The Woman on the Orient Express
Hoping to make a clean break from a fractured marriage, Agatha Christie boards the Orient Express in disguise. But unlike her famous detective Hercule Poirot, she can’t neatly unravel the mysteries she encounters on this fateful journey.Agatha isn’t the only passenger on board with secrets. Her cabinmate Katharine Keeling’s first marriage ended in tragedy, propelling her toward a second relationship mired in deceit. Nancy Nelson—newly married but carrying another man’s child—is desperate to conceal the pregnancy and teeters on the brink of utter despair. Each woman hides her past from the others, ferociously guarding her secrets. But as the train bound for the Middle East speeds down the track, the parallel courses of their lives shift to intersect—with lasting repercussions.Filled with evocative imagery, suspense, and emotional complexity, The Woman on the Orient Express explores the bonds of sisterhood forged by shared pain and the power of secrets.

The Woman on the Orient Express Details

TitleThe Woman on the Orient Express
Author
ReleaseSep 20th, 2016
PublisherLake Union Publishing
ISBN-139781503938120
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Mystery

The Woman on the Orient Express Review

  • Brina
    January 1, 1970
    Throughout my life I have always enjoyed reading mysteries as palette cleansers in between heavier reads. Whether its a contemporary series or historical stand alone, I am intrigued over the prospect of whodunit. Yet, my favorite mystery writer remains the Dame of British crime, Agatha Christie, especially cases featuring her Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. When I found out about a historical novel featuring Christie, I was equally intrigued. Lindsay Jayne Ashford's Woman on the Orient Express Throughout my life I have always enjoyed reading mysteries as palette cleansers in between heavier reads. Whether its a contemporary series or historical stand alone, I am intrigued over the prospect of whodunit. Yet, my favorite mystery writer remains the Dame of British crime, Agatha Christie, especially cases featuring her Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. When I found out about a historical novel featuring Christie, I was equally intrigued. Lindsay Jayne Ashford's Woman on the Orient Express focusing on Christie's life in the late 1920s ended up being fast reading fun with a story that did not disappoint. It is 1928. Agatha Christie has found out that her husband's long affair to Nancy Neele will end up in marriage. Christie is devastated emotionally but being the independent woman that she is decides to travel to Baghdad aboard the famous Orient Express train. In need of a holiday without the world knowing of her divorce or other private affairs, Christie assumes the name Mary Miller on her voyage. With a sharp mind that is always a step ahead of most, Christie believes that no one will find out about her secrets. On the train she meets archeologist Katharine Woolley who has many secrets of her own. As a trail blazing woman in her field, Woolley desires female companionship if only to boss her new found friends around. With a mind as sharp as a tack, she soon discovers Christie's identity but keeps it to herself until the right moment. Meanwhile the two women also meet Nancy Nelson who is running away from her husband because she is pregnant with another man's child. The three women eventually reveal each other's whereabouts to each other and strike up an enriching friendship. In real life, Christie did travel to Baghdad and Mesopotamia where she met Katharine Woolley as well as her future husband Max Mallowan. The Middle East would serve as the setting of many future mysteries including Murder in Mesopotamia and of course the timeless Murder on the Orient Express starring Hercule Poirot. Ashford researched the era well, mixing facts with fiction. Using detailed descriptions of time and place, she developed a detailed story with many characters that came to a nexus at the site of the Woolley's archeological dig in Ur, Iraq. Yet, like many of the mysteries I read, I found the writing to be fast paced, easy sentence structured without quality literary fiction. The novel did have a plot I enjoyed, which was perfect for a fast paced fun, summer read. While Woman on the Orient Express may not win awards for literary fiction, it did shed light on Agatha Christie's divorce and later married life. A sharp mind who is always on the lookout for writing materials, Christie journaled about her experiences in the desert, later turning them into many novels including my all time favorite mystery. Lindsay Jayne Ashford has created a fun story, which she followed up with a detailed epilogue. I always enjoy Agatha Christie's mysteries, and I also enjoyed reading about her, albeit in a fictionalized setting. For a fast paced read, Woman on the Orient Express is a solid 3.5/3.75 stars.
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  • Marita
    January 1, 1970
    Three women are on the Orient Express on their way to Baghdad. Each one has a secret. Circumstances throw them together, and strong bonds are forged between them. This fictionalised account of an actual train journey that Agatha Christie took imagines what might have happened on that trip. Fact is mixed with fiction, some characters were real people, others not. It happened in 1928 when Agatha was depressed due to her ex-husband remarrying. When Archie had told her in 1926 that he wanted a divor Three women are on the Orient Express on their way to Baghdad. Each one has a secret. Circumstances throw them together, and strong bonds are forged between them. This fictionalised account of an actual train journey that Agatha Christie took imagines what might have happened on that trip. Fact is mixed with fiction, some characters were real people, others not. It happened in 1928 when Agatha was depressed due to her ex-husband remarrying. When Archie had told her in 1926 that he wanted a divorce and that he was having an affair, she had a breakdown and disappeared for a period of time. It had caused a huge hue and cry at the time with much speculation by all and sundry, and now she simply wanted to get away from it all. And so she travelled to Baghdad under an assumed name. Eventually Agatha Christie married Max Mallowan, and the novel conjures up their romance. Max Mallowan and Agatha Christie (Wikipedia - public domain)The characters of the three women are sympathetically drawn. Katharine is manipulative, Ann/Nancy is desperate and Agatha/Mary is down in the dumps, but these three women soon come to lean on one another for support.There are some excellent descriptions of what they see and experience in Baghdad and its environs, and particularly at an archeological dig at Ur.Notes:1. Sir Max Mallowan was a prominent British archeologist. He and Agatha actually met a year later than this particular trip, and they were married in 1930.2. Katharine Woolley was a real person; Nancy Nelson is a fictitious character.3. Archie Christie married Nancy Neele in 1928
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  • Luffy
    January 1, 1970
    I approached this book not knowing beforehand about the fact that it was a fictional account of Agatha Christie's journey on the Orient express. I was amused by the premise when I began reading. But soon I was invested in the tale.Most of the journey from Calais to Istanbul made for an absorbing perusal. If you know where to look, there are references to Poirot's fictional journey in the same train. There is even a mystery in the story.Most of the main characters are women, and they have issues I approached this book not knowing beforehand about the fact that it was a fictional account of Agatha Christie's journey on the Orient express. I was amused by the premise when I began reading. But soon I was invested in the tale.Most of the journey from Calais to Istanbul made for an absorbing perusal. If you know where to look, there are references to Poirot's fictional journey in the same train. There is even a mystery in the story.Most of the main characters are women, and they have issues with romance or love. The three main characters hide something from their past. What kept me going was the syntax of the author. She had researched her subject well and it shows. The epilogue was so poignant. Altogether a very satisfying book.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This wonderful, historical novel, mixes fact and fiction and puts Agatha Christie at the centre of a story based loosely on real life. It is 1928 when Agatha has divorced her husband, Archie, after he told her that he was in love with another woman. She has endured endless press speculation about her life, especially after the incident where she went missing after the breakup of her marriage. Now, with Archie about to re-marry, she is feeling forlorn, sensitive and depressed. Determined to get a This wonderful, historical novel, mixes fact and fiction and puts Agatha Christie at the centre of a story based loosely on real life. It is 1928 when Agatha has divorced her husband, Archie, after he told her that he was in love with another woman. She has endured endless press speculation about her life, especially after the incident where she went missing after the breakup of her marriage. Now, with Archie about to re-marry, she is feeling forlorn, sensitive and depressed. Determined to get away from England, she takes the Orient Express and head for Baghdad, under the name, Mary Miller.Her journey will introduce her to two other women, also travelling on the train. There is the beautiful, flirtatious widow, Katharine Keeling; who is heading to Mesopotamia to work on a dig there and who is due to marry the much older archaeologist, Leonard Wooley. There is also Nancy, a married woman who is fleeing her husband and who hopes to meet her married lover on the train. All three of the women have their secrets to bear, but the journey will bring them together. When Katharine invites them to visit the dig at Ur, events will threaten to overwhelm the women, who – despite their differences – do their best to help each other.I will say that I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie and I was unsure about reading this novel based upon her life. However, it is wise to remember that this is a novel and, although there is some factual content, it is fiction and the character of Nancy does not actually exist. I have read Christie’s biography and her book about her life on expeditions in the Middle East, “Come, tell me how you live,” which is a charming memoir, and this novel does really help you imagine what that time, and place, was like. This is an evocative and well written book, which is sensitive to Christie as a woman and imagines her romance with Max Mallowan. I can, in all honesty, hardly recall enjoying a historical novel more than this one – I recommend it highly as a very enjoyable read. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.
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  • Duane
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this 5 stars on "Audible" so I will do the same here. If I had just read the book it probably would have been a 4/4.5, but the narration by the very talented Justine Eyre was superb, thus the 5 stars. The writing was very good, and the concept of the story and the plot was great. Ashford created an excellent set of characters for her story, and if you're going to have Agatha Christie be one of them, you better have your A-game. She pulled it off quite nicely; I think Agatha would have bee I gave this 5 stars on "Audible" so I will do the same here. If I had just read the book it probably would have been a 4/4.5, but the narration by the very talented Justine Eyre was superb, thus the 5 stars. The writing was very good, and the concept of the story and the plot was great. Ashford created an excellent set of characters for her story, and if you're going to have Agatha Christie be one of them, you better have your A-game. She pulled it off quite nicely; I think Agatha would have been pleased. The story is based on a trip Agatha took to Mesopotamia on the Orient Express shortly after her divorce. This trip supposedly gave her the idea for her famous novel Murder on the Orient Express. It's excellent historical fiction with a fair share of mystery and intrigue thrown in, and a little adventure and romance to top it off. A very entertaining read.
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  • Carol ꧁꧂
    January 1, 1970
    2.5★I read a lot of favourable reviews for this title & I did think about breaking my longstanding rule - only freebies for my Kindle. I loved the cover art & a fictionalised account of Agatha Christie's trip on the Orient Express & subsequent adventures in the Middle East sounded right up my alley. Very high rating on GR too.I'm so thankful I didn't pay for this book! The book had a reasonable start & I loved some of the descriptions of the three ladies' travels. In particular m 2.5★I read a lot of favourable reviews for this title & I did think about breaking my longstanding rule - only freebies for my Kindle. I loved the cover art & a fictionalised account of Agatha Christie's trip on the Orient Express & subsequent adventures in the Middle East sounded right up my alley. Very high rating on GR too.I'm so thankful I didn't pay for this book! The book had a reasonable start & I loved some of the descriptions of the three ladies' travels. In particular my inner foodie loved reading about the food.I just don't feel Ashford really knew what to do with her characters - in particular the fictional Nancy & her lover. The resolution of her story (view spoiler)[ including the farcical appearance of her vengeful ex - I expected Felix to twirl his moustache!- was farcical & seemed more like a uninspired writer tying up loose ends. (hide spoiler)]I was uncomfortable with some of the speculation about real life character Katherine Woolley - although Ashford isn't the only writer intrigued by this enigmatic woman's fascination & sexuality. I guess my expectations were too high. Treating this subject as Chic Lit was a waste of a good idea.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars Audiobook narrated by Justine Eyre Brief description I have never read any books by Agatha Christie, but this book just sounded as if it was right up my alley. Although the fictionalized story only partially takes place on the Orient Express and it isn't a standard mystery, readers are introduced to three women all fleeing the past and heading to Baghdad. Distancing herself from the approaching second marriage of her ex-husband and the wagging tongues of the British media, is renowned 3.5 stars Audiobook narrated by Justine Eyre Brief description I have never read any books by Agatha Christie, but this book just sounded as if it was right up my alley. Although the fictionalized story only partially takes place on the Orient Express and it isn't a standard mystery, readers are introduced to three women all fleeing the past and heading to Baghdad. Distancing herself from the approaching second marriage of her ex-husband and the wagging tongues of the British media, is renowned mystery writer, Agatha Christie, travelling under the name Mary Miller. Her roommate is Katherine Keeling, a British woman working on a Mesopotamian archaeological dig, living under the shadow of her first husband's death. Unlike the first two women, that both existed, Lindsay Jayne Ashford, introduces us to Nancy Nelson, a newly married woman, fleeing from her husband while pregnant with another man's child. Added into the mix is a romance for Agatha Christie with a handsome archaeologist working on the same dig as Katherine. What I thought I listened to the audio as I was travelling through Maine this past weekend and I felt myself lured into the vivid scenes on the train and in and around Baghdad that Ashford brings to life. I like that as a reader we are given time inside the inner thoughts of all three ladies. Ashford brings to light the ideas about women at the time in the post WWI era. Both Agatha and Katherine had served as nurses during the war and yet, afterwards, felt it difficult to slide into the wife and mother roles that society expected of them and set about to carve lives separate from that. Nancy's story line was a bit predictable and I felt the ending of her story rather convenient. As well, the narrator of the audio does make her out to sound like an energetic but naive schoolgirl. I much preferred the voices of Agatha and Katherine best. I feel a bit so-so about the romance for Agatha. I just never warmed to Ashford's characterization of Max. Maybe I am feeling a bit too personal about it, but I am always wary of a man that I like criticizing a friend as much as Max does of Katherine. It miffed me how gullible Agatha is to fall for what he has to say. Talk about leaping to conclusions! But I suppose that is something that so many of us( including me at periods of my life) have tended to do. So it's realistic, but annoying in book characters!All in all, I would read a book by Ashford again.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't have a clue what the book was about when I started to read this book. I thought this book would have some kind of mystery that that would inspire Agatha Christe to write one her mystery books. It wasn't until I had read perhaps half the book that I read the blurb and I'm glad that I did not read it before because I thought it gave away a little too much for my taste. I preferred to discover key events rather than knowing before I start a book.As for the mysteries in this book. Well, I c I didn't have a clue what the book was about when I started to read this book. I thought this book would have some kind of mystery that that would inspire Agatha Christe to write one her mystery books. It wasn't until I had read perhaps half the book that I read the blurb and I'm glad that I did not read it before because I thought it gave away a little too much for my taste. I preferred to discover key events rather than knowing before I start a book.As for the mysteries in this book. Well, I can't say that this book turned out as I thought it would. But, still, I quite liked the book. I liked the women's stories, their friendship as they started to get to know each other. Some things are based on real events and real people and some are the author's inventions like Nancy Nelson. And, this may not have turned out to be the murder mystery story that I thought it would be, but I enjoyed traveling with the women on the Orient Express and later on their time in the Middle East. I love reading about travels in the beginning of the 2000-century. For some reason, it's just so much more exotic, and thrilling to follow people as they travel back then. Especially women like Katharine Keeling who was a real famous archeologist. Nowadays, well everyone is flying everywhere and there are tourists all over the globe. So, despite not turning out as I thought it would, did I enjoy the book. I liked the writing style and I especially liked reading about three interesting women.3.5 starsI want to thank Lake Union Publishing for providing me with a free copy of this book through NetGalley!
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I am such a huge Agatha Christie fan, she's the #1 author for a reason. Her books are always something I look forward to reading. When I saw this book I was instantly intrigued. Even though this is a fictional account of Agatha's time after her divorce from Archie, there are quite a few facts interwoven throughout the story. As Agatha makes her way on to the famous Orient Express, she meets two other women traveling, Katharine and Nancy. They befriend each other a I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I am such a huge Agatha Christie fan, she's the #1 author for a reason. Her books are always something I look forward to reading. When I saw this book I was instantly intrigued. Even though this is a fictional account of Agatha's time after her divorce from Archie, there are quite a few facts interwoven throughout the story. As Agatha makes her way on to the famous Orient Express, she meets two other women traveling, Katharine and Nancy. They befriend each other and continue their friendship throughout Agatha's time in Ur. She also meets her second husband, Max, at this time as well. I loved this other side of Agatha. Just imagining what this iconic author was like and where she got her inspirations, it was a pure treat. I loved the characters and the writing. I will say that there's not a lot that happens in this novel and I can see where many people will find this story boring. I don't know if I enjoyed it as much as I did because I love Agatha Christie but my guess is that that's exactly why I liked it. **Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • ☮Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Of all the films made from Agatha Christie books, Murder on the Orient Express has always been my favorite. In the back of my mind ever since, I have wondered about the train, The Orient Express, as it seemed like an amazing way to see and experience life and history all at once.This book offered me the next best thing, plus a fictional account of a time Ms. Christie traveled on the train following her divorce in 1928. I just loved this book and learned so much! Agatha meets many interesting and Of all the films made from Agatha Christie books, Murder on the Orient Express has always been my favorite. In the back of my mind ever since, I have wondered about the train, The Orient Express, as it seemed like an amazing way to see and experience life and history all at once.This book offered me the next best thing, plus a fictional account of a time Ms. Christie traveled on the train following her divorce in 1928. I just loved this book and learned so much! Agatha meets many interesting and diverse people, some real, some fictional, and her life is changed from making the trip. It culminated in traveling from Baghdad to an archeological dig in Ur, where a good portion of the story takes place. A little bit of history, women's fiction, love, friendship, and adventure in the desert all rolled up into one.The train, like life, must go on until it reaches it's destination. You might not always like what you see out the window, but if you pull down the blind you will miss the beauty as well as the ugliness. An ARC from NetGalley and the publisher.
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  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    The train ride to Damascus is long. The stoppages and well met along the way both squalid and elegant. The women interesting and troubled. All for various reasons. The book is too long. The travelogue stops both smelly and breath-taking to visuals. The women (our prime three) both insular and chatty. And secretive. All for various reasons.At the 3/4th point of the book I would have given it a 3 star and noted it was a good emotive "he done me wrong" aftermath mixed with intriguing crosscut Agath The train ride to Damascus is long. The stoppages and well met along the way both squalid and elegant. The women interesting and troubled. All for various reasons. The book is too long. The travelogue stops both smelly and breath-taking to visuals. The women (our prime three) both insular and chatty. And secretive. All for various reasons.At the 3/4th point of the book I would have given it a 3 star and noted it was a good emotive "he done me wrong" aftermath mixed with intriguing crosscut Agatha Christie style "think". Which, if you haven't experienced that is far more intrepid in consequences than the norm. But then, it changes. It becomes nearly another genre. And that really has nothing to do with the dry or obscure geographic location within isolation, either. And then it turns again. Which surprised me twice as much as the first twist did. This is an uncommon book in format. There is so much context input in proportion to reveal or outcome. But it works. Rather parallel to a Christie work itself. Which gained it an entire star.It's too bad the ending was such a disappointment to me. Too tidy. Twice quotient by two too tidy. But I'm sure it's, that tie up ending- also popular with the greatest majority of readers who get to page 300 plus, which I would guess too, would ALSO be majority females. And are there any men like Max anymore? Oh come on, "just close your eyes!"Tidy like this book's ending just doesn't jive with reality. In this era or any? Never. But I thought the Katherine depiction also made up for that author ending "appeasement to please and sell" factor. Agatha herself? That characterization was more than adequate but I missed her sharp retort factor- nearly completely. Oh, I am sure she had it.It's very difficult to "get" real life famous characters of celeb status of any age in fiction works of this length to their thoughts for/ to any believable context plot, IMHO. But, this one approached a cross-cut style with her work itself and that was truly appreciated.Almost forgot, the fun factor!!! The first half was a 5 in fun factor. I loved the train ride.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 - just for fun stars.I think Agatha Christie would be delighted to find herself a fictional character involved in an oriental adventure in the company of two other women that she just happened to meet on a train. Ashford's imagination of what might have happened on Agatha's voyage on the Orient Express in 1928 felt true and possible, and what more can you ask?I needed a palate cleanser after two many hard, serious books, and this little gem was just the ticket. I found each of the women fasc 3.5 - just for fun stars.I think Agatha Christie would be delighted to find herself a fictional character involved in an oriental adventure in the company of two other women that she just happened to meet on a train. Ashford's imagination of what might have happened on Agatha's voyage on the Orient Express in 1928 felt true and possible, and what more can you ask?I needed a palate cleanser after two many hard, serious books, and this little gem was just the ticket. I found each of the women fascinating in their own right, such different personalities, but showing that all experiences are universal...most of us have stood on one side or the other and failed to examine the flip side of the coin. I hope the real Agatha Christie recovered from her divorce and all the publicity of her mysterious disappearance that made headlines and heartaches. I have never pictured her as a beautiful woman, having seen mostly older photographs, but a quick google of her showed a young woman who might have turned many of the heads around her. I cannot say I am a true fan of Christie, although I have read and enjoyed a number of her books. However, I do think it is fun to find a well-known person scuttling about in the pages of a modern novel, if the writer can do it well--and Lindsay Jayne Ashford does.
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  • Simona Stoica
    January 1, 1970
    Femeia din Orient Express este cadoul ideal pentru fanii Agathei Christie. Glasul lui Hercule Poirot o însoțește pe autoare într-o călătorie exotică, sursă de inspirație pentru viitoare romane și personaje. Prietenia dintre ea, Nancy și Katherine pornește de la o rețea complicată de secrete, dezvăluite în celebrul Orient Express și pe un sit arheolgic, unde Agatha îndrăznește din nou să viseze, să spere și să se îndrăgostească. Fie că este autoare sau personaj, Agatha Christie este minunată.
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  • Lyn Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    Shades of Agatha Christie indeed! Not only is Christie herself reinvented as a quasi-fictional character, but the author has Christie find ideas from her journeys that she will use as themes for the novels she will write. Several other real people appear as characters too - archaeologists Leonard Woolley and Max Mallowan, and Woolley's wife Katherine. As much of the emotional drama of the book revolves around failing marriages and awkward sex, I couldn't help feeling embarrassed for the people Shades of Agatha Christie indeed! Not only is Christie herself reinvented as a quasi-fictional character, but the author has Christie find ideas from her journeys that she will use as themes for the novels she will write. Several other real people appear as characters too - archaeologists Leonard Woolley and Max Mallowan, and Woolley's wife Katherine. As much of the emotional drama of the book revolves around failing marriages and awkward sex, I couldn't help feeling embarrassed for the people whose names are attached to Ashford's characters, and for their families. It seems that once an author decides to put the tag 'historical novel' on a story s/he wants to write, any speculation about the characters is fair game, and speculating about other people's sex lives sells books. And this speculation tends to stick, even when it's labelled fiction.Somehow it seems to matter more when the reinvented lives are in the recent, not the far, past.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    The Woman on the Orient Express is a fictionalized account of Agatha Christie's journey to Baghdad in 1928, after her first marriage failed. Along the way she befriends two women. All three are keeping certain secrets, but they eventually bond and confide in each other. I liked this a lot more than I thought I would. It's not a mystery, just a gentle tale about friendship, a little romance, and making the most of second chances.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    The Woman on the Orient Express is a good solid drama. A steady and interesting read that has a few surprises. The main character is Agatha Christie and many of the people in the book actually lived. The story starts out with a visit from a young acquaintance coming to visit an aged Agatha. The young man wanted information about some people Agatha had known a long time ago. So the story proceeds with Agatha recalling/retelling of her experience when she booked a trip on the Orient Express. Agath The Woman on the Orient Express is a good solid drama. A steady and interesting read that has a few surprises. The main character is Agatha Christie and many of the people in the book actually lived. The story starts out with a visit from a young acquaintance coming to visit an aged Agatha. The young man wanted information about some people Agatha had known a long time ago. So the story proceeds with Agatha recalling/retelling of her experience when she booked a trip on the Orient Express. Agatha's divorce with Archie Christie was all over the papers and she just had to get out of England. Agatha traveled under an assumed name to avoid attention as Agatha was a fairly well known author by that time. Over the course of time travelling on the train, Agatha meets up with Nancy and Katherine. These ladies have their own secrets. I found a couple of incongruities, I thought, in the plot that sort of bothered me but not enough to put me off of the story.The characters are well developed as the story progresses. The overall story is about Agatha. The focus for a major part the story is the relationship that the three women share. I'm not the ideal audience for the story because a lot of the issues in the book are what I would characterize as "women's issues" of the 1920's. There are aspects of the book that had me travelling through Europe on this train making me think that this would be interesting trip to take sometime. A good part of the book talks about the archaeological finds in the Mesopotamia region of the Middle East including some cultural references. This is an OLD place dating back to the birth of civilization.This book is predominately women's fiction and is written well enough not to be overpowering. I listened to the audio book and the narrator did a great job with all the characters. It took me a little bit to acclimate to the British accent. I think since the voice in the story was Agatha's the accent was to emulate Agatha's accent when she was alive. I don't know though for sure as I have never listened to a recording of the author's voice. This is a women's drama and story about Agatha Christie that I found interesting and overall well written.
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  • Iustina Dinulescu
    January 1, 1970
    "Ai încredere în tren. Căci trenul, ca viața, trebuie să meargă până ajunge la destinație. E posibil să nu-ți placă întotdeauna ce vezi pe fereastră, dar, dacă tragi perdeaua, vei pierde atât frumusețea, cât și urâțenia." Femeia din Orient Express m-a dus cu gândul la un citat foarte drag mie, care cred ca ilustrează în cel mai scurt și mai profund mod ideea principală a cărții: „Inima unei femei este un ocean adânc de secrete.” Este o poveste despre legăturile puternice dintre femei, despre a d "Ai încredere în tren. Căci trenul, ca viața, trebuie să meargă până ajunge la destinație. E posibil să nu-ți placă întotdeauna ce vezi pe fereastră, dar, dacă tragi perdeaua, vei pierde atât frumusețea, cât și urâțenia." Femeia din Orient Express m-a dus cu gândul la un citat foarte drag mie, care cred ca ilustrează în cel mai scurt și mai profund mod ideea principală a cărții: „Inima unei femei este un ocean adânc de secrete.” Este o poveste despre legăturile puternice dintre femei, despre a doua șansă la iubire și la viață. Călătoria cu Orient Express-ul este o călătorie de căutare și regăsire a eu-lui. Agatha, Nancy și Katharine s-au pierdut cândva pe ele însele. În această călătorie ele se regăsesc mai puternice decât credeau că pot fi.Prietenia care ia naștere între cele trei femei le salvează într-un mod diferit pe fiecare în parte. Le determină să lase garda jos, să își înfrunte greșelile sau secretele, să se regăsească pe sine. Mi-a plăcut foarte mult modul în care autoarea a construit fiecare personaj feminin și cum a țesut apoi legăturile dintre ele. Mi-a plăcut stilul descrierii. Mi-am imaginat totul în cele mai mici detalii. Am văzut apusurile de soare minunat descrise, am mirosit toate mirodeniile și m-am transpus cu totul în acea atmosferă exotică atât de bine redată. Am iubit cartea asta și personajele ei. Am îmbrățișat-o când am terminat-o.Această carte este emoție în stare pură. O recomand cu căldură.Recenzia completa aici: http://momenteinviata.ro/femeia-din-o...
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  • Adela Cacovean
    January 1, 1970
    Recenzie video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fp6PS...
  • Jen Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the few books where I did not read the synopsis before reading the book. All I knew of the book was it was a mystery and probably involved Agatha Christie. There were mysterious elements about the lives of the women Christie befriended on the Orient Express but this book was really about the life of Agatha Christie with fictional accounts interweaved into the story. I found myself immersed in Christie's life and enjoyed learning about her writing and muses. Her personal life was i This is one of the few books where I did not read the synopsis before reading the book. All I knew of the book was it was a mystery and probably involved Agatha Christie. There were mysterious elements about the lives of the women Christie befriended on the Orient Express but this book was really about the life of Agatha Christie with fictional accounts interweaved into the story. I found myself immersed in Christie's life and enjoyed learning about her writing and muses. Her personal life was intriguing as I didn't know about her tumultuous relationship with Archibald Christie and her fascinating second marriage to Sir Max Mallowan. I was also interested in Nancy and Katherine and the friendship/sisterhood that the three women experienced in Mesopotamia. All three women had strong spirits and were supportive to one another in trying times. The sprinkling of cultural references from the Bedouin tribes to the archeological digs added to the beauty of the story. A well written book and I will read another by Ashford.5 Stars
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  • Smitha
    January 1, 1970
    I came upon this book while surfing GoodReads on a lazy day.The fact that it features Agatha Christie (though in a hugely fictional role) attracted me, and I started asap.Three strong ladies -Agatha Christie, who is travelling by the Orient Express to escape the sordid details of her divorce from Archie, her first husband, Nancy, a newly wed socialite running away from her cruel husband, and Kathleen, a self assured archeologist feature as the kingpins.They each have secrets that they carry. And I came upon this book while surfing GoodReads on a lazy day.The fact that it features Agatha Christie (though in a hugely fictional role) attracted me, and I started asap.Three strong ladies -Agatha Christie, who is travelling by the Orient Express to escape the sordid details of her divorce from Archie, her first husband, Nancy, a newly wed socialite running away from her cruel husband, and Kathleen, a self assured archeologist feature as the kingpins.They each have secrets that they carry. And soon their lives connect, in the Orient Express as well as in Baghdad and Urr, the archeological village.There Agatha meets Max Malloween, her future husband, various other archaeologists, and uncovers certain mysteries of life.Was a captivating read. Enjoyable.
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    Mysteries beyond the Orient Express! Enthralling!Set in 1928, the story opens later years with Agatha Christie, now a grandmother, being visited by a young man. He has with him a photograph of Agatha and two other women. One is his mother. He wants to know more about them, and in doing so, find out more about himself. He is convinced there is a mystery surrounding them that affects him. Agatha shares their story.Meshing together fact and fiction Ashford has crafted a wonderful story depicting a Mysteries beyond the Orient Express! Enthralling!Set in 1928, the story opens later years with Agatha Christie, now a grandmother, being visited by a young man. He has with him a photograph of Agatha and two other women. One is his mother. He wants to know more about them, and in doing so, find out more about himself. He is convinced there is a mystery surrounding them that affects him. Agatha shares their story.Meshing together fact and fiction Ashford has crafted a wonderful story depicting a painful part of Agatha Christie's life. This rather haunting and beautifully wrought story deals with the time after Agatha's mysterious disappearance and subsequent painful divorce from her husband Archie.Agatha travels to Bagdad via the Orient Express. It is on this trip that she meets two woman who will become important friends. Katherine is an archaeologist on her way to a dig in Ur. Nancy is a young woman, confused because of her lover's treatment. She is on her way to spend time with her cousin in Bagdad.Ashford brings to life Agatha's journey, the exoticness of the sights and smells of the bazaars, the desert and the dig at Ur. The interplay between the three women is fascinating.On this trip a very real life drama unfolds before Agatha's eyes, that transcends the fiction of her novels. I love the voice of Hercules Poroit occasionally popping into Agatha's head. Directing her. He is like her inner self pointing the way.A fascinating look into the life and legend that was Agatha Christie told compellingly in the first person cleverly blending fact and fiction. A NetGalley ARC
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  • Mandy Radley
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable read, partly fact (I think not much fact) and a lot of fiction about Agatha Christie's trip on the Orient Express to Baghdad in 1928 following the divorce from her husband. Makes me want to read Death on the Nile, and Murder on the Orient Express. Loved the movies, never read the books.
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  • Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition
    January 1, 1970
    Distraught over the break up of her marriage, Agatha Christie actually boarded the Orient Express, enroute to Istanbul and had adventures there.This author has woven facts about Christie's life into the setting which makes this novel seem real. It was a very interesting concept and the dialogue was quite similar to how chacters speak in an Agatha Christie novels. However, the plot seemed a little heavy handed. (I may have been spoiled, because I was reading a beautifully atmospheric novel by Dap Distraught over the break up of her marriage, Agatha Christie actually boarded the Orient Express, enroute to Istanbul and had adventures there.This author has woven facts about Christie's life into the setting which makes this novel seem real. It was a very interesting concept and the dialogue was quite similar to how chacters speak in an Agatha Christie novels. However, the plot seemed a little heavy handed. (I may have been spoiled, because I was reading a beautifully atmospheric novel by Daphne duMaurier at the same time.) What started out interesting, with secrets being held by everyone, kind of disolved into a romance novel and was a little disappointing to me. I quite liked the epilogue and the afterword was very informative. I would recommend this book to people who enjoy Agatha Christie novels.
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book far more than I had expected to. I have not yet read any of Agatha Christie's works, and yet the rich story & character development of this book still made it at least a 4-star read that kept me very engaged! The narration was lovely as well. :)
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    This book had some interesting parts, but I felt that it wasn't very well written. The first half was pretty good, but it seemed to just peter out at the end. I liked the IDEA of the book better than the actual writing. Still, it kept me going to the end.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I was a huge Agathe Christie fan as a teenager and in my early teens, and although I have not read much by the author since devouring all her books in my youth, this amazing woman still intrigues me. Therefore I was quite excited when the audiobook version of The Woman on the Orient Express popped up in my recommendations from Amazon earlier this month, hoping to find out more about the mystery still surrounding the author’s life. Focusing on events that may have inspired Christie’s writing and I was a huge Agathe Christie fan as a teenager and in my early teens, and although I have not read much by the author since devouring all her books in my youth, this amazing woman still intrigues me. Therefore I was quite excited when the audiobook version of The Woman on the Orient Express popped up in my recommendations from Amazon earlier this month, hoping to find out more about the mystery still surrounding the author’s life. Focusing on events that may have inspired Christie’s writing and lead to the meeting between the author and her soon-to-be husband Max Mallowan, the novel is mainly set on the Orient Express on its journey from London to Baghdad, and at the archaeological site at Ur. Christie’s friendship with Katherine Whooley is well documented in history, and in her novel, Ashford stages the first meeting between the two woman aboard the train. To complete the trio, Ashford also includes a third – fictional – character, Nancy Nelson, a young woman who flees England as she is carrying her married lover’s child. As the train journey progresses, the three women get to know each other and form a tentative friendship, which sees them all travelling to the archaeological site at Ur, where Katherine has been working. I loved the historical details Ashford seamlessly slips into the story, like the mystery surrounding Agatha’s recent breakdown, or the speculations about Katherine’s medical issues that may have contributed to the suicide of her first husband. Nancy is the only character who is not based on an actual person from Christie’s real life, and I admit I struggled a bit accepting her into the fold. With Christie’s death still falling into my lifetime (she died in 1976, and yes, I am that old!), it is too current for me to accept these “alternative facts”, and I’m not sure if the blend of fact and fiction is really for me when it concerns the recent past. That said, I thoroughly enjoyed the author’s descriptions of the train journey to many exotic locations, staying true to an era in history where women were not as free to travel and forge their own path in life – which makes Christie all the more remarkable. The story inspired me to pick up an old copy of Christie’s autobiography, which I read in my early twenties and now want to revisit again. I will enjoy comparing the two stories (as I am sure that Christie may have also slipped a few fictional elements into her version of events – wouldn’t you, given the chance?).All in all, The Woman on the Orient Express was a light, enjoyable story for my daily commute. Whilst I found some of the events in the last part of the story slightly predictable and differing a bit too much from historical facts for my liking, it put an interesting spin on a chapter in Christie’s life which saw her moving on from her broken marriage and finding new love. Justine Eyre provided a wonderful narration, which brought all characters and places to life for me. *blog* *facebook* *instagram*
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    This was a WONDERFUL book! I loved the descriptions on the Orient Express, the travel to the Middle East, the characters, I was totally caught up in it all. Its a fantastic book and Im surprised it wasn't published by a well known publisher. They missed out. GREAT BOOK!
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a free copy of this book from Lake Union Publishing through NetGalleyThis book started out a little slow for me and, even with only three main characters, I had some trouble keeping the women and their respective men troubles in order. Really glad I stuck with it though because while I do still feel that the way the stories are broken up is confusing at times, each of the three perspectives are interesting and unique and the description of the travels through the middle east will tr **I received a free copy of this book from Lake Union Publishing through NetGalleyThis book started out a little slow for me and, even with only three main characters, I had some trouble keeping the women and their respective men troubles in order. Really glad I stuck with it though because while I do still feel that the way the stories are broken up is confusing at times, each of the three perspectives are interesting and unique and the description of the travels through the middle east will transport you to a fascinating place in time. The mix of fact and fiction in this book is engaging and it was refreshing to see Agatha Christie playing a main character in a book rather than as author. There were a few references to Hercule Poirot and her books but they were not the focus of the story. Rather, her role of author was focused on as a complication to her marriage, among other things, and how she came to terms with the possibility of being left because she was more successful. Coming to terms with a broken first marriage was a defining factor in the book and something all three main characters had in common. All had different circumstances and all dealt with the fallout differently, but each came out stronger and clinging to what they believed in instead of clinging to the past. Each had to decide what they valued most and fought fiercely to retain it. Intertwined in this story of personal chaos are absolutely alluring depictions of the Middle East during the British ruling. At every turn are delicious descriptions of unique food and small tidbits of the way the natives lived their lives. While it's obvious that women are generally still seen as second class citizens (at best) during this time period, it was fascinating to see the differences between being a western woman who is treated with more respect based only on the fact that they are western and the native women who are in very traditional subservient roles. It's interesting to think of how far, and how not far, those different groups have come today.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    There's is a superb amount of historical context and research put into this book, but it is just dreadfully boring to read. I really think that the main issue with this book was that it just tried to cram TOO much into it.As a reader you start out with a weird as crap beginning of some dude popping up to Agatha Christie to talk about the past, but in a creeper/stalker/spy type of way; which even after reading it still didn't make a lot of sense to me. Then we also follow two other women who end There's is a superb amount of historical context and research put into this book, but it is just dreadfully boring to read. I really think that the main issue with this book was that it just tried to cram TOO much into it.As a reader you start out with a weird as crap beginning of some dude popping up to Agatha Christie to talk about the past, but in a creeper/stalker/spy type of way; which even after reading it still didn't make a lot of sense to me. Then we also follow two other women who end up on the same Orient Express when Agatha is on her way to Baghdad, hoping to rendezvous with a man from her past. There is a big theme of woman empowerment after a failed marriage/relationship and that is a spectacular topic. I loved the sweeping descriptions of locations from the past and the thoughts of the women. What didn't work for me was that these characters would have been better served broken up into entirely new chapters instead of jumbled all together. (Perhaps this is better depicted in a physical form than it was on the kindle format I read). Overall, I found myself task saturated and overwhelmed with so much information continuously rapid fired at the reader and then left to sort it all out and try to figure out which pieces should be attributed to which woman. My favorite character was actually Katharine, one of the women other than Agatha Christie, as she was portrayed in a somewhat pompous, air of conceit. Overall, this wasn't more than a 3 story read for me, felt more like 2 books smashed into one.**I received a free copy of this book from Lake Union Publishing through NetGalley
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  • Ladyslott
    January 1, 1970
    In 1926 Archibald Christie asked Agatha Christie for a divorce; Agatha Christie disappeared for 11 days, suffering from what was termed a mental fugue. In 1928 Archibald Christie married again. This fictional story depicts Agatha disappearing again on the eve of Archie’s wedding, traveling incognito on the Orient Express to Baghdad. This was an interesting mystery, but not a murder mystery. While aboard the train Agatha befriends two other women, all three of the women are keeping secrets and ov In 1926 Archibald Christie asked Agatha Christie for a divorce; Agatha Christie disappeared for 11 days, suffering from what was termed a mental fugue. In 1928 Archibald Christie married again. This fictional story depicts Agatha disappearing again on the eve of Archie’s wedding, traveling incognito on the Orient Express to Baghdad. This was an interesting mystery, but not a murder mystery. While aboard the train Agatha befriends two other women, all three of the women are keeping secrets and over the course of their trip everyone’s secrets will be revealed, some more devastating than others.The best parts of this historical fiction novel were the descriptions of the social mores of the years in between the world wars and the ways that women’s lives were very constrained. I also enjoyed the descriptions of travel on the Orient Express and life in Baghdad at the archaeological digs.Although not a typical whodunit mystery, it was enjoyable even though the ending felt a bit rushed and all the issues tied up a little too neatly.
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