Endurance
A stunning memoir from the astronaut who spent a record-breaking year aboard the International Space Station--a candid account of his remarkable voyage, of the journeys off the planet that preceded it, and of his colorful formative years.The veteran of four space flights and the American record holder for consecutive days spent in space, Scott Kelly has experienced things very few have. Now, he takes us inside a sphere utterly inimical to human life. He describes navigating the extreme challenge of long-term spaceflight, both existential and banal: the devastating effects on the body; the isolation from everyone he loves and the comforts of Earth; the pressures of constant close cohabitation; the catastrophic risks of depressurization or colliding with space junk, and the still more haunting threat of being unable to help should tragedy strike at home--an agonizing situation Kelly faced when, on another mission, his twin brother's wife, Gabrielle Giffords, was shot while he still had two months in space. Kelly's humanity, compassion, humor, and passion resonate throughout, as he recalls his rough-and-tumble New Jersey childhood and the youthful inspiration that sparked his astounding career, and as he makes clear his belief that Mars will be the next, ultimately challenging step in American spaceflight. A natural storyteller and modern-day hero, Kelly has a message of hope for the future that will inspire for generations to come. Here, in his personal story, we see the triumph of the human imagination, the strength of the human will, and the boundless wonder of the galaxy.

Endurance Details

TitleEndurance
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 17th, 2017
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139781524731595
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Science, Biography Memoir, Space, Biography, History, Adventure, North American Hi..., American History

Endurance Review

  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent slice-of-life view aboard the International Space Station - along with smoothly interwoven stories through Scott Kelly's life to how he got to the opportunity to spend a year in space. I can't wait to see if an audiobook version comes out, if it dies and Scott Kelly reads it, fantastic!
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    Scott Kelly has done a very good job of relating his experiences as an astronaut in a way that someone without technical knowledge can understand. Some of his stories made me laugh out loud. It did kind of drag for me near the end, but his book sparked my interest in the ISS, NASA, and a possible mission to mars.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this e-book from the publisher (via NetGalley) in exchange for an honest review.I’m an absolute sucker for astronaut biographies, so I had to read this. There haven’t been a ton of books written by astronauts who have flown on the ISS. Scott Kelly is a Shuttle astronaut as well as a Russia-launched ISS astronaut, so he speaks about spaceflight from multiple perspectives. His military background comes across strongly in the way he writes – straight forward, tell it like I received a free copy of this e-book from the publisher (via NetGalley) in exchange for an honest review.I’m an absolute sucker for astronaut biographies, so I had to read this. There haven’t been a ton of books written by astronauts who have flown on the ISS. Scott Kelly is a Shuttle astronaut as well as a Russia-launched ISS astronaut, so he speaks about spaceflight from multiple perspectives. His military background comes across strongly in the way he writes – straight forward, tell it like it is. I initially had a hard time getting into this one, but I became engrossed at about the 30% mark, then tore through the rest. For those expecting a book just about the Year in Space program, you may come away disappointed. The book really wasn’t centered on that program, and he didn’t really give a lot of detail about what went on, experiment wise. He does talk a lot about life on the ISS, so that was very interesting. We get his life story, his military career story and the story of how he was selected to be an astronaut. This book gave the best descriptions about life on the ISS that I’ve encountered so far. It was really neat to see the difference between how the Russian modules are run versus the US run modules. I think this book will appeal to non-fiction fans, especially those interested in NASA, the ISS and space science. I’m not sure this will appeal to a wide variety of people, but it is what it is.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from a giveaway...I originally thought my husband would read it (since he is a space aficionado, follows launches and SpaceX, etc) but when I received the book I was intrigued and decided to read it. I almost never read nonfiction (though am an avid fiction reader), but I'm so glad I read it! I loved it and would definitely recommend, especially if you have an interest in space stuff!Kelly juxtaposed his life onboard the ISS for the year-long mission with how he be I received an ARC of this book from a giveaway...I originally thought my husband would read it (since he is a space aficionado, follows launches and SpaceX, etc) but when I received the book I was intrigued and decided to read it. I almost never read nonfiction (though am an avid fiction reader), but I'm so glad I read it! I loved it and would definitely recommend, especially if you have an interest in space stuff!Kelly juxtaposed his life onboard the ISS for the year-long mission with how he became an astronaut and the events leading up to the year-long mission. This was told in alternating chapters: the time on the International Space Station was written in present tense while his autobiographical part was past tense. I liked that the chapters alternated, because it prevented me from getting too bored or bogged down with one storyline. Both parts I found fascinating. To become an astronaut is immensely difficult and I have always been curious how that happens, both the selection process and the training, since astronauts are the crème de la crème. Add to that when you discover that Scott Kelly was a horrible student and aimless during his school years; how did this man end up obtaining one of the most difficult jobs ever? And that he and his twin brother were selected at the same time? The chapters about the ISS were equally interesting. Learning about the difficulties of space station life, from the everyday actions of eating and dressing and sleeping to the challenging duties required of the astronauts, was enlightening and made me appreciate my easy life a whole lot more. I was amazed by what he goes through for launches and landings. His whole story is very inspiring.I gave a five star rating, but the book is not perfect. Overall I found it well written. However (and some of this may change since I did read an ARC after all) there was some repetition in stories or descriptions, though that didn't bother me too much. Also, the book was sprinkled with curse words and some talk of crude things (like diapers and toilets on the ISS). Again, this didn't bother me but it might bother others, or be a bit much for younger readers. And I viewed the crude stuff as okay because I realized that it's a part of the everyday challenges in space.
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  • Bentgaidin
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting memoir from an astronaut who spent a year on the ISS; coming out in October. (I read an ARC.) The story of his history with pilot training and the space program is interwoven through the description of his year in space in a triumphant call for science and exploration. Kelly makes no secret that he wants us to be going to Mars, and so the book is about the hard work we've already done, the obstacles we've overcome, and the community of people who would be ready to take us there. A An interesting memoir from an astronaut who spent a year on the ISS; coming out in October. (I read an ARC.) The story of his history with pilot training and the space program is interwoven through the description of his year in space in a triumphant call for science and exploration. Kelly makes no secret that he wants us to be going to Mars, and so the book is about the hard work we've already done, the obstacles we've overcome, and the community of people who would be ready to take us there. Apart from that goal, the book is aggressively apolitical -- he was in space when he heard that his sister-in-law, Representative Gabrielle Giffords, was shot in what he describes here as "random violence," and his training and experiences in the space program take place seemingly apart from the rest of the world in a way that occasionally make the narrative feel untethered. (This seems by design, so as to not turn off readers of any political stripe, and gain their support for further funding and exploration.) It's at least a quick read, and a good personal history, and worth a flip-through for anyone excited about space.
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  • Rosann
    January 1, 1970
    Scott Kelly's memoir is not just a story of a man in space for a year (though that in itself is an amazing story). It is a well-told tale of a family that produced not one, but two astronauts. It is the story of the space program itself, the international nature of space exploration, the funny, exciting, exhilarating nature of one of the last real frontier. Especially apropos at this time of budget cuts, international tension and suspicion of science, this memoir reminds us of the greatness that Scott Kelly's memoir is not just a story of a man in space for a year (though that in itself is an amazing story). It is a well-told tale of a family that produced not one, but two astronauts. It is the story of the space program itself, the international nature of space exploration, the funny, exciting, exhilarating nature of one of the last real frontier. Especially apropos at this time of budget cuts, international tension and suspicion of science, this memoir reminds us of the greatness that can result when goals are high, people of all stripes strive for the stars (and eventually Mars!), and teams of engineers, pilots, doctors, astronomers, and importantly, friends and family pull together to accomplish big things.The kindle edition was sadly light on those things that can interest me most: photos (much talk of- no actual), maps, diagrams and the like. Here's hoping the physical edition is stuffed with them.
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  • Katelyn
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading about space, despite the fact that I have zero interest in going there (way too terrifying). I enjoyed Kelly's memoir about how he became a test pilot and then an astronaut and his trips on the space shuttle as well as his work on the International Space Station (2 trips, including staying for a year, the longest anyone had every been up there). I'd only recommend this for fans of this genre, as it's overlong. I read an ARC that had a lot of repetition of stories and phrases in it I love reading about space, despite the fact that I have zero interest in going there (way too terrifying). I enjoyed Kelly's memoir about how he became a test pilot and then an astronaut and his trips on the space shuttle as well as his work on the International Space Station (2 trips, including staying for a year, the longest anyone had every been up there). I'd only recommend this for fans of this genre, as it's overlong. I read an ARC that had a lot of repetition of stories and phrases in it, but they may clean that up in the final edition. Mike Massimino's "Spaceman" is a more accessible memoir.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Astronaut Scott Kelly takes us inside his life: how he went from being an indifferent student, to a Navy pilot, to an astronaut and ISS inhabitant. He doesn’t sugar coat anything, admitting that he was not the model husband or father. He does shine, however, in his remarkable description of life on the International Space Station and aboard the Space Shuttle. This book is not only a must read for space geeks, but also offers plenty of fascinating insights to general readers like me--highly recom Astronaut Scott Kelly takes us inside his life: how he went from being an indifferent student, to a Navy pilot, to an astronaut and ISS inhabitant. He doesn’t sugar coat anything, admitting that he was not the model husband or father. He does shine, however, in his remarkable description of life on the International Space Station and aboard the Space Shuttle. This book is not only a must read for space geeks, but also offers plenty of fascinating insights to general readers like me--highly recommended.
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  • Just Another Fangirl
    January 1, 1970
    A disjointed memoir full of f-bombs and other profanity.received ARC from publisher
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this a lot more than I thought I would.
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by NetGalley. Fantastic - I couldn't put it down. This will be a good one to booktalk.
  • Debbie Hathaway
    January 1, 1970
    Endurance is an amazing book. As a long time space nerd, I eagerly looked forward to reading it and I was not disappointed. Scott allowed me to enter the exclusive astronaut club and become a part of the crew. I was there on his space walks and on his visits to the Russian cosmonauts. I shared his frustrations and the wonder of seeing the Earth from above. Thank you, Scott, for taking me along the trip of a lifetime.
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