Antisocial
6 hours and 30 minutesAlexandria Prep is hacked in this whodunit set in the age of social media and the cloud.Senior spring at Alexandria Prep was supposed to be for sleeping through class and partying with friends. But for Anna Soler, it’s going to be a lonely road. She’s just been dumped by her gorgeous basketball star boyfriend—with no explanation. Anna’s closest friends, the real ones she abandoned while dating him, are ignoring her. The endearing boy she’s always had a complicated friendship with is almost too sympathetic.But suddenly Anna isn’t the only one whose life has been upended. Someone is determined to knock the kings and queens of the school off their thrones: one by one, their phones get hacked and their personal messages and photos are leaked. At first it’s funny—people love watching the dirty private lives of those they envy become all too public. Then the hacks escalate. Dark secrets are exposed, and lives are shattered. Chaos erupts at school. As Anna tries to save those she cares about most and to protect her own secrets, she begins to understand the reality of our always-connected lives: Sometimes we share too much.

Antisocial Details

TitleAntisocial
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherDelacorte Press
ISBN110193896X
ISBN-139781101938966
Number of pages256 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Mystery

Antisocial Review

  • Dannii Elle
    February 8, 2017
    I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Jillian Blake, and the publisher, Delacorte Press, for this opportunity.The moment I received the email to inform me that I had been approved for this arc, I dropped everything and started reading it. The synopsis described this as "Pretty Little Liars meets WikiLeaks" and I was immediately intrigued.Alexandria Prep is your typical, American high school where each student is defined by their online presence I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Jillian Blake, and the publisher, Delacorte Press, for this opportunity.The moment I received the email to inform me that I had been approved for this arc, I dropped everything and started reading it. The synopsis described this as "Pretty Little Liars meets WikiLeaks" and I was immediately intrigued.Alexandria Prep is your typical, American high school where each student is defined by their online presence. When the school's web system is infiltrated and the students are targeted at random to have their entire online lives leaked, chaos ensues.The high school setting and type cast characters were rather cliched. But cliched in a good way. It reminded me of Mean Girls in a literary format. But each of these tightly-formed cliques were detonated from the inside with the leakage of information, proving no one is really as they seem.Whilst this provided an intriguing narrative, I found the intensity dropped around the midway point before picking back up towards the end. It was a fast-paced and thrilling read, for the most part, but I just wanted a little something more from this.My main point of discord with this book was with protagonist, Anna. In particular, her anxiety disorder. I understand that no two cases of mental illness are the same, but I found hers to be a little unbelievable. Her social unease disappeared when it was convenient, rather than remaining a constant throughout the book. It wasn't that she was 'cured'; she seemed to exhibit the traits of two different characters as the book progressed. I don't think mental illness was purposefully misrepresented, it just seemed that it was added into the narrative without serving a purpose to the narrative and without perhaps enough research to make it believable.My own struggle with anxiety makes me perhaps overly sensitive to characters I hope to see myself in. This also wasn't a prominent enough issue to ruin my enjoyment of the book but it did make me struggle to relate and engage with Anna, when I wasn't sure who she really was.
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  • Jen
    April 16, 2017
    At first I wasn't sure about this one. The idea of the students at a tony private high school being terrorized by a teenage hacktivist who has infiltrated their phones and is spilling all their darkest secrets isn't exactly the most original idea out there. (For example Pretty Little Liars and Get Even.) The book's protagonist, Anna, suffers from social anxiety. I thought it was interesting that the story was told through that lens -- from the point of view of someone to whom social interaction At first I wasn't sure about this one. The idea of the students at a tony private high school being terrorized by a teenage hacktivist who has infiltrated their phones and is spilling all their darkest secrets isn't exactly the most original idea out there. (For example Pretty Little Liars and Get Even.) The book's protagonist, Anna, suffers from social anxiety. I thought it was interesting that the story was told through that lens -- from the point of view of someone to whom social interaction in general and social media in particular feels fraught with peril. The depiction of social anxiety felt uneven to me. Yes, Anna was seeing a therapist and taking medication, but at times her anxiety felt more like a convenient plot device meant to up the stakes. One thing I didn't love was that the way Anna describes all the groups in her school feels ripped from Clueless circa 1995: jocks, cheerleaders, drama kids, student council, techies, etc. There's also an inherent pitfall in using texting slang -- or any kind of slang -- which is that even before the book is published, the words feel out of date. The other was that at times the book felt preachy, like a PSA to teenagers from a well-meaning adult.In any case, as the story opens, Anna has crossed social lines by dating a basketball player. The two have already broken up, but she's not completely over him. Then she secretly hooks up with a close friend of hers, an event that gave the book a slightly triangle-y feel. Yes, she and the new guy have a lot in common, but she also worries that he's a rebound fling.When the book finally got going, it got better. As mentioned above, someone starts hacking the students' phones and spilling their darkest secrets. This causes Anna social anxiety to ratchet up at a time when her romantic life is complicated. She has two best friends and the hacking also puts a hug strain on their relationship.In the end, I didn't find this nearly as interesting as a similar book published a few weeks earlier, Takedown but I enjoyed it in the end. Read more of my reviews on YA Romantics or follow me on Bloglovin The FTC would like you to know that the publisher provided me a free advance copy of this book, that free books can be enjoyable or not, and other readers may disagree with my opinion.
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  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    January 22, 2017
    See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from Amazon Vine.Diversity: 3 – Closer to RealityRacial-Ethnic: 4 (Anna is half-Columbian; her best friend Radhika is Indian and Rad’s boyfriend Andrew is Chinese)QUILTBAG: 1 (quite a few characters get outed as gay by the leaks, but only one has any major role)Disability: 3 (Anna has social anxiety disorder and her ex has OCD/anxiety too)Intersectionality: 3 (Anna is pretty well-written and I’m happy to see all three categories a See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from Amazon Vine.Diversity: 3 – Closer to RealityRacial-Ethnic: 4 (Anna is half-Columbian; her best friend Radhika is Indian and Rad’s boyfriend Andrew is Chinese)QUILTBAG: 1 (quite a few characters get outed as gay by the leaks, but only one has any major role)Disability: 3 (Anna has social anxiety disorder and her ex has OCD/anxiety too)Intersectionality: 3 (Anna is pretty well-written and I’m happy to see all three categories above represented)In my book, it’s always time for a YA thriller. Putting together the pieces of a mystery, trying to solve it just before or at the same time as the main character, watching everything get worse and worse right up to the climactic scene,… Maybe I’m a bit cruel, but as often as I read YA contemporary novels, YA thrillers and mysteries are a bit above them in my heart. Antisocial is a pretty good one with plenty of representation across the board and its realistic stakes will chill just about every reader.I’ve always tried to be my best self online, but even I’m terrified at the idea of all my texts, emails, etc. being leaked online. Whether it would expose someone’s two-faced ways or provides enough evidence that they could be successfully convicted of a felony, everyone has something to fear if their name gets attached to their anonymous or private online shenanigans. Anna’s fear: the friends who are just barely starting to accept her back after she abandoned them for her boyfriend will learn how she insulted all of them when talking to him.Antisocial is a tiny little book at 256 pages and perfectly paced so you’ll feel compelled to read it all in one sitting. In particular, Anna is an incredible character [email protected] and anxiety disorder-ridden readers hungry for representation will love. She’s half-Columbian, has social anxiety disorder, and had a stint in a group home, but she’s still determined to find out who’s leaking students’ online histories, which were gathered via an app the school required students to download. Turned out the app was gathering all their data and storing it and then someone found a hackable hole! Oops.Even when her ex-boyfriend’s data gets leaked and she finds out how easily he dumped her when he wrecked her with the break-up, she still wants to help him. He has a form of OCD (pretty respectful and nonstereotypical, at that!) and they shared a kinship over their anxieties. No matter how much he hurt her, she’d rather do what’s right than revel in his humiliation. If I explained my history with an ex-friend, you’d quickly learn I wouldn’t be as good of a person in the same situation as Anna.Too bad it has a lot of stereotypes and cliches going on among both the characters and the events. One twist of an event in particular toward the end of the book failed to make me feel anything at all when it was intended to be gut-wrenching. Honestly, it made me laugh and quote Heathers, which made fun of something very similar. It doesn’t ruin anything for either book or film to tell you I was giggling to myself and quoting “I LOVE MY DEAD GAY SON” as the twist’s aftermath played out.My giggling was sandwiched between me groaning at how melodramatic and ridiculously corny the whole ending is. This is what Heathers was making fun of almost thirty years ago! Considering everything the data leaks caused at their school, trying to spin it as “everything will be sunshine and rainbows soon” makes me want to gag. You know who things won’t be okay for? The kid who made a podcast out of the leaks and delighted in it. He better change schools or he is screeeeeewed. No one’s gonna forgive him that easily for having fun with someone else’s humiliation.All in all, Antisocial is a gripping thriller for the modern teen. Its ending may not have left me feeling anything other than mildly amused, but the core conceit of the story is what will make it memorable for readers and get the most praise. I’m excited to read more from Jillian Blake in the future and would recommend this for anyone whose hunger for thrillers still needs to be satiated or is in a bit of a reading slump. This tiny little thrill ride should cure you pretty easily!
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  • Kara
    February 21, 2017
    First things first. Trigger warnings for suicide, doxing, and a short self-harm scene. None of it was promoted as positive or romanticized--it was just there.This book was fantastic. High school can be a really tough place for many people. I know it was tough for me, and I went to high school before the age of social media, where any rumor can be spread with the click of a button faster than a bully can trip a kid in the hallway, sending their books flying.In an internet age, when almost our ent First things first. Trigger warnings for suicide, doxing, and a short self-harm scene. None of it was promoted as positive or romanticized--it was just there.This book was fantastic. High school can be a really tough place for many people. I know it was tough for me, and I went to high school before the age of social media, where any rumor can be spread with the click of a button faster than a bully can trip a kid in the hallway, sending their books flying.In an internet age, when almost our entire life history can be found online, it's easy to fear being hacked. Heck, I bet every single person reading this review at least knows OF someone that has had their personal information hacked. I, myself, had my checking account information stolen due to malware on my husband's computer. Well, that's what happens in Antisocial. It starts out with just the popular kids being hacked, but then it starts to spread to the entire student body. All their text messages and photos are posted online for the entire school to see.It wasn't a perfect book, and some stuff bothered me, (the way Anna's character was written didn't feel genuine to me) but there has to be something said for compulsive readability and the fact that I read this in less than a day. I don't know how long it's been since I finished a book that fast.Also, bonus points for covering many difficult topics that are relevant to teenagers, and covering them in a tactful and educational way without coming off preachy or like the book has a moral message to impart.Edited to add: One of the things that bothered me was Anna's social anxiety. It's not that it wasn't handled well--it was, and I can say that with confidence because I am a sufferer of SAD. But there were times that I felt like the author was bringing up Anna's social anxiety in a way that felt forced and didn't fit with her character. It was mentioned SO often that it started to feel a bit unnatural. Social anxiety affects a lot of things in a person's life, but it is not the ONLY thing that Anna is, and it sort of came off that way to me.
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  • Jasmine Riel (singprettyreadbooks)
    May 23, 2017
    I thought the mystery aspect of the book was interesting and the ending was pretty cool...but I don't understand how they are connected. I felt like this went from suspense/thriller to cheesy teen after school special.The main character is diverse - she is Latina and struggles with anxiety. But like another reviewer said, it seemed like her anxiety was only apparent when it was convenient, as if it were merely a tool for building tension. Her mental illness didn't seem consistent throughout the I thought the mystery aspect of the book was interesting and the ending was pretty cool...but I don't understand how they are connected. I felt like this went from suspense/thriller to cheesy teen after school special.The main character is diverse - she is Latina and struggles with anxiety. But like another reviewer said, it seemed like her anxiety was only apparent when it was convenient, as if it were merely a tool for building tension. Her mental illness didn't seem consistent throughout the book.
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  • Prissy Pineda
    May 6, 2017
    Antisocial is reminiscent of "Mean Girls" with an updated premise and vocabulary. Anna's school has been the target of a hack that has affected everyone in the student body (and even a teacher). Everyone's secrets are being revealed and the consequences include ruined friendships, lost college admissions, and broken dreams. More than just a cautionary tale on the dangers of the internet, Antisocial is realistic in its premise and execution.
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  • katayoun Masoodi
    May 25, 2017
    2 1/2 really, there were some ok parts and some parts that i felt i wanted to kick them all and some parts that was like a bollywood movie, dramatic and unreal. though reading this after one of my favorite books probably didn't help.
  • Reg Mars
    March 20, 2017
    I got this from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review. I really didn't want to DNF this but I couldn't do it. I was trying but couldn't get passed the first chapter. I just couldn't deal with the writing. It wasn't enjoyable.
  • Cassi
    May 21, 2017
    This is probably closer to 3.5 starsI was totally intrigued by the idea of this books. Mean Girls meets Wikileaks sounds amazing. And it also sounded like an intriguing mystery/ And while it was engaging and interesting, it didn't quite live up to my hopes.One of the things that I did like about this book was the characters. This is a book full of unlikable characters who felt like realistic teenagers. I think the Mean Girls comparison here was about the characters. Firstly because there was a h This is probably closer to 3.5 starsI was totally intrigued by the idea of this books. Mean Girls meets Wikileaks sounds amazing. And it also sounded like an intriguing mystery/ And while it was engaging and interesting, it didn't quite live up to my hopes.One of the things that I did like about this book was the characters. This is a book full of unlikable characters who felt like realistic teenagers. I think the Mean Girls comparison here was about the characters. Firstly because there was a huge emphasis on the different cliches in the school as well as the idea of popularity. But there was also this whole frenemies thing in the book with the characters not being honest with each other about their thoughts and feelings. But that is kind of one of the things that made them feel realistic.Much of the book focused on the characters and their interaction and development. There were two interesting narratives here when it came to the characterizations. The first was around your public versus private image. As the hack occurred and people found out the truth of their classmates these two things came into question and made for the drama. I really love books that explore this theme and this one did it pretty well. It didn't have quite the depth that I hope for but I it definitely was interesting.I think it was also supposed to be a subtle story of friendship. I really like books that have themes of friendship so I was excited about that here. It's a book with quirky kind of nerdy types who make up a group of friends. When the hack came through, their friendships and relationships were tested. Again I think it did an okay job of creating drama and establishing interest while making the friendships stronger for the truth. But for some reason it didn't quite have the heart that books about friendships usually have. Maybe because it spent so long tearing things down it was hard to bring them back together, or maybe it just was just a different kind of friendship story.I think the biggest thing that held me back from really loving this book however was the mystery, or lack thereof. By the sounds of the synopsis you would think that this is more of a mystery and thriller but it definitely isn't. The mystery, like a lot of this book, was kind of subtle. There wasn't much of an attempt to solve the mystery or even really much of a reveal. I wasn't even all that surprised when they told you who was responsible. But maybe that was because they just moved on from there and there was still a ton of loose ends. The disappointing thing is that there was a lot promise. This could have been a really interesting book with a crazy twist, but it wasn't. The hack was just a means to an end and frankly that disappointed me. I also feel like I didn't quite love the pacing here. This was a pretty short read and it didn't take me very long to get through but it still felt a little slow. I mean I read an e-ARC and I only looked at how many pages it was when I finished it and to be honest I was kind of surprised it was under 300 pages. It didn't read like a fast and short read. It's not that it was slow, it just chugged along with only basic plot development. Then when it reached it's climax it just sort of moved on. There was some interest and drama but it just hit those points and kept going. When the book was over it didn't have the impact I was hoping for.Antisocial was an okay read with a lot of promise that it didn't quite follow through on. Yes, it jad unlikable but interesting characters and some intriguing themes, but it was just a little basic and slow despite not being very long.
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  • Stephanie Ward
    May 19, 2017
    3.5 Stars'Antisocial' is a thrilling young adult contemporary mystery that looks at some of the real problems social media and always being "connected" online can cause. The topic and plot are perfectly in sync with today's culture and makes the reader step back and really consider the things discussed in the story. I'm a huge fan of mysteries and thrillers, so this book was right up my alley. Here are my top pros and cons:Pros:Characters - Well rounded with distinct personalities and traits, es 3.5 Stars'Antisocial' is a thrilling young adult contemporary mystery that looks at some of the real problems social media and always being "connected" online can cause. The topic and plot are perfectly in sync with today's culture and makes the reader step back and really consider the things discussed in the story. I'm a huge fan of mysteries and thrillers, so this book was right up my alley. Here are my top pros and cons:Pros:Characters - Well rounded with distinct personalities and traits, especially our main character Anna. One of the big things with her is that she suffers from social anxiety disorder, and I love that the author wrote her this way. I myself suffer from SAD and I appreciate how realistic Anna's condition is portrayed. I also like that she's the main character, but she has her own problems and flaws - just like everyone else. It made it easy for me to identify with her right from the beginning.Plot - A juicy mystery with an incredibly relevant story line. I always like trying to figure out the "bad guy" or who's behind it all before the main character, and this was a pretty hard one to crack. I liked all the twists and turns the story took on, especially when big secrets came to light.Writing Style - Once again, this is a huge part of my reading experience and is one of the most important things about a book. The author chose my favorite style - the first person point of view - for the story, and I think it was the perfect fit. The novel is told from Anna's perspective, which made it easy to connect with her. I loved getting to know her on a deeply personal level. All of her inner thoughts, fears, dreams, hopes, and everything else is on display for us. It was a great choice for the writing style and I know that I wouldn't have had as positive an experience reading the book if it had been done otherwise.Cons:The only thing that sort of bugged me was how parts of the book felt pretty predictable - they were your standard and expected occurrences in this type of novel. Also, Anna could get a bit annoying at times - but, oddly enough, I can't really pinpoint why or what made me feel this way. Strange, but it happened. These are solely my own personal opinions and other readers will not have the same issues.Overall, I would recommend this book to fans of YA mysteries, thrillers, suspense, contemporary, romance, and those looking for novels with highly relevant material.Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachel
    May 21, 2017
    ANTISOCIAL is a fascinating and compelling and unputdownable read that sheds light on what can happen to friendships and to lives when “private” data becomes public. It shows just how hungry for gossip everyone is, how quick to spread the word, how riveted to the scandal, how hasty to point fingers, and how vicious we can become. But it also reminds us that not everyone is all good or all bad, that we are more than the negative things we say or that are said about us, and that for most of us the ANTISOCIAL is a fascinating and compelling and unputdownable read that sheds light on what can happen to friendships and to lives when “private” data becomes public. It shows just how hungry for gossip everyone is, how quick to spread the word, how riveted to the scandal, how hasty to point fingers, and how vicious we can become. But it also reminds us that not everyone is all good or all bad, that we are more than the negative things we say or that are said about us, and that for most of us the positive outweighs the negative. It is a riveting, addictive, at times chilling, a little bit heartbreaking, and absolutely thrilling debut.The unraveling of Alexandria Prep is shown from Anna Soler’s point of view. Her world had already come undone when her boyfriend dumped her and she lost her connection to the elite in his world. Having ditched her friends for him and his during the three months they’d gone out, she didn’t think things could get much worse for her.But when a vulnerability in a school scheduling app causes search data to be leaked, the information goes viral and soon hackers are accessing and revealing more personal and harmful information. Chaos ensues. Friendships are destroyed. Futures are ruined.And through it all, Anna can’t help but watch, read, listen, and wait. Because while she might not be one of Prep’s most envied or be the most social online, it’s only a matter of time before her secrets are exposed - the things she’s done that she can’t take back and the things she’s said that can’t remotely be called nice.Jillian Blake did a fantastic job at showing the many facets of this complicated issue. She gave readers a lot to think about and a different way of looking at a situation that might appear to be only negative. She alerts people to the danger of saying and sharing too much, she points out that it’s a problem that doesn’t just affect those who overshare, and she reminds us that no one is perfect, that everyone is flawed.ANTISOCIAL is more than just a wickedly scandalous story, though the dirt that is revealed about the many students at Alexandria Prep will make readers feel as voyeuristic as the characters as they devour each shocking piece of news. It has substance. It has a bit of a mystery. It has a fast-pace, entertaining if not entirely likable characters, and a positive message. It is an exciting story that is not to be missed.
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  • Sritha Bandla
    May 14, 2017
    Well, there is a lot I should say about this book. I can’t say this is the best book I have ever read or something but you can give it a try if your are hard core YA fan.Antisocial is about a girl Anna who is suffering from SAD. Social Anxiety Disorder. In a way Anna is little bit like me. I don’t get all worked up if I meet some strangers but I do feel bit weird. I like to spend time alone as do Anna. So, Anna just came out of a serious relationship. At least that is what she thought. She is so Well, there is a lot I should say about this book. I can’t say this is the best book I have ever read or something but you can give it a try if your are hard core YA fan.Antisocial is about a girl Anna who is suffering from SAD. Social Anxiety Disorder. In a way Anna is little bit like me. I don’t get all worked up if I meet some strangers but I do feel bit weird. I like to spend time alone as do Anna. So, Anna just came out of a serious relationship. At least that is what she thought. She is so stupid that she totally A-walled her friends. It is not like she can make new friends instantly. The whole prep school is divided into weird groups.. Some call themselves “instas”. And many other groups which I don’t even remember. Ya. That is not very important. Anna’s group has five friends.Haven, Radhika,Nikki,Jethro and on other guy that I really don’t remember.Haven Is a hacker. When the prep school’s private app prep for today undergoes many hacker attacks so much information about the lives of students is revealed. Some are Anna’s friends and some or not. But her worst fear is what happens when some one hacks her phone. May be some one already did and they are waiting for the right moment to reveal her darkest fears and secrets.Jethro has her back. He cares for her and he wants to be more than friends. Anna likes him and they have the best time together, yet she hesitates to make things real and face the reality and accept his love. She also fears for her ex boyfriend Palmer one of the best basketball players in their prep school. She still thinks he has feelings for her. But no! Why, why would she think like that. He broke up with her brutally. I would never care for someone like him.In one of the hacker attacks Palmer’s chats with Wallace were revealed. He mentioned about Anna. For Palmer Anna is just some refreshment. He never truly cared about her. After knowing the truth she hates him even more.This book is about how putting your personal lives in the hands of Social media can affect you in ways you probably can’t imagine. You may not even know who is stalking you – virtually. Your are the victim- always. There is a very strong concept behind the story but the presentation very poor. Jillian Blake for sure is an amazing author but I didn’t feel that pull for the characters. Probably I won’t even remember the names when I start reading some other book. The point is it did not touch any of emotions. I didn’t feel anything after I read the book. 
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  • Shane
    May 14, 2017
    Antisocial has an important message in regards to what you put out there, whether in text messages or posting on social media. And while that is a great aspect of the story, for the most part, I felt detached. There were times the situation just didn't make much of an impact on me because I've read it so many times in other books with the same school setting. However, it is realistic and depicts what's happening now in this digital age we're living in. It's just that I feel like the story could Antisocial has an important message in regards to what you put out there, whether in text messages or posting on social media. And while that is a great aspect of the story, for the most part, I felt detached. There were times the situation just didn't make much of an impact on me because I've read it so many times in other books with the same school setting. However, it is realistic and depicts what's happening now in this digital age we're living in. It's just that I feel like the story could have been stronger and some things weren't cleared up in the end. Initially, I was curious about the characters and what was taking place at this school. I could relate to Anna in the sense that she started seeing someone and neglected her close friends. It happens. Sometimes you go back and fix those relationships and sometimes it's best to let them go, especially if they weren't strong, to begin with. But in Anna's case, she got dumped, and that ignited the desire to go and make amends with her friends. But with the way one friend in particular was, I couldn't understand why she would even bother. This one character pressured another friend into making a stupid decision and was rather hurtful more times than once. My attention remained locked for the first few chapters, especially since the story is fast-paced and light. But after the hacking started, some crazy things began to happen as well and it became difficult to stay focused. For instance, there were times I was reading but wasn't really into it and couldn't recall what I'd just read. But that could just be me, because like I said there are great aspects of the story, and the writing is good. It's an interesting book but could have been. I still recommend it if you're looking for a quick read with the usual high school drama mixed with digital abuse.
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  • Jessica
    May 13, 2017
    I was very intrigued when I first read this synopsis and thought it would be so interesting if everyone's online secrets were suddenly revealed. The internet and social media are places people feel like they can do things without people knowing or without repercussion, so I couldn't wait to see what would happen when high schoolers would have to face the consequences of those secrets being revealed. Coming back from winter break, senior Anna Soler has returned to a very different life. As her bo I was very intrigued when I first read this synopsis and thought it would be so interesting if everyone's online secrets were suddenly revealed. The internet and social media are places people feel like they can do things without people knowing or without repercussion, so I couldn't wait to see what would happen when high schoolers would have to face the consequences of those secrets being revealed. Coming back from winter break, senior Anna Soler has returned to a very different life. As her boyfriend just broke up with her, Anna doesn't know if she can be friends with the group of people she just sort of dropped when she started dating her ex-boyfriend. But when personal things are becoming leaked at school, Anna finds herself in the background to the drama that has just been unleashed. People lives start to unravel and chaos takes over the lives of the seemingly perfect royalty of the school. Starting this book, I found it really hard to connect with the characters. I felt like it started out in a really weird spot where Anna has already been dumped by her boyfriend and was trying to find her way back into her old friend group. It felt info-dumpy when we were introduced to her old group of friends, so I found it hard to get to know and like the other side characters. Not to mention Anna already had a sort of past with Jethro, her friend who was always a little something more that they never acted upon. Their relationship didn't sit right with me, especially with something that happened so soon after her relationship with her ex-boyfriend had ended. Also, Anna is supposed to have an anxiety disorder and I didn't feel like it was all that believable. She would feel an anxiety attack coming on, but then it would go away super quickly. She didn't really have to extract herself from the situation because something would happen to make it go away. Also, the way Anna describes the people in the book was sort of cliche and they all fell into very cliche stereotypes of high school. I did enjoy how so many secrets were slowly revealed and how the hacker of the school started to escalate in intensity, but I just found it hard to connect with all of the characters, including the main character. In the end, this was just an okay book to me. It was definitely entertaining and I did enjoy reading it, but I wish I could connect with the main character and the side characters a little more.
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  • Hannah Haney
    May 16, 2017
    Marketed as Pretty Little Liars meets Wikileaks, I was intrigued by this book almost immediately. Antisocial follows Anna Soler, a student at Alexander Prep Academy. Anna was recently dumped by her jock boyfriend and is finding that her senior year is less than ideal. When someone starts hacking the school's scheduling app (and getting access to everyone's online records) and broadcasts the secrets, Anna isn't the only one having a rough senior spring. The writing is solid and gripping. I flew t Marketed as Pretty Little Liars meets Wikileaks, I was intrigued by this book almost immediately. Antisocial follows Anna Soler, a student at Alexander Prep Academy. Anna was recently dumped by her jock boyfriend and is finding that her senior year is less than ideal. When someone starts hacking the school's scheduling app (and getting access to everyone's online records) and broadcasts the secrets, Anna isn't the only one having a rough senior spring. The writing is solid and gripping. I flew through this one, thinking about it whenever I wasn't reading it. This book also handled representation fairly well. Anna is Colombian and has a social anxiety disorder. While both of these things informed her character (particularly SAD), they did not define her. However, on that same vein, I had a particular problem with the last 20% of the novel. (view spoiler)[Palmer's death seemed to be nothing more than a brief plot point to help end the leaks and bring the school back together. It came way too late in the novel, seemed perhaps slightly out of character for Palmer (though we don't get much of a look into his mind or see that he's struggling—maybe that's the point), and none of the characters seemed to really respond to his death. Anna seems to fall into a depression, but quickly pulls herself out of it for the good of the school. I wanted to see Palmer's death get more resolution. (hide spoiler)] I was also disappointed that we didn't see more resolution of Jethro's storyline. He was so important for the first half of the book, but then seemed to completely fade away, despite his significance to the plot. Overall, I recommend this book. A quick, dramatic read, with a gripping plot and PLL-worthy characters and drama. I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.
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  • Michelle
    April 6, 2017
    Loved it.Speaks a lot about how dishonest we can be, even with those we love & care about. Speaks a lot about how important honesty is, even if it hurts the ones you love. I mean, would you rather just get it offa your chest? Instead of holding of in or talking behind their back? I would, hurtful or not.It also speaks about an important issue everyone loves to sweep under the rug: Mental Illness of all flavors. We shouldn't have to fear talking about what's dwelling in our heads. How & w Loved it.Speaks a lot about how dishonest we can be, even with those we love & care about. Speaks a lot about how important honesty is, even if it hurts the ones you love. I mean, would you rather just get it offa your chest? Instead of holding of in or talking behind their back? I would, hurtful or not.It also speaks about an important issue everyone loves to sweep under the rug: Mental Illness of all flavors. We shouldn't have to fear talking about what's dwelling in our heads. How & what we're feeling. It's so sad that we can't talk about certain things cuz it makes us appear weak or crazy. We should show & teach our children that it's OK to talk about how & what you're feeling. That it's OK to talk. We need to show & teach our children that we won't "freak out" or judge them. Which is what every teen (and adults, even) feel. I know that's how I felt & felt like I didn't have someone to talk to. Not even my own patents. Which is also why I remind my brats every day that they can come & talk to me about ANY thing, no matter what it is, w/o judgement.I can relate abit when it comes to Anna & her anxiety, cuz I'm the same way. Been there, done that, still dealing with it. *sigh*I feel so bad about what happened to all those kids. I feel has for the kid who pretty much opened Pandora's Box.But I bet of taught all those kids & adults a good lesson.Could you imagine a world where people say what they really meant, felt thought, in complete honesty?An excellent book.Highly recommend.Received as a Gr giveaway.
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  • Hallie
    April 25, 2017
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This will appeal to plugged in teens who like mysteries. Anti-Social is one of many books this year that will make readers question technology's presence in their lives. Readers will relate to Anna, a teen with anxiety who has recently been dumped, and feel for her as she tries to get back in her friend groups' good graces. The story is focused on a leak of all personal information, searches, and communication from students' c I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This will appeal to plugged in teens who like mysteries. Anti-Social is one of many books this year that will make readers question technology's presence in their lives. Readers will relate to Anna, a teen with anxiety who has recently been dumped, and feel for her as she tries to get back in her friend groups' good graces. The story is focused on a leak of all personal information, searches, and communication from students' cell phones and it begs readers to consider the things we hide assuming our information is always safe. Overall, this book is fast paced with a relatable main character. The ex-boyfriend/best friend love triangle is interesting and the fate of the characters after the leaks keep readers engaged. The book has a suicide and self-harm scene and it's important to provide those trigger warnings before recommending to readers.
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  • Tammy
    March 21, 2017
    3.5/5 A quick look at what a nightmare it could be attending high school today with all the social media, texting and emailing kids do and what happens when the entire school gets hacked and all their private conversations and google searches go public. It does remind you that nothing you do or say in this internet age is completely private. I liked Anna. She made her mistakes by abandoning her friend group when she had a boyfriend but she also tried to make up for it once she and Palmer broke u 3.5/5 A quick look at what a nightmare it could be attending high school today with all the social media, texting and emailing kids do and what happens when the entire school gets hacked and all their private conversations and google searches go public. It does remind you that nothing you do or say in this internet age is completely private. I liked Anna. She made her mistakes by abandoning her friend group when she had a boyfriend but she also tried to make up for it once she and Palmer broke up. I preferred her with Jethro even though he seemed more into it than her initially. The kumbaya assembly at the end seemed a little too unreal. There is a reason why most of us never see our high school classmates again once we graduate.
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  • Mehsi
    May 21, 2017
    40% and I am dropping this one. What I expected: a mystery, someone spreading secrets all over the world. A bit of heartbreak. What I got instead: a terrible MC, a rebound (what did she think would happen if she did that?), mystery? really?, hacks? whut?, secrets? where?. In 40% we got TWO, yes TWO hack thingies. 1) for a google search (oohhh so much oohhh), and 2) exposing secrets of Wallace. Ohhh, dear, so much hacks! *snorts* One at 9%, and then the other at 38/39%. This looked so great, and 40% and I am dropping this one. What I expected: a mystery, someone spreading secrets all over the world. A bit of heartbreak. What I got instead: a terrible MC, a rebound (what did she think would happen if she did that?), mystery? really?, hacks? whut?, secrets? where?. In 40% we got TWO, yes TWO hack thingies. 1) for a google search (oohhh so much oohhh), and 2) exposing secrets of Wallace. Ohhh, dear, so much hacks! *snorts* One at 9%, and then the other at 38/39%. This looked so great, and it was one of my most anticipated books this month, but well, I am not going to spend another minute on this book.
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  • Mare SLiTsReaD Reviews
    March 17, 2017
    Thank you Netgalley and Delacorte Press for a copy of this e-arc 3.5 starsLet me start off by saying I believe everyone who uses social media should read this book. It will open your eyes on how easily you can be found on the internet. Doxxing, Personal life, RL vs Social life. And if you are a parent with kids in the millennial era this is def something you should read. I liked the story, I did. BUT......I didnt really feel a connection to any of the characters to be honest. But then again i Thank you Netgalley and Delacorte Press for a copy of this e-arc 3.5 starsLet me start off by saying I believe everyone who uses social media should read this book. It will open your eyes on how easily you can be found on the internet. Doxxing, Personal life, RL vs Social life. And if you are a parent with kids in the millennial era this is def something you should read. I liked the story, I did. BUT......I didnt really feel a connection to any of the characters to be honest. But then again i think most females are catty doesn't matter what age you are. So there's that. Catty girls. UGH. Sad.And then I think OMG my daughter is starting high school next year and I wonder how I'm going to survive it. Cause i will tell you now I will want to cut a b*tch for treating her in any sort of catty way...But I'm deviating from the story. Girls, jocks, nerds..... you will find it all here. Doxxing, public shaming, secrets revealed, public outing, STDs, anything and everything will be found in the pages of this book. Mare~
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    February 9, 2017
    First I have to give a big thumbs up to Jillian Blake for how well she handled the issue of anxiety in her main character. I felt she accurately portrayed this mental health condition particularly as it relates to teens and their particular psychological development. It was nice to read a book that had such a diverse group of characters with different sexual orientations, cultures, skin colors, etc instead of the normal group of white girls who are all blonde or brunette. There was some of the s First I have to give a big thumbs up to Jillian Blake for how well she handled the issue of anxiety in her main character. I felt she accurately portrayed this mental health condition particularly as it relates to teens and their particular psychological development. It was nice to read a book that had such a diverse group of characters with different sexual orientations, cultures, skin colors, etc instead of the normal group of white girls who are all blonde or brunette. There was some of the stereotypes often found in the YA genre but I’m not sure that can be entirely escaped when writing books like these particularly when it’s billed as a mix of Pretty Little Liars meets Wikileaks so expect lots of drama.Overall the plot line was well written and felt credible as she did a wonderful job creating realistic feeling scenes, true-to-life characters and her dialogue actually read like human conversation.I liked the intensity she created in her story so it kept my interest. Having such a positive message pouring forth from her words and concluding it on a high note made it worth my time. Due to the increased lack of privacy which has been normalized over this generation, the mirror held up by this book towards social media and the amplified love of gossip that is permeating American culture made for a whole other layer on top of the expected teen drama.The truly heartbreaking thing about this book is you could very well see this happening in reality due to the issue of cyber bullying becoming so ingrained and nearly as much a part of kids and teens lives as puberty.
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  • Molly
    January 28, 2017
    I couldn't put this book down. It was so amazing and it is now one of my favorite stand alone books. I am absolutely in love with it. I love the story and the many characters in it, especially Anna. She was a wonderful main character. Some books that involve a main character with anxiety sometimes don't work out and are not accurate to someone who actually has anxiety, but from a person who has severe anxiety, I really liked the way it was taken in this book and it was the best one I've seen so I couldn't put this book down. It was so amazing and it is now one of my favorite stand alone books. I am absolutely in love with it. I love the story and the many characters in it, especially Anna. She was a wonderful main character. Some books that involve a main character with anxiety sometimes don't work out and are not accurate to someone who actually has anxiety, but from a person who has severe anxiety, I really liked the way it was taken in this book and it was the best one I've seen so far. Absolutely brilliant. I will be telling all of my friends to buy this book when it is released.
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  • Vox
    May 14, 2017
    As I read this book, I kept thinking that this stuff could really happen. Perhaps it's because I teach high school kids and see, far too often, the dangerous effects of social media. But the troubles unleashed in Antisocial feel very real.Jillian Blake sets her story in the tony area of Alexandria, Virginia, which happens to be my hometown. Blake has a sharp perception of the people who live in that area: government workers, people affiliated with the government, or those attempting to influence As I read this book, I kept thinking that this stuff could really happen. Perhaps it's because I teach high school kids and see, far too often, the dangerous effects of social media. But the troubles unleashed in Antisocial feel very real.Jillian Blake sets her story in the tony area of Alexandria, Virginia, which happens to be my hometown. Blake has a sharp perception of the people who live in that area: government workers, people affiliated with the government, or those attempting to influence it. To some degree, the setting reflects the characters. The students at Alexandria Prep have their own governmental-esque hierarchy, and those who wish to influence it take control of the whole thing.It begins with a somewhat innocuous list of all of the Internet searches performed by students at the school. No identifying names, just the search terms. It doesn't take long to figure out who searched for what, which of course is the goal. A public shaming of sorts.This fairly tame hacking leads to something far more severe, however, as friends turn against each other, Anna, our narrator, is a senior at the school and is trying to climb back into her own clique, something she abandoned when she began dating the school's popular star basketball player. With that relationship over, Anna has to rebuild relationships she let dissolve, all while a mysterious hacker (or hackers) attempt to thwart everything between everyone.What adds to the sense of urgency and stress is Anna having to manage her anxiety disorder. She feels everything to an extreme, which can make her believe facts that are not in evidence. Yet she's a girl who wants a second chance, even as she isn't quite sure what she needs to do to prove herself. It makes her relatable and empathetic.This isn't to say that Anna won't frustrate you. The way she tries to handle conflicting feelings will make you roll your eyes, wishing you could shout at her to just stop being stupid. But she's an eighteen-year-old girl, something Jillian Blake never lets you forget. Anna doesn't know herself yet. She has a lot of growing up to do, and part of that process is learning to manage how she reacts to disappointments and sadnesses.The hacking at the center of this book should terrify teens and their parents. It also should serve as a cautionary tale: think about what you want everyone to know because when you text someone or when you post something on social media, you have to assume that privacy rules do not exist. We all understand the need to vent. But when your venting is in writing - when it's something that can be shared - you have to assume that others will see it.Blake takes this tale in an overwrought direction, adding a tragedy that feels almost soap operatic in nature. It isn't needed. The damages inflicted by this hacking are powerful enough. The resolution might make you roll your eyes a little bit, but the message should not be lost when Anna identifies the most used word in all of the texts and postings. It is, indeed, the most powerful word of all.
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  • A.D. Green
    May 9, 2017
    Social media, privacy, online security, then add to the mix anxiety, self-perception, friendships, and the blurry lines in between, #Antisocial is about being social, just not quite exactly in the way we were once upon a time used to.Anna Soler’s senior year didn’t progress as smoothly as she had wanted to. Waiting for college admissions with no boyfriend and ‘Insta’ frenemies to rely on, she has to face the inevitable — making amends with the friends she have been ignoring for months. Managing Social media, privacy, online security, then add to the mix anxiety, self-perception, friendships, and the blurry lines in between, #Antisocial is about being social, just not quite exactly in the way we were once upon a time used to.Anna Soler’s senior year didn’t progress as smoothly as she had wanted to. Waiting for college admissions with no boyfriend and ‘Insta’ frenemies to rely on, she has to face the inevitable — making amends with the friends she have been ignoring for months. Managing anxiety, dealing with a break-up and struggling to repair her friendships, Anna finds herself lost. She can’t escape the question nested in her mind — is she who she thinks she is or is she the person the others see her as? Once a series of phone hacks start to shake the school grounds, the question crawls into the teenage minds of her peers as well. Everyone becomes torn between who they think they are and who their friends are.The novel offers an unique view on anxiety and mental health in the backdrop of constant scrolling, feed updating, desire for validation and short attention span. High school is tough, some thrive and some have to survive. #Antisocial explores how hard it can get when one’s darkest secrets are exposed for the world to see. There’s no place to hide, privacy is luxury from the past. If gossip and false accusations are intolerable, having a hard proof of what one has done or hasn’t, brings it to another level.Growing up in the era of this tech chaos must be overwhelming and it’s not something you can prepare for. Parents battle with defining and clarifying the boundaries they enforce, schools fail to sustain their own policies. Alexandria Prep High School has banned the use of mobile devices in the school’s premises, yet they’ve encouraged the use of their newly released scheduling app. Controversial, not? I’ve been born amid the relatively early blossom of the Internet and my adolescent years had only experienced the beginning of the heavy social media use. Honestly, I’ve got no idea how today’s kids do it twenty-four-seven without losing their sanity.The plot develops in a good pace, the characters act their age and you won’t find extra fluff that doesn’t need to be there. Unfortunately, I felt that the ending was a bit unsatisfying. A key storyline was not fully resolved and another plot device had to be used in order to serve as half a ‘cautionary tale’, half a catalyst.#Antisocial is enjoyable and funny, very in touch with pop culture and easily connects with the reader. Whether you’re in high school, finding yourself in university or well, ‘a grown-up’, it has a message that deserves to be sent across.I have kindly received an advanced copy of this book from NetGalley and Random House Children’s Delacorte Press in exchange of a fair review.
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  • Barbara
    May 11, 2017
    Senior year at Alexandria Prep in Virginia is not going particularly well for Anna Soler. Not only did her boyfriend, basketball star Palmer Meade, dump over the holidays, but now she must make amends with her two best friends, Nikki and Rad, who she ignored while in the throes of romance and social upward mobility. As Anna tries to fit back into her previous social group, a series of scandals rock the high school. As it turns out, someone has hacked into the school's scheduling app, and first, Senior year at Alexandria Prep in Virginia is not going particularly well for Anna Soler. Not only did her boyfriend, basketball star Palmer Meade, dump over the holidays, but now she must make amends with her two best friends, Nikki and Rad, who she ignored while in the throes of romance and social upward mobility. As Anna tries to fit back into her previous social group, a series of scandals rock the high school. As it turns out, someone has hacked into the school's scheduling app, and first, all the topics students have searched for are displayed. Then, everything the students have texted or sent to one another has been captured and is ready to be shared. Embarrassing secrets about hook-ups, eating disorders, mental health issues, and petty remarks about each other are suddenly visible for all to see. Because only a certain number of students is highlighted each day, Anna desperately hopes to keep her own secrets from ever being shared in public. As the finger of blame is pointed in various directions, it isn't clear why anyone would want to get revenge on classmates so desperately. Even while she feels romantic stirrings toward her friend, Jethro Stephens, Anna also feels sorry for Palmer as his world comes crashing down around him. The author does a great job of showing how helpless the school administration is in the face of this scandal and how difficult it is to control the messages we send out once they've been sent. While I was pleased that Anna figured a way to make the entire experience a healing one, especially after an unexpected suicide occurs, I wish the author had explored social anxiety disorder a little bit more. While brief comments about how Anna and Palmer have this in common are provided, it would have been enlightening to examine that particular topic, one that is not often found discussed in books for teens. Although this is a good debut from a promising author, I considered the ending a bit too hopeful and too expected and Anna's recovery from her disorder to be a little less stressful than I would have expected. The book gives readers quite a lot to think about and might give them pause before taking a selfie or sending out any sort of text message. It certainly caused me to do quite a lot of thinking about my own cell phone and Internet use and habits.
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  • Stormi (Books, Movies, Reviews. Oh my!)
    May 13, 2017
    Antisocial is a great book to help remind us that once you put something out in the world wide web it’s there pretty much forever and anyone can hack you.Anna has an anxiety disorder and it’s so bad that she quite even being on the social networks, she goes on as an anonymous person and lurks. She thought things were going great but then her popular boyfriend breaks up with her and she pretty much ignored her friends so they are not all that happy to have her back. Her friend who was her best fr Antisocial is a great book to help remind us that once you put something out in the world wide web it’s there pretty much forever and anyone can hack you.Anna has an anxiety disorder and it’s so bad that she quite even being on the social networks, she goes on as an anonymous person and lurks. She thought things were going great but then her popular boyfriend breaks up with her and she pretty much ignored her friends so they are not all that happy to have her back. Her friend who was her best friend, Rad makes her have take pics of her ex-boyfriend at the basketball games for the paper as punishment.Then one day at a game one of the players personal info is put on the screen for all to see and it seemed funny at first because everyone wants to see those they call instagramers go down. Then a bunch of personal stuff is leaked and it causes chaos among everyone. One of Anna’s friends has a pic spread around for all to see and she didn’t even take it, so now Anna is mad. Everyone thinks it’s Haven a hacker but he swears it wasn’t him.Anna has some text that she has with her ex-boyfriend about her friends when she was venting that she really doesn’t want out so she has to try and find out who is behind the hacking before it affects her and her friends anymore than it has. College placements are all on the line for some if anything to bad comes out.Antisocial is a great learning lesson for those who think that it’s okay to just talk about or post anything on any social network and not think anything about it. Your privacy isn’t private and it can hurt your chances of getting into college or an career. It doesn’t matter if your just playing around it can come back and bit you.I think teenagers can relate better to the characters than I did and it was easy to see that even though I am older. I still really could find the characters interesting and remember having those types of clicks in school even though they might have been a bit different. It kept me interested in wanting to find out who was hacking and why they decided to do it.I thought it was a good debut novel.
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  • Samantha
    May 12, 2017
    I'm just going to come right out and say it: I couldn't finish the book. Now, some of you might wonder why I'm posting this even thought I didn't read the whole thing, and the answer to that is simple - I still have the right to explain why I couldn't finish it. Antisocial was marketed as a "whodunit set in the age of social media and the cloud, " however, the book failed to capture my attention. I didn't feel a need to find out what was going on, I didn't care about the characters, the stakes w I'm just going to come right out and say it: I couldn't finish the book. Now, some of you might wonder why I'm posting this even thought I didn't read the whole thing, and the answer to that is simple - I still have the right to explain why I couldn't finish it. Antisocial was marketed as a "whodunit set in the age of social media and the cloud, " however, the book failed to capture my attention. I didn't feel a need to find out what was going on, I didn't care about the characters, the stakes were meh, and, most of all, the narrative voice shut me out of the story. For me, one of the most important parts of a book is the character voice. If it's in first person, I want to feel like I can actually envision the character. I want to be able to get behind their motivations, or at least have a strong feeling. With Antisocial, the narrative tone rubbed me the wrong way right off the bat. The opening line of the book, as it stands because I read an ARC, states: "If I seem a little wired or high strung or just plain off, don't worry. I'm not nuts." It then goes on to explain how she suffers from social anxiety disorder, and that interacting online is already a nightmare, etc. That wasn't my issue. My problem was being talked to as a reader, I hate it when the character is telling me something rather than showing the action. Hate it, hate it, hate it. Don't tell me you're weird, show it. Long story short, I couldn't get behind the writing, and it continued that way until I finally gave up. Oh well. Antisocial was meant to be an exciting, whodunit-type mystery. Instead, I sat in the airport and wanted to claw my eyes out (that might be a bit extreme, but oops). I couldn't get beyond the first few chapters. You can try it out for yourself, you might not be as picky as I am, but proceed with caution.
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  • Adriana
    May 7, 2017
    Antisocial is the epitome of what teenagers have to deal with in the age of technology and social media. I was never someone who cared for social media in high school or even now and it's not like I was in high school too long ago. It's now that I'm in my twenties that I see what a big impact social media has cost us. People have committed suicide and destroyed lives because of what has been said on their screen. It's something I've only begun to understand until now. How there are people out th Antisocial is the epitome of what teenagers have to deal with in the age of technology and social media. I was never someone who cared for social media in high school or even now and it's not like I was in high school too long ago. It's now that I'm in my twenties that I see what a big impact social media has cost us. People have committed suicide and destroyed lives because of what has been said on their screen. It's something I've only begun to understand until now. How there are people out there who feel isolated and alone with no one to talk to. And when you make a mistake where there was a picture taken - your life could be over. Antisocial helps you see this and more.Anna, is a complicated person to like. She's come groveling back to her friends after she abandoned them for her boyfriend who happened to be popular. They shared similarities that no one else acknowledged - an intense social anxiety. I just happened to be watching this long video/documentary yesterday where it had multiple people with different forms of mental illness including Social Anxiety Disorder. Now it's different from really not wanting to go to places or see people. It's feeling extremely scared and worried in social situations with feelings of people judging you while you are judging yourself even more than I feel possible. We know the feeling growing up but it's way more intense. So I saw Anna this way and felt for her. But then she just left her friends. Stopped talking to them for no reason. See? She's a complicated person to like.During the story, there is a person or people that start hacking important players and start ruining their lives. I mean, they deserve it but it has a collateral effect on Anna's friend. More and more people's secrets are being exposed. Anna is in fear of what she's written about her friends. Ugly things that she didn't really mean. Her friends are a wide cast of diverse kids (like in real life *shocked face*) including a hacker, a tough girl, a quiet girl, a popular kid, and a sweet guy. Most of them have different backgrounds other than just white which I appreciated. Almost all of them, including Anna, have secrets that they don't want to come out.I really enjoyed Antisocial for its mystery, diversity, plot, and characters. All of it felt very possible to me. It was a very real story. On the other hand, I also felt there was a lot of generational talk that I didn't particularly care for but when everything came together - I was happy to have read this. There could have been a little more to make this truly amazing since I felt towards the end things began to get weird and sideways. Unexpectedly, I did feel profoundly unhappy reading the last few chapters. Antisocial shows us how mean and cruel we can be. That we are people who carry secrets and lies but we also make mistakes. Despite everything, people aren't just their secrets and mistakes. There is so much more of us than what we or others portray us to be.
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  • Jessica Figueroa
    May 13, 2017
    Anna pretty much ditched her friends after getting herself a boyfriend and now that's its over she wants to go back to them. As you'd imagine some are okay with the idea and then there's some not interested but shes willing to make it work. Then in come a a list and then their classmates dirty little secrets being spilled. As every ones secrets expose Anna is doing everything she can to find out who it is before her secrets get outed knowing that it'll make her lose the friends shes trying to ga Anna pretty much ditched her friends after getting herself a boyfriend and now that's its over she wants to go back to them. As you'd imagine some are okay with the idea and then there's some not interested but shes willing to make it work. Then in come a a list and then their classmates dirty little secrets being spilled. As every ones secrets expose Anna is doing everything she can to find out who it is before her secrets get outed knowing that it'll make her lose the friends shes trying to gain back.I loved this book more then I thought it would. This book is pretty awesome in a way and will really make the readers think. I mean social media is a lot of peoples lives and so many things are say things and do things that aren't meant to be said for the public view and knowing that a person situation can be outed is pretty scary. Most things posted on the Internet will never go away and as many of the characters in this book were seniors looking towards their futures and collage and such it would really jeopardize that. So this book is pretty eye opening. I thought this would be a light read but I got something out of it. Then we got Anna as a character working through her anxiety and seeing how it impacted her and how shes working through things. Lastly when I hear about characters with anxiety they pop a pill to help themselves and not look for an outlet other then that which I thought was interesting. Overall this was a pretty great mystery book and I really enjoyed it.
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  • Vicki Watson
    May 26, 2017
    What if your greatest secrets became public? Just imagine for a minute virtually ANY place that you committed something to word or photo becoming public, say over the last year. Yikes! Not just any and all social media, but even private emails and texts. All public. All drizzled out to the world at a rate of many a day in your schools, work places, churches and homes. Can you even imagine the scandal or the pain this would cause? Now, add to that the anxiety that would accompany these technologi What if your greatest secrets became public? Just imagine for a minute virtually ANY place that you committed something to word or photo becoming public, say over the last year. Yikes! Not just any and all social media, but even private emails and texts. All public. All drizzled out to the world at a rate of many a day in your schools, work places, churches and homes. Can you even imagine the scandal or the pain this would cause? Now, add to that the anxiety that would accompany these technological hacks by having to wait over a period of weeks to see when YOUR private information was leaked to your world. At first it’s probably kind of funny, when it’s someone else because sadly people love watching the shocking, scandalous, dark and dirty private lives of those they envy or dislike become all too public thus knocking them off their pedestals. That is until the hacks escalate and find US or those closest to us. They find the things we just rolled off the cuff while we were mad or scared or jealous. They find our deepest darkest secrets because of course anything we’ve ever searched online is found too. Lives would be shattered, chaos would erupt, friendships and family ties would be severed. This debut novel is more real time, real world than I like to imagine-it’s a wakeup call on steroids! Wake up peeps! If you didn’t have anxiety over digital and personal privacy before you read it, you surely will after.
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