Rich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians, #3)
When Nicholas Young hears that his grandmother, Su Yi, is on her deathbed, he rushes to be by her bedside--but he's not alone. It seems the entire Shang-Young clan has convened from all corners of the globe, ostensibly to care for their matriarch but truly to stake claim on the massive fortune that Su Yi controls. With each family member secretly fantasizing about getting the keys to Tyersall Park--a trophy estate on 64 prime acres in the heart of Singapore--the place becomes a hotbed of intrigue and Nicholas finds himself blocked from entering the premises. As relatives claw over heirlooms, Astrid Leong is at the center of her own storm, desperately in love with her old sweetheart Charlie Wu, but tormented by his ex-wife--a woman hell bent on destroying Astrid's reputation and relationship. Meanwhile Kitty Pong, married to billionaire Jack Bing, finds a formidable opponent in his fashionista daughter, Colette.

Rich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians, #3) Details

TitleRich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 23rd, 2017
PublisherDoubleday
ISBN-139780385542234
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Humor

Rich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians, #3) Review

  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes the best antidote for the craziness of the world is reading a wacky book. (It leaves my head clearer than drinking would, anyway.) Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems , the third in his Crazy Rich Asians series, was just the ticket. Campy, a bit melodramatic, and utterly outrageous, Kwan's tales of three generations of Chinese families, set mostly in Singapore, provides a hysterical glimpse into how the ultra-rich live."Peel away the veneer of wealth and sophistication and you'll find e Sometimes the best antidote for the craziness of the world is reading a wacky book. (It leaves my head clearer than drinking would, anyway.) Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems , the third in his Crazy Rich Asians series, was just the ticket. Campy, a bit melodramatic, and utterly outrageous, Kwan's tales of three generations of Chinese families, set mostly in Singapore, provides a hysterical glimpse into how the ultra-rich live."Peel away the veneer of wealth and sophistication and you'll find extremely provincial, narrow-minded people. The problem is that they all have too much money, and it's come so easily to them that they think they're bloody geniuses and so they are always right."Su Yi, the matriarch of the Young Family, is on her deathbed. She has a massive fortune, capped by Tyersall Park, a 64-acre estate on prime land in Singapore. While Asian tradition would usually expect Su Yi to leave the estate to her eldest son, Philip, many believed she'd bequeath it to his son, her favorite grandson, Nicholas. But Nicholas has been estranged from his grandmother after she voiced her disapproval of his marrying Rachel, whom she viewed as a common Chinese girl, so he hasn't been home to visit her in several years.With disposition of Su Yi's estate in question, her entire family heads to Tyersall Park to hopefully get into her good graces (and perhaps move up a bit in her will) before she passes. Her eldest daughter, Felicity, knows that she'll probably get the short end of the stick because of her gender, but she has bigger fish to fry—her daughter Astrid is scandalizing the family with her relationship with her college boyfriend Charlie Wu. The family never thought that he was good enough for her, even though he is a self-made technology tycoon now, they don't want the two to get together now, even though both are on the verge of divorcing.Another grandson, Edson (Eddie) Chang, has also come to be with Su Yi, with his family in tow. Eddie is the most status-conscious of any of the family members—he always has to be sure people know he's wearing top-of-the-line designers, the most expensive and unique shoes (one pair needed to be dyed multiple times, so they took weeks to be ready for him), and the most luxurious of luxury timepieces. He is bound and determined to finally get the respect he believes he deserves, and if that means keeping others away from his grandmother until he wins her over to his side, so be it.While Nicholas says he doesn't care about the estate and doesn't want to revisit the hurt his grandmother caused, he realizes he needs to say goodbye to her. (Plus, his high-strung mother insists about five times a day, when she's not interrogating him and Rachel about when they'll give her a grandchild.) His return home dredges up some resentment (especially with his cousin Eddie), but spending time with Su Yi and other family members reminds him of the importance of family, but reinforces how smart he and Rachel are to live in New York!Meanwhile, former, umm, actress Kitty Pong has finally gained some status with her marriage to China's second-richest man, Jack Bing. But her quest for respectability keeps falling short, as she can't seem to reconcile her schizophrenic tastes in fashion and decor with what is expected of someone in her position. Even worse is the fact that she is convinced her stepdaughter, fashionista-turned-attorney's wife Colette, is trying to upstage her at every turn. No matter how hard she tries to stand out, Colette seems to be in her way, despite her sudden passion for the environment and no-frills fashion."Scientists talk about how we inherit health issues from our parents through our genes, but we also inherit this entire lineage of fear and pain—generations of it." Rich People Problems is quite funny as it chronicles the over-the-top behavior of these people as they battle for an inheritance, social acceptance, love, and most of all, more money. Kwan imbues his book with painstaking details (even his footnotes are hysterical while also being informative) and a litany of designers, couture, and descriptions of food sure to make your stomach growl quite loudly. Even the characters' names are amazing—my favorite is probably Scheherazade Shang, or Harvard Bing, the infant son of Kitty and Jack. The visuals Kwan's imagery conveys are eye-popping, and some of the dialogue is campier than any soap opera diva or villain's.Like many, I've occasionally thought about what life might be like if I didn't have to worry about money—what I would do, where I would go, what I would spend it on. But the amount of money the characters in this book throw around (one character gets an eye lift for a rare fish to make it look younger) is unfathomable, which makes the book so much fun to read. A true guilty pleasure. See all of my reviews at http://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blo....
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan is a 2017 Doubleday publication.Hilarity and intrigue merge to create yet another wildly entertaining installment in this fabulous series!As with the previous installments, a little time has elapsed, meaning there have been a few changes since we last touched base with all these zany characters. Rachel and Nicholas receive word that his grandmother is suffering from congestive heart failure. As the family begins to gather around her, Nicholas feels pressured fr Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan is a 2017 Doubleday publication.Hilarity and intrigue merge to create yet another wildly entertaining installment in this fabulous series!As with the previous installments, a little time has elapsed, meaning there have been a few changes since we last touched base with all these zany characters. Rachel and Nicholas receive word that his grandmother is suffering from congestive heart failure. As the family begins to gather around her, Nicholas feels pressured from all sides to return home. He finally agrees, but in the meantime Eddie is working hard hoping he will be the one to inherit from his grandmother’s will, and Astrid is going through a contentious divorce as is her lover, Charlie Wu. Kitty is still playing all angles, working to get all she deserves, (or thinks she does), while engaging in a battle of wills with her step-daughter. What I enjoyed most about this installment was the background information provided about Su Yi, and the surprising turn of events that gives Nicholas the chance to finally understand his grandmother. It's poignant, insightful, and very interesting- but the irony! OMG! Hilarious. But, never fear, all the fabulous clothes, food, and destination spots are described in vivid details, and there is certainly no shortage of drama!!The way everything came together in the end suggests this is the last installment in the series. Boo! I have really had a lot of fun reading about these insanely rich Asians and all their conniving, manipulative shallowness, as well as learning about their language, slang, and traditions. But, the epic and wonderful love stories were at the heart of everything. The characters evolved and changed beautifully, most of them finding contentment in one way or the other, which is very satisfying. I have heard there was a movie in works based on this series, so at least I have that to look forward to! Overall, this third, and last, book in the series is every bit as entertaining as the first two, but with a slight bittersweet tone at times. But, the divine ending was all I could have asked for!! 4.5 stars
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  • Rincey
    January 1, 1970
    These are so consistently fun
  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems from Netgalley and Doubleday in exchange for an honest review.In this third installation, Kevin Kwan brings back the magic I felt China Rich Girlfriend was missing. Although to be honest, I could still do without Kitty. I did not like her in the second book, and still felt like she was mostly unneeded - mainly because there are so many great characters in the book who could have used the time given to her. Back to the great parts of this boo I received an ARC of Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems from Netgalley and Doubleday in exchange for an honest review.In this third installation, Kevin Kwan brings back the magic I felt China Rich Girlfriend was missing. Although to be honest, I could still do without Kitty. I did not like her in the second book, and still felt like she was mostly unneeded - mainly because there are so many great characters in the book who could have used the time given to her. Back to the great parts of this book - I continue to love the relationships between Rachel and Nick and Astrid and Charlie, and I loved that Kevin brought back Rachel's best friend too! I also thoroughly loved getting the glimpses into Su Yi's history. There is a whole lot of great drama, and definitely some laugh out loud moments - mostly around Eddie and his ridiculousness. And of course, there is the luxury these characters are afforded. The beautiful vacation spots, the descriptions some times made me feel like I could be right there. Well done Kevin Kwan! I cannot wait to see Crazy Rich Asians when it hits the big screen - and who knows....maybe we will get a fourth book in the future!
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  • Bailey
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing end to a really wonderfully charming and hilarious trilogy.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Rich People Problems is the third installment in Kevin Kwan's humorous series titled Crazy Rich Asians. This one was less funny and more emotional but it was still an amazing read just in a different way. Lots of resolution, some things coming full-circle, plenty of surprises for both the reader and certainly for the characters. It was an excellent addition (and ending, I think) to the series. Note: This series must absolutely be read in order. Check it out!My favorite quote:“Scientists talk abo Rich People Problems is the third installment in Kevin Kwan's humorous series titled Crazy Rich Asians. This one was less funny and more emotional but it was still an amazing read just in a different way. Lots of resolution, some things coming full-circle, plenty of surprises for both the reader and certainly for the characters. It was an excellent addition (and ending, I think) to the series. Note: This series must absolutely be read in order. Check it out!My favorite quote:“Scientists talk about how we inherit health issues from our parents through our genes, but we also inherit this entire lineage of fear and pain—generations of it.”
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  • Jeann (Happy Indulgence)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Rich People Problems, it was hilarious, outlandish and filled with entertainment. It reminded me a lot of what I loved out of Crazy Rich Asians, the bizarre antics of the Shang-Young family, the name and label dropping and all of the deliciously decadent food. Full review to come.---Actual Rating: 4.5This review was originally posted on Happy Indulgence. Check it out for more reviews!What do you do when you’re outrageously rich and you’re part of the most powerful, influential families i I loved Rich People Problems, it was hilarious, outlandish and filled with entertainment. It reminded me a lot of what I loved out of Crazy Rich Asians, the bizarre antics of the Shang-Young family, the name and label dropping and all of the deliciously decadent food. Full review to come.---Actual Rating: 4.5This review was originally posted on Happy Indulgence. Check it out for more reviews!What do you do when you’re outrageously rich and you’re part of the most powerful, influential families in Asia? You spend it of course, in the wildest and craziest ways.From plastering oneself with the next season’s designer labels, to being named a Countess and having everyone bow to them, to getting plastic surgery for a prized pet fish, there is no going too far for these people. Only not going far enough which is ridiculously entertaining.With the revered grandmother Su Yi’s health on the line and her inheritance as the talk of the town, the Shang-Young clan make preparations for her legacy.Nicholas Young, the prodigal grandson living in New York, debates whether to return and make peace with his grandmother. Astrid, the good daughter who has never disappointed her parents, is in the midst of divorce and reuniting with an old flame. The outlandish Edison is set out to mourn by his grandmother’s bedside in the showiest of manners, and it’s also not the last we’ve seen of the tacky Kitty Pong in her rise to fame.I loved all the vivid descriptions of the French inspired grandeur of the Tyersall Park home, and the stunning locations from the designer boutiques in France, to the sandy beaches of Asia, the buzzing food stalls of Singapore and everything in between. With the name dropping of expensive watches, designer labels and even pop culture references, Rich People Problems shows us a world unattainable to most. I particularly loved the minute descriptions of the delicious Asian delicacies, from dim sum, to fried noodles with gravy, and of course, multiple course degustations.My favourite part of Rich People Problems is that it felt very much like a direct sequel of the first book, as we see what becomes of each and every character. I loved Nick Young and the loyalty he feels towards his family and preserving Tyersall Park, even though his grandma banished him several years ago. I loved Rachel and how she tries to do what’s best for Nick and his family, despite their ill treatment to her. I also loved seeing all the family members reunite under one roof over their grandmother’s health and also a breathtaking and oestentatious proposal that could only be orchestrated by the filthy rich.While I loved the conclusion of the book and seeing what becomes of our favourite characters, I felt that the ending was a bit rushed. The epilogue references some scenes that I wish we got to experience firsthand. Aside from this, everything was wrapped up beautifully and you couldn’t ask for a better ending to this wild and crazy whirlwind of a book.As the last book in the trilogy, Rich People Problems reminded me of everything I loved about the first book – fame, fortune and the wacky antics of Asia’s finest. This excessive, over the top world was entertaining, fast paced, hilarious and ridiculously addictive. I can’t wait for the Crazy Rich Asians movie to come out, especially with it’s all Asian cast. If you’re looking for a hilariously entertaining insight to the filthy rich from a different perspective, you can’t go wrong with this series.I received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Trina (Between Chapters)
    January 1, 1970
    This was my favorite of the 3 books because by this point I was invested in the characters due to sheer exposure from binge reading.The first 2/3 or so would have easily been 4 stars if that was the end of the book, but then it continued to drag on and I started to feel myself not caring about the outcomes anymore. The drama was the same ol same ol, especially between Kitty and Colette and omg I was sick of it.Although a fun peek into the world of the obscenely rich, I just don't think Kwan is a This was my favorite of the 3 books because by this point I was invested in the characters due to sheer exposure from binge reading.The first 2/3 or so would have easily been 4 stars if that was the end of the book, but then it continued to drag on and I started to feel myself not caring about the outcomes anymore. The drama was the same ol same ol, especially between Kitty and Colette and omg I was sick of it.Although a fun peek into the world of the obscenely rich, I just don't think Kwan is a great writer. The characters are underdeveloped and their personalities are changed on a whim to create drama. New characters are introduced left and right that play little to no role in the story, and truly absurd circumstances happen to them to write them out again. The plot is messy and poorly paced. He repeatedly uses slurs throughout the series (which I don't know if this is a cultural difference but Kwan has said the book was written for an American audience, and I think that living in the US, he and some of the characters from the US would know how these things come across.) The one thing he does well is the atmosphere/setting.Content warnings: The R slur. A tasteless Helen Keller joke. Suicide attempt. Revenge porn. Death/grief.
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  • Mizuki
    January 1, 1970
    Review for book 2: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Rating: 'I agree that this series needs a K-drama adaptation 4 comedy stars' (and I'm not even a K-pop fan...)My GR friend Dyanna actually includes photos of her dream cast for the characters in her review for Crazy Rich Asians: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Favorite quote: "By sheer dumb luck, my father was born in the right place at the right moment in time--when the whole region was going through enormous, unprecedented grow Review for book 2: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Rating: 'I agree that this series needs a K-drama adaptation 4 comedy stars' (and I'm not even a K-pop fan...)My GR friend Dyanna actually includes photos of her dream cast for the characters in her review for Crazy Rich Asians: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Favorite quote: "By sheer dumb luck, my father was born in the right place at the right moment in time--when the whole region was going through enormous, unprecedented growth. And oh yeah, he also inherited an empire that had already been set up four generations before him. I think he looks down on people like your father--people who are self-made--because at the heart of it he is a deeply insecure individual. He knows he did absolutely nothing to deserve his fortune, and so the only thing he can do is disparage others who have the audacity to make their own money." So this is the end of the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy. (LINK: https://media.giphy.com/media/h0MTqLy...)Okay, the dramas are still good (e.g. Cindy Bing's many battles with her estranged step daughter), and there are a handful of characters whose stories I still wish to see more development from. As a whole it is still an enjoyable read--plus if you are a foodies you would absolutely love all the mentions of Asian dishes in the book.Overall this is an enjoyable melodrama, even thoughI really don't enjoy a few of the storylines in this volume. If the main theme of the first book is about Rachel Chu meeting the super rich Young clan and the dramas surrounding the issue of 'marrying up to a super rich family', then the most intriguing part of this third book is the fight over who will get the inheritance and the charmed mansion Tyersall Park from Su Yi--the dying Ah Ma (Translation: grandmother).Surely we can't have a novel series about rich people without having some fights over inheritance, and Rich People Problems is no exclusions.(LINK: https://giphy.com/gifs/crazyrichasian...)The protagonist Nick Young is still a reliable character and I still like to see how he (and his parents) goes through the whole in-fight for the inheritance. I can understand these characters to an extent even I am by no mean rich, and the author Kevin Kwan had managed to include so many details to make me understand how the mind of these characters and the cultures and customs they live in.Yet on the other hand, I don't care much about the divorce dramas about Astrid the heiress, her ex-husband Michael and new love interest Charlie. I just don't care about it.When reading the book, I found myself disliking many of the characters because (1) they are self-important to the boots and won't lift a finger to help the poor people, (2) most of these people are too busy living in their glamours super rich world to notice what's going on for the rest of the population, (3) expects a few characters who actually have a job, many of these rich people had done nothing to gain their fortune. *sighs* I got seriously pissed that many of these rich people in the story are getting rich just because they are land owners or making money out of real estate business. All these people are simply feeding on the middle class and working class people. +___+PS: I actually like how Nick's cousin Eddie Chen (view spoiler)[redeemed himself by the end of the story (hide spoiler)] and the plot twist about Eddie's long suffering wife Fiona.PSS: Just for the record, we HongKongers never use 'Fucky fuck' as a curse word, we simply say 'Fuck your mom' (like most Han Chinese do) or just 'Fuck you' (like most people do).PSSS: Just for the record, local HongKongers (mostly people who came to HK after WWII or later) used 'Chan' as the translation of the Chinese family name '陳', not 'Chen'. 'Chen' is used mostly among people from mainland China. So.........I found it odd that when Eddie Chen and his family is supposed to be living in HK for at least three generations but they still have a mainland-version translation as their family name...why?PSSSS: Well, through the series, Kevin Kwan did address how people from mainland China and/or their new money class are discriminated by the other Chinese speaking communities and/or the oversea Chinese communities. But to be honest, it isn't like I can muster up much sympathy for this group of people. *shrugs*Other novels about rich people and their soap dramas:Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, by John Berendt: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...The Ashleys by Melissa de la Cruz: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5...Blue Bloods, by Melissa de la Cruz::https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8...
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  • Lisa Kong
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, Kevin Kwan has done it again ( I knew he would). I had VERY high expectations for this book and they were exceeded so so far. This book is full of unexpected plot twists, hilarious and outrageous moments, and had characters I could relate to even though I can't even imagine being 1/100 times as a rich as them. Truth is, Asians (esp Chinese) still have their cultural roots, most of which I could 100% relate to and that's why I love this series so much. The storylines get more and more compli Wow, Kevin Kwan has done it again ( I knew he would). I had VERY high expectations for this book and they were exceeded so so far. This book is full of unexpected plot twists, hilarious and outrageous moments, and had characters I could relate to even though I can't even imagine being 1/100 times as a rich as them. Truth is, Asians (esp Chinese) still have their cultural roots, most of which I could 100% relate to and that's why I love this series so much. The storylines get more and more complicated and in my mind I don't think they'll ever cross but BOY in the end they all collided with so much force it was perfect. My only complaint is I seriously wish this book was longer as it's the finale and I'm sure Kevin Kwan has only told a quarter of his outrageous stories, most of which he probably experienced. (btw, I still can't imagine a world in which these type of people ACTUALLY exist). Also, Oliver T'sien (my favorite character from CRA 1 whom I lost my respects to after the CRG ending) gained back my love. Also, I thought Kitty Pong was crazy in the second book, and boy I was wrong. Honestly this is so rambly but basically this will be probably my favorite book of the year and I will miss these characters dearly (though I will secretly be crossing my fingers for a new installment =D) I'M SO EXCITED FOR THIS I CANT EVEN. TWO OF MY MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS ARE COMING OUT ON THE SAME DAY 5/23. IDEK WHICH ONE TO READ FIRST. I KNOW KEVIN KWAN IS GOING TO WRITE ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS I WILL EVER READ. I WISH IT WAS LIKE 184839291 PAGES. XD
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  • Joce (squibblesreads)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so so so so so sad to leave my friends in this series. I didn’t want this book to end so I could spend more time with them. Overall, more emotional, with more backstory than the first two and we really sunk into the spirit of the characters and the elements that make up the glue that holds the family together. Ugh, I’m obsessed. If I had to rank the three, the first one is my favorite, followed by this one, and the second is my least favorite. But they’re all wonderful.Something to make note I’m so so so so so sad to leave my friends in this series. I didn’t want this book to end so I could spend more time with them. Overall, more emotional, with more backstory than the first two and we really sunk into the spirit of the characters and the elements that make up the glue that holds the family together. Ugh, I’m obsessed. If I had to rank the three, the first one is my favorite, followed by this one, and the second is my least favorite. But they’re all wonderful.Something to make note of was that there was a small subplot that involved questionable villification of mental illness and use of the “hysterical woman” trope which I didn’t enjoy. Like don’t let Freud into this book please. I deducted 1 star here, or it would have been the full 5.
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  • DeB MaRtEnS
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved this series, primarily because it is outrageous, funny and over the top. New money, old money, extravagances beyond comprehension combined with family rivalry, secrecy and love stories - delicious! Add that it is centred in Singapore, provides reams of cultural education as a serious side dish to the funky fun, and the series was simply a treat of entertainment and novelty. I hope that Kevin Kwan leads readers on more adventures. The romps were "divine", and I'd like to savour another I've loved this series, primarily because it is outrageous, funny and over the top. New money, old money, extravagances beyond comprehension combined with family rivalry, secrecy and love stories - delicious! Add that it is centred in Singapore, provides reams of cultural education as a serious side dish to the funky fun, and the series was simply a treat of entertainment and novelty. I hope that Kevin Kwan leads readers on more adventures. The romps were "divine", and I'd like to savour another!
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Rich People Problems is a fabulous read. Kevin Kwan’s witty writing and highly entertaining characters make Rich People Problems so much fun to read. There are A LOT of characters to keep up with, but once I had them all straight again I didn’t want the book to end. Kwan is a master at depicting familial relationships, and with everyone descending on Tyersall Park, there is much family drama to be had. I really enjoyed learning more about Su Yi’s background and Tyersall Park itself. Kwan’s descr Rich People Problems is a fabulous read. Kevin Kwan’s witty writing and highly entertaining characters make Rich People Problems so much fun to read. There are A LOT of characters to keep up with, but once I had them all straight again I didn’t want the book to end. Kwan is a master at depicting familial relationships, and with everyone descending on Tyersall Park, there is much family drama to be had. I really enjoyed learning more about Su Yi’s background and Tyersall Park itself. Kwan’s descriptions of the ultra-rich lifestyles of certain characters and the outlandish behavior of others, including poor Eddie and Kitty. A fish gets plastic surgery, a socialite has a “personal documentarian”, and a decorator creates a look he called “Ming emperor meets Louis-Napoleon at Studio 54” which includes Tibetan yak hair dyed simmering shades of persimmon. Kwan is truly a master at depicting the absurdity of various characters’ lifestyles in the most hilarious manner. Be prepared to laugh out loud repeatedly.I was excited to see artist James Turrell receive a shout-out from Kwan. Turrell designed an illuminated tunnel at the art museum near my home, and it remains one of our favorite things to see whenever we visit the museum. I highly recommend this book and hope there will be another one. I am looking forward to the Crazy Rich Asians movie in the meantime. Thanks to Doubleday and NetGalley for the chance to read this book.
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  • Love Fool
    January 1, 1970
    When Nicholas Young hears that his grandmother, Su Yi, is on her deathbed, he rushes to be by her bedside--but he's not alone. It seems the entire Shang-Young clan has convened from all corners of the globe, ostensibly to care for their matriarch but truly to stake claim on the massive fortune that Su Yi controls. With each family member secretly fantasizing about getting the keys to Tyersall Park--a trophy estate on 64 prime acres in the heart of Singapore--the place becomes a hotbed of intrigu When Nicholas Young hears that his grandmother, Su Yi, is on her deathbed, he rushes to be by her bedside--but he's not alone. It seems the entire Shang-Young clan has convened from all corners of the globe, ostensibly to care for their matriarch but truly to stake claim on the massive fortune that Su Yi controls. With each family member secretly fantasizing about getting the keys to Tyersall Park--a trophy estate on 64 prime acres in the heart of Singapore--the place becomes a hotbed of intrigue and Nicholas finds himself blocked from entering the premises. As relatives claw over heirlooms, Astrid Leong is at the center of her own storm, desperately in love with her old sweetheart Charlie Wu, but tormented by his ex-wife--a woman hell bent on destroying Astrid's reputation and relationship. Meanwhile Kitty Pong, married to billionaire Jack Bing, finds a formidable opponent in his fashionista daughter, Colette.Part 3 and better than ever! Now I loved the last two (and can't wait for the movie to come out!). I am a huuuuuge fan. What's better than insanely rich people who are so over the top that you can't even imagine it being real but deep down know that there are people like that and you sadly will probably never be one of them. Now all that over the top, hilarious, and wealthy drama and times it by 3, stir, and you get Rich People's Problems. More drama. More money spent. More greed. More love. Of course, there are elements that are sad, like Nick's grandmother on her deathbed. The woman has had a colorful life and we learn more about her past with flashbacks but that woman should pat herself on the back because she has lived... not like some other people who mostly just sit on their couch, watch some reality shows, and stalk people on Instagram. Nick and his grandmother are not on good terms, he got married to Rachel without her blessing. Because of this, her fortune and the dream castle Tyersall Park are up for grabs. Nick would have been the ideal grandchild to inherit everything since he was a favorite and a male but since he married Rachel everyone knows most likely, he's not getting anything. With family kissing the dying grandmother's ass and fighting for anything they can grab, that over the top drama that I love comes into play... Of course there are my two favorite characters, Astrid who is the Grace Kelly of the family and Kitty who is the dream rags to riches story... so basically she is insane and has billions to be insane with. Astrid just wants to live her life with her boyfriend Charlie but of course their exes won't allow that. Kitty just wants to be the socialite she believes she deserves to be but her past and tackiness makes it difficult for people to see her as the mega wealthy classy woman she believes she should be looked as. And of course, her step daughter Colette returns... bigger and badder than ever. The drama! The wealth! How can you not love it!
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  • anolinde
    January 1, 1970
    More like 2.5.I didn't find this book nearly as entertaining as its predecessors. Not sure if the novelty's worn off or what, but it just seemed a lot... idk, tackier than the others? The constant footnotes got pretty annoying - did we really need that whole spiel about Jon Snow? It felt like there was just so much name/reference-dropping, but the names and references seemed less impressive than before.Nick and Rachel, having been the focus of the first two novels, were reduced to secondary char More like 2.5.I didn't find this book nearly as entertaining as its predecessors. Not sure if the novelty's worn off or what, but it just seemed a lot... idk, tackier than the others? The constant footnotes got pretty annoying - did we really need that whole spiel about Jon Snow? It felt like there was just so much name/reference-dropping, but the names and references seemed less impressive than before.Nick and Rachel, having been the focus of the first two novels, were reduced to secondary characters; Rachel in particular had nothing to do. Even Astrid and Charlie's romance wasn't as captivating as it could have been. The bulk of the story revolved around side characters such as Kitty, Colette, and Oliver, none of whom were particularly engaging. (Side note - I found Colette's fate to be (view spoiler)[needlessly cruel. I actually don't remember her at all from the second book, so it's possible she was pretty horrible in that book, but I do remember Carlton killing that girl and paralyzing the other, and I was not impressed when Colette's reveal of his past - so quickly brushed off by Scheherazade - was written as such an evil thing for her to do. (hide spoiler)])In addition to these side characters, Nick's grandmother, Sun Yi, was given an expanded backstory. I'm really not a fan of pulling shit like this at the end of a series without having laid out the groundwork first; it just felt like the author needed to add some more pages to the book, so he came up with the ~mystery~ of Nick's grandmother. It was hard to muster the interest in her past, especially when the drama surrounding Tyersall Park was so much more entertaining.The ending was a bit cliche, but more or less fine.
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  • Stephanie Anze
    January 1, 1970
    When Su Yi, the matriarch of the Shang, Young and Leong families is affected by heart problems, everyone rushes to see her. While some are there to say good bye, the rest are there after one thing only: Tyersall Park. Tyersall Park is a grand mansion on sprawling property in Singapore that currently belongs to Su Yi. Being a prized estate, everyone is wondering who will inherit it. Meanwhile, Nick has not seen nor spoken to his grandmother (Su Yi) since he announced his intentions to marry Rache When Su Yi, the matriarch of the Shang, Young and Leong families is affected by heart problems, everyone rushes to see her. While some are there to say good bye, the rest are there after one thing only: Tyersall Park. Tyersall Park is a grand mansion on sprawling property in Singapore that currently belongs to Su Yi. Being a prized estate, everyone is wondering who will inherit it. Meanwhile, Nick has not seen nor spoken to his grandmother (Su Yi) since he announced his intentions to marry Rachel. Now, he returns home to try and make amends with her before its too late but he is denied entrance into his childhood home. Hilarity and drama ensues. The final installment in the 'Crazy Rich Asians' series, 'Rich People Problems' is exactly what the title implies. While there are absurd moments and the plot is somewhat convoluted, there is something about the narrative that is just downright indulgent, fun and difficult to put down. Asia's elite is back with their antics and boy, there is drama, drama followed by more drama. Nick is denied acess to see his grandmother, his cousins are plotting a scheme to get Tyersall Park, Astrid is having problems in the sentimental department, Eleanor is pressuring Rachel for a grandchild and somewhere among all these scenarios, a fish gets plastic surgery. Its crazy, I know but I found myself laughing out loud several times. This book differs from the others in that the reader gets background information on Su Yi and Tyersall Park itself, which was refreshing and explains so much. Let me just say that there is more to her than meets the eye. The ending was very fitting given the nature of the book though (in my opinion) it wrapped up a few situations just too neat. When I first started the series, I did not think I would even remotely like it but it was quite a fun, entertaining and enjoyable read overall. I can not wait for the movie adaptation of 'Crazy Rich Asians' to be realeased!Spoiler ahead: do not read if you have not read this book. I really hope Kevin Kwan follows up with Rachel and Nick's baby. Even if it just a short story or novella. You know Eleanor will be a special kind of grandmother.
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  • Christine Luong
    January 1, 1970
    A disappointing, bloated mess. The book starts off promising enough, with 3 tongue-in-cheek anecdotes about "rich people problems", but then it totally veers off course. Part 1 is almost unreadable, as it tries way too hard to recapture the perfect blend of snark, humor, and ridiculousness of Crazy Rich Asians. The whole book is a hot mess with so many plot holes and unnecessary story lines. I'm glad to have finished the trilogy and know how it all ends, but the Kitty vs. Collette story line is A disappointing, bloated mess. The book starts off promising enough, with 3 tongue-in-cheek anecdotes about "rich people problems", but then it totally veers off course. Part 1 is almost unreadable, as it tries way too hard to recapture the perfect blend of snark, humor, and ridiculousness of Crazy Rich Asians. The whole book is a hot mess with so many plot holes and unnecessary story lines. I'm glad to have finished the trilogy and know how it all ends, but the Kitty vs. Collette story line is just too eyerollingly awful, and ends on an absolutely absurd and unnecessarily mean note.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Review soon!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    You can read all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends! totally meant to have this review ready 2 weeks ago when Rich People Problems was published, but you know what? I wasn’t finished reading it. I’ve found that when I am Really Into a book, it takes me a while to finish it. I feel like that’s opposite of a lot of my reading friends. The thing is, if I’m Really Into a book, then I want to savor it, stay in the story & make it last. That’s exactly what happened You can read all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends! totally meant to have this review ready 2 weeks ago when Rich People Problems was published, but you know what? I wasn’t finished reading it. I’ve found that when I am Really Into a book, it takes me a while to finish it. I feel like that’s opposite of a lot of my reading friends. The thing is, if I’m Really Into a book, then I want to savor it, stay in the story & make it last. That’s exactly what happened with Kevin Kwan’s third installment of his Crazy Rich Asians series.If you haven’t read the first 2 books, I think you need to. Sure, you will understand the story, you can get caught up, but Really you’re missing a hell of a lot of fun. I read (or listened to) Crazy Rich Asians & China Rich Girlfriend via audiobook & I LOVED them both. My daughter was saying, “Rachel-lah” for weeks after. This time I around, I opted for the ARC written copy & I missed my narration. If you’re into Audiobooks, these are fantastic. Okay, back to Rich People Problems.I’m so happy to be back with the gang; Eddie, Nicky, Rachel, Araminta, Kitty Pong & more. I’m in dire need of a month-long getaway at Tyersall Park & I could definitely go for a Parisian shopping spree right about now. I loved that my main man, Nigel Barker from America’s Next Top Model & famous photo was featured in Rich People Problems. I don’t want to spoil the ending, but Kevin wrapped this storyline up perfectly & left the door open for book four. You are sure to see Rich People Problems everywhere this summer; it’s hilarious, entertaining & heartfelt. I fell in love with these characters years ago & I’m so happy Kevin brought them back to life. Don’t forget; there is a Crazy Rich Asians movie headed your way soon & I can’t wait!Special thanks to Kevin Kwan, Doubleday Books & NetGalley for providing our copy in exchange for an honest & fair review.
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  • Lea
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT a whirlwind. You guys, I cannot recommend this series enough, and this just might be my favourite book in it.Rich People Problems is OUTRAGEOUS, and outrageously funny. It's got scandal after scandal, and Kevin Kwan has MASTERED the art of ending his chapters with a shocker, so that it is physically IMPOSSIBLE to stop reading this book until the very end.It was great to read more about Su Yi (Nick's grandma) and all of our faves, but the real scene stealers were the anti-heroes or the strai WHAT a whirlwind. You guys, I cannot recommend this series enough, and this just might be my favourite book in it.Rich People Problems is OUTRAGEOUS, and outrageously funny. It's got scandal after scandal, and Kevin Kwan has MASTERED the art of ending his chapters with a shocker, so that it is physically IMPOSSIBLE to stop reading this book until the very end.It was great to read more about Su Yi (Nick's grandma) and all of our faves, but the real scene stealers were the anti-heroes or the straight-up villains, ESPECIALLY Kitty Pong and Eddie Cheng. I was SCREAMINGGGG at these crazy rich people's antics. There were a TON of special celebrity cameos, all of which were hilarious and amazing. I can't even decide on my favourite one but it just might be the one with a certain (view spoiler)[noted fashion photographer (hide spoiler)].A wonderful ending to a wonderful series. I can't wait to see the movie and what Kevin Kwan will do next.PS.: there were a ton of references to the books Kevin listed on the Kitty Pong Reading Challenge!! I kept going "WAIT A MINUTE...!", it was a real treat. He's a smart guy, that Kevin Kwan.
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  • Jessica Woodbury
    January 1, 1970
    I figured I'd get around to this book eventually and when I ditched another audiobook right before a flight, it was the right time for a book I knew would be fluffy and reliable. A solid entry in the series, with piles and piles of soapy plot twists. By now I'm used to the descriptions of clothing and cars and private jets. I liked the Su Yi secrets and the way the family came together again. I admit, I could keep reading a new entry in this series every couple years. They're such a palate clean I figured I'd get around to this book eventually and when I ditched another audiobook right before a flight, it was the right time for a book I knew would be fluffy and reliable. A solid entry in the series, with piles and piles of soapy plot twists. By now I'm used to the descriptions of clothing and cars and private jets. I liked the Su Yi secrets and the way the family came together again. I admit, I could keep reading a new entry in this series every couple years. They're such a palate cleanser.
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  • Gabriella
    January 1, 1970
    While I breezed through the first two novels in Kevin Kwan’s trilogy (can I call it that?), this one was harder to sink my teeth into. There are still many positives: I really enjoyed the added focus on the history of the Shang and Young families, which did a lot to redeem some of the less agreeable characters throughout the series (namely, the matriarch of the Youngs, Shang Su Yi.) In general, Rich People Problems reversed my opinions of several main characters, as well as a few supporting ones While I breezed through the first two novels in Kevin Kwan’s trilogy (can I call it that?), this one was harder to sink my teeth into. There are still many positives: I really enjoyed the added focus on the history of the Shang and Young families, which did a lot to redeem some of the less agreeable characters throughout the series (namely, the matriarch of the Youngs, Shang Su Yi.) In general, Rich People Problems reversed my opinions of several main characters, as well as a few supporting ones. Kwan continues the redemptive arc of Kitty Pong, which was continuously delightful, though Oliver T’sien makes a less intriguing counselor than Corinna Ko-Tung. He was one of my favorite smaller characters from Crazy Rich Asians, and I wished his extra page time allowed him to do what he does best—stir up gossip alongside the other disentranced members of Singapore’s high society. Eddie Cheng’s newfound career as a “professional mourner,” in hopes of receiving his grandmother’s fortune, made him one of my favorite characters of this final novel—I really hope his five-star performance at the wake on pages 226-227 makes it into the movies! This final book falls apart in a way that was perhaps inevitable: Nick Young and Rachel Chu get lost in the (frankly, more interesting) drama of the other characters. Not only do they fail to earn their roles as memorable protagonists in this novel, but Nicholas manages to become more irritating than his cousin Eddie! In the latter part of Rich People Problems, Nick’s righteous indignation about the sale of his family’s estate becomes incredibly hypocritical. While I guess it’s admirable that he decides to “save Tyersall Park” from being “turned into some grotesque gated community that only allows in millionaire Christians,” it’s pretty exasperating that he doesn’t address the fact that it’s been a century-old gated community for his family and friends. There’s an attempt at redemption, but the whole “Tyersall was once the Underground Railroad Of Asia so now we’ll open it to the plebeians and tourists” subplot is given drastically too little time to become coherent. In Rich People Problems, Kwan overestimates the morality (and relevance) of Nick and Rachel—just because they aren’t actively participating in Singapore’s high society, doesn’t mean they can’t be oblivious to their own immense privilege. In fact, while everyone else in their world seems to be at least settled with their socioeconomic status in the world, Nick and Rachel’s ineffective, navel-gazing class guilt starts to seem like something they’re too old to still be grappling with. I’m still super excited for the movie, but I’m also glad to be done with the Chu-Youngs for a minute. Every time they appeared, I found myself rushing through the chapter, searching for the characters I could stand, instead of (like before) finding them on every page.
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  • Sarah (A French Girl)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5. THANK YOU NETGALLEY FOR PROVIDING ME WITH AN ARC!Now that I think about it, I realize that it's a bit weird that I've never talked about one of my favourite series. Written by Kevin Kwan, Crazy Rich Asians depicts the crazy adventures of the extravagant Chinese elite. Admittedly, the set of three books is not for everybody. Think of it as a mashup between Gossip Girl and 90210 where the cast is in their early 30s and instead of hanging out in Barney's or Nordstrom, do their shopping between 4.5. THANK YOU NETGALLEY FOR PROVIDING ME WITH AN ARC!Now that I think about it, I realize that it's a bit weird that I've never talked about one of my favourite series. Written by Kevin Kwan, Crazy Rich Asians depicts the crazy adventures of the extravagant Chinese elite. Admittedly, the set of three books is not for everybody. Think of it as a mashup between Gossip Girl and 90210 where the cast is in their early 30s and instead of hanging out in Barney's or Nordstrom, do their shopping between China's fanciest shops and every major fashion city. In the first book, Nick brought along his girlfriend Rachel to his best friend's wedding in Singapore, exposing her to his world made up of ridiculously wealthy relatives, friends and acquaintances without any preparation. In fact, prior to the trip Rachel knew little about her boyfriend's family and assumed that his silence on his background hinted at a poverty-ridden home that he wanted to hide. In this last opus, Nick's iron fisted grandmother is dying. The entire family and their bunch of extended relative gather at her deathbed to gain a share of her massive fortune. Once, Su Yi's favoured grandchild, the two had been on the out lately due to his relation and subsequent marriage to Rachel, an American born Chinese from a middle-class family. However, feeling that this might be his last opportunity to speak with his grandmother, Nick decides to book a trip to his homeland. Rich People Problem is as crisp and entertaining as his predecessors. Everybody's back in this latest instalment. However, as Su Yi's life is coming to an end the author offers glimpse of her backstory through flashbacks. Amidst the ridiculous antics of his cast, what shone the most is the author's love and pride for his country. It's the in the way he weaves history into his plot, in the way he writes about places and the food, and how his characters speak. The characters are fictional, and represent an extremely tiny portion of China's population. Despite this, I felt like I discovered China and its people a little bit through this book. A critique that has often been levelled at this series is its lack of introspection, its seeming acceptance of the gilded lives of an entitled elite. I think the author deserve a bit more credit than that. His real critique of the Chinese billionaires and millionaires is in his candid depiction of who and what they are. His characters are likeable and endearing, yet the reader is never led to believe that they are anything but ridiculously spoiled individuals living in their own little bubble. From Nick being pissed off by an offer of billions of dollars to buy his grandmother’s mansion, to Astrid tumultuous and public relationship with a former flame, though we can empathise with the characters’ problems, we are always reminded that these are empty rich people problems that would not have any significance or importance outside their gilded world. As you can see, naming this third book Rich People Problem was clever indeed.Perhaps, more could have been done to induce some much needed character growth, especially for Nick. Nick's brand of entitlement lies in a disconcerting naivety about issues of wealth and poverty. There’s a quote from book 2 from Jacqueline, a family friend of the Young, that stuck with me. She was trying to advise Nick against marrying Rachel because by following through with his plan, Nick would have probably been disinherited and would have had to face the consequence of his choice. "You can act all self-righteous in front of me right now, but believe me, when it is all taken away, you won’t know what hit you. Doors that have been open to you all your life will suddenly be closed, because in everyone’s eye you are nothing without Tyersall Park." Obviously, Nick utterly missed her point. I kind of wish the author would have explored this topic a little bit more. If this was another story, Nick would have finally realized to what extent his family name influenced the way people interacted with him and his life. He would have at long last acknowledged how lucky and privileged he had been his entire life. But Rich People Problem is not that kind of book which is fine since Crazy Rich Asians never pretended to be a study of power and privilege. I highly recommend this book and the entire series to anyone who want to have a good laugh while discovering a little bit of China!
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  • Sarah⭐ The Ultimate Book Hoarder.
    January 1, 1970
    PRE-READ: I finally own this book! Yus! This series is as addicting as cocaine.~The conclusion of the series wraps up everything in a nice little bow, which is fine, but I kinda expected something... More? It seemed too perfect. A lot of unanswered questions were left aswell.
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  • Angel
    January 1, 1970
    While there were definitely a couple things I could really do without--anti-blackness, a dig or two at biracial kids--this series has been really good at owning what it is. The satire is biting and so very funny, and the emotional beats feel true and honest. I've really enjoyed walking with Rachel and Nick as they navigated this world of excess and entryways, and I'm sad that this is the end of a series that has distracted me from the crap that's going on all the time.
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  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com
    January 1, 1970
    Spectacular fun. A book that you cannot help but be entertained by due to the richly engaging and extravagant characters. This book will leave you reeling from the laughs and the realization on how the other half lives.
  • Sulis Peri Hutan
    January 1, 1970
    Sukaaaaaaaaa, duh bakalan kangen dong karena udah tamat, tapi puas lah sama endingnya 😂Kalau buku pertama lebih ke pengenalan karakter, buku kedua mengupas keluarga Rachel (yg bikin aku ngefans berat sama Carlton!), buku ketiga ini membuktikan betapa pentingnya pohon keluarga di awal halaman. Karena memang membahas mereka dengan cukup detail dan tentu saja Tyersall Park.Aku senang harapanku terkabul! Charlie dan Astrid adalah pasangan favorit di serial ini! Dan tentu saja mendapat jatah yang ban Sukaaaaaaaaa, duh bakalan kangen dong karena udah tamat, tapi puas lah sama endingnya 😂Kalau buku pertama lebih ke pengenalan karakter, buku kedua mengupas keluarga Rachel (yg bikin aku ngefans berat sama Carlton!), buku ketiga ini membuktikan betapa pentingnya pohon keluarga di awal halaman. Karena memang membahas mereka dengan cukup detail dan tentu saja Tyersall Park.Aku senang harapanku terkabul! Charlie dan Astrid adalah pasangan favorit di serial ini! Dan tentu saja mendapat jatah yang banyak seperti sebelumnya 😬Bagian yang bikin ngakak."Tentu saja, aku lupa terus kalau ayahmu Bao Gaoliang," kata Alistair."Pertanyaan terakhir... siapa gadis itu?" tanya Carlton.Yang terakhir keluar dari helikopter adalah sosok kecantikan Eurasia yang menawan berusia awal dua puluhan. Dengan rambut pirang sepanjang pinggang, dia menggenakan gaun Rochas panjang tanpa lengan dari linen hitam dan sandal emas dari Da Costanzo, terlihat seakan-akan baru saja datang dari pesta pantai di Majorca."Sepertinya aku baru saja bertemu calon istriku." kata Carlton, memandangi rambut gadis itu berkibar dengan sensasional tertiup angin dari rotor helikopter."Semoga berhasil, Bung! Itu sepupuku Scheherazade Shang. Dia sedang mengerjakan disertasinya di Sorbonne. Kecerdasan dan kecantikan. Kau tahu, aku dengar ada cowok lain yang sudah bertahun-tahun mencoba mendekatinya dan sama sekali tidak berhasil. Namanya Pangeran Harry."😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂Sekarang tahu kemana hati Pangeran Harry berlabuh setelah cintanya ditolak 😬
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  • Mbgirl
    January 1, 1970
    No more "Alamak"! expressions for me:)The final of Kwan's trilogies continues to sport delicious satire! I thoroughly poured through all of the book, at a clip. My SG friend emailed me to let me know that filming has indeed begun for the film version, starring Constance Wu!Plastic surgery for arawanas, learning about the lifestyle of the rich and famous in Philippines, more great SG history ( I'm headed to HSBC treetop walk next time-- Tyersall Park, for sure)... and a great poke at the absolute No more "Alamak"! expressions for me:)The final of Kwan's trilogies continues to sport delicious satire! I thoroughly poured through all of the book, at a clip. My SG friend emailed me to let me know that filming has indeed begun for the film version, starring Constance Wu!Plastic surgery for arawanas, learning about the lifestyle of the rich and famous in Philippines, more great SG history ( I'm headed to HSBC treetop walk next time-- Tyersall Park, for sure)... and a great poke at the absolute superficial and shallow nature of billionaire Chinese-- fu er dai.As well, I found very relatable the family and extended family gossip and issues that were played out and highlighted with the grandma character of SuYi.As a polyglot, I savored every Canto and Mandarin reference, all the Hokkien phrases, and Malay expletives and slang. Wonderful closing work for Kevin Kwan. I laughed out loud dozens of times.Such the perfect light and fun summer reading series. I'll read the first book in Alberta since my mother wants in on his book!PS. Aww, a blogger living there told me there is no such Tyersall Park-- just a street. Snap!
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't want the book to end. I want to spend more time with these amazing and hilariously over the top characters. I enjoyed learning more about Su Yi in this one. This is the perfect summer read. Thank you to Doubleday for sending me an ARC.
  • Cheryl DeFranceschi
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this trilogy. It was just so much fun from start to finish. I will miss all the wacky antics of this large family, but I'm grateful for the peek into their lives that Kevin Kwan showed us.
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