Cogheart (The Cogheart Adventures, #1)
Some secrets change the world in a heartbeat...Lily’s life is in mortal peril. Her father is missing and now silver-eyed men stalk her through the shadows. What could they want from her?With her friends—Robert, the clockmaker’s son, and Malkin, her mechanical fox—Lily is plunged into a murky and menacing world. Too soon Lily realizes that those she holds dear may be the very ones to break her heart...Murder, mayhem and mystery meet in this gripping Victorian adventure.

Cogheart (The Cogheart Adventures, #1) Details

TitleCogheart (The Cogheart Adventures, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 1st, 2016
PublisherUsborne
ISBN-139781474915007
Rating
GenreFantasy, Childrens, Middle Grade, Science Fiction, Steampunk, Adventure, Fiction

Cogheart (The Cogheart Adventures, #1) Review

  • jv poore
    January 1, 1970
    Set in the skies above and the streets running through London, this scintillating story of clockworks, mechanimals, hybrids and humans is the book that will keep kids reading well past bed-times. It has to be hard for a young reader to step away from this fast-paced, perilous plot because as an adult, I found myself hurrying through a chore or four so that I could get back to the search for the oh-so-secret cogheart.Professor John’s airship was attacked and it seems the sole survivor is Malkin, Set in the skies above and the streets running through London, this scintillating story of clockworks, mechanimals, hybrids and humans is the book that will keep kids reading well past bed-times. It has to be hard for a young reader to step away from this fast-paced, perilous plot because as an adult, I found myself hurrying through a chore or four so that I could get back to the search for the oh-so-secret cogheart.Professor John’s airship was attacked and it seems the sole survivor is Malkin, the mechanimal fox that serves as family pet and pseudo-protector. He must get a message to John’s daughter, Lily, but even a creature as clever as he cannot make that journey alone.Slinking and thinking, Malkin has no idea he has been spotted. The teen-aged boy living above Townsend’s Horologist’s was having trouble sleeping and he spied the fox from his window. With a watchful eye, Robert realized the fox was a mechanimal and impulsively sought him out to see if he could be of assistance. He is his da’s apprentice, after all.Robert and Malkin are indeed an unlikely duo, but it is apparent that they must work together to get to Lily, because they are definitely being pursued. Mr. Creepy-Mirror-Eyes Scary-Face (not his real name) and his equally alarming pal are popping up everywhere and it soon becomes obvious that the four share the same goal but for very different reasons. One pair wants to protect Lily and provide comfort, the other is after the Professor’s greatest invention.When we finally meet Lily, and she pulls her little nose out of her beloved penny dreadful, we see a young lady that needs no protecting. But she’s no fool, so she is willing to let Robert and Malkin assist in her quest to obtain the elusive perpetual motion machine and to keep it safe from the heinous hybrids and whoever they are working for.Cogheart could be categorized as an epic action-adventure and that would be accurate; but there are also some subtle, yet intriguing, conversations that provided unique points to ponder. I just love everything about this book and I cannot wait to give my copy to my favorite classroom library.This review was written by jv poore for Buried Under Books, with huge thanks to North Star Editions for the Advance Review Copy.
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  • Lizzy (Bent Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    Cogheart is a tale with many moving pieces, not unlike the steam-punk mechanicals that Lily's father builds. Unfortunately I think it's a bit flat, as I never felt very attached to the characters. Also, for a middle grade novel, there is an awful lot of proverbializing and "lessons learned" sort of speeches, which I found annoying and am sure many of the target audience would as well. It also has a bit of a dark feel in some places, not unlike the Series of Unfortunate Events series - only these Cogheart is a tale with many moving pieces, not unlike the steam-punk mechanicals that Lily's father builds. Unfortunately I think it's a bit flat, as I never felt very attached to the characters. Also, for a middle grade novel, there is an awful lot of proverbializing and "lessons learned" sort of speeches, which I found annoying and am sure many of the target audience would as well. It also has a bit of a dark feel in some places, not unlike the Series of Unfortunate Events series - only these dark events don't seem to have much effect on the characters except as plot devices. Despite these flaws, I did finish the book and found the mech aspect interesting. I just have doubts about the book's ability to hold the attention of a middle grade reader due to the issues I've mentioned.
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  • Puck
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars for this exciting steampunk adventure. Cogs and chronometers, this book is amazing! It caught my eye in Waterstones because of the beautiful cover and since I’ve never read something steampunk-related before, I decided to give this a try. And I’m glad I did, because I loved this book. Cogheart is a middle-grade adventure story that takes place in Victorian London. We follow Lily, a headstrong, 11-year old girl who’s father, the talented inventor John Hartman, has gone missing and is pres 4 stars for this exciting steampunk adventure. Cogs and chronometers, this book is amazing! It caught my eye in Waterstones because of the beautiful cover and since I’ve never read something steampunk-related before, I decided to give this a try. And I’m glad I did, because I loved this book. Cogheart is a middle-grade adventure story that takes place in Victorian London. We follow Lily, a headstrong, 11-year old girl who’s father, the talented inventor John Hartman, has gone missing and is presumed dead. Lily doesn’t believe this, and when she hears from her mechanical fox Malkin that John was working on a special new invention, Lily goes looking for answers. On her search she gets followed by a couple of creepy men, but luckily she finds an ally in Robert, the clockmaker’s son with a fear of heights. So the plot seems very mysterious and exciting, but the first part of the book is actually quite slow. However, when Lily, Robert and Malkin meet the plot truly kicks off and the rest of the story becomes as action-packed and thrilling as the blurb promises. Some situations, especially near the end, were so intense that I hardly could put the book down! I also completely fell in love with Robert. Lily is a charming girl but Robert became my favorite because of his character development. He grows from a hesitant boy who’s unsure of his talents into a brave young man who conquers his fears.Next to know is that the world-building is brilliantly done. The image of Victorian London filled with mechanical machines- and people felt very real and alive. We have “Hybrids” (half-mech, half-human people) and steam-powered airships, mixed with vivid descriptions of 19th century London. Author Peter Bunzl really brings his steampunk world alive with only a few lines: well done! However, as talented as he is in writing action-scenes and world-building, Bunzl needs some practice in writing dialogue. He often lets the characters say things that are too unrealistic. The lines sound as if they need to be written down, instead of spoken out loud. For example, this is part of a conversation between Robert and his father. It’s nicely written and contains a great lesson, but it’s maybe not something I would truly say to an 11-year old boy: “Such terrible things happen in the world, don’t they? Violence against mechs and humans. And sometimes it feels easier to give in, or not to get involved. But, I suppose, without those evils there’d be no chance for us to do good, and doing good is what matters. Though it can sometimes be very frightening…” Thaddeus paused and tapped the workbench thoughtfully with his screwdriver. ”No one conquers fear easily, Robert. It takes a brave heart to win great battles.” So apart from telling us an exciting story, Bunzl doesn’t shy away from heavy themes like loss and grief, and from teaching lessons about loyalty, bravery, and being honest to each other. Combined with the nail-biting action scenes, the engaging (lead) characters, and the beautiful world building make Cogheart a fantastic book and an impressive debut.The reason why I won’t give this book 5 stars is because of its slow start and the unpolished dialogues, but I still highly recommend it. The book is aimed at middle-grade, but fans of “The Golden Compass” & “The Invention of Hugo Cabret”, or people who’d like to read something steampunk-related like me, will definitely love this too. ☺Read here my reviews of the other books in The Cogheart Adventures Series: #2 Moonlocket | #3 Skycircus
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  • Kaitlin
    January 1, 1970
    A super easy read and one which has a lot of Victorian steam punk elements which include a tiny mechanical fox called Malkin, a young girl with a rebellious streak and a boy who is the clockmaker's apprentice. Lots for kids to enjoy and well worth a read. 4*s
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  • Kerri Duff
    January 1, 1970
    This book was beautiful. It was charming and quaint, set in London, 1896. The characters were wonderful, I loved Lily and know she would have been a childhood favourite/hero of mine. It's not merely her though - all the characters were so well formed, including the wonderful Malkin (a mechanical fox), Robert (the clock makers son) and the villains. It's actually rather scary at times which I appreciated - it's a children's book that isn't glossing over death or peril but it isn't glorifying it e This book was beautiful. It was charming and quaint, set in London, 1896. The characters were wonderful, I loved Lily and know she would have been a childhood favourite/hero of mine. It's not merely her though - all the characters were so well formed, including the wonderful Malkin (a mechanical fox), Robert (the clock makers son) and the villains. It's actually rather scary at times which I appreciated - it's a children's book that isn't glossing over death or peril but it isn't glorifying it either. Excited to read the sequel, Moonlocket. 💟
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  • Robin Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    A really wonderful steampunk story that reminded me of Philip Reeve's Mortal Engines series. It's pacy and exciting, and I loved the world that Peter has built.*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. Please do not use it in any marketing material, online or in print, without asking permission from me first. Thank you!*
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  • Annemieke / A Dance with Books
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and North Star Editions for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. For a while I had my eye on Cogheart to purchase as an ebook. Then I stumbled upon it on Netgalley where it was getting a rerelease this year with North Star Editions and I knew I had to request it. This is just a lovely, delicious steampunk middle grade novel. The story starts us off with Prof Hartman who gets attacked on his air ship. His mechanimal Maulkin escapes and is sent with a message to Thank you to Netgalley and North Star Editions for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. For a while I had my eye on Cogheart to purchase as an ebook. Then I stumbled upon it on Netgalley where it was getting a rerelease this year with North Star Editions and I knew I had to request it. This is just a lovely, delicious steampunk middle grade novel. The story starts us off with Prof Hartman who gets attacked on his air ship. His mechanimal Maulkin escapes and is sent with a message to the professor’s daughter. If you think this book starts off with a bang I am sorry to say that the start was slow. That is also one of the biggest reasons I didn’t end up rating this book higher. It takes a while for the story to get going after that. The first half is telling us the situation. It is setting everything up. The plot doesn’t really pick up until Lily and Robert meet. Then the adventure truly begins. The world building is fine but I do have some questions. There seems to be an emphasis made that mechanimals and mechs do not have a soul and are just things to discard. But Prof Hartman’s own mechs seem to be very different in this. Just Maulkin and the cook. There is an emphasis on that too. I wonder how he made them so different from others. Maybe this is something that will come up in later books? I hope so. I think that would be interesting to read. Having said all that however the steampunk elements beyond that were great. It really speaks to the imagination with mechs, mechanimals and air ships. There were air battles and quick thinking on your feet. Things I’d want in any steampunk book. One of the things that I also really appreciated was that adults still tried to help. Robert’s father and their savior later one. Adults were the bad guys but not only that. Sometimes middle grade can be too black and white in that. Characterwise Lily is a girl that is headstrong and knows what she wants. When the book starts she is in a prim boarding school, where she has to walk with books on her head instead of reading them. Something she would a disgrace. I liked her right from there on out. Robert next to her is a very hesitant boy who grows throughout the book. He slowly finds himself. Learns that he can do things. That he has learned things from his father. So overall I think this is quite a solid middlegrade steampunk book.
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  • Quirkybookworm
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, be still my heart! This is one of the most creative steam punk novels for teens! Lily and Jack are really just adorable and brave as they navigate their way through dangers along with mechfox. I just wanted to hang out them and be a kid again! I was able to get lost in that world completely. The author managed to paint the steam punk world very vividly along with words such as cogs, by the ticks, and so forth. There are many factors in the book we deal with in real life. Overall, this book g Oh, be still my heart! This is one of the most creative steam punk novels for teens! Lily and Jack are really just adorable and brave as they navigate their way through dangers along with mechfox. I just wanted to hang out them and be a kid again! I was able to get lost in that world completely. The author managed to paint the steam punk world very vividly along with words such as cogs, by the ticks, and so forth. There are many factors in the book we deal with in real life. Overall, this book gave me huge warm fuzzy feelings! I believe many kids along with adults would totally enjoy this book. I cannot wait for the next book to come out! You guys have got to read this novel!Did I say the author is a hunk? What? I’m behaving!!
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  • Hafsa Sabira
    January 1, 1970
    The novel follows Lily and her dangerous adventure in search of her lost father. After her mother dies in a tragic accident, Lily's father changes their identity and admits Lily into a Victorian boarding school where Lily has trouble fitting in. When her father goes missing, Lily is taken home from her school and left at the mercy of her governess and godfather. Soon Lily discovers silver-eyed men on pursuit of something that her mechanical genius father created. As life becomes more and more mi The novel follows Lily and her dangerous adventure in search of her lost father. After her mother dies in a tragic accident, Lily's father changes their identity and admits Lily into a Victorian boarding school where Lily has trouble fitting in. When her father goes missing, Lily is taken home from her school and left at the mercy of her governess and godfather. Soon Lily discovers silver-eyed men on pursuit of something that her mechanical genius father created. As life becomes more and more miserable for Lily, she runs away with her friends—Robert, the clockmaker’s son, and Malkin, her mechanical fox to seek help and to find her missing father. The novel is a combination of mystery, action and adventure where sacrifice is made and lives are lost. However, I found the novel a bit rushed in some places, specially during the conversations. Some characters also seemed like they are trying too hard, specially the mechanical ones. Also, the whole point about making the perpetual machine, breaking a promise and trying to hide it- just don't seem rational. I guess I felt like this because so many explanations were missing in this novel, probably kept for the second book. I am not going to read it as I didn't quite enjoy this one. Moreover, the novel ended in such a way that the need for a sequel doesn't seem necessary, with all the villains dead and the heroes saved.Therefore, three stars it is.
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    What are the Cogheart Adventure books about?The Cogheart Adventure books are fantastical action-packed stories for ages 8+ set in an alternative Victorian world. They feature three main characters: Lily, the fiery and quick-witted daughter of two world famous inventors, Robert, a talented and thoughtful clockmaker’s son and Malkin, a scruffy and opinionated mechanical fox. The three heroes must use every ounce of their courage and cunning as they face a series of mysterious life-threatening adve What are the Cogheart Adventure books about?The Cogheart Adventure books are fantastical action-packed stories for ages 8+ set in an alternative Victorian world. They feature three main characters: Lily, the fiery and quick-witted daughter of two world famous inventors, Robert, a talented and thoughtful clockmaker’s son and Malkin, a scruffy and opinionated mechanical fox. The three heroes must use every ounce of their courage and cunning as they face a series of mysterious life-threatening adventures!What inspired you to write the Cogheart Adventures?I was reading about various clockwork robots that existed in the Eighteenth century, before Victorian times. They were called automatons and were incredible pieces of engineering. Some of them still survive; if you look them up on youtube you will see how amazing they are.Automatons were built to do simple tasks; like write their name or a few lines of poetry; play a musical instrument or do a card trick. Some were even parts of complex clocks and their movements told the time.I wondered what if these automatons got so good that they could do anything and everything? What if, though they were mechanical robots, they became almost human? Could a spark of life exist inside them? Could they think and feel? And what would that mean for their inventors and owners?Why did you decide to set the stories in a Victorian world?Having decided to write about automatons I had to find a world they would fit in. I thought – what if I set the story in a time over a hundred years after the invention of the first automaton, in the last years of Queen Victoria’s reign, possibly by then, in this fictional world, automatons might have got so good they could do anything.I also knew I wanted to write a big action adventure story with these fantastical elements in, and I decided I could bring these together more easily in a ‘steampunk’ setting. So it’s a Victorian world with airships and steam-driven and clockwork machines – rather than merely a factual representation of historical Victorian life.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    So, this is a rough one for me to review. Anyone who has been following me for any length of time knows how much I love Middle Grade books. There's something beautiful about a tough topic dealt with in a way that is consumable by young readers. Even better, there's something lovely about watching a young person conquer an unimaginable adventure. I always have high hopes for all the MG books that I read, and this was no exception.At first, I was enchanted with the idea of a steampunk story for yo So, this is a rough one for me to review. Anyone who has been following me for any length of time knows how much I love Middle Grade books. There's something beautiful about a tough topic dealt with in a way that is consumable by young readers. Even better, there's something lovely about watching a young person conquer an unimaginable adventure. I always have high hopes for all the MG books that I read, and this was no exception.At first, I was enchanted with the idea of a steampunk story for young readers. The idea of Lily living in a place that was populated with dirigibles and mechanical people just stole my heart. However, I soon found that this book had a few flaws. While the story moves quickly, and the plot stays on track, there's not a lot of depth here. I found myself thinking about many other books that this story is similar to, that do things just a little bit better. It's a little cookie cutter, and that made it a rough read for me.Now, do I think that young readers would like this book? Probably! The story has plenty of twists and turns and Lily's group is plucky to a fault. As I mentioned above, the plot moves quickly and the characters are rather fun. As an adult reader though, this book just didn't hold the magic that I really wanted it to. Lily was the basic version of every young heroine I've followed on an adventure, and all of the things that happened to her felt similar to other books I've read as well. This wasn't a bad book, just not a memorable one for me.For young readers who enjoy high flying adventures with a touch of danger, this is a book they'll love. For adult readers, I'm not so sure.
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  • Ruzaika
    January 1, 1970
    Another version of this review can be found here.Received with many thanks in exchange for an honest review from the publisher.Cogheart by Peter Bunzl was a true delight to read. A middle-grade steampunk adventure set in Victorian England, this book has mechanical, mechanimals, hybrids, steam-powered airships and so much more. What first caught my eye was the brilliantly done cover- simply beautiful, don't you think? It gives you an idea of what to expect- two fabulous protagonists, a mechanical Another version of this review can be found here.Received with many thanks in exchange for an honest review from the publisher.Cogheart by Peter Bunzl was a true delight to read. A middle-grade steampunk adventure set in Victorian England, this book has mechanical, mechanimals, hybrids, steam-powered airships and so much more. What first caught my eye was the brilliantly done cover- simply beautiful, don't you think? It gives you an idea of what to expect- two fabulous protagonists, a mechanical fox and a unique key...what could possibly happen when you put all these together? Well, here's what: Lily is a 13-year-old spunky tomboy who is suddenly pulled out of school when her father, a renowned inventor goes missing and is presumed dead. Lily in understandably very shook, but her pet mechanical fox, Malkin, has other news. On learning that her father was working on a new invention that could possibly change the world as they know it, Lily knows she can't simply sit at home doing nothing while everything turned to chaos around her. She starts searching for answers, which ultimately draws all kinds of danger towards her- creepy mirror-eyed men included. However, with the help of her Robert, the clockmaker's son and others, Lily is sure she can take on whatever may come. The question is- can she?The story starts with Lily in school, absolutely detesting every minute of their attempts to turn her into a demure young lady. The author then slowly builds up the pace, and everything unfolds smoothly up until Lily meets Robert and is reunited with Malkin, and that's when the story truly takes off. I absolutely loved the world-building. It all just felt so real, and I had no problem in conjuring up everything in my mind as I read on- right from Lily's posture classes to the mechanicals (mechanical humans) and hybrids (half-human, half-mechanical beings). The author does a great job in describing 19th century England and combining it with his very original ideas- I'd gladly move into this enchanting world without a second thought!The characters, again, felt very real and alive. Lily and Robert went through a lot of development from who we first see, and Robert, especially, has a superb character arc, considering all he goes through the course of the story. Anna was a very welcome addition, and I loved how she fit into their story. The villainous mirror-eyed men and others were written deliciously creepily too! I also loved how the mechanicals felt so very human- and yes, Malkin too, was a fabulous character! The plot itself was super exciting, and the second half, especially, had me glued to the pages- the author does a great job with the action scenes, especially, and doesn't shy away from dealing with themes such a loss and grief. I loved the little bits of wisdom sprinkled throughout, and it was lovely to see the story tackle all kinds of subject while focusing on the fun and exciting parts too! The ending was very satisfying, while leaving room for the story to progress as a sequel, and I, for one, simply can't wait to get started on it as soon as possible!In conclusion I'd say- by all the ticks, just read this book already! The story idea: 5/5The realization of the story: 4.5/5The characters: 5/5The cover: 5/5Enjoy factor: 5/5Final Rating: 5/5
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  • Rebecca Jane Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Part of this review contains spoilers, I'll point out before I mention any! Apart from that, read away!--I stumbled across this book accidentally in my library, whilst searching for another. I must admit that it's cover captured my attention before it's contents. I sat down with it for half an hour before deciding to commit and take it home to finish... :).This was in the children's/young adult section and it did read like a children's/very young adult book... It would have been something I'd ha Part of this review contains spoilers, I'll point out before I mention any! Apart from that, read away!--I stumbled across this book accidentally in my library, whilst searching for another. I must admit that it's cover captured my attention before it's contents. I sat down with it for half an hour before deciding to commit and take it home to finish... :).This was in the children's/young adult section and it did read like a children's/very young adult book... It would have been something I'd have read at the end of primary school and loved! So with it's target audience in mind, I think it was sweet and enough to provoke curiosity! Adults can enjoy this too, for the language isn't simple or overtly obvious - it just may feel it's missing something.Saying this, when I marked this as finished - I discovered it was the first in potential series. So that may explain why this felt like an extended short story. If these characters are going to develop over the course of a few books, it could be interesting. Though I'm not sure where the story could go from here? Discrimination of Mech-animals perhaps?The book was easy to plough through, I've read it in three days. The language may push youngsters in places (especially all the random french during the first half), but for teenagers and adults - it's fine. As a book overall, it's not emotionally moving or mentally challenging - it's quite light to process.I found myself going back to the prologue twice whilst reading and then found it easier to understand. Sometimes energetic and somewhat random prologues and openings do mean more, the further into the story you read. It's worth reading through and going back if you need to.Potential spoilers in the next two paragraphs: The only negatives I have, are potentially due to me not being it's target audience: There were several twists and revelations in the book, most of which occurred in the last 100 pages... however by 140 pages in, I'd figured out most of them. I felt the author was too obvious with his hints. Especially with the letter he sent to Lily..... So I was furious when the characters (not figuring out what I'd cottoned onto,) continued on for another hundred pages and playing out a rather predictable story. Youngsters may not pick up the plot line so easily - so I can imagine the last 50 pages being quite exciting and twist-ful! Again, my age impacted how I treated the characters: I kept forgetting they were 13 years old, not adolescents. I think they behaved too adult in places - especially Robert's reaction and dealing with his father's murder. I found it a little unrealistic.The biggest thing I loved about this, was the world of mechanicals! I think that has huge potential. The idea of Mech-animals, rules and regulations AND their limited tick-span - has room for huge story telling. Especially in an alternate Victorian universe - it was rather cool!Overal, I think this is a good children's book, though I wouldn't say it's written for older adolescents. I'd market this to tweens and older children, adults can enjoy it all the same. It's quite a simple story under all the action and mystery! I'm not sure if I'll continue reading the series, but would recommend to youngsters! x*It says I've read this twice and I've only read it once! I read this over three days in June 2017.
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  • Lana
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first steampunk, Victorian adventure and I had no idea what to expect! “Punchcards And pistons!” This book was so much fun!Lily is a fiesty, young girl living away from home in an all girl’s school, when she learns her father is missing and presumed dead. This is where her adventure takes off!Lily was being protected by her father, but she doesn’t even know why. Now she is being hunted for an invention her father was trying so hard to protect. Does she find the invention that everyone This is my first steampunk, Victorian adventure and I had no idea what to expect! “Punchcards And pistons!” This book was so much fun!Lily is a fiesty, young girl living away from home in an all girl’s school, when she learns her father is missing and presumed dead. This is where her adventure takes off!Lily was being protected by her father, but she doesn’t even know why. Now she is being hunted for an invention her father was trying so hard to protect. Does she find the invention that everyone is after, or ever see her father again? I won’t say…But it is full of adventure with evil teachers, creepy bad guys and mechanical friends! The author was able to create such a creative, fantasy world with inventions and clock-workings that I was easily able to feel apart of and thoroughly enjoyed!This is a book I would highly recommend to a young reader!I received this advanced copy from NetGalley and the publisher, Jolly Fish Press in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This book will be published February 12, 2019.
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  • La La - Everyone's Crazy Aunt
    January 1, 1970
    I was so disappointed with the last 20% of this story as a Middle Grade, I don't know what to rate it. Plus, I just saw the author's blurb says he was excited to write about these kids finding their way in the world, but that's YA. Middle Grade books are about kids finding their place in the family and among their peers. I am so tired of authors writing MG aged characters who are far beyond the maturity of children that age, instead of making them a year or two older and publishing it as YA. It I was so disappointed with the last 20% of this story as a Middle Grade, I don't know what to rate it. Plus, I just saw the author's blurb says he was excited to write about these kids finding their way in the world, but that's YA. Middle Grade books are about kids finding their place in the family and among their peers. I am so tired of authors writing MG aged characters who are far beyond the maturity of children that age, instead of making them a year or two older and publishing it as YA. It would have been much less problematic for me if it was YA.And I cannot believe the reader who gave it extra stars because it was "wonderfully gruesome". It wasn't scary, smelly, drooling, ghoulish monsters MG gruesome; it was violent and overly detailed gruesome. Please adult and teen readers, when you review Middle Grade keep in mind that MG is 7-12 year old readership, and although some things may be great reading entertainment for you on a more mature level, they might not be great for elementary grade students. The adults chasing and shooting children in this book was even too much for me to take at some points.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    An exciting and gripping page turner of an adventure set in an alternate steampunk, Victorian England. With dastardly villains and two brilliant lead characters! I really enjoyed this and am definitely intrigued to see where it goes from here. Works nicely as a stand alone though a sequel is planned, so looks to be a fun set of mysteries. Was brilliant to see a strong female lead who breaks the boundaries of her time period, and the writing makes note of this too!
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  • HP Saucerer
    January 1, 1970
    A marvelous, rip-roaring steampunk adventure, packed with danger and daring, dastardly villains, two brilliant lead characters and lashings of mystery and nerve-jangling suspense. Positively tocking brilliant.
  • Dreximgirl
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the world and the steampunk aspects of this book, but I have to admit it fell a little flat for me. I found it perhaps written a little too young for me as I saw all of the twists coming and nothing really surprised me. But yet at the same time some things happened that felt a little out of place, like major things would happen to these kids but they'd just be fine and carry on without really feeling the emotions or impact of those things. I liked the mechs but I don't think that will I enjoyed the world and the steampunk aspects of this book, but I have to admit it fell a little flat for me. I found it perhaps written a little too young for me as I saw all of the twists coming and nothing really surprised me. But yet at the same time some things happened that felt a little out of place, like major things would happen to these kids but they'd just be fine and carry on without really feeling the emotions or impact of those things. I liked the mechs but I don't think that will be enough to get me to continue with this series.
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  • Emma Radford
    January 1, 1970
    What a great read - brilliant protagonists, gripping adventure and crazy inventions in this steampunk novel. Look forward to the next instalment.
  • Sand-Witch
    January 1, 1970
    This kid tho. It’s very fun and adventurous. It has mystery to it and at one point it gets very gruesome. 4.5 stars. This book is really good.
  • Rae
    January 1, 1970
    Cogheart by Peter Bunzl is a fun middle school adventure set in the late 1800s.I don’t read a lot of middle school books, but I’m glad I picked this one up! Cogheart was such a cute read! It was a playful book that set a frolicking pace and was jam-packed with action.I adored the storyline for Cogheart! When Lily’s father goes missing, presumed dead, Lily’s world is turned upside down. She doesn’t know who to call friend or foe and finds herself in the middle of an intrigue she doesn’t fully und Cogheart by Peter Bunzl is a fun middle school adventure set in the late 1800s.I don’t read a lot of middle school books, but I’m glad I picked this one up! Cogheart was such a cute read! It was a playful book that set a frolicking pace and was jam-packed with action.I adored the storyline for Cogheart! When Lily’s father goes missing, presumed dead, Lily’s world is turned upside down. She doesn’t know who to call friend or foe and finds herself in the middle of an intrigue she doesn’t fully understand. Her father was an inventor, and there are people after an invention of his that could change the world. Lily, on the other hand, just wants to find her father and live her life.Along the way, Lily has help from her friends. She befriends Robert, the clockmaker’s son, who accompanies her on her journey. She also has her constant companion, Malkin, with her. Malkin is a mechanimal fox, which is such a neat concept! I love the idea of mechanimals, and Malkin was a pretty cool addition to the story.The ending of Cogheart was a suitable end to book one in a series. It provided a good sense of closure. I’m looking forward to reading future books by this author!I enjoyed the characters in Cogheart. Lily’s backstory was bittersweet, but I liked her spunky personality and her stubbornness in the book. Robert was a wonderful companion for Lily to have along with her. Malkin was a sly little fox. And the bad guys were fabulously bad. All-in-all, the characters were a joy in this smartly written book.I would recommend Cogheart to those who enjoy reading middle school books or are looking for a light read. This book would be a perfect snack after consuming a lofty tomb!Thank you to NetGalley for providing the Kindle version of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Allie
    January 1, 1970
    Full ReviewI absolutely adored this book! It was honestly so hard choosing my favorite quote to put at the top of this review because I had so many highlighted. I'm a big fan of lyrical writing - it helps pull me into the story's world more - and Peter Bunzl's writing style is beautiful, especially for a middle grade! The writing was simple enough to be understood, but still enjoyable for anyone who picks it up, no matter what age!Lily is a great main character! She's realistic and relatable and Full ReviewI absolutely adored this book! It was honestly so hard choosing my favorite quote to put at the top of this review because I had so many highlighted. I'm a big fan of lyrical writing - it helps pull me into the story's world more - and Peter Bunzl's writing style is beautiful, especially for a middle grade! The writing was simple enough to be understood, but still enjoyable for anyone who picks it up, no matter what age!Lily is a great main character! She's realistic and relatable and her sass is on point! I love stories with MCs who actually have good relationships with their parents (AND THEY'RE NOT DEAD) and the relationship that grows between Lily and her father is so nice. I love the fact that Robert has the same fears that I do, and that he was able to face them every time that he had to. The villains of this story were all very well developed and certainly hate-worthy because I hated them basically the moment they showed up, haha! As for the mechanicals, each of them was so unique and I loved them all! Another thing that I really liked was how realistically this book describes the feeling of loss. I've recently learned just what that feeling is and the way it's described in Cogheart was so relatable; I feel like this was definitely a story that came in at the right time in my life. Altogether, Cogheart is a story full of adventure and strong bonds, along with learning how to cope with loss. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I'll be getting my hands on the sequel ASAP!Initial ReviewAh, I loved this so much! Full review to come soon!!
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  • Matilda Chapman
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book expecting to love it. The plot sounded incredible and the cover is simply gorgeous. Prior to starting Cogheart, I was reading multiple books per week. However, this took me just under a month. The characters were underdeveloped and dull. Even Malkin the mechanical fox wasn't as amazing as I'd expected him to be. The world in which it was set was not very well described so you felt a bit lost and the battle moments were tedious at best. The only book so far this year I almos I went into this book expecting to love it. The plot sounded incredible and the cover is simply gorgeous. Prior to starting Cogheart, I was reading multiple books per week. However, this took me just under a month. The characters were underdeveloped and dull. Even Malkin the mechanical fox wasn't as amazing as I'd expected him to be. The world in which it was set was not very well described so you felt a bit lost and the battle moments were tedious at best. The only book so far this year I almost DNF'd but I carried on in hopes that it would get better. It didn't. So much potential, and perhaps I would read Moonlocket to see if that's an improvement, but after putting Cogheart down, I only feel a sense of freedom because I can move onto something more worthwhile.
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  • Zainab Ishaq
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an exciting adventure set in Steam Punk, England. The book was basically for young readers but I read children's literature after a very long time so I really enjoyed reading this book.The plot of the book was great. I won't reveal here so I don't spoil it for those who still have to read this book or are currently reading.Peter Brunzl's debut book was an undoubtly amzing adventure with a gripping plot, with lead main heroines and many dark secrets.The end was quite satisfying but This was such an exciting adventure set in Steam Punk, England. The book was basically for young readers but I read children's literature after a very long time so I really enjoyed reading this book.The plot of the book was great. I won't reveal here so I don't spoil it for those who still have to read this book or are currently reading.Peter Brunzl's debut book was an undoubtly amzing adventure with a gripping plot, with lead main heroines and many dark secrets.The end was quite satisfying but still there are mysteries and secrets which are still to be revealed. So I am really looking forward to more adventures of Lily and Robert and yes how can I miss Malkin.
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  • Eims
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I had read this as a kid, eight years old me would have been very into it. Thirty-one year old me has to recognise that it's a kids book. It's an interesting take on Victorian England. I'd recommend for 9+ (it can be creepy in parts and a bit violent, not necessarily gory but just a bit ew). It's made my shelf (love the cover) and I'd recommend it happily enough to parents/kids/adults who read kids books.
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  • Steff Pasciuti
    January 1, 1970
    With a cover like this one, Cogheart by Peter Bunzl was never a book that I could have passed up the opportunity to read. In a world where mechanized people and animals serve the humans around them, very few have come to the conclusion that these machines can feel. But Lily, the daughter of a rather renown and brilliant mech inventor knows better. When her father's ship suddenly crashes and he is presumed dead, Lily falls into the guardianship of his housekeeper. Pulled from school, the life she With a cover like this one, Cogheart by Peter Bunzl was never a book that I could have passed up the opportunity to read. In a world where mechanized people and animals serve the humans around them, very few have come to the conclusion that these machines can feel. But Lily, the daughter of a rather renown and brilliant mech inventor knows better. When her father's ship suddenly crashes and he is presumed dead, Lily falls into the guardianship of his housekeeper. Pulled from school, the life she once knew is quickly thrown into chaos as her father's mechs are sold off and the housekeeper isn't quite who she says she is. And then there's the matter of the invention her father made.Honestly, despite how much I loved reading Cogheart, the truth of the matter is that the story was incredibly predictable. I picked out the main villain incredibly quickly, determined where what it was that he was after in the first place was located immediately after the event with Lily and her mother was revealed as well as the use of it discussed. There was absolutely nothing surprising about anything in the story. And despite all of this I did definitely have an enjoyable time with the book. The characters were pretty exceptional, despite the fact that the villain was obvious. The plot was great. And I loved the idea of a mechanical fox, though I'll admit I wasn't too fond of the fact that it could speak.I think, had I been younger when I read this book it would have easily become one those books that I would have adored and reread a large number of times. I think it definitely fits the middle grade readership well and I certainly see a lot of younger readers enjoying it. And the cool thing is that I now have it on my radar for any of my kiddos at work who like foxes or these kinds of stories. So, Cogheart gets four out of five foxes as a rating, only losing the one due to how predictable I found it. But at the end of the day, I really loved this story.| Twitter | Reader Fox Blog | Instagram |
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    ARC REVIEW Cogheart Adventures #1, I'm not usually one to read kids books unless it's for my kids. This book caught my eye as most younger generation books do it looked interesting and it's was about something I enjoy reading about, and I do enjoy steampunk. While reading this book I kept thinking about Steamboy and Castle in the Sky needless to say in my mind's eye I kept seeing this as an anime. Descriptive narrative was great it was easy picturing an alternate Victorian England the action was ARC REVIEW Cogheart Adventures #1, I'm not usually one to read kids books unless it's for my kids. This book caught my eye as most younger generation books do it looked interesting and it's was about something I enjoy reading about, and I do enjoy steampunk. While reading this book I kept thinking about Steamboy and Castle in the Sky needless to say in my mind's eye I kept seeing this as an anime. Descriptive narrative was great it was easy picturing an alternate Victorian England the action was exciting and the steampunk elements were wonderful. Could have used a little more character development but this is just the first book it was enough to get me interested in reading the other two and suggesting it to my daughter. I also think this would transfer great to graphic novel format.Lily Harman stuck in an all girls school longed for adventure. Robert Townsend wishes he could work on airships and not a horologist like his father. Lily's world is turned upside down when her father, a famous mechanist, disappears after his airship crashed and is presumed dead. Malkin, Lily's mechanimal, was with Lily's father when the ship went down but escaped so he could deliver a message to Lily. Robert found Malkin rundown and injured and with men searching the village for him and Robert's father was luckily able to repair Malkin. Lily's so called guardian retrieved her from the hell that was her school and brought her back home only to become a prisoner in her own home. Lily knows something is wrong and won't stop until she finds out what happened to her father, unfortunately the letter her father sent with Malkin explaining everything was damaged and she's still left with more questions than answers. All she knows is that her father created a machine that could change the world and it's missing and it's up to Lily, Robert, and Malkin to discover the truth.Overall, this was a great story. I enjoyed it so much.
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Cogheart is a story of a very brave girl who teams up with a boy who becomes brave, as well as a mechanical fox and some other mechanical helping characters. It's a real steampunk story with cogs and machines and robots who feel like people. There's also a female air pirate/journalist who is awesome.This story is adventure-packed and relatively fast-paced. I liked the main characters, especially Lily, and I liked her love for m I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Cogheart is a story of a very brave girl who teams up with a boy who becomes brave, as well as a mechanical fox and some other mechanical helping characters. It's a real steampunk story with cogs and machines and robots who feel like people. There's also a female air pirate/journalist who is awesome.This story is adventure-packed and relatively fast-paced. I liked the main characters, especially Lily, and I liked her love for machines, and that in the end she was allowed to learn what she wanted even if the interests weren't considered feminine.Still, ultimately I found this story... too bleak, if that makes sense. It does have a happy ending and a happy epilogue, but there's also a lot of death and some quite gory scenes. I'm not saying it's inappropriate for a middle grade novel really, because I don't want to patronise kids, but it wasn't as lighthearted and fun as I expected from the cover and blurb.
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  • Koeur
    January 1, 1970
    Review: This had a hard time, initially, getting up to speed. We get a little mired in a “Matilda” like story where Lily is at boarding school with a mean head mistress while her Father suddenly goes missing. I can see where some reviewers lacked the patience to see it through or it affected their perception of the book entire. If you can get through the first 3rd of the novel, you will strike gold and become engaged in a steampunkian adventure.Like most novels, once the movement begins in earne Review: This had a hard time, initially, getting up to speed. We get a little mired in a “Matilda” like story where Lily is at boarding school with a mean head mistress while her Father suddenly goes missing. I can see where some reviewers lacked the patience to see it through or it affected their perception of the book entire. If you can get through the first 3rd of the novel, you will strike gold and become engaged in a steampunkian adventure.Like most novels, once the movement begins in earnest, so evolve the characters. Lily is an engaging character from the start and Robert adds a complimentary perspective to the story line. Anna is a great addition and comes at the right time to move events to critical mass.This YA novel has a bit of something for everyone. For me the writing was engaging enough to stay tuned and I am glad I did. I look forward to the further adventures of Lily and Robert in “MoonLocket“.You can get all my reviews, here.
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  • Fi's Journey
    January 1, 1970
    "No one conquers fear easily. It takes practice to reach true heights; a brave heart to win great battle."2.5 starsI liked some aspects of the story but didn't got attached to any of the characters or the story line. But it was a fun and action-packed adventure through the sky.
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