Bruchko
What happens when a nineteen-year-old boy leaves home and heads into the jungles to evangelize a murderous tribe of South American Indians? For Bruce Olson, it meant capture, disease, terror, loneliness, and torture. But what he discovered by trial and error has revolutionized then world of missions.Bruchko, which has sold more than 300,000 copies worldwide, has been called “more fantastic and harrowing than anything Hollywood could concoct.” Living with the Motilone Indians since 1961, Olson has won the friendship of four presidents of Colombia and has made appearances before the United Nations because of his efforts. Bruchko includes the story of his 1988 kidnapping by communist guerrillas and the nine months of captivity that followed. This revised version of Olson’s story will amaze you and remind you that simple faith in Christ can make anything possible. “[Bruchko is] an all-time missionary classic. Bruce Olson is a modern missionary hero who has modeled for us in our time the reaching of the unreached tribes.” --Loren Cunningham Co-founder, Youth With A Mission

Bruchko Details

TitleBruchko
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 18th, 2006
PublisherCharisma House
ISBN-139781591859932
Rating
GenreBiography, Christian, Nonfiction, Religion, Christianity

Bruchko Review

  • Natalie Vellacott
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting read about an American missionary seeking to use cultural analogies to share the Gospel with tribal people in Colombia/Venezuela....Why the low rating? My full review is here;http://christianmissionaryuk.blogspot...The book is free of bad language and sexual content. There is some violence/distressing scenes that may make it unsuitable for some readers. It is worth reading (especially for missionaries) if only for the purposes of personal reflection.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    Bruce Olsen talks about how Jesus transformed his life as a teenager and the tug God gave him to become a missionary despite how crazy/fanatical everyone thought he was (including his own family). Though he didn't have any training, he already taught himself Greek, Hebrew, and Latin so he could understand old Biblical texts on a higher level and set off at the age of 19 to Venezuela, SA (where he learned Spanish). One tribe continually became of interest to him called the Molitone tribe who were Bruce Olsen talks about how Jesus transformed his life as a teenager and the tug God gave him to become a missionary despite how crazy/fanatical everyone thought he was (including his own family). Though he didn't have any training, he already taught himself Greek, Hebrew, and Latin so he could understand old Biblical texts on a higher level and set off at the age of 19 to Venezuela, SA (where he learned Spanish). One tribe continually became of interest to him called the Molitone tribe who were known for being brutal, never having contact with any other people at all (without killing them). He threw himself into the jungle, first learning about the Yukon tribe (learning their language as well) who agreed to bring him as far as he could to the Molitones. After some time he was able to learn their language and lived among them as a brother. It took 5 years before he had been able to share his passion of Christ them them. What wonders God had done after the years of patience he had. Instead of doing what most missionaries had done (by trying to Americanize a culture), Bruce Olsen, called "Bruchko" by the Molitone Indians, allowed God to use their culture to bring Christ to their tribe (and let Him transform their lives). It was such an amazing story to read about, and very sad and heartbreaking at times. I really loved it!!!!
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  • Chasity Simmons
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I've ever read!
  • Luke
    January 1, 1970
    Probably my favorite biography I have ever read.Powerful!!This is someone who is living the cross (if I may make that statement without irony).The original title was For This Cross, I'll Kill You. I have been graced with a signed copy. (Woohoo!) One of my heroes.
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  • David Stearman
    January 1, 1970
    Eye opener. Real hard-core missionary adventure. This book was a significant motivator behind my choice to do missions work myself.
  • Jason D'Souza
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book 3 times... better then watching Survivor or any multi-million reality TV show out there.
  • Christina DeVane
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fascinating read of a man who did mission work in a very unconventional way. He went through so much physical discomfort to show people Jesus.
  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Challenging. Exciting. Inspiring. Relevant. Cultural. Communicative. Application to be made. Helpful. Encouraging. Excellent.
  • Jaclynn
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book thinking it might be similar to a Jim Elliot or Nate Saint missionary story.But Bruce was a 19 year old boy who went about being a missionary in all the "wrong" ways. His Lutheran parents couldn't understand his personal relationship with Jesus or his desire to go to South America to work with the Indians. The Motilones, a murderous tribe no less!The mission board denied him and he picked up his studies again in linguistics, thinking that God must have other plans. But God I picked up this book thinking it might be similar to a Jim Elliot or Nate Saint missionary story.But Bruce was a 19 year old boy who went about being a missionary in all the "wrong" ways. His Lutheran parents couldn't understand his personal relationship with Jesus or his desire to go to South America to work with the Indians. The Motilones, a murderous tribe no less!The mission board denied him and he picked up his studies again in linguistics, thinking that God must have other plans. But God kept nudging him and so he went anyway. The man who was suppose to pick him up in Venezuela never did show up and that was only the beginning of a long series of "untraditional" events that would befall him as a missionary. Bruce came near death many times, experienced "shunnning" from other missionaries. But God provided money, "happenstance circumstances" and an eventual meeting of the Yuko and then the Motilone Indians. Bruce went on to acquire a brother of the tribe, Bobby, and they were as David and Jonathan. Much needed sanitary and medical help was brought to the Indians and Bruce found a way to bring the necessities without intruding on the Indian's many ways and customs. Eventually their language was established as a written one and the Gospel was translated.The greatest lesson Bruce learned was that he didn't need Jesus to intervene and change all the trouble he was often up against. "If it weren't for Jesus, the Motilones would be pushed back into the jungle until they were slowly but surely eliminated! If it weren't for Jesus, there would be no struggle. It's not in spite of Jesus that Bobby died. It's because of Jesus...There was still so much to do...so many things that Christ had called me to do. It would take more pain, more loneliness. Maybe death. Why was it so hard? Why? Then I saw Jesus...think I see, It's the Cross." I held up my hand and put my thumb across my forefinger. "It's for this cross."
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  • Brandon H.
    January 1, 1970
    Another inspiring Christian missionary story! This is the story of how God used a klutzy Norwegian boy from Minnesota to bring the transforming gospel of Christ to the hostile indigenous Motoline Indian tribe in the jungles of Colombia. This is a good book to read if you've heard the argument that Christian missionaries do great damage to the indigenous tribes and those tribes would be better off if the Christians left them alone.There's a good deal of challenges, difficulties, and a few tragedi Another inspiring Christian missionary story! This is the story of how God used a klutzy Norwegian boy from Minnesota to bring the transforming gospel of Christ to the hostile indigenous Motoline Indian tribe in the jungles of Colombia. This is a good book to read if you've heard the argument that Christian missionaries do great damage to the indigenous tribes and those tribes would be better off if the Christians left them alone.There's a good deal of challenges, difficulties, and a few tragedies in this story which is to be expected. But there's also some humorous aspects to the story as well.For example, the time when Mr. Olson was new to the jungle and asked an Indian in a certain tribe why his people were rejecting the missionaries that were trying to work with them and do them good. The Indian replied, "They won't sing our songs now. They sing those weird, wailing songs that are all out of tune and don't make sense. And the construction that they call a church...have you seen their church? It's square. How can God be in a square church? Round is perfect."
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  • Glenn Myers
    January 1, 1970
    Extraordinary story that would stretch the credibility of many; except that as late as 2007,after 45 years, this genius of a missionary was still living among the tribe that adopted him, and their change and development is easy for all to see; so, presumably, are the records of him speaking on their behalf at the United Nations. The Motilone/Bari people were the sort who are bulldozed into oblivion or alcoholism: small (2,500 people) and Amazonian. Olson brought the gospel to the people in a way Extraordinary story that would stretch the credibility of many; except that as late as 2007,after 45 years, this genius of a missionary was still living among the tribe that adopted him, and their change and development is easy for all to see; so, presumably, are the records of him speaking on their behalf at the United Nations. The Motilone/Bari people were the sort who are bulldozed into oblivion or alcoholism: small (2,500 people) and Amazonian. Olson brought the gospel to the people in a way that strengthened, rather than diminished, their local culture, and they thrived and survived the transition into the modern world. Many of their people have become university graduates (and have then gone back to the jungle). Their numbers have grown. Send anthropologists urgently!
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  • Emily Heinkel
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible picture of the gospel's reach in other cultures and understandings. This book inspired us to step beyond how we receive the good news and see how a Motilone Indian might process this gift. Olson is unrelenting in his pursuit of this people group. Through sickness and health, he waits on the Lord and trusts that God will make himself real to this people. Would love to read it again.
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  • Samuel Keller
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! What an amazing story I liked that the 19 year old boy took responsibility and decided to go and do missionary work by himself and then successful in the end!
  • Sam Brown
    January 1, 1970
    An extremely moving book.
  • Abigail Larsen
    January 1, 1970
    Bruce Olson left the comforts of North America at the age of nineteen to serve as a missionary to the murderous Motilone Barí Indians, an indigenous tribe residing in Colombia. This venture was nothing but an uphill battle as Bruce worked tirelessly to gain the trust and acceptance of the tribe. Taken captive by the very people he came to share the Good News with, he writes of how God allowed him to experience unbelievable hardships and pain, then used those awful experiences to soften the heart Bruce Olson left the comforts of North America at the age of nineteen to serve as a missionary to the murderous Motilone Barí Indians, an indigenous tribe residing in Colombia. This venture was nothing but an uphill battle as Bruce worked tirelessly to gain the trust and acceptance of the tribe. Taken captive by the very people he came to share the Good News with, he writes of how God allowed him to experience unbelievable hardships and pain, then used those awful experiences to soften the hearts of the tribe he was burdened for. Trudge with Bruce through the dangerous South American jungles as he endures disease, torture, fear, and loneliness. Sit with him as he purposely contracts pink eye, creating an opportunity to win over the tribe’s witch doctor and introduce American medications and healthier living. Observe his diligence in slowly learning the difficult dialect of the Indians, and be amazed as the hand of God gradually touches the hearts of this lost people group through one man’s humble service. I highly recommend Bruchko to asipring missionaries, young or old, and to anyone looking for a biblical perspective on life, trials, evangelism, and how good we have it here in North America. (That covers most of us.) Recommended read-aloud age: 8 & upRecommended read-alone age: 13 & upMy blog: www.oursureanchor.com
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    There was so much to do...so many things that Christ had called me to do. It would take more pain, more loneliness. Maybe death.Why was it so hard? Why?Then I saw Jesus. He was struggling up a hill with a great burden. His face was lined with grief, His back bent.Oh my. This was amazing. This was effectively written much like a fictional book, but factural in its story. Bruce Olson's commitement to Christ really drew me. So many others would have given up. So many others would have thought, "Th There was so much to do...so many things that Christ had called me to do. It would take more pain, more loneliness. Maybe death.Why was it so hard? Why?Then I saw Jesus. He was struggling up a hill with a great burden. His face was lined with grief, His back bent.Oh my. This was amazing. This was effectively written much like a fictional book, but factural in its story. Bruce Olson's commitement to Christ really drew me. So many others would have given up. So many others would have thought, "This is hopeless." But God used this man in a powerful way. You feel the emotions while reading this; the struggle of a man to remember his calling.It's amazing to me how Bruce was "alone" from the beginning. Having support here in earth should not change how we serve God. Bruce went to reach the Motilone indians with God backing him up...no one else.Although, I rated this five stars, there was a part where Bruce is translating the Bible for the indians and changes the wording of a verse so that the indians could see it more by their lifestyle. Personally, I didn't feel that a right thing to do. Besides that, I whole-heartedly commend this book.Definitely plan on reading this again. A book that will convict the heart and make you look at how you can serve God more.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    A surprising autobiography about a 19-year-old who, with $70 in his pocket, decides to become a missionary to Indian tribes in South America. The tribes, he discovers, are suffering from disease and a culturally bound depression. And being primarily hunter/gatherers, the tribes are constantly struggling to attain food. Olson introduces change in a culturally sensitive way. For example, he introduces antibiotics by giving a bottle to the witchdoctor. At first, she administers it along with her us A surprising autobiography about a 19-year-old who, with $70 in his pocket, decides to become a missionary to Indian tribes in South America. The tribes, he discovers, are suffering from disease and a culturally bound depression. And being primarily hunter/gatherers, the tribes are constantly struggling to attain food. Olson introduces change in a culturally sensitive way. For example, he introduces antibiotics by giving a bottle to the witchdoctor. At first, she administers it along with her usual incantations. A decade later, the witchdoctors of the tribe have become medical practitioners.Olson introduces Christianity in a similar way, suggesting it as an answer to the tribe's belief that it has angered God and is hence eternally distant. By using their idioms and heritage, Olson provides a message that becomes not only relevant to them, but transformative.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot say enough about this amazing story. As Christians, we often think that we go through trials and tribulations - and in many cases we do. But nothing I have ever experienced can compare to what young Bruce Olson went through on his journey to share Jesus with the Motilone. This is not a tale of someone trying to steal away a people's traditional way of life; no, it is a breathtaking glimpse into what God can do when we let Him lead.The Motilones learn about Jesus, but they learn in ways I cannot say enough about this amazing story. As Christians, we often think that we go through trials and tribulations - and in many cases we do. But nothing I have ever experienced can compare to what young Bruce Olson went through on his journey to share Jesus with the Motilone. This is not a tale of someone trying to steal away a people's traditional way of life; no, it is a breathtaking glimpse into what God can do when we let Him lead.The Motilones learn about Jesus, but they learn in ways that honor their traditions, their history and their way of life. This is a life-changing book. Not one that promises you riches or fame or The Secret; this book will change your life because it is a simple story of one young man who followed his call.
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  • Chuck
    January 1, 1970
    Who takes off as a teenager and lives in the jungles of South America without knowing the language, without a support system and without money? Apparently, Bruce Olson. This is the amazing story of God in the life of someone who is sold out to following Jesus.Need to be reminded what trust looks like? Want to be challenged in your level of comfort and contentment? Willing to have to suspend your credulity for a little while? Read Brushko. You can't help but want to trust God more than you do now Who takes off as a teenager and lives in the jungles of South America without knowing the language, without a support system and without money? Apparently, Bruce Olson. This is the amazing story of God in the life of someone who is sold out to following Jesus.Need to be reminded what trust looks like? Want to be challenged in your level of comfort and contentment? Willing to have to suspend your credulity for a little while? Read Brushko. You can't help but want to trust God more than you do now.Already recommending it to those around me.
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  • Sergio Aureli
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. Im going on a voluteer trip to Costa Rica to build schools in February and the team leader had everyone read this book in preperation for the trip. Its very interesting to see someone that young drop everything and fly to South America to live with the Motilone Indians. I really liked the style of writing that Bruce Olsen used and how he gave a background of his life. Although I was required to read this book, I would definetly read it again and reccomend this book to I really enjoyed this book. Im going on a voluteer trip to Costa Rica to build schools in February and the team leader had everyone read this book in preperation for the trip. Its very interesting to see someone that young drop everything and fly to South America to live with the Motilone Indians. I really liked the style of writing that Bruce Olsen used and how he gave a background of his life. Although I was required to read this book, I would definetly read it again and reccomend this book to anyone interested in adventure.
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  • Rebekah Tooley
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not quite sure how to review this book. I feel no words justify it! This has to be the best missionary story I've ever read! Everything was amazing! There was a situation in which when he was translating the bible in the native language that I normally would not have agreed with but I understand the language barrier and how he did what he felt God would have him to do! I will definitely be reading this book again!
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  • Raquel Romero
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best-told and most inspiring missionary stories out there.
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Not what missionary work is like today, but still an adventurous story of what risks people took to share the gospel. I loved this!
  • Susanna
    January 1, 1970
    Best of the "missionary story" genre, in my opinion. Just a fantastic, challenging story.
  • Brooke
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing! Inspiring! Motivating!
  • Gabby
    January 1, 1970
    It's an amazing book that brought me to tears!!
  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    At times depressing and scary but also capable of getting you out of your own head. Really good story and teaches many valuable lessons.
  • Patrick Porras
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal, amazing, unbelievable, heartbreaking, and inspiring story. Helped me see God.Not the most well written. Pretty much a sort of diary account of highlights and timelines. Not bad at all, just reads straightforwardly.
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I nearly gave this book 3 stars based on how I feel about Olsen’s methodology with missions. However, as I am rating a book and not his methods, I will say the story is engaging and very interesting. There really is never a dull moment, though there are some pretty gross ones. You feel Olsen’s heart for the Motilon people, and the triumphs of seeing lives changed by the gospel is mingled with the tragic reality of living in the jungle.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Great read! Incredible faith. Crazy stories of the jungle. William read this as part of our curriculum; I read it so I could read his report intelligently. So glad I did!
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