies will enjoy the feel of this book and the characters in it. Each character is archetypal and the story has a clear arc.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A cute and simple introduction to detectives and mystery books for little kids. Cute, cute.
  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    3.5*
  • Faith Tydings
    January 1, 1970
    It was ok! There was a lot of older innuendo that a child would likely not understand and there was A LOT to look at in this book; it was a little distracting. The story was cute.
  • Elisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I need a P.I. to help me track the narrative!
  • Deidrah Reeves
    January 1, 1970
    Good for booktalk--1st and 2nd grade. Funny, mystery
  • Agnès
    January 1, 1970
    Great fun! Lots of bird puns.
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