Ripper
From New York Times bestselling author Patricia Cornwell comes Ripper: The Secret Life of Walter Sickert, a comprehensive and intriguing exposé of one of the world’s most chilling cases of serial murder—and the police force that failed to solve it.Vain and charismatic Walter Sickert made a name for himself as a painter in Victorian London. But the ghoulish nature of his art—as well as extensive evidence—points to another name, one that’s left its bloody mark on the pages of history: Jack the Ripper. Cornwell has collected never-before-seen archival material—including a rare mortuary photo, personal correspondence and a will with a mysterious autopsy clause—and applied cutting-edge forensic science to open an old crime to new scrutiny.Incorporating material from Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper—Case Closed, this new edition has been revised and expanded to include eight new chapters, detailed maps and hundreds of images that bring the sinister case to life.

Ripper Details

TitleRipper
Author
FormatKindle Edition
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 28th, 2017
PublisherThomas & Mercer
Number of pages570 pages
Rating
GenreCrime, Historical, Nonfiction, True Crime

Ripper Review

  • Zuky
    March 6, 2017
    Ahh, I can't wait to read this. It's bringing up so much controversy!Let the record show that I have very little knowledge on Jack the Ripper and Walter Sickert, plus I have not read Cornwell's first novel on this case.
  • Nylle
    March 6, 2017
    Book is GoodI bought the audio app. I notice if you accidentally touch the screen it jumps to the next page. And I can't figure how to save and close book
  • John Shaw
    March 5, 2017
    Cornwell seeks to tell us exactly how clever she is, again.This time at volume.Cornwell had previously written a book detailing exhaustively how she, personally,researched the Jack The Rippercase and had come to the conclusionthat the artist Walter Sickert is the one true Ripper.Countless tomes, articles and films have been made to try to explain who the Ripper was. I admit it is a tantalizing mystery, this madmanwho terrorized London in the 1890s and captivated the World ever since. However the Cornwell seeks to tell us exactly how clever she is, again.This time at volume.Cornwell had previously written a book detailing exhaustively how she, personally,researched the Jack The Rippercase and had come to the conclusionthat the artist Walter Sickert is the one true Ripper.Countless tomes, articles and films have been made to try to explain who the Ripper was. I admit it is a tantalizing mystery, this madmanwho terrorized London in the 1890s and captivated the World ever since. However the truth is his identity is lost to time.As much fun as it is to play guessing gamesbarring time travel or a note hidden in the Palacein Victoria's own handdetailing the Royal cover up the Ripperologists(why is this even a word?)insist had to have happened.We will just never know.This book is nothing but running out Cornwells' ego and giving us all a good look so we can see how smart she is.
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  • Nancy Silk
    March 4, 2017
    "Awesome Research Accomplished"First, I'd like to point out that this is not fiction. It's the true account of 15 years of research into trying to discover who actually was Jack The Ripper. I am so, so thrilled to be able to borrow on Amazon this new release by Patricia Cornwell. It depicts her deep research as she tells her own story. It may actually be she who narrates the audio, but I'm not sure. There are many pictures of records researched and through new technology there are some pictures "Awesome Research Accomplished"First, I'd like to point out that this is not fiction. It's the true account of 15 years of research into trying to discover who actually was Jack The Ripper. I am so, so thrilled to be able to borrow on Amazon this new release by Patricia Cornwell. It depicts her deep research as she tells her own story. It may actually be she who narrates the audio, but I'm not sure. There are many pictures of records researched and through new technology there are some pictures actually in motion to excite the reader. Thank you Patricia Cornwell, her editors, and Amazon for making this research history available to Kindle readers.
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  • Lily Dashiell
    March 4, 2017
    First things First, Cornwell did not destroy any Sickert artwork. Anyone who is clinging to the idea that she did is being willfully ignorant. Just like Cornwell's first outing on this subject, I found this book riveting. I can't wrap my mind around the resistance to the idea that Sickert could be the Ripper. Given what we now know about psychopathy, why couldn't he be? When I read 2001 Case Closed I thought the case she presented was strong. Then, I went online and saw the explosion of dissent First things First, Cornwell did not destroy any Sickert artwork. Anyone who is clinging to the idea that she did is being willfully ignorant. Just like Cornwell's first outing on this subject, I found this book riveting. I can't wrap my mind around the resistance to the idea that Sickert could be the Ripper. Given what we now know about psychopathy, why couldn't he be? When I read 2001 Case Closed I thought the case she presented was strong. Then, I went online and saw the explosion of dissent by Ripperologists. Mainly the 'was he or wasn't he in London' question. The dated sketches discovered by Cornwall (in the 2nd book) seem to throw definitive 'he wasn't' claims into serious question. There's so much compelling evidence in this book, I feel confident saying Sickert is the Ripper. (I'm waiting for my computer to shut itself off now or my door to slam - the only part of the book I found myself scratching my head over.)You may not walk away convinced but the book is still worth reading. I'd be really interested in someone writing a book that gives specific counter-evidence to her claims if they feel they have it. No one could make me believe he didn't write a lot of those letters and then the question would be why? Sickert's work, to me, is disturbing. Having not known of his work before seeing it in these books, I found it stunning that such dark paintings were so beloved by so many, with no one asking why they make you feel such negative things at gut level. Everyone looks miserable or flat-out dead. I don't get it. I'll continue to research his work to see if I can find anything that's more cheerful.I always found the idea of ALL but 1 or 2 of the Ripper letters being hoaxes to be ridiculous. What are the odds that so many different people would feel the need to write such taunting letters and so persistently? To find so many different inks and styles of writing used is way more than a coincidence. Who had access to those kinds of supplies?As to the fistula, the idea that there might have been tremendous pain or fear during the operations, for me, doesn't necessarily mean a person will become mentally unwell. Perhaps, Sickert was unfortunate in that he was born with an unsound mind and an unsound body -- both coming together in a terrible way? I hope records of his operations will be found -- I'm sure they'd be enlightening.As someone who had a tonsillectomy at 4 1/2, during which the nurse threatened to tie me to the bed if I asked to go to the bathroom again, I can attest to the fact that at that age things are larger than life. I can still remember it 50 years later and there was no trauma or pain, just terrifying fear and a feeling I had been left forever by my Mother. Considering, this was a one-night deal, I can only imagine what it was like for little Sickert to go through what he did so far away from home, etc. This journey has been a long one for Patricia. She addressed a lot of things in this book and admitted that she wasn't perfect -- which many 'ripperologists' I've read online, would probably never do. Lots of arrogance around these parts. My advice to her would be to put it down now. Unless someone comes forward with more information they are currently hiding or new information someone finds, it's done. She did the work, put the book forward, after that, no one can control what anyone else believes.May I also say the new JTR TV show is nauseating. Real people suffered and died, it's not something I want to see a tv drama about.
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  • Jade
    March 4, 2017
    Thought Provoking and Intriguing ForensicsThis book jumped out at me during a time that I had been feeling a little lost on reading, but Ms. Cornwell certainly pulled me out of that funk. I find the abnormal psychology fascinating, so people who like these explorations will certainly appreciate this book. One of the great aspects is really getting a look into the vast amount of forensic research for this work. Ms. Cornwell presents compelling arguments, but also backs them up with facts as well Thought Provoking and Intriguing ForensicsThis book jumped out at me during a time that I had been feeling a little lost on reading, but Ms. Cornwell certainly pulled me out of that funk. I find the abnormal psychology fascinating, so people who like these explorations will certainly appreciate this book. One of the great aspects is really getting a look into the vast amount of forensic research for this work. Ms. Cornwell presents compelling arguments, but also backs them up with facts as well as theories. As she herself states, one doesn't have to agree, just to think and consider.This is an easy and page turning read, and I recommend it to anyone with an interest in the Ripper, criminal cold cases, or even the history of Victorian London. Ms. Cornwell also does a great service to the victims of these crimes, allowing them to present as people, and not just the forgotten women (and possibly children) who fell to what would become an iconic monster. The author's candor about her own experience with this work is also admirable, and I found this to be just the right book to get those cognitive wheels spinning.
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  • Lisa
    March 3, 2017
    UnforgettableI came across this book by accident really, but as a fan of Patricia Cornwell and also having a morbid fascination with all things "Ripper" I was excited to read what would be a huge turn from her usual writing style and genre.I was not disapounted. Patricia as always doesn't just say something and leave it at that, she backs it up with relentless excavation of fact and or fiction, forensically deploying every available skill and expert to produce an incredibly detailed and shocking UnforgettableI came across this book by accident really, but as a fan of Patricia Cornwell and also having a morbid fascination with all things "Ripper" I was excited to read what would be a huge turn from her usual writing style and genre.I was not disapounted. Patricia as always doesn't just say something and leave it at that, she backs it up with relentless excavation of fact and or fiction, forensically deploying every available skill and expert to produce an incredibly detailed and shocking account of the most horrendous serial killer of all time. Reading this with the kindle motion edition, was an experience in itself. The photographs and artwork adding a whole new level to the book and one I am not likely to forget.I had never come across Sickert as a possible suspect for being the Ripper, but now that I have and given the evidence and information in this book, I feel Patricia is more than justified in her conclusions and that the decade plus, she has dedicated to it's research has culminated in an engrossing and convincing story.This book will leave a lasting impression on anyone who reads it and it is defiantly not for the faint hearted. I am now about to start on Ms Cornwell's first been book on the subject.
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  • Elizabeth Norvell
    March 1, 2017
    BoringThis book was dry, dry reading. Nothing like the usual Patricia Cornwell. I was incredibly disappointed in the lack of storytelling.
  • Ray Palen
    February 28, 2017
    Read my 5-Star review this Friday on bookreporter.com .
  • Chris Wolak
    February 27, 2017
    I read Cornwell's first book on the subject, PORTRAIT OF A KILLER: JACK THE RIPPER -- CASE CLOSED, when it first came out in 2002. That first Ripper book had a lot of pre-publication buzz. I read the book because I was a relatively new fan of Cornwell's fiction (I started reading her in 1999) and I thought it would be interesting to see how she applied modern investigative techniques and technology to a historic--and still open--case. Plus, I love reading about the 19th century. This updated and I read Cornwell's first book on the subject, PORTRAIT OF A KILLER: JACK THE RIPPER -- CASE CLOSED, when it first came out in 2002. That first Ripper book had a lot of pre-publication buzz. I read the book because I was a relatively new fan of Cornwell's fiction (I started reading her in 1999) and I thought it would be interesting to see how she applied modern investigative techniques and technology to a historic--and still open--case. Plus, I love reading about the 19th century. This updated and expanded book is definitely worth a revisit.Read my full review here:http://www.wildmoobooks.com/2017/02/p...
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  • Randy Williams
    February 27, 2017
    Here's a new, evidence-based Jack the Ripper theory/book, written by an actual investigator and three of the world's top criminologists Dr. Michael M. Baden, Dr. Henry C. Lee & Dr. Cyril H. Wecht: https://www.facebook.com/notes/sherlo...
  • Jess
    February 20, 2017
    Walter Sickert was NOT Jack the Ripper! There is ZERO evidence to substantiate it aside from this woman's twisted imagination and a strong need to prove that she did not destroy priceless works of art in the pursuit of a hunch. He was not even IN THE COUNTRY during at least 2 of the murders. I am so sick of this. Please, stick to fiction and leave history and 'investigations' to those who know what the hell they are talking about.
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