Treasured Grace (Heart of the Frontier, #1)
Tracie Peterson Begins Compelling New Series Set on the 1840s FrontierGrace Martindale has known more than her share of hardship. After her parents died, raising her two younger sisters became her responsibility. A hasty marriage to a minister who is heading to the untamed West seemed like an opportunity for a fresh start, but a cholera outbreak along the wagon trail has left Grace a widow in a very precarious position.Having learned natural remedies and midwifery from her mother, Grace seeks an opportunity to use her skills for the benefit of others. So when she and her sisters arrive at the Whitman mission in "Oregon Country," she decides to stay rather than push on. With the help of Alex Armistead, a French-American fur trapper, Grace begins to provide care for her neighbors, including some of the native populace. But not everyone welcomes her skills--or her presence--and soon Grace finds herself and those she loves in more danger than she imagined possible.

Treasured Grace (Heart of the Frontier, #1) Details

TitleTreasured Grace (Heart of the Frontier, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 28th, 2017
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN-139780764213274
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Christian, Romance, Fiction, Christian Romance

Treasured Grace (Heart of the Frontier, #1) Review

  • Shirley Revill
    January 1, 1970
    I recently listened to Cherished Mercy not realising the book was part three of a trilogy but the audiobook worked absolutely fine as a standalone. The story really impressed me so I decided to read the other books in the series. I wasn't disappointed at all with the audiobook Treasured Grace it was just as as good as the first book that I listened to. It's really nice to have found another author whose stories I have really enjoyed. The narration was really good and added to the enjoyment of th I recently listened to Cherished Mercy not realising the book was part three of a trilogy but the audiobook worked absolutely fine as a standalone. The story really impressed me so I decided to read the other books in the series. I wasn't disappointed at all with the audiobook Treasured Grace it was just as as good as the first book that I listened to. It's really nice to have found another author whose stories I have really enjoyed. The narration was really good and added to the enjoyment of this audiobook. Can't wait for the next book to continue the story.
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  • Gretchen Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Tracie Peterson has written some of my favorite books and this one certainly did not disappoint. This book was set in the 1800's about three sisters who head west to Oregon territory. Along the way there they end up stopping for the winter at a mission that is close to two different tribes of Native Americans, Cayuse and the Nez Perce, as tensions rise between "the Boston men" and the Natives the struggle for the sisters increases. I thought the character development was really thought through a Tracie Peterson has written some of my favorite books and this one certainly did not disappoint. This book was set in the 1800's about three sisters who head west to Oregon territory. Along the way there they end up stopping for the winter at a mission that is close to two different tribes of Native Americans, Cayuse and the Nez Perce, as tensions rise between "the Boston men" and the Natives the struggle for the sisters increases. I thought the character development was really thought through and I loved the emotion that Tracie Peterson is able to draw out of the reader. This was such a sad time in American history, but I thought Peterson did a really good job of portraying all sides and I found it to be a very interesting read both historically and just in general.
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  • Kav
    January 1, 1970
    Don't let this ethereal cover art fool you. As gorgeous as it is, it doesn't begin to reflect the emotional turmoil found within the pages of this compelling book. Peterson has built a fascinating tale around an alarming piece of American history. It's a story rife with angst during a tumultuous time when settlers made their way West in hopes of a better life.Grace only wants two things. To keep what's left of her family together and use her healing gifts to serve others. Going west seems to be Don't let this ethereal cover art fool you. As gorgeous as it is, it doesn't begin to reflect the emotional turmoil found within the pages of this compelling book. Peterson has built a fascinating tale around an alarming piece of American history. It's a story rife with angst during a tumultuous time when settlers made their way West in hopes of a better life.Grace only wants two things. To keep what's left of her family together and use her healing gifts to serve others. Going west seems to be the way to do that. But Grace and her sisters aren't prepared for the hardships they must endure in the untamed wilderness. Heart breaking, gut-wrenching times are ahead for these sisters and it will take every last ounce of faith they possess to make it through.Fur trapper Alex has reasons for his mostly solitary lifestyle but they stop making sense once he meets Grace. There's lots of clashing wills and strong opinions as these two butt heads. But admiration soon grows into something deeper -- a bond that is difficult to sever no matter how hard they try!Breathtaking historical details bring all the complexities of this time period to life. And it's interesting to read with the benefit of 21st century knowledge. Settler and Native relationships are volatile -- and with good reason. I'll admit to cringing a time or two over White arrogance and ignorance when it comes to the Natives and their way of life.A gripping read that puts me in mind of Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman even though Grace isn't actually a physician. And bonus -- this is just the first in the Heart of the Frontier series so there's much more to look forward to.Book providing courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications.
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  • Shannon (Mrsreadsbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Grace Martindale has known more than her share of hardship. After her parents died, raising her two younger sisters became her responsibility. A hasty marriage to a minister who is heading to the untamed West seemed like an opportunity for a fresh start, but a cholera outbreak along the wagon trail has left Grace a widow in a very precarious position.Having learned natural remedies and midwifery from her mother, Grace seeks an opportunity to use her skills for the benefit of others. So when she Grace Martindale has known more than her share of hardship. After her parents died, raising her two younger sisters became her responsibility. A hasty marriage to a minister who is heading to the untamed West seemed like an opportunity for a fresh start, but a cholera outbreak along the wagon trail has left Grace a widow in a very precarious position.Having learned natural remedies and midwifery from her mother, Grace seeks an opportunity to use her skills for the benefit of others. So when she and her sisters arrive at the Whitman mission in “Oregon Country,” she decides to stay rather than push on.With the help of Alex Armistead, a French-American fur trapper, Grace begins to provide care for her neighbors, including some of the native populace. But not everyone welcomes her skills–or her presence–and soon Grace finds herself and those she loves in more danger than she imagined possible.First, I have to say that I rarely read Christian Fiction, as I have yet to find any authors that I really like and this is the first book by Tracie Peterson that I have read. This book sounded interesting to me because I really enjoy historical fiction and I thought the inclusion of midwifery also sounded interesting. For Christian Fiction, I have to admit that some of the elements of the plot very fairly violent and traumatic, which I was not expecting. And there were many other topics, that I don’t want to mention because I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but they didn’t really set up the story to be a great romance. I have read other romance books where the main characters have traumatic pasts, but most of the time the traumatic events weren’t happening right in the middle of the love story. That aspect just wasn’t what I was expecting in a Christian romance novel, but like I said, I have not really read anything from this genre. I did like the setting of historical Oregon, but I never really found myself connecting with the main character, Grace. The books has fairly high ratings and I imagine that fans of the author will very much enjoy this book. I personally just didn’t really connect to the characters or the story, although I did enjoy the historical setting. The writing itself is fine and I do really enjoy historical fiction, I think I might have just been surprised by the violence and traumatic events focused on in this book.Thank you to the publisher, Bethany House, for sending me a review copy of this book.
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  • Romancebooksandmore
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsGrace Flannagen Martindale is headed west with her siblings the story starts with her burying her husband. It was a loveless match only put together so all parties could travel to Oregon. Grace decides to stay the winter at the Whitman Mission well she awaits word from her uncle. This is a decision that will end up haunting all. Alex Armistead is a fur trapper who lives among the Native american’s he has ran from his home in New Orleans ten years before and his past still haunts him. He m 5 starsGrace Flannagen Martindale is headed west with her siblings the story starts with her burying her husband. It was a loveless match only put together so all parties could travel to Oregon. Grace decides to stay the winter at the Whitman Mission well she awaits word from her uncle. This is a decision that will end up haunting all. Alex Armistead is a fur trapper who lives among the Native american’s he has ran from his home in New Orleans ten years before and his past still haunts him. He meets grace and her sisters at the Mission but can’t bring himself to love her as his past holds him back. When the mission is attacked he has to try and help the Native American’s figure out what the future holds well at the same time trying to rescue the women and Children from the mission. Can he let go of his past during all this and let love in. This is a fictionalized account of a real life massacre and of course it’s set in the west during the late 1840’s so there is lots of death and illness. Add on to that trigger warnings for talk of rape, abortion and thoughts of suicide. Well this story does have a HEA and I put this book high up on my fav’s list I know it’s not for everyone so I caution anyone who goes into it that you need a strong stomach or a box of Kleenex. Now that I have read book one it’s time for me to reread books 2 and three with fresh eyes.
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  • Paula-O
    January 1, 1970
    Series "Heart of the frontier" book #1, Treasured Grace by Tracie PetersonI like reading this author and the story of Grace is one you don't want to miss.Three young women Grace-Hope and Mercy head west on the Oregon trail, Grace marries The Rev Martindale to be a marriage in name only as he needs a wife only to go to the mission field.He was a man that seemed to be full of himself and was always "Right", the sisters did not seem to miss him much when he died early on and was buried along the wa Series "Heart of the frontier" book #1, Treasured Grace by Tracie PetersonI like reading this author and the story of Grace is one you don't want to miss.Three young women Grace-Hope and Mercy head west on the Oregon trail, Grace marries The Rev Martindale to be a marriage in name only as he needs a wife only to go to the mission field.He was a man that seemed to be full of himself and was always "Right", the sisters did not seem to miss him much when he died early on and was buried along the way, Now the sisters hope to stay at the Whitman mission over the winter as many have been ill and died when Measles affected the train.Grace is a healer and works helping many but while at the mission the good doctor does not want her helping him. His ways are different from hers. At the mission they also meet a tribe of indians called Cayuse , many were not happy with the good doctor and thought he was killing their people with poison. There is tension between the mission and the indians.This is a complex story and you will enjoy reading how the girls live and work at the mission. Grace meets a man named Alex that becomes a great friend over time.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Strong pro life message! Thank you Tracie Peterson!
  • Lizzy Bueckert
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the characters very much and also the subject matter of the story. I felt for those that suffered and for all those who were not directly affected but had loved ones who were. I look forward to the next book!
  • Dianne Sidebottom
    January 1, 1970
    Sad time in history was the era when this took place. Interesting perspective through eyes of witnesses. How in hindsight looking back how the matter was dealt with. Plus their are victims today. Tough subject to write about. Interested in the setting of how Tracie will write the next books.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great start to a new series. Grace was the embodiment of her name. She was a very Christian and hospitable woman. Her attitudes towards the Native Americans started out severely prejudiced but overtime she modified her thinking. Despite all the tragedy struck the family, they kept their faith in God for the most part although they did ask questions. Anyone who had been through what they had to go through word. I think Alex was just a little too stubborn not to have come to his senses This was a great start to a new series. Grace was the embodiment of her name. She was a very Christian and hospitable woman. Her attitudes towards the Native Americans started out severely prejudiced but overtime she modified her thinking. Despite all the tragedy struck the family, they kept their faith in God for the most part although they did ask questions. Anyone who had been through what they had to go through word. I think Alex was just a little too stubborn not to have come to his senses sooner but I suppose if it was a whole lot sooner in the book would not have been as good. I appreciated hearing the stories of the different tribes of Native Americans involved. It’s so sad to hear about all of misunderstandings and issues that they had back then. The faith of the family in Jesus carried through the whole novel and I felt that it was very well written as are all of Tracy Peterson’s works. I’m looking forward to reading the next in the series which I’m sure will be story of Hope... Who really had some trails and issues to deal with through this book and I’m praying that she finds her solution in the next one. I’m sure she well :-).
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  • Callie
    January 1, 1970
    1/5 stars.I have to admit, I didn't enjoy this book.The back cover of Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson sounded interesting, which was why I picked it up. I had read a book by Peterson in the past, and though I didn't remember loving that one, I thought I'd give her another shot. I probably would have thought better of it if I had realized this book was about a massacre.I don't have a problem with books that deal with tragedy, but I have little patience for historical fiction books that portray 1/5 stars.I have to admit, I didn't enjoy this book.The back cover of Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson sounded interesting, which was why I picked it up. I had read a book by Peterson in the past, and though I didn't remember loving that one, I thought I'd give her another shot. I probably would have thought better of it if I had realized this book was about a massacre.I don't have a problem with books that deal with tragedy, but I have little patience for historical fiction books that portray historical events by heaping one tragic event after another upon the characters, with no lighthearted moments to break it up. That's what this book did, and by the end I was just so tired of the book. It felt like every time something got slow she'd throw another death or other difficult situation in there to try to keep it interesting.This book also just dragged on and on to me, and I think that is because I just don't personally like Peterson's writing style. I felt like a lot of the deaths and tragedies felt cold, because I never felt like we really got into the character's heads and emotions. The author was just telling us how the characters were feeling instead of letting us feel things with them, if that makes sense. The characters seemed one-dimensional, and any personal histories that were woven into the story seemed like an afterthought, instead of something that was incorporated from the beginning. There was nothing really driving the plot forward, it just felt like a bunch of historical events and personal tragedies were strung together, and that was it. I also felt like Peterson tried to address too much in this book. This book tried to address loveless marriage, alternative medicine, hypocrisy, racism, death and grief, r.ape, abortion, adoption - all in one book, and it was too much. I couldn't pick out an overall theme or point to the story. I also had little confidence in Peterson's portrayal of historical events. Some of the historical figures were portrayed in less than flattering ways, and she provided no historical research to back up her representation of their personalities. I'm thinking particularly of Dr. Whitman, the missionary involved in the massacre, who came off like a total jerk. When I read historical fiction, I like to know that the author tried her best to get it right, and I didn't see the effort here aside from a short note at the beginning of the book. There was no explanation of her research and why she included certain figures/events/conversations. It felt careless.On top of that, I find the main character very unrelatable, and almost unlikeable. She acted like a know-it-all and got on my nerves. This is obviously just a personality conflict between me and the character (that does happen, and I don't blame the author for that).Finally, and this was disturbing to me - there was also a comment on page 89-90 where a character made a very sympathetic statement about someone wanting to marry their dog...I think it might have been a joke, but the context didn't seem like that statement was a joke. No characters laughed after he said it. Some people might not take this seriously, but I do, because I know in many countries around the world people do actually marry animals. And it's animal abuse, and it's sick. That sentence came out of left field and made me very uncomfortable. We no longer live in a global culture where a sentence like that can automatically be counted as a joke, and I have no idea what she was getting at by including it.The one thing I did think she did well was to incorporate the salvation message into her story. She did it very naturally I thought, and I like when Christian authors take that kind of effort. However, I can hardly give the author any points for that considering my other problems with the book, especially the seemingly sympathetic reference to be.asti.ality.Overall though, this book just really wasn't for me at all. Others with different tastes may like it more. I will not be reading Peterson again.Note: I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for a review. This is my honest opinion.
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  • Fizzy
    January 1, 1970
    Before I start this review there is a disclaimer I need to share with you. This is a book of historical fiction, I mean how many of us played Oregon Trail with the old school floppy disks (literally floppy) on a green screen computer. That is this book, sorta, the settling of Oregon Territory and the path to get there. This book is not an old school video game with green ducks and greener tomb stones. This book is about the real life tensions between the ‘Boston Men’ (or whites) settling near th Before I start this review there is a disclaimer I need to share with you. This is a book of historical fiction, I mean how many of us played Oregon Trail with the old school floppy disks (literally floppy) on a green screen computer. That is this book, sorta, the settling of Oregon Territory and the path to get there. This book is not an old school video game with green ducks and greener tomb stones. This book is about the real life tensions between the ‘Boston Men’ (or whites) settling near the Native’s (Indians). This is a book about a young widow and her sister’s who stay on a the mission due to a measles outbreak on their wagon train. There is violence, the murder of individuals at the mission as tensions run high between the two groups due in part to the many deaths from measles, and while not graphic is not subtle either. There is sexual assault (spoiler!) that leads to pregnancy. There is talk of rape and the desire to end a pregnancy. This book is not graphic but it’s also not subtle. Our history is not subtle either. I know that some readers may not be comfortable with some of these topics and I would not do my due diligence if I did not disclaimer this. However, even in Christian Fiction there has to be truth. These things really did happen. They are part of our historical truth and they are opportunities for growth and learning and strengthening of faith.There were a couple of hiccups in this book for me. I’m going to start with Grace. Grace did not lend herself to being a character that I could relate too or really care for. She felt overbearing and bossy. I mean I get it, after the death of her parents she became responsible for her sisters. She married for convenience to the Right Revered Martindale. I’m not even certain he had a first name, maybe Right Revered was his given name? Who goes by that all the time? Pretentious! He needed a wife to gain the mission field, she needed a new start and help getting them to her uncle in Oregon City. He died on the trail before the book started so . . . Still, she felt more structure and rules than someone who would offer a hug or be a gentle shoulder to cry on. Hope was alternate with pout-y and wounded. I mean I get it but it fell flat for me. These characters lacked a depth that would have gone a long way toward building the story. Even the conflict, drama, and emotions missed some little something that would have brought this story to life for me. Depth. I needed depth.However, despite the flatness of the characters and the drama this book did hit a few right things for me. I appreciate the detail that was apparent in research by the author. While I would have appreciated research notes or even some reference points, you could tell there was effort there. I also appreciated that there was a depth of scripture and spirituality. It wasn’t detracting from the greater story and actually added to the story. From a Christian Fiction standpoint this is huge. When scripture and to some degree theology is used in a book there is a balance. Sometimes those things actually detract from the greater story which the detracts from the stronger Christian take-away for the book. Peterson handled this smoothly so that these things built the story. It’s a fine line and I love that it was handled amazingly!Originally posted at https://fizzypopcollection.com/treasu....
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson was an interesting historical novel set during the 1800's. The author has done her research well and really showed the hearts of the native Americans who were feeling anger and frustration of being forced off of their land by white people who gave no thought to ask first about how they could live together and instead just swooped in and took. This all comes to a head of course in a most horrifying account of an attack on the mission in which our main character Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson was an interesting historical novel set during the 1800's. The author has done her research well and really showed the hearts of the native Americans who were feeling anger and frustration of being forced off of their land by white people who gave no thought to ask first about how they could live together and instead just swooped in and took. This all comes to a head of course in a most horrifying account of an attack on the mission in which our main character resides with her two sisters Hope and Mercy.While the story had its moments I found that I simply could not relate to the main characters of Grace and Alex. It might have been the fact that my kindle copy was poorly formatted. One page would have a conversation on it and then the next page would jump to the middle of a scene about something else, so that I had no idea what was going on. I was constantly flipping back pages to find the correct passage I was reading. Not an easy thing to do on a Kindle since the pages aren't numbered. That said, I think even if the formatting had not been off I would have still found these characters hard to relate to. They simply had no depth or personality. For example, the romance between Grace and the trapper Alex made no sense. It was instant attraction without any real explanation. And the long drawn-out reason why Alex could not commit to Grace made it even harder for me to care for them at all. This romance just fell flat.The only characters that had any depth were Nigel and Hope. Nigel I hated because he was a pest, but at least I felt something. And Hope - well - what she went through would break anyone's heart. I liked the transformation that occurred in her and think the story would have been much better served with her as the main character. The emphasis on faith was done very well and the transition in Hope in particular was interesting to see. Altogether this was not a bad book because it was true to the times and well-researched, but when it ended I should have felt something and I didn't. If not for the excellent research and well written scenes regarding the mission attack, I would have given this three stars.​This book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: "So what do you plan to do now that he's dead?"Premise/plot: Treasured Grace is the first in a new series, Heart of the Frontier, by Tracie Peterson. It is a three book series starring three sisters: Grace, Hope, and Mercy. The first book features Grace as its heroine. Grace and her sisters have reached the end of the Oregon Trail, but, things have ended unexpectantly. Her husband has died; she's now in charge of her two sisters and a flock of sheep. It's near winter. She does no First sentence: "So what do you plan to do now that he's dead?"Premise/plot: Treasured Grace is the first in a new series, Heart of the Frontier, by Tracie Peterson. It is a three book series starring three sisters: Grace, Hope, and Mercy. The first book features Grace as its heroine. Grace and her sisters have reached the end of the Oregon Trail, but, things have ended unexpectantly. Her husband has died; she's now in charge of her two sisters and a flock of sheep. It's near winter. She does not want to take the easy solution and marry the first man who asks her. She doesn't want another marriage of convenience. She wants time to think, and time to heal. Speaking of healing, she's a healer. She would like to dedicate her time to helping others, tending the sick and dying. And she's NEEDED more than ever when measles break out just days away from reaching the Whitman mission. Measles wreaks havoc on the tense relations between the mission and the Native Americans. A few from one tribe are ANGRY, and their wrath is focused on one man: Marcus Whitman. Our heroine, Grace Martindale, is no friend of Whitman herself. The two clash in many, many ways. My thoughts: I found this a compelling, fascinating historical novel. I enjoyed getting to know all three sisters. I felt the book was equal parts history and romance. I liked the balance. It wasn't just a story of how a woman, Grace, is given a second chance to find love and a happily ever after. It wasn't a case of instant love either. There are obstacles in their way, but, the obstacles aren't your typical over-done "obstacles" found in 98% of Christian romances. The history in the novel is that of the Whitman mission and the tragic massacre. Essentially, I found this to be better than your average historical romance.
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  • Raechel
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 StarsI was looking forward to reading this book, but it wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, actually. On the review-email it gave the description that the main characters were a midwife and a trapper – and to me, that sounds very good, so I requested it. And while Alex was indeed a trapper, Grace wasn’t a midwife – she was a healer, which maybe they would’ve been called midwives back then, but there was nothing that even mentioned her being called a midwife or any midwifery duties…But anywa 2.5 StarsI was looking forward to reading this book, but it wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, actually. On the review-email it gave the description that the main characters were a midwife and a trapper – and to me, that sounds very good, so I requested it. And while Alex was indeed a trapper, Grace wasn’t a midwife – she was a healer, which maybe they would’ve been called midwives back then, but there was nothing that even mentioned her being called a midwife or any midwifery duties…But anyway, after I figured that out, I tried to get into the book, and it was a fine read. For me it was just that – a good read, not terrible, but not fantastic either. Pretty light.Personally, I didn’t feel I could really connect with any of the characters much, and there wasn’t huge depth to the story. It was also a case of instant affection between characters, but not fully carried out till the end.There was the incident in the middle that was fairly intense and a tiny bit gruesome, and while it was awful, it did help you connect a little bit with two of the side characters.This book, I felt, was more of ‘tell rather than show’ – you didn’t get to really be involved in the characters or relate to them. You just read what happened to them.Now, as I say this, I also want to repeat that it wasn’t an awful book – it was clean, and there was a slight sharing of the message of Salvation, albeit not a strong one. For me personally, I wouldn’t mark it as a favourite, but many may love it.I received a copy from Bethany House. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Lisa (Bookworm Lisa)
    January 1, 1970
    The trials of the settlers of the Western Frontier were not easy. This book takes a look at a time in history when the "whites" and the "Indians" were in conflict. It follows a young woman, Grace Martidale, and her sisters as they follow the Oregon Trail. I appreciated that this book did not gloss over details of life for the people. Part of this book focuses on the Whitman Mansion Massacre. The book looks at the tensions that led up to it, the plight of the victims, and the aftermath. It isn't The trials of the settlers of the Western Frontier were not easy. This book takes a look at a time in history when the "whites" and the "Indians" were in conflict. It follows a young woman, Grace Martidale, and her sisters as they follow the Oregon Trail. I appreciated that this book did not gloss over details of life for the people. Part of this book focuses on the Whitman Mansion Massacre. The book looks at the tensions that led up to it, the plight of the victims, and the aftermath. It isn't pretty. Tracie Peterson stays true to the history and covers the treatment of the hostages (including rape, without details). It was a violent action and that is described as well. If anything, it gave me an appreciation for history and for the people who were brave enough to leave their homes and security to settle the frontier.Grace is a healer. She and her sisters stay at the mansion due to an outbreak of the measles on the trail. She is compassionate and brave. The romance between her and a trapper, Alex, is sweet. It doesn't come close to being rushed. In some ways it was a little slow for me. I think that Tracie Peterson did a great job at describing the position of both sides of the conflict. There was so much misinformation and hurt egos. This book touched me and reminds me that sometimes we need to learn of the unpleasant points in history so that it doesn't happen again. I can relate this to so many social and political point in our wold today and see that we still have a long way to go.
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  • Laurel
    January 1, 1970
    Grace Martindale is left by alone with her sisters on the journey west when her husband dies. She isn't devastated, as it was a marriage for convenience only, but it is hard to be a single women on the wild frontier. Luckily she is smart and she has skills as a healer. When she gets to the Whitman mission she hopes to use those skills, especially as there is a devastating bout of cholera going around. She is shocked to find that the doctor there won't accept her help. On top of that, the relatio Grace Martindale is left by alone with her sisters on the journey west when her husband dies. She isn't devastated, as it was a marriage for convenience only, but it is hard to be a single women on the wild frontier. Luckily she is smart and she has skills as a healer. When she gets to the Whitman mission she hopes to use those skills, especially as there is a devastating bout of cholera going around. She is shocked to find that the doctor there won't accept her help. On top of that, the relationship between the Indians and the whites is very tense, and the Indian chief thinks that Dr. Whitman is purposely letting the Indians die of cholera. Grace knows this is more likely because Whitman is bleeding his patients, but nevertheless tension keeps growing. One day she meets Alex, a white man who is like a brother to the Indians. Under his guidance she begins healing them, and in doing so she gets closer to Alex. Then one day tragedy strikes. Grace is away for the day when she gets word that the Indians massacred everyone in sight at the village and are holding all the women and children hostage. What the damage ever be repaired?I liked this book because of how it showed that there are good and bad people in every group. It was also written very smoothly and flowed.I recommend this book to middle school and up who like historical fiction.
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  • Lisa at Farm Fresh Adventures
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good read. I enjoyed the Oregon Trail aspect especially once they arrived at Fort Vancouver as that is where I get up. I studied all about McCloughlin and such and how important he was. I could not stand Dr. Whitman in this book. I am hoping his behavior and attitude was a stretch and not historically accurate. The Indian situation of the time was so hard. Especially for those who sympathized with them and yet still understood that the white man was going to keep coming and coming and t It was a good read. I enjoyed the Oregon Trail aspect especially once they arrived at Fort Vancouver as that is where I get up. I studied all about McCloughlin and such and how important he was. I could not stand Dr. Whitman in this book. I am hoping his behavior and attitude was a stretch and not historically accurate. The Indian situation of the time was so hard. Especially for those who sympathized with them and yet still understood that the white man was going to keep coming and coming and there was nothing they could do about it. It was a tragic story of what happened at Whitman mission and my heart broke for Hope. I don't feel like we hd much back story on Alex or Grace. It seemed all focused on the present. Good writing but only 4 stars.
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  • Rebekah Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Well, after reading several of Tracie Peterson's books, I've come to the conclusion that I do not care for her writing style. She seems to be a fairly popular Christian fiction author, but the few books I have read from her have been lackluster and just "ok". Treasured grace centers around a horrifying event, so it has a dark and depressing feel for a good section of the story. That does not help the already mediocre characters and lack of direction. However, for me Hope's story saves the day as Well, after reading several of Tracie Peterson's books, I've come to the conclusion that I do not care for her writing style. She seems to be a fairly popular Christian fiction author, but the few books I have read from her have been lackluster and just "ok". Treasured grace centers around a horrifying event, so it has a dark and depressing feel for a good section of the story. That does not help the already mediocre characters and lack of direction. However, for me Hope's story saves the day as she battles with her predicament. The way Peterson brought in biblical truths during Hope's decisions was what saved this story from a 2 star. Hope's decision really made me think and pray. This will be my last Peterson novel, as life is too short to read 3 star books :)
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Okay so somehow my first review disappeared even after saving so now I got to re-do it yeah! Okay so can I just that Tracie Peterson and Melanie Dickerson are the two best authors in the world! I absolutely loved this book! It had so much plot and the characters were AMAZING!!!!! Okay so there were a few plot twists and there was a very major one that had me in tears. (But I wont say anymore.) There was a few things that I would advise that if you are under 14 not to read this book. It is histor Okay so somehow my first review disappeared even after saving so now I got to re-do it yeah! Okay so can I just that Tracie Peterson and Melanie Dickerson are the two best authors in the world! I absolutely loved this book! It had so much plot and the characters were AMAZING!!!!! Okay so there were a few plot twists and there was a very major one that had me in tears. (But I wont say anymore.) There was a few things that I would advise that if you are under 14 not to read this book. It is historical fiction and it was based on something that really did happen in history. I loved the ending of this book! I cannot wait to read the next book in this series!!
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  • Leanne
    January 1, 1970
    Tracie Peterson done a wonderful job with this book! It is well written and has memorable characters.The plot and speed of the story were great. And it was hard to put the book down! Although some of the events that took place were hard to hear about. But Tracie Peterson handled a hard time in history nicely, and the book never got into to many details. It was a great book and I highly recommend it! I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers for my honest review. The opinions are m Tracie Peterson done a wonderful job with this book! It is well written and has memorable characters.The plot and speed of the story were great. And it was hard to put the book down! Although some of the events that took place were hard to hear about. But Tracie Peterson handled a hard time in history nicely, and the book never got into to many details. It was a great book and I highly recommend it! I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers for my honest review. The opinions are my own.
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  • Katerina Provost
    January 1, 1970
    A light read and a beautiful story of redemption.
  • Debbie Dadey
    January 1, 1970
    As part Cherokee, I'm not a big fan of Andrew Jackson who is a character in this book. I do like history though. I enjoyed the story; my main problem was that the female character wanted to learn more, but never made any effort to do so.
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This book was ok. I've read better from this author.It is still a spell binding book. I do like it because of the historical parts of the story. There were some characters that I liked better than others but to me the story just didn't pick up like it should have I was overall disappointed. In the shadow of Denahli was my favorite read.
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy reading American historical fiction. I also enjoy reading Tracie Peterson's books. This book is the first in a new series which is called Heart of the Frontier. The story is quite tragic and deals with the relationships between Native Americans and White settlers. The reader's perspective could vary dependent on the opinion of the White settlers moving West across America in the 1800's. Today I started reading, BELOVED HOPE, which is book 2 in the series.
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  • Terry Houchin
    January 1, 1970
    I love Tracie Peterson's books. Thank you Bethany House for sending me a copy to review.Treasured Grace is the first book in the Heart of the Frontier Series. It tells the tale of three sisters who are traveling to Oregon City to stay with their uncle. The trip west in 1848 is not for the faint of heart.The timing for this book is right before the gold rush in California. Wagon trains are heading west to settle the Oregon Territory. There is choloera to deal with because of the unsanitary practi I love Tracie Peterson's books. Thank you Bethany House for sending me a copy to review.Treasured Grace is the first book in the Heart of the Frontier Series. It tells the tale of three sisters who are traveling to Oregon City to stay with their uncle. The trip west in 1848 is not for the faint of heart.The timing for this book is right before the gold rush in California. Wagon trains are heading west to settle the Oregon Territory. There is choloera to deal with because of the unsanitary practices on the trail. Measles, which to us doesn't seem like such a terrible disease since we have the vaccinations to prevent it, but to a wagon train of people in close quarters, it proves to be deadly. Then there are the Indians who are looking for any excuse to kill the white man who is stealing their land from them. A very volatile setting.The things the characters do to survive in this environment is what makes the story.This book is for historical fiction lovers or Christian fiction readers in particular. I thouroughly enjoyed this book and recommend you give it a try.
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  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany Books. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]The author of this book, working in a genre I do not read as often as others but still often enough to familiar with [1], managed to make about the most Nathanish historical romance possible, and I mean that in the most unpleasant possible way. I feel it necessary to give a fair warning about this review, because I am going to discuss some spoilers and some matter that is likely to be potentially [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany Books. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]The author of this book, working in a genre I do not read as often as others but still often enough to familiar with [1], managed to make about the most Nathanish historical romance possible, and I mean that in the most unpleasant possible way. I feel it necessary to give a fair warning about this review, because I am going to discuss some spoilers and some matter that is likely to be potentially triggering to people. Consider yourself warned. I must admit that I did not find the novel to be a bad one, but it was certainly one I got no enjoyment reading, even though I went into the book looking forward to a romance novel set in the Oregon Country during the early days of the Oregon Trail, and everyone knows how much I love the Oregon Trail [2]. I found this book to be historically accurate, but I think the author greatly erred in choosing to base her romance on the particularly traumatic material she chose to write about. Perhaps she will see her choice validated in terms of sales and awards, but this reader found the material of the Whitman massacre and its aftermath a decidedly unpleasant base to make a romance novel that depends on Nathanish characters.In explaining what makes this novel particularly Nathanish, I am going to give away a lot of plot spoilers. The central romance of this novel is between a virgin widow named Grace who had been in a loveless marriage with a would-be missionary to the native peoples of Oregon who only married because he would not be ordained a minister otherwise and had no interest consummating his marriage, to the relief of his poor wife and her two orphaned sisters who traveled with her to Oregon country, and a troubled and tormented trapper named Alex with a dramatic life history of his own. Exhausted by a slow journey, the family stops at the Whitman mission only to be subjected to the horrors of the Cayuse uprising that led to Grace's immensely flirtatious younger sister being raped and impregnated by her rapist and seeing her love killed in front of her eyes. The novel deals with her resulting PTSD in rather dramatic ways, discussing nightmares and irritability and depression, struggles with suicide and a desire on the part of Hope to abort her unwanted baby only to give the child up for adoption. And then, after a lack of communication between the main lovers, whose inability to communicate with each other despite their feelings for each other is something I know all too well in my own life, Grace nearly finds herself in another loveless marriage before the author brings the two of them together for the requisite happy ending that does not feel particularly happy in light of everything that happened before it.As I mentioned before, the material of this novel is not the sort of material that makes for a compelling romance. The main plot is dragged on for far too long, as the tension relies on the two lovers to feel deeply attracted to each other but be unable to communicate with each other to the point where they both end up nearly trapped in unhappiness before one conversation makes everything alright. Maybe some people enjoy that sort of plot contrivance, but I find that sort of problem to be particularly tragic in light of my own personal experience. Not only this, but often the main plot gets overwhelmed by the even more tragic subplot that is unpleasant because of personal experience as a survivor of early childhood rape afflicted with PTSD for my entire life. None of this novel is enjoyable to read, and the happy ending seems merely a deux ex machina arranged because no one would want to read an unhappy ending to a novel this deeply unpleasant. The author deserves some credit for having tackled some serious themes and showing the resilience of faith in the midst of life's sorrows, but this novel is a peace of dreary melodrama that the world would be better without.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012...[2] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...
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  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson is a marvellous Christian historical romance. It is the start of the Heart Of The Frontier series and what a cracking read that promises to be.Set in 1847, Tracie Peterson has incorporated the Whitman Mission massacre into her work of fiction. This does not make for easy reading but history is not always kind. We need to learn from history in the hope of not repeating it.The novel highlights the tensions between the Native Americans and the white settlers. Fear Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson is a marvellous Christian historical romance. It is the start of the Heart Of The Frontier series and what a cracking read that promises to be.Set in 1847, Tracie Peterson has incorporated the Whitman Mission massacre into her work of fiction. This does not make for easy reading but history is not always kind. We need to learn from history in the hope of not repeating it.The novel highlights the tensions between the Native Americans and the white settlers. Fear brings hostility. Some on both sides are unable to see past the colour of a person's skin. Others realise a man's worth is in their character. "He was... a good hearted man who cared about people no matter their colour."There were many with pioneering spirits who pushed into the wilderness in the hope of a new life. "We did not come to this place because it was safe, we came to serve." People bandied together forming friendship bonds.Close knit communities meant sickness was rife in all settlements. Traditional medicine clashed with natural healing methods and ancient Native American beliefs. Deaths aroused suspicion which fuelled violence due to fear. Despicable acts of violence and rape were inflicted, producing an atmosphere of hate and fear. Women and children were traumatised and the effects were long lasting.The novel explores the varying attitudes to God produced by life. "You ain't gonna have any peace at all until you yield yourself to God." God gives a peace that passes understanding at the hardest of times. For some "Prayer is essential." For others they were "questioning where God was in all this." Life may turn people from God. In the suffering and the pain we may question God's goodness and if He cares at all. Or is He an impotent God? God understands our anger and our pain. He longs for us to give it to Him and to help us heal.All life is sacred. It is a gift from God no matter what the circumstances of conception. A child does not ask to be born. A child is not a monster. A child is to be loved, cared for and nurtured.Life is sacred. There is the difficult subject of contemplated suicide. Tracie Peterson is sensitive in her portrayal.There are the themes of guilt and forgiveness. Our past actions may leave us feeling guilty. We need to surrender our guilt to God, receive His forgiveness and then forgive ourselves.Tracie Peterson has written an epic tale, identifying the pioneering spirits going forth and overcoming. Her characters endear themselves to the reader. We 'feel' their pain and helplessness whilst applauding their ability to keep going, pressing on into a new life in uncharted territory.Treasured Grace is a wonderful start to a new series. I am on to book two, Beloved Hope now as I cannot wait to see what happens next.I received this book for free. A favourable review was not required and all views expressed are my own.
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  • Narita
    January 1, 1970
    Historical novels are always so exciting to me as I get to step into the past with characters and their lives the author has created. I live beside them and experience living and facing challenges during that era. The early American frontier was such a time of change and adventure. That’s why so many of us love westerns right? Reading about those times and entertaining ourselves with movies is far different than living during that era. This is something the author really brought to light for me. Historical novels are always so exciting to me as I get to step into the past with characters and their lives the author has created. I live beside them and experience living and facing challenges during that era. The early American frontier was such a time of change and adventure. That’s why so many of us love westerns right? Reading about those times and entertaining ourselves with movies is far different than living during that era. This is something the author really brought to light for me. If you lost your family you were on your own and at the true mercy of others. You couldn’t run down to Walmart and buy medicine when you were sick or groceries and these are just a few difficulties they faced!After losing her parents, Grace marries the bad-tempered Rev. Martindale so she could provide for her sisters and travel the Oregon Trail west. It was a marriage of convenience as he had to be married to serve as a missionary. Her plans were derailed when he suddenly dies along the way. She is left with nothing again.Dr. Whitman of the Whitman Mission (of the infamous massacre) allows them to stay. Grace finds herself in conflict with the doctor/missionary because she is an herbalist. He does not want her treating anyone. This is ironic as she saved so many lives with her remedies on the wagon train. It reminded me of western medicine and holistic medicine conflicts today.While Grace and her sisters have a roof over their head they are not out of danger. Unfortunately the wagon train brought an epidemic of measles and there are many deaths, especially among the Indians. The Cayuse Indians the doctor is treating are dying in large numbers. They believe his medicine is purposely killing them. Add to that the problem of the increasing population of white men taking the Indian’s land, and there is serious trouble. Hostilities are increasing and the mission is in danger of Indian attack.A bright note in her life is handsome trapper Alex Armistead. Familiar with the ways of the Indians and the wilderness, he protects and watches out for Grace and her sisters.There were so many things I liked about the book. First and foremost was the focus on scripture and the plan of salvation. So rare to find a novel that actually shares this. The author emphasized strongly the reliance on God and strong faith in any situation, not allowing compromises. The tragedies faced by the characters are heart-breaking.I use natural remedies and oils regularly. I found it extremely interesting as to how Grace used and obtained her treatments. Once again a startling reminder of the hardships the people faced with injuries and illness.Always a great author, Ms. Peterson did an extraordinary of capturing historical facts and bringing to life the raw emotions of those who lived through the events. A book you will want to read!I received this book from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review. The opinions stated are my own.
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  • Prairie Sky Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    After recently discovering what an enjoyable author Tracie Peterson is, I was excited to read her newest series set on the Oregon frontier. “Treasured Grace” was published in 2017 by Bethany House as the first in a new series entitled “Heart of the Frontier”. Each book focuses on one of three sisters, and “Treasured Grace” reveals the story of Grace Martindale, the eldest sibling. Unlike many works of Christian Historical fiction, this novel is based on the true events of the Whitman Mission mas After recently discovering what an enjoyable author Tracie Peterson is, I was excited to read her newest series set on the Oregon frontier. “Treasured Grace” was published in 2017 by Bethany House as the first in a new series entitled “Heart of the Frontier”. Each book focuses on one of three sisters, and “Treasured Grace” reveals the story of Grace Martindale, the eldest sibling. Unlike many works of Christian Historical fiction, this novel is based on the true events of the Whitman Mission massacre — a gruesome event that changed history. The characters in this story are average, not extremely realistic but not terribly flat. I was hoping for more depth in their personalities as time went on, (I really wanted to care about them more than I did) but that just didn’t happen and I’m not quite sure why... As a reader, I suppose I never fully stepped into their shoes. It was more of a feeling of watching their story unfold from afar. As for the plot and problem of the story, well, conflict began to build quite early in the story, and it was clear that trouble with the Natives would occur before long. Even though I expected it, I wasn’t quite prepared for the actual scene where the massacre took place. It was gruesome and disturbing, especially the brutal attacks upon the young women who were allowed to survive. “Treasured Grace” is not an uplifting, sweet, heartwarming, or happy novel. With a horrific massacre at its core, we can’t really expect much else... While the descriptions of the attack were troubling, and almost made me wish I hadn’t read the book, it helps to remember that this is history we are talking about. While not all of the events may have happened exactly as the author depicted, certainly innumerable ones just like them have occurred over the course of time. It is how people respond to them, and grow from them, that makes them worth recounting. While I wouldn’t say that the characters in this book were as memorable or realistic as many fictitious people I’ve “met” through the years, they do have a memorable tale to tell. They also learn to recognize God’s hand in their lives, even in the midst of unthinkable suffering. And this response may just teach us, as readers, something that we can apply to our own lives. “Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.”
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