Meet Miss Fancy
A charming and significant story set prior to the Civil Rights Movement about a boy who finds a way to challenge segregation laws.Frank has always been obsessed with elephants. He loves their hosepipe trunks, tree stump feet, and swish-swish tails. So when Miss Fancy, the elephant, retires from the circus and moves two blocks from his house to Avondale Park, he's over the moon! Frank really wants to pet her. But Avondale Park is just for white people, so Frank is not allowed to see Miss Fancy. Frank is heartbroken but he doesn't give up: instead he makes a plan!Frank writes to the City Council so his church can host a picnic in the park, and he can finally meet Miss Fancy. All of his neighbors sign the letter, but when some protest, the picnic is cancelled and Frank is heartbroken all over again. Then Miss Fancy escapes the zoo, and it's up to Frank to find her before she gets hurt.

Meet Miss Fancy Details

TitleMeet Miss Fancy
Author
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780399546686
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Historical, Historical Fiction, Animals, Fiction

Meet Miss Fancy Review

  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: Frank loved elephants. He loved drawing elephants and talking about elephants. He loved their hosepipe trunks and their flap-flap ears, their tree-stump feet and their swish-swish tails. But not once, not ever, had Frank seen a real elephant.Premise/plot: This picture book is set in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1913. It is loosely based on a true story. There was an elephant, Miss Fancy, whom schoolchildren helped to purchase from a circus for Avondale Park. Miss Fancy lived in her ne First sentence: Frank loved elephants. He loved drawing elephants and talking about elephants. He loved their hosepipe trunks and their flap-flap ears, their tree-stump feet and their swish-swish tails. But not once, not ever, had Frank seen a real elephant.Premise/plot: This picture book is set in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1913. It is loosely based on a true story. There was an elephant, Miss Fancy, whom schoolchildren helped to purchase from a circus for Avondale Park. Miss Fancy lived in her new home from 1913 to 1934. Birmingham, Alabama, as adult readers will no doubt know was segregated at that time--only whites were allowed. Frank, our fictional hero, is not allowed in the park nor allowed to visit Miss Fancy. But where there's a will, is there a way? My thoughts: I loved this one. First I just have to say that I love, love, love Frank. We're kindred spirits. I also love, love, love elephants. I love their hosepipe trunks and their flap-flap ears. Which brings me to the second thing I love: the writing or the narrative. What else did I love? The illustrations. The author's note. The fact that this is based on a real elephant and keepers. I found it a satisfying read. Frank did find his own way. In all honesty, I enjoyed it all.The book is a good example--in my humble opinion--of an author showing instead of telling.Text: 5 out of 5Illustrations: 5 out of 5Total: 10 out of 10
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  • Sammy
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute picture book! I highly recommend.
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    What if you were a child, a young boy, and loved elephants more than anything? You loved to draw them and talk about them. You loved their "hosepipe trunks and their flap-flap ears, their tree-stump feet and their swish-swish tails." But, but, you've never ever seen a real elephant. This is a story about that boy, Frank, and his adventure with Miss Fancy, one elephant who spent some years in Avondale Park in Birmingham, Alabama. He is that boy who lived only two blocks from the park and helped c What if you were a child, a young boy, and loved elephants more than anything? You loved to draw them and talk about them. You loved their "hosepipe trunks and their flap-flap ears, their tree-stump feet and their swish-swish tails." But, but, you've never ever seen a real elephant. This is a story about that boy, Frank, and his adventure with Miss Fancy, one elephant who spent some years in Avondale Park in Birmingham, Alabama. He is that boy who lived only two blocks from the park and helped collect pennies with other schoolchildren so the city could raise the money to buy Miss Fancy from a circus. Wrapping her poignant story with some truth, this brand new wonderful book from Irene Latham shows the sad history of segregation years ago and the ingenuity of a young boy who only wanted to touch Miss Fancy. Finally, Frank got to see her when she came by train, but when the crowd arrived, with Miss Fancy, he walked with her all the way until he couldn't anymore. The sign said "No Colored Allowed". What if you were that boy, heartbroken? There is a reward for being that boy, and I hope you can read Irene's story in order to discover it. John Holyfield encompasses the words with his gorgeous realistic illustrations, filling the pages with color and emotion and detail of this community, its people and a special elephant. Irene adds an informative author's note about the story, the history and adds a real photo of Miss Fancy! The book will be a great start for children beginning to know the history of segregation.
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  • Taylor Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored Irene's previous work and "Meet Miss Fancy" is no different. It is absolutely lovely to see a story featuring a small piece of magic from Birmingham's past while also highlighting the real truth of living in the Jim Crow South before the Civil Rights Movement. This story is heartwarming as we see our friend's passion for elephants and his dream to meet Miss Fancy of Avondale Park come to life.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it - great illustrations and story telling about Fancy, an elephant that lived in Alabama through the 30's and the fictional story of a boy who desperately wanted to meet Fancy. Parts are based on history - Fancy really did exist, and an African American church really did petition to be able to hold a picnic on the grounds of the town park, but with draw the request after it's approval because of the controversy.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    Based on a true history of Miss Fancy, who lived in Birmingham, AL. This book is set in the era of Jim Crow laws. This is not only a beautiful story from a historical perspective, it is also a story of perseverance, dreams, and possibilities. I will definitely use this book in my classroom. Thank you #BookPosse
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Fictional picture based on the real Miss Fancy the Elephant that lived for a bit at the park in Birmingham, Alabama. The main character, Frank, loves elephants, but the "No Colored Allowed" sign means that he can't visit Miss Fancy. Is it wrong that I hate to see smiling elephants when they are kept in captivity?
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Something fell a little flat with this one- might have been better structured as non-fiction? Recommended for historical fiction and elephant fans ages 4-6.
  • Sierra
    January 1, 1970
    Mostly in it for the illustrations.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    A nice introduction to Miss Fancy. I personally felt a little weird about the way some of the segregation stuff was portrayed. It's matter-of-fact, but it also almost seems like it's brushed off as not that big of a deal. Still, a good bit of it was grounded in facts. Definitely recommended for any Birmingham area libraries.Ages: 6+Diversity: Black boy MC, direct discussion of segregation laws.
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