Kid Gloves
If you work hard enough, if you want it enough, if you’re smart and talented and “good enough,” you can do anything.Except get pregnant.Her whole life, Lucy Knisley wanted to be a mother. But when it was finally the perfect time, conceiving turned out to be harder than anything she’d ever attempted. Fertility problems were followed by miscarriages, and her eventual successful pregnancy plagued by health issues, up to a dramatic, near-death experience during labor and delivery.This moving, hilarious, and surprisingly informative memoir not only follows Lucy’s personal transition into motherhood but also illustrates the history and science of reproductive health from all angles, including curious facts and inspiring (and notorious) figures in medicine and midwifery. Whether you’ve got kids, want them, or want nothing to do with them, there’s something in this graphic memoir to open your mind and heart.

Kid Gloves Details

TitleKid Gloves
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 26th, 2019
PublisherFirst Second Books
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Comics, Parenting, Adult

Kid Gloves Review

  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Kid Gloves looks like another cutesy book about pregnancy, but it's a lot more than that. It also features myths and facts about pregnancy, some interesting history regarding how far obstetric medicine has come, tidbits about medical struggles, and most notably, a long section on infertility and miscarriages.There's a point Lucy makes at one point that really resonated with me, as a fellow miscarriage survivor: If 1 in 4 pregnancies end in miscarriage, why aren't 25% of media portrayals of pregn Kid Gloves looks like another cutesy book about pregnancy, but it's a lot more than that. It also features myths and facts about pregnancy, some interesting history regarding how far obstetric medicine has come, tidbits about medical struggles, and most notably, a long section on infertility and miscarriages.There's a point Lucy makes at one point that really resonated with me, as a fellow miscarriage survivor: If 1 in 4 pregnancies end in miscarriage, why aren't 25% of media portrayals of pregnancies acknowledging that? Instead, we live in a world where people are made to feel guilty, ashamed, and/or tragically alone after a miscarriage, and we have to do better. It isn't fair for anyone to suffer these traumas alone.While it got a bit boring at times, overall, I thought Kid Gloves was an interesting pregnancy memoir. I'm not sure I would give it to an expectant mother, because I think it would have terrified me to read about Lucy's emergency c-section and pre-eclampsia in such vivid details, but it was still fascinating to read about and heart-warming to know that everything turned out okay for Lucy and her little family in the end.Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Carol Tilley
    January 1, 1970
    An important and moving book that's certain to be an Eisner contender for 2019.
  • Marcela
    January 1, 1970
    This gets a high rating because I'm a pregnant lover of comics and this book came along at the perfect time. Kid Gloves will actually be published right around the time when my baby enters the world, so I was thrilled to get an ARC via NetGalley. I really appreciate Lucy Knisley's candor and humor and how deeply she shares her own experiences of loss and pain and the incredibly bizarre and heartbreaking and wonderful ride that is pregnancy. There aren't enough graphic memoirs about pregnancy out This gets a high rating because I'm a pregnant lover of comics and this book came along at the perfect time. Kid Gloves will actually be published right around the time when my baby enters the world, so I was thrilled to get an ARC via NetGalley. I really appreciate Lucy Knisley's candor and humor and how deeply she shares her own experiences of loss and pain and the incredibly bizarre and heartbreaking and wonderful ride that is pregnancy. There aren't enough graphic memoirs about pregnancy out there, so I'm grateful to Knisley for sharing her story right when I needed it. I laughed, I cried, I related. Highly recommended for those who are expecting and need a break from the overwhelming crush of pregnancy fact books.
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  • Rachel Watkins
    January 1, 1970
    With brutal honesty and delightful images, Lucy Knisley documents her journey with birth control, pregnancy, and early parenting in KID GLOVES. Her book explores the history of birthing and fills in the gaps on what was blatantly missing in sex ed classes. Highly recommend.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    "I grew the ivy over the garden wall."I really love Lucy Knisley's work. This is the third graphic memoir that I've read by her, and I've found that she has the ability to craft incredibly personal stories that still feel universal. In this book, she looks back on the conception, pregnancy, and birth of her first child. I'm not someone who personally envisions having kids of my own, but having loved Relish and Something New , I knew that I couldn't miss one of Knisley's books. Like with the o "I grew the ivy over the garden wall."I really love Lucy Knisley's work. This is the third graphic memoir that I've read by her, and I've found that she has the ability to craft incredibly personal stories that still feel universal. In this book, she looks back on the conception, pregnancy, and birth of her first child. I'm not someone who personally envisions having kids of my own, but having loved Relish and Something New , I knew that I couldn't miss one of Knisley's books. Like with the other two, Knisley weaves together a story that blends her personal experiences with historical details. As she crafts her own birth plan, she shares the origin of the natural birth movement. When she discusses pain meds, she shares a story of a woman burned at the stake for daring to request them. I'm coming away from this book having learned facts I've never come across before, a number of which I even paused reading to research further.In sharing her personal experiences, Knisley continues to be as open and honest as she is in her other books. I love reading her work because it reminds me of sitting down to catch up with a friend. Knisley opens up about her experiences with miscarriages (and the devastating effect they have on so many women), the fears her and her husband had about parenting, and the illness that nearly took her life after giving birth. There's humor, grief, joy, and more. I can definitely see this being an emotional read for anyone who has shared her experiences.Knisley makes a great point in the book about women not being taught their own history in schools—from the way our bodies and minds were treated and how this continues to impact us today (expecting or otherwise). In many ways, this book is a story of womanhood and both how it does and doesn't intersect with motherhood. Because of this I'd certainly recommend this to reader who identity as women, and anyone else who is interested in an insightful look at one woman's experiences and how universal they can truly be.
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  • Bethwyn (Butterfly Elephant Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of Lucy Knisley's work, so obviously I jumped at the chance to read Kid Gloves before its release. I wasn't entirely sure whether I would be super interested in the subject matter (I don't plan on having kids and have never really had the desire to research babies), but I assumed that Knisley would create a wonderful book that would engage me, anyway.I should never have even SLIGHTLY doubted Knisley - this book is amazingly drawn/created, the facts inside are fascinating and some I am a huge fan of Lucy Knisley's work, so obviously I jumped at the chance to read Kid Gloves before its release. I wasn't entirely sure whether I would be super interested in the subject matter (I don't plan on having kids and have never really had the desire to research babies), but I assumed that Knisley would create a wonderful book that would engage me, anyway.I should never have even SLIGHTLY doubted Knisley - this book is amazingly drawn/created, the facts inside are fascinating and sometimes anger-inducing (feminist rights being stomped all over in the past, etc.), and her writing had me in tears about two times during the course of reading this book (and, yes, I read it all in one sitting, so a LOT of tears were shed that day). Knisley's combination of research, engaging art, and tales from her own life works so well I can understand why I fell in love so hard with this book, too. I read and ecopy of this book from NetGalley (and First Second Books - thank you so much, guys!), and that means... I may have to get a physical copy when this comes out to put on my Lucy Knisley shelf. Lucy Knisley - you are a very very good human. Thank you.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- If you work hard enough, if you want it enough, if you’re smart and talented and “good enough,” you can do anything.Except get pregnant.Her whole life, Lucy Knisley wanted to be a mother. But when it was finally the perfect time, conceiving turned out to be harder than anything she’d ever attempted. Fertility problems were followed by miscarriages, and her eventual succe I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- If you work hard enough, if you want it enough, if you’re smart and talented and “good enough,” you can do anything.Except get pregnant.Her whole life, Lucy Knisley wanted to be a mother. But when it was finally the perfect time, conceiving turned out to be harder than anything she’d ever attempted. Fertility problems were followed by miscarriages, and her eventual successful pregnancy plagued by health issues, up to a dramatic, near-death experience during labour and delivery.This moving, hilarious, and surprisingly informative memoir not only follows Lucy’s personal transition into motherhood but also illustrates the history and science of reproductive health from all angles, including curious facts and inspiring (and notorious) figures in medicine and midwifery. Whether you’ve got kids, want them, or want nothing to do with them, there’s something in this graphic memoir to open your mind and heart.This was a moving book, to say the least ... so many women go through this and this is a great read for any woman, infertile or not. I learned a lot about reproductive health and if there is a teenager in your life wondering about or working on a project about fertility and infertility, this would be a great book for them!
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  • Ashley Owens
    January 1, 1970
    I received a electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I 100% loved and would recommend this. I related to it SO MUCH. I just gave birth to my daughter just under 4 months ago. And while my experience wasn't exactly the same as the authors, there were many events/hardships/points where I went though something incredibly similar. Because I related to her journey of infertility, pregnancy, and delivery so much, I was very emotional while reading this.It was awesom I received a electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I 100% loved and would recommend this. I related to it SO MUCH. I just gave birth to my daughter just under 4 months ago. And while my experience wasn't exactly the same as the authors, there were many events/hardships/points where I went though something incredibly similar. Because I related to her journey of infertility, pregnancy, and delivery so much, I was very emotional while reading this.It was awesome to get an actual history on women's health throughout this novel. And because the author is not shy about really detailing what she went through and because of her illustrations depicting her sadness and frustrations, I connected with all of it even more. It was also great to know I'm not alone in my experiences, and to know that others have/had the same doubts, struggles, and anxieties as me. It was kind of a cathartic read.I will definitely be sharing this with my loved ones who are trying to get pregnant, are pregnant, or have just had a baby. Once it comes out that is... the release date isn't until like January!
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    So so so good. She manages to cover women’s health, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood with honesty, humor, and love. I needed to read this book ❤ highly recommend. ARC provided by NetGalley So so so good. She manages to cover women’s health, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood with honesty, humor, and love. I needed to read this book ❤️ highly recommend. ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    I read an ARC from First Second via NetGalley. I’ve read all Lucy’s books and I enjoy her writing style and artwork. This book was something new for Lucy, while it was still about a personal journey to become pregnant and give birth, it also successfully infused information, research, and popular misconceptions. While everyone’s baby journey is completely different, Lucy acknowledges what is depicted as an easy process in the media, isn’t always easy in real life. Realistically conception and ch I read an ARC from First Second via NetGalley. I’ve read all Lucy’s books and I enjoy her writing style and artwork. This book was something new for Lucy, while it was still about a personal journey to become pregnant and give birth, it also successfully infused information, research, and popular misconceptions. While everyone’s baby journey is completely different, Lucy acknowledges what is depicted as an easy process in the media, isn’t always easy in real life. Realistically conception and childbirth is a struggle for most couples, both physically and mentally. People feel like something is wrong with them when things don’t go right, but the more we talk about taboo subjects, it becomes a reality that having children isn’t easy.The book works for teens because of the educational components within a personal story. It also works for adults who can agree that so many important things aren’t talked about like the statistics for miscarriages and America’s maternal mortality rate which is the highest in any developed nation. I’m glad I read this because I learned a lot and related to some of Lucy’s journey. While her story is pretty dramatic, I became completely attached and can’t wait for the next story about her family.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic memoir is about the expectations we give ourselves about pregnancy and motherhood and how those best laid plans NEVER work exactly as we want them to. My own pregnancy and labor and postpartum period was nothing like Lucy Knisley’s but that’s kind of the point: we expect one thing because it’s what we’ve been raised to expect, but everyone - every single one of us - has our own story that’s singularly ours. I think this could be an important addition to the pregnant woman’s reading This graphic memoir is about the expectations we give ourselves about pregnancy and motherhood and how those best laid plans NEVER work exactly as we want them to. My own pregnancy and labor and postpartum period was nothing like Lucy Knisley’s but that’s kind of the point: we expect one thing because it’s what we’ve been raised to expect, but everyone - every single one of us - has our own story that’s singularly ours. I think this could be an important addition to the pregnant woman’s reading canon: cautionary but realistic, harrowing at times but ultimately hopeful. (I also think it’s really important that she talks about how her doctor dismissed some of her fears, because that was my biggest takeaway from my childbirth experience: that I wish I had known how to advocate for myself and my kid.)
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  • Robyn
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely my favorite Lucy Knisley book. She always talks so openly and honestly about who she is, but this one felt extra important because of the topic. She wrote frankly about miscarriage, eclampsia, and how hard pregnancy can be. I wanted to read this book because I really love Lucy's style and writing, but I definitely learned a lot and found myself feeling more for her in this book than I have in the past. Seriously would recommend. I'm not the right person to review this (I've ne This is definitely my favorite Lucy Knisley book. She always talks so openly and honestly about who she is, but this one felt extra important because of the topic. She wrote frankly about miscarriage, eclampsia, and how hard pregnancy can be. I wanted to read this book because I really love Lucy's style and writing, but I definitely learned a lot and found myself feeling more for her in this book than I have in the past. Seriously would recommend. I'm not the right person to review this (I've never struggled with any of these issues), but I really loved it.
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  • Ann Santori
    January 1, 1970
    I'm biased because, damn, do I love a Lucy Knisley book, but I'm not even a mother (well not of *human* babies) and I was cringing and sighing and crying through this whole book. That is the genius of Knisley . . . with simple comic-style drawings and her well-chosen words, along with her endless willingness to lay bare her life -- in all its beauty and pain -- to make good art.I received a free e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    I love Lucy Knisley’s work, and this may be her best book yet. Smart, emotional, and raw - Lucy shares her birth story and the struggles along the way in a way that’s unique and meaningful. Plus this features great research that puts some medical “professionals” in their damn place and validates pregnant people speaking up when something feels wrong. I think the world will be a better place because this book exists - the challenge now is who to give it to next!
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  • Matthew Noe
    January 1, 1970
    ""When we write about our lives, it's a form of time travel. We inhabit the body we were back then, yet we do so from our safe distance in the future.""I can't get this quote out of my head. I laughed and cried throughout the entire book. I'm now going to have to read every other comic by Lucy and I'd wager this becomes an Eisner nomination with ease. Absolutely a must read for graphic medicine folks. I received an ARC of this title via Netgalley
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  • Ang
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my gosh, this was gorgeous. I'm a long-time Lucy Knisley fan, so I didn't expect anything less than wonderful, but I was unprepared for how far beyond wonderful this was. I don't quite know what else to say about; it's one woman's experience with pregnancy and childbirth, with interstitial sections about pregnancy and birth in general. And it's just great. Just great.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve enjoyed watching Lucy Knisley grow up and enter this new stage in her life. Knisley is open and honest about her hopes, fears and anxieties. I suspect that she may get some criticism about not fully acknowledging her privilege but this is her story. And, she had many difficulties that she was frank about as well as addressing "taboo subjects" within this memoir. I’ve always enjoyed her perspective mixed in with her drawings. I’m looking forward to see how she adjusts with motherhood.
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  • Ms. Arca
    January 1, 1970
    4.5?5 stars? Hard to say since I’m a fan of Lucy Knisely’s style and the way she honestly shares her thinking about life. She’s got humor, relatable concerns and low moments... and yet, she always finds the human connection love spots in all of her work that make you see the big picture and feel grounded. I am going to need to read or watch something else before going to bed tonight, though (her birth story was particularly nerve wracking and harrowing). But in all I’m grateful she made a a grap 4.5?5 stars? Hard to say since I’m a fan of Lucy Knisely’s style and the way she honestly shares her thinking about life. She’s got humor, relatable concerns and low moments... and yet, she always finds the human connection love spots in all of her work that make you see the big picture and feel grounded. I am going to need to read or watch something else before going to bed tonight, though (her birth story was particularly nerve wracking and harrowing). But in all I’m grateful she made a a graphic novel about her experience getting pregnant, she’s just who I would want to make one on this topic (I love what she does with food so she has my trust;). I’m also just so impressed that she got this project done, infused so much research, and reflected so thoughtfully. Another solid piece of work that is refreshingly feminist and different than what is out there and from her previous work while still being so her. I think this one is a gift to many— thanks Lucy!
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  • MC Bonet
    January 1, 1970
    ::SPOILER AHEAD::This book is fantastic! I recommend it for those who are looking to get pregnant, those currently pregnant, and those who could not get pregnant. I'm in the last class. To me, this book spoke volumes. A comic that deals with both pregnancy and miscarriage is a rare and wonderful gem. It also touches upon the history of women's health, a subject that is never taught in school. My only question is, why didn't Lucy seek another opinion? If you had symptoms and you expressed that th ::SPOILER AHEAD::This book is fantastic! I recommend it for those who are looking to get pregnant, those currently pregnant, and those who could not get pregnant. I'm in the last class. To me, this book spoke volumes. A comic that deals with both pregnancy and miscarriage is a rare and wonderful gem. It also touches upon the history of women's health, a subject that is never taught in school. My only question is, why didn't Lucy seek another opinion? If you had symptoms and you expressed that the doctor shrugged off everything you said, why not go to another doctor for a second opinion? Not that it matters now. It's in the past. But perhaps the author's experience can help other women who are going through the same thing.
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  • Bethwyn (Butterfly Elephant Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Simply amazing. I am feeling so many things. Lucy Knisley, thank you for creating your work. I need time to process....I'm not crying YOU ARE SHUTUP.
  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    This look at what it's like to go through all the various aspects of conceiving to what happens after birth provides so much information.Small word of caution - there is a chance of triggering deeply saddening feelings, especially for those who've experienced a miscarriage. *Received an advanced readers copy in exchange for honest review from NetGalley
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  • Marissa
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful, heartfelt book! Librarians, your patrons *NEED* this book! Make sure to purchase it for your collections next year!
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I love Lucy Knisley's Instagram SO much. She's funny and insightful about the wonderful absurdity of being a parent, and her drawings are simple but expressive. All of that humor and insight is on display here. I found myself nodding in recognition and tearing up during her son's (distressingly awful) birth. There's so much that people don't tell you about getting and being pregnant, and it's refreshing to see both Knisley's personal experience and the scientific and cultural histories from her I love Lucy Knisley's Instagram SO much. She's funny and insightful about the wonderful absurdity of being a parent, and her drawings are simple but expressive. All of that humor and insight is on display here. I found myself nodding in recognition and tearing up during her son's (distressingly awful) birth. There's so much that people don't tell you about getting and being pregnant, and it's refreshing to see both Knisley's personal experience and the scientific and cultural histories from her research on the page.My only complaint is that the tone is a little removed. Given both some of the history that she relates (the family who invented the forceps kept them secret for TWO HUNDRED YEARS, resulting in uncounted number of deaths of babies and pregnant women) and her own personal experience (view spoiler)[(despite basically ALL the warning signs, her pre-eclampsia went undiagnosed, she almost died following an emergency c-section, she was discharged from the hospital still so sick that she was actively vomiting and had to be re-admitted the next day with a fever of 104), (hide spoiler)] she maintains a relatively cool tone. I was boiling with indignation on her behalf, but her own indignation is barely hinted at. Overall, though, a fantastic addition to the recent boom of baby/pregnancy memoirs, and well worth reading for parents-to-be of all genders.
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  • Narita
    January 1, 1970
    I've followed Knisley's books and her work for a long time now--from reading her "Stop Paying Attention" blog to the more recent "Something New." She is an impeccable artist and storyteller and incredibly gracious in how she shares her insights and experiences. This book felt like it stepped up into another level of her work. It is a beautiful, fragile, intimate story that pulled my attention and emotions into it immediately. She shares a very human story and one that many women can empathize wi I've followed Knisley's books and her work for a long time now--from reading her "Stop Paying Attention" blog to the more recent "Something New." She is an impeccable artist and storyteller and incredibly gracious in how she shares her insights and experiences. This book felt like it stepped up into another level of her work. It is a beautiful, fragile, intimate story that pulled my attention and emotions into it immediately. She shares a very human story and one that many women can empathize with. I was very pulled into her record of this journey and felt so moved. Also! Usually when I come to the title of a book within the book, there's usually a little "zing." (Can't really articulate, but hopefully this is understood.) When I came across the title within this book, I had to put the book down because it was just such a beautiful moment and I feel like it really covered the at-the-heart idea of what "Kid Gloves" is about.And, typical Knisley, the pages are filled with research on the topic of the story. This book covers a fascinating history of women's health and childbirth that made me want to research and learn more.Concise and excellently told and covering such an intimate and beautiful topic, Knisley has done it again!
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  • Ms. Arca
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so important. I’m a fan of Lucy Knisely’s style and the way she honestly shares her thinking about whatever transition she is going through in life. She’s got humor, relatable concerns and low moments, and yet, she finds the human connection love spots in all of her work that make you see the big picture and feel grounded. I am going to need to read or watch something else before going to be tonight though (her birth story was particularly nerve wracking and harrowing), but all in a This book is so important. I’m a fan of Lucy Knisely’s style and the way she honestly shares her thinking about whatever transition she is going through in life. She’s got humor, relatable concerns and low moments, and yet, she finds the human connection love spots in all of her work that make you see the big picture and feel grounded. I am going to need to read or watch something else before going to be tonight though (her birth story was particularly nerve wracking and harrowing), but all in all I’m incredibly grateful she made a graphic novel about her experience getting pregnant. I’m also just so impressed that she got this project done, infused so much research, and reflected so thoughtfully. Another solid piece of work that is refreshingly feminist and different than what is out there. I can see this becoming a staple and a book that women share with one another as they go through the seemingly endless ups and downs of the pregnancy process. Thanks, Lucy!
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  • Mary Evers
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review***I was beyond excited to get to read this book! Lucy Knisley is the whole reason that I got into the world of graphic novels!I've been eagerly awaiting the release of this book and can't wait until the print version is out and I can get it as a gift for all of my friends that have had, are expecting, or are thinking about having children of their own. I've personally experienced some of the struggles talked about **I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review***I was beyond excited to get to read this book! Lucy Knisley is the whole reason that I got into the world of graphic novels!I've been eagerly awaiting the release of this book and can't wait until the print version is out and I can get it as a gift for all of my friends that have had, are expecting, or are thinking about having children of their own. I've personally experienced some of the struggles talked about in this book and can't begin to express how grateful I am that someone has had the courage to discuss and share personal experiences relating to having children. It's not all happy and wonderful having children, terrible loss and struggle can occur and it takes immense bravery to talk about it and share those struggles (and achievements) with the entire world. This is the book I wish I had when starting my journey to start a family.
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  • Marion
    January 1, 1970
    The honesty with which Lucy Knisley has lead readers' through her life (the good, the bad, and everything in-between) has allowed us to feel as though we not only know her, but are friends with her. "Kid Gloves" is no different as she takes us through the heartbreak of fertility issues and miscarriages, all the way to her near-death experience during labor and delivery and transition into motherhood. She holds nothing back with her watercolor comic-style illustrations and lyrical prose that take The honesty with which Lucy Knisley has lead readers' through her life (the good, the bad, and everything in-between) has allowed us to feel as though we not only know her, but are friends with her. "Kid Gloves" is no different as she takes us through the heartbreak of fertility issues and miscarriages, all the way to her near-death experience during labor and delivery and transition into motherhood. She holds nothing back with her watercolor comic-style illustrations and lyrical prose that takes the reader through it all. The beauty of Knisley's work is that it never feels isolating. Regardless if you have kids or not, Knisley draws you in with not only her story, but with the (at times ridiculous) history of reproductive health, women's rights, and the men and women of medicine. She does a lovely job of peppering in this information throughout the graphic novel in a seamless way that doesn't take the reader out of the story, but further enhances it. It also serves as a nice break from the at times jarring circumstances of her life, which can be emotionally overwhelming. It's a tough but important read. Lucy Knisely will always have a special place in my heart and I look forward to sharing this book with many readers. ARC provided through NetGalley.
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  • Were Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps even a 4.5.I'm definitely going to go back and read Lucy Kingsley's other graphic novels after this!This is a book written for an adult audience. The books starts off with Lucy wanting to get pregnant and dealing with two very painful miscarriages. When an issue with her uterus is discovered and fixed she becomes pregnant and chronicles her experiences. It's honest, filled with facts, personal anecdotes, and lots of research, and I really enjoyed reading it. I could see it fitting in a s Perhaps even a 4.5.I'm definitely going to go back and read Lucy Kingsley's other graphic novels after this!This is a book written for an adult audience. The books starts off with Lucy wanting to get pregnant and dealing with two very painful miscarriages. When an issue with her uterus is discovered and fixed she becomes pregnant and chronicles her experiences. It's honest, filled with facts, personal anecdotes, and lots of research, and I really enjoyed reading it. I could see it fitting in a school that wanted a fully fleshed sexuality and health section, a lot of information in there was stuff she had never learned (and I hadn't either, one in 4 pregnancies end in a miscarriage?! 1 in 4, why aren't we talking about this more?!). but it's an adult story, with adult subject matter, and I don't picture very many young readers being attracted to it.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Lucy Knisley is my all-time favorite cartoonist, and I’ve been anxiously awaiting this book since she announced her pregnancy. I was thrilled to see it available on NetGalley, and it was everything I hoped it would be. (Aside from more about Pal himself, but that’s forthcoming, so I can’t be mad!) Lucy is always thoughtful, funny, smart, and socially conscious, and seeing her apply these things to pregnancy was fantastic. It wasn’t easy for her at any step of the process, so her willingness to s Lucy Knisley is my all-time favorite cartoonist, and I’ve been anxiously awaiting this book since she announced her pregnancy. I was thrilled to see it available on NetGalley, and it was everything I hoped it would be. (Aside from more about Pal himself, but that’s forthcoming, so I can’t be mad!) Lucy is always thoughtful, funny, smart, and socially conscious, and seeing her apply these things to pregnancy was fantastic. It wasn’t easy for her at any step of the process, so her willingness to share her story with such honesty and emotion is all the more admirable. I learned a lot, and I can’t wait to get my hands on a physical copy of the book. For now, I’ll settle for her Instagram posts of Pal. Such a cool family.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Lucy Knisley’s latest, "Kid Gloves," is a beautiful graphic memoir about her personal experiences with pregnancy. She recounts several, heartbreaking miscarriages, bringing light to the stigma surrounding such tragedies, and provides historical information about pregnancy and birth-related care. Finally, she surpasses the 12-week mark of pregnancy, after which the risk of miscarriage is lessened, and officially announces her pregnancy to loved ones. Endearingly referring to her growing child as Lucy Knisley’s latest, "Kid Gloves," is a beautiful graphic memoir about her personal experiences with pregnancy. She recounts several, heartbreaking miscarriages, bringing light to the stigma surrounding such tragedies, and provides historical information about pregnancy and birth-related care. Finally, she surpasses the 12-week mark of pregnancy, after which the risk of miscarriage is lessened, and officially announces her pregnancy to loved ones. Endearingly referring to her growing child as “Pal,” Knisley’s narration of her pregnancy is delicate, nuanced, and often funny. Catering to those across the spectrum of parenthood, "Kid Gloves" is a moving, fearless triumph — I loved every page.
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